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Encyclopedia > Sweet potato
Sweet Potato
Sweet potato in flowerHemingway, South Carolina
Sweet potato in flower
Hemingway, South Carolina
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Solanales
Family: Convolvulaceae
Genus: Ipomoea
Species: I. batatas
Binomial name
Ipomoea batatas
(L.) Lam.[verification needed]
Raw Sweet Potato
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 90 kcal   360 kJ
Carbohydrates     20.1 g
- Sugars  4.2 g
- Dietary fiber  3.0 g  
Fat 0.1 g
Protein 1.6 g
Vitamin A equiv.  709 μg  79%
- β-carotene  8509 μg  79%
Thiamin (Vit. B1)  0.1 mg   8%
Riboflavin (Vit. B2)  0.1 mg   7%
Niacin (Vit. B3)  0.61 mg   4%
Pantothenic acid (B5)  0.8 mg  16%
Vitamin B6  0.2 mg 15%
Folate (Vit. B9)  11 μg  3%
Vitamin C  2.4 mg 4%
Calcium  30.0 mg 3%
Iron  0.6 mg 5%
Magnesium  25.0 mg 7% 
Phosphorus  47.0 mg 7%
Potassium  337 mg   7%
Zinc  0.3 mg 3%
Percentages are relative to US
recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database

The sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), commonly though incorrectly called a yam in parts of the United States is a crop plant whose large, starchy, sweet tasting tuberous roots are an important root vegetable. The young leaves and shoots are sometimes eaten as greens. The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum). It is even more distantly related to the true yam (Dioscorea species), which is native to Africa and Asia. Thus, a sweet potato and a yam are in fact different foods. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Hemingway is a town located in Williamsburg County, South Carolina. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... Divisions Green algae land plants (embryophytes) non-vascular embryophytes Hepatophyta - liverworts Anthocerophyta - hornworts Bryophyta - mosses vascular plants (tracheophytes) seedless vascular plants Lycopodiophyta - clubmosses Equisetophyta - horsetails Pteridophyta - true ferns Psilotophyta - whisk ferns Ophioglossophyta - adderstongue ferns seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta - seed ferns Pinophyta - conifers Cycadophyta - cycads Ginkgophyta - ginkgo Gnetophyta - gnetae Magnoliophyta - flowering... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants (also angiosperms or Magnoliophyta) are one of the major groups of modern plants, comprising those that produce seeds in specialized reproductive organs called flowers, where the ovulary or carpel is enclosed. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class of flowering plants. ... Families at least the following: Solanaceae Convolvulaceae and others, varying between classification systems; for details see text The Solanales are an order of flowering plants, included in the asterid group of dicotyledons. ... Type genus Convolvulus L. Genera See text The Convolvulaceae, known commonly as the bindweed or morning glory family, is a group of about 60 genera and more than 1,650 species of mostly herbaceous vines, but also trees, shrubs and herbs. ... Species I. alba- Moonflower I. aquatica- Water spinach I. batatas- Sweet potato I. purpurea I. violacea - Beach morning glory The Genus Ipomoea, with over 500 species, is the largest genus in the Family Convolvulaceae. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of plant foods that move food through the digestive system, absorbing water and making defecation easier. ... In chemistry, especially biochemistry, a fatty acid is a carboxylic acid often with a long unbranched aliphatic tail (chain), which is either saturated or unsaturated. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ... The structure of retinol, the most common dietary form of vitamin A Vitamin A is an essential human nutrient. ... β-Carotene represented by a 3-dimensional stick diagram Carotene is responsible for the orange colour of the carrots and many other fruits and vegetables. ... Thiamine mononitrate Thiamine or thiamin, also known as vitamin B1, is a colorless compound with chemical formula C12H17ClN4OS. It is soluble in water and insoluble in alcohol. ... Riboflavin (E101), also known as vitamin B2, is an easily absorbed micronutrient with a key role in maintaining health in animals. ... Niacin, also known as nicotinic acid or vitamin B3, is a water-soluble vitamin whose derivatives such as NADH, NAD, NAD+, and NADP play essential roles in energy metabolism in the living cell and DNA repair. ... Pantothenic acid, also called vitamin B5 (a B vitamin), is a water-soluble vitamin required to sustain life (essential nutrient). ... Pyridoxine Pyridoxal phosphate Vitamin B6 is a water-soluble vitamin. ... Folic acid (the anion form is called folate) is a B-complex vitamin (once called vitamin M) that is important in preventing neural tube defects (NTDs) in the developing human fetus. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... For other uses, see Calcium (disambiguation). ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... Introduction Magnesium is an essential element in biological systems. ... General Name, symbol, number phosphorus, P, 15 Chemical series nonmetals Group, period, block 15, 3, p Appearance waxy white/ red/ black/ colorless Standard atomic weight 30. ... General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... General Name, symbol, number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Standard atomic weight 65. ... Reference Daily Intake (RDI) is the daily dietary intake level of a nutrient considered sufficient to meet the requirements of nearly all (97–98%) healthy individuals in each life-stage and gender group. ... Camotes Islands consist of four islands, Pacijan Island, Poro Island, Ponson Island and a tiny Tulang Island. ... Agriculture refers to the production of food, feed, fiber and other goods by the systematic growing of plants, animals and other life forms. ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Starch (CAS# 9005-25-8, chemical formula (C6H10O5)n,[1]) is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin (usually in 20:80 or 30:70 ratios). ... A tuberous root is a modified lateral root, enlarged for storage. ... Root vegetables are underground plant parts used as vegetables. ... Leaf vegetables, also called greens or leafy greens, are plant leaves eaten as a vegetable, sometimes accompanied by tender petioles and shoots. ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ... Yams at Brixton market Yam is the common name for some species in the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae). ...


The genus Ipomoea that contains the sweet potato also includes several garden flowers called morning glories, though that term is not usually extended to Ipomoea batatas. Some cultivars of Ipomoea batatas are grown as ornamental plants. For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the plant. ... This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ...


This plant is a herbaceous perennial vine, bearing alternate heart-shaped or palmately lobed leaves and medium-sized sympetalous flowers. The edible tuberous root is long and tapered, with a smooth skin whose color ranges between red, purple, brown and white. Its flesh ranges from white through yellow, orange, and purple. A herb (pronounced hurb in Commonwealth English and urb in American English) is a plant grown for culinary, medicinal, or in some cases even spiritual value. ... Red Valerian, a perennial plant. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Leaves are an Icelandic five-piece alternative rock band who came to prominence in 2002 with their debut album, Breathe, drawing comparisons to groups such as Coldplay and Doves. ... For other uses, see Flower (disambiguation). ... A tuberous root is a modified lateral root, enlarged for storage. ...

Contents

Origin and distribution

Sweet potatoes in the field.
Sweet potatoes in the field.

Sweet potatoes are native to the tropical parts of the Americas, and were domesticated there at least 5000 years ago. [1] [2] They spread very early throughout the region, including the Caribbean. They were also known before western exploration in Polynesia. How exactly they arrived there is the subject of a fierce debate which involves archaeological, linguistic and genetic evidence. Sweet potato Image taken by me, released under GFDL Pollinator 06:39, 15 Feb 2004 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Sweet potato Image taken by me, released under GFDL Pollinator 06:39, 15 Feb 2004 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... West Indies redirects here. ... Carving from the ridgepole of a Māori house, ca 1840 Polynesia (from Greek: πολύς many, νῆσος island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena, acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge. ...


Sweet potatoes are now cultivated throughout tropical and warm temperate regions wherever there is sufficient water to support their growth.


According to 2004 FAO statistics world production is 127,000,000 tons [3]. The majority comes from China with a production of 105,000,000 tonnes from 49,000 km². About half of the Chinese crop is used for livestock feed [4]. FAO redirects here. ... This article is about the metric tonne. ...


Per-capita production is greatest in countries where sweet potatoes are a staple of human consumption, led by the Solomon Islands at 160 kg per person per year, Burundi at 130 kg and Uganda at 100 kg.


In New Zealand, sweet potato is known by its Māori name, kūmara. It was a staple food for Māori before European contact. Today, it is still very popular, although less popular than regular potatoes. There are about 85 commercial kūmara growers, with 1,220 hectares producing 20,000 tonnes of kūmara annually. This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ...


North Carolina, the leading U.S. state in sweet potato production, currently provides 40% of the annual U.S. production of sweet potatoes. Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...


Mississippi is also a major sweet potato producing state, where they are grown on approximately 8,200 acres. Mississippi sweet potatoes contribute $19 million dollars to the economy of the state and around 150 Mississippi farmers presently grow sweet potatoes. Mississippi's top five sweet potato producing counties are Calhoun, Chickasaw, Pontotoc, Yalobusha, and Panola. The National Sweet Potato Festival is held annually the entire first week in November in Vardaman, which proclaims itself as "The Sweet Potato Capital". This article is about the U.S. state. ... Calhoun County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... Chickasaw County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... Pontotoc County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... Yalobusha County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... Panola County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... Vardaman is a town located in Calhoun County, Mississippi. ...


The town of Benton, Kentucky celebrates the sweet potato annually with its Tater Day Festival on the first Monday of April. Benton is a city located in Marshall County, Kentucky. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...


Cultivation

Freshly dug sweet potato.
Sweet Potatoes at a shop in India.
Sweet Potatoes at a shop in India.
An ornamental sweet potato of the "Ace of Spades" cultivar
An ornamental sweet potato of the "Ace of Spades" cultivar

The plant does not enjoy frost. It grows best at an average temperature of 24 °C (75 °F), abundant sunshine and warm nights. Annual rainfalls of 750-1000 mm are considered most suitable, with a minimum of 500 mm in the growing season. The crop is sensitive to drought at the tuber initiation stage 50-60 days after planting and is not tolerant to water-logging, as it may cause tuber rots and reduce growth of storage roots if aeration is poor. Image File history File links en:Description: Ipomoea batatasL. (en:Sweet Popatoes. ... Image File history File links en:Description: Ipomoea batatasL. (en:Sweet Popatoes. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Frost on black pipes Frost is a solid deposition of water vapor from saturated air. ... For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ...


Depending on the cultivar and conditions, tuberous roots mature in two to nine months. With care, early-maturing cultivars can be grown as an annual summer crop in temperate areas, such as the northern USA. Sweet potatoes rarely flower when the daylight is longer than 11 hours, as is normal outside of the tropics. They are mostly propagated by stem or root cuttings or by adventitious roots called "slips" that grow out from the tuberous roots during storage. True seeds are used for breeding only. Peas are an annual plant. ... In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ... For other uses, see Flower (disambiguation). ... A noontime scene from the Philippines on a day when the Sun is almost directly overhead. ...


Under optimal conditions of 85 to 90 % relative humidity at 13 to 16 °C (55 to 61 °F), sweet potatoes can keep for six months. Colder temperatures injure the roots. A hygrometer used to measure the humidity of air. ...


They grow well in many farming conditions and have few natural enemies; pesticides are rarely needed. Sweet potatoes are grown on a variety of soils, but well-drained light and medium textured soils with a pH range of 4.5-7.0 are more favourable for the plant. They can be grown in poor soils with little fertilizer. However, sweet potatoes are very sensitive to aluminium toxicity and will die about 6 weeks after planting if lime is not applied at planting in this type of soil. Because they are sown by vine cuttings rather than seeds, sweet potatoes are relatively easy to plant. Because the rapidly growing vines shade out weeds, little weeding is needed, and farmers can devote time to other crops. In the tropics the crop can be maintained in the ground and harvested as needed for market or home consumption. In temperate regions sweet potatoes are most often grown on larger farms and are harvested before frosts set in.


China is the largest grower of sweet potatoes; providing about 80% of the world's supply, 130 million tons were produced in one year (in 1990; about half that of common potatoes). Historically, most of China's sweet potatoes were grown for human consumption, but now most (60%) are grown to feed pigs. The rest are grown for human food and for other products. Some are grown for export, mainly to Japan. China grows over 100 varieties of sweet potato. For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ...


After introduction there, sweet potatoes very early became popular in the islands of the Pacific ocean, from Japan to Polynesia. One reason is that they were a reliable crop in cases of crop failure of other staple foods due to typhoon flooding. They are featured in many favorite dishes in Japan, Taiwan, the Philippines , and other island nations. Indonesia, Vietnam, India, and some other Asian countries are also large sweet potato growers. Uganda (the third largest grower after Indonesia), Rwanda, and some other African countries also grow a large crop which is an important part of their peoples' diets. North and South America, the original home of the sweet potato, together grow less than three percent of the world's supply. Europe has only a very small sweet potato production, mostly in Portugal. In the Caribbean, a variety of the sweet potato called the boniato is very popular. Interestingly, the flesh of the boniato is cream-colored, rather than the more popular orange hue seen in other varieties. Boniatos aren't as sweet and moist as other sweet potatoes, but many people prefer their fluffier consistency and more delicate flavor. Boniatos have been grown throughout the subtropical world for centuries, but became an important commercial crop in Florida in recent years. Pacific redirects here. ... Carving from the ridgepole of a Māori house, ca 1840 Polynesia (from Greek: πολύς many, νῆσος island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Sweet potatoes were an important part of the diet in the United States for most of its history, especially in the Southeast. In recent years however they have become less popular. The average per capita consumption of sweet potatoes in the United States is only about 1.5-2 kg (4 lbs) per year, down from 13 kg (31 lb) in 1920. Southerner Kent Wrench writes: "The Sweet Potato became associated with hard times in the minds of our ancestors and when they became affluent enough to change their menu, the potato was served less often."


New Zealanders grow enough kūmara to provide each person with 7kg (15.4 lbs) a year, and also import substantially more than this from China.


Diseases

Main article: List of sweet potato diseases

Nutrition and health benefits

Besides simple starches, sweet potatoes are rich in complex carbohydrates, dietary fiber, beta carotene (a vitamin A equivalent nutrient), vitamin C, and vitamin B6. Polysaccharides (sometimes called glycans) are relatively complex carbohydrates. ... Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of plant foods that move food through the digestive system, absorbing water and making defecation easier. ... Beta-carotene is a form of carotene with β-rings at both ends. ... The structure of retinol, the most common dietary form of vitamin A Vitamin A is an essential human nutrient. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... Main article: vitamin B6 Pyridoxine is one of the compounds that can be called vitamin B6, along with Pyridoxal and Pyridoxamine. ...


In 1992, the Center for Science in the Public Interest compared the nutritional value of sweet potatoes to other vegetables. Considering fiber content, complex carbohydrates, protein, vitamins A and C, iron, and calcium, the sweet potato ranked highest in nutritional value. According to these criteria, sweet potatoes earned 184 points, 100 points over the next on the list, the common potato.(NCSPC) The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ... Retinol (one vitamer of Vitamin A) A vitamin is an organic compound required as a nutrient in tiny amounts by an organism. ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... For other uses, see Calcium (disambiguation). ...


Sweet potato varieties with dark orange flesh have more beta carotene than those with light colored flesh and their increased cultivation is being encouraged in Africa where Vitamin A deficiency is a serious health problem. Despite the name "sweet", it may be a beneficial food for diabetics, as preliminary studies on animals have revealed that it helps to stabilize blood sugar levels and to lower insulin resistance.[1] Some Americans, including television personality Oprah Winfrey, are advocating increased consumption of sweet potatoes both for their health benefits and because of their importance in traditional Southern cuisine. Beta-carotene is a form of carotene with β-rings at both ends. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... Oprah Winfrey, (born January 29, 1954) is a multiple-Emmy Award winning host of The Oprah Winfrey Show, the highest rated talk show in television history. ...


Uses

A sweet potato.
A sweet potato.

The roots are most frequently boiled, fried, or baked. They can also be processed to make starch and a partial flour substitute. Industrial uses include the production of starch and industrial alcohol. Image File history File linksMetadata 5aday_sweet_potato. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 5aday_sweet_potato. ... Starch (CAS# 9005-25-8, chemical formula (C6H10O5)n,[1]) is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin (usually in 20:80 or 30:70 ratios). ... For other uses, see Flour (disambiguation). ... Starch (CAS# 9005-25-8, chemical formula (C6H10O5)n,[1]) is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin (usually in 20:80 or 30:70 ratios). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Culinary uses

Although the leaves and shoots are also edible, the starchy tuberous roots are by far the most important product. In some tropical areas, they are a staple food-crop. Starch (CAS# 9005-25-8, chemical formula (C6H10O5)n,[1]) is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin (usually in 20:80 or 30:70 ratios). ... The tropics are the geographic region of the Earth centered on the equator and limited in latitude by the two tropics: the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern hemisphere. ...


Candied sweet potatoes are a side dish consisting mainly of sweet potatoes prepared with brown sugar, marshmallows, maple syrup, molasses, or other sweet ingredients. Often served on American Thanksgiving, this dish represents traditional American cooking and indigenous food. For the plant, see Althaea (genus). ... Bottled maple syrup produced in Quebec. ... Molasses or treacle is a thick syrup by-product from the processing of the sugarcane or sugar beet into sugar. ... For other uses, see Thanksgiving (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Sweet potato pie is also a traditional favorite dish in southern U.S. cuisine. A slice of sweet potato pie. ...


Baked sweet potatoes are sometimes offered in restaurants as an alternative to baked potatoes. They are often topped with brown sugar and butter. A baked potato with butter. ...


Sweet potato fries are another common preparation, and are made by julienning and deep frying sweet potatoes, in the fashion of French fried potatoes. Julienning is a method of food preparation in which the food item is cut into long thin (matchstick-sized) strips. ... A Deep-fried Twinkie Deep-frying is a cooking method whereby food is submerged in hot oil or fat. ... Chips redirects here. ...


Sweet potato leaves are a common side dish in Taiwanese cuisine, often boiled with garlic and vegetable oil and dashed with salt before serving. They are commonly found at biàndāng restaurants, as well as dishes featuring the sweet potato root. Cuisines in Taiwan (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) have several variations. ... Bento served at a restaurant Bentō ) is a single-portion takeout or home-packed meal common in Japanese cuisine. ...


The young leaves and vine tips of sweet potato leaves are widely consumed as a vegetable West African countries (Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia for example). According to FAO leaflet No. 13 - 1990, sweet potato leaves and shoots are a good source of vitamins A, C, and B2 (Riboflavin), and according to research done by A. KHACHATRYAN, are an excellent source of lutein.


Steamed/Boiled chunks, for a simple and healthy snack, chunks of sweet potato may be boiled in water or cooked in the microwave. This article is about the type of Electromagnetic radiation. ...


Sweet potato chips can be sliced, fried, and eaten just like potato chips or french fries. Saratoga chips Potato chips (British English or Hiberno-English: crisps) are slim slices of potatoes deep fried or baked until crisp. ... French fried potatoes, commonly known as French fries or fries (North America) or chips (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Commonwealth) are pieces of potato that have been chopped into batons and deep fried. ...


Raw sweet potatoes can be eaten as well, most easily in chip form. They taste somewhat like a sweet carrot. This article is about the cultivated vegetable. ...

A Japanese yaki-imo vendor and cart outside of Nara Park in Nara, Japan.
A Japanese yaki-imo vendor and cart outside of Nara Park in Nara, Japan.

Sweet Potato Butter can be cooked into a gourmet spread. deer in Nara Park Nara Park is a civil park in the city of Nara, established in 1880. ... Nara can refer to: The city of Nara, Nara Prefecture, Japan The Nara Period of the History of Japan Nara prefecture, part of the Kansai region of central Honshu, Japan Nara is a major Manchu clan. ...


Japanese cuisines: Boiled sweet potato is the most common way to eat it at home. Also, the use in vegetable tempura is common. Yaki-imo (roasted sweeted potato) is a delicacy in winter, sold by hawkers. Daigaku-imo is a baked sweet potato dessert. In Imo-gohan, slices or small blocks of sweet potato are cooked in rice. It is also served in nimono or nitsuke, boiled and flavoured with typically soy sauce, Mirin and Dashi. Because it is sweet and starchy, it is used in Imo-kinton or some other wagashi. Shōchū is a Japanese spirit made from fermentation of rice and sweet potato. There are many views as to what defines Japanese cuisine, as the everyday food of the Japanese people has diversified immensely over the past century or so. ... Tempura Tempura Ice Cream Tempura (Japanese: てんぷら or 天麩羅, tenpura) refers to classic Japanese deep fried batter-dipped seafood and vegetables. ... Not to be confused with Desert. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Soy sauce (US) or soya sauce is a fermented sauce made from soybeans (soya beans), roasted grain, water and salt. ... Mirin (kanji: 味醂; hiragana: みりん) is an essential condiment used in Japanese cuisine, with a slightly sweet taste. ... Dashi (出汁) is one of several simple soup stocks considered fundamental to Japanese cooking. ... A selection of wagashi to be served during a Japanese tea ceremony. ... ShōchÅ« ) is a distilled alcoholic beverage popular in Japan. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ...


In New Zealand, Māori traditionally cooked their kūmara in hāngi (earth ovens). Rocks were placed on a fire in a large hole. When the fire died out, kūmara and other food was wrapped in leaves and placed on the hot rocks, then covered with earth. The kūmara was dug up again several hours later. The resulting food was very soft and tender, as though steamed.


In Korean cuisine, sweet potato starch is used to produce dangmyeon (cellophane noodles). Hanjeongsik Korean cuisine is based on the traditional foods and preparation techniques of Korea. ... Also known as bean thread noodles. ...


Non-culinary uses

Sweet Potato. Moche Culture. 300 A.D. Larco Museum Collection.
Sweet Potato. Moche Culture. 300 A.D. Larco Museum Collection.

In South America, the juice of red sweet potatoes is combined with lime juice to make a dye for cloth. By varying the proportions of the juices, every shade from pink to purple to black can be obtained. (Verrill p. 47) Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Larco Museum (Spanish: ) is located in the Pueblo Libre District in Lima, Peru. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Look up dye in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that Textile be merged into this article or section. ...


All parts of the plant are used for animal fodder. Fodder growing from barley In agriculture, fodder or animal feed is any foodstuff that is used specifically to feed domesticated livestock, including cattle, goats, sheep, horses, chickens and pigs. ...


Sweet potatoes or camotes are often found in Moche ceramics.[2] The Moche civilization (alternately, the Mochica culture, Early Chimu, Pre-Chimu, Proto-Chimu, etc. ...


Several selections are cultivated in gardens as ornamental plants for their attractive foliage, including the dark-leafed cultivars 'Blackie' and 'Ace of Spades' and the chartreuse-foliaged 'Margarita'.


Biofuel

Taiwanese companies are making alcohol fuel from sweet potato.[citation needed] Gasoline on the left, alcohol on the right at a filling station in Brazil Rising energy prices and global warming have led to increased interest in alternative fuels. ...


Ethnomedical Uses

A substance which may be synthetic, plant derived, or endogenous which is used to increase the production of milk in humans and other animals. ... Leaves are an Icelandic five-piece alternative rock band who came to prominence in 2002 with their debut album, Breathe, drawing comparisons to groups such as Coldplay and Doves. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... Species Species N. americanus and A. duodenale The hookworm is a parasitic nematode worm that lives in the small intestine of its host, which may be a mammal such as a dog, cat, or human. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the death metal band, see Abscess (band). ... For fungal genus, see tuber (genus). ...

Names

Kumara for sale, Thames, The North Island, New Zealand.
Kumara for sale, Thames, The North Island, New Zealand.

Often called a yam, the sweet potato is not in the Yam family, but that is only the beginning of the confusion (see yams). Nor is the sweet potato closely related to the common potato, although both are Solanales plants. Although yams and sweet potatoes are both angiosperms (flowering plants), they are not related botanically. Yams are a monocot (a plant having one embryonic seed leaf) and from the Dioscoreaceae or Yam family. Sweet Potatoes, often called ‘yams’, are a dicot (a plant having two embryonic seed leaves) and are from the Convolvulacea or morning glory family. The first Europeans to taste sweet potatoes were members of Columbus' expedition to Haiti in 1492. Later explorers found many varieties under an assortment of local names, but the name which stayed was the Haitian name of batata. This name was later transferred to the ordinary potato, causing a confusion from which it never recovered. The first record of the name "sweet potato" is found in the Oxford English Dictionary of 1775. Kūmara is the Polynesian name for an orangey-fleshed vegetable that looks like a sweet potato, and is a tuberous relative of the morning glory. It has a rich nutty taste. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (993x660, 299 KB) Summary Kumara for sale, Thames, The North Island, New Zealand (18 January 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (993x660, 299 KB) Summary Kumara for sale, Thames, The North Island, New Zealand (18 January 2005. ... For the Levantine god of the untamed sea, see Yaw. ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator, colonizer, and explorer and one of the first Europeans to explore the Americas after the Vikings. ... Kumara may refer to: Kumara, the Sanskrit word for son The Four Kumaras, sages from the Hindu tradition Kumara, New Zealand, a town KÅ«mara, the New Zealand word for the sweet potato (from Māori) Murugan, a Hindu deity also known as Kumara Category: ... Polynesian is an adjectival form which refers variously to: Polynesian pie Polynesian sauce, a food condiment available at Chick-fil-A the aboriginal inhabitants of Polynesia, and their: Polynesian culture Polynesian mythology Polynesian languages Category: ...


The moist-fleshed, orange cultivars of sweet potato are often referred to as "yams" in the United States. One explanation of this usage is that Africans brought to America took to calling American sweet potatoes Nyamis, perhaps from the Fulani word nyami (to eat) or the Twi word anyinam, which refers to a true yam. The true yam, which is native to Africa and Asia, can grow up to 2 m (6 ft) in length (sometimes with knuckle-like ends) and has a scaly skin, a pinkish white center, and a thick, almost oily feel to the tongue. The Fulbhe (singular Pullo) or Fulani is an ethnic group of people spread over many countries in West Africa,Central Africa and as far as East Africa. ... Twi (pronounced chwee ) is a language spoken in Ghana by about 7 million people. ... Yams at Brixton market Yam is the common name for some species in the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae). ...


In Kenya "Ngwaci" is the Kikuyu word for sweet potatoes. The Kiswahili word is "viazi vitamu", literally sweet potatoes. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


"Batata" or "Bataka" is the commonly used word for all varieties of Potato in Marathi and Gujarati, the two languages of Western states of India. "Ratala" is however, the name only reserved for sweet potatoes in marathi. Marathi is one of the widely spoken languages of India, and has a long literary history. ... Gujarati (ગુજરાતી Gujǎrātī; also known as Gujerati, Gujarathi, Guzratee, and Guujaratee[3]) is an Indo-Aryan language descending from Sanskrit, and part of the greater Indo-European language family. ...


Later on many farmers and stores began marketing American-grown sweet potatoes as yams; the name stuck. In more recent times there has been an effort to stop the use of “yam” for sweet potatoes, but this has only been partially successful. USDA branding regulations require the word “yam” to be accompanied by the words “sweet potato” when referring to these moister sweet potatoes.


Starchy, white-fleshed types are sometimes called batatas or boniatos, from generic Spanish terms for all types of sweet potato.


Substratum names used in local varieties of English include kumara (from the Māori word kūmara), as it was the staple food of the native Māori diet, in the UK and Australasia (in NSW it is sometimes spelled as "Kumera", although "sweet potato" is more common in Australia, at least in Victoria). The term is also used in indigenous languages of Melanesia, as well as "peteita", and camote (from Nahuatl camohtli via Spanish) in the southwestern United States and in the Philippines as alternate name for Sweet potato. In Fiji and Vanuatu it is known as kūmala. In the Papua New Guinean language of Tok Pisin is it known as cau cau. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Māori or Te Reo Māori,[1] commonly shortened to Te Reo (literally the language) functions as one of the official languages of New Zealand. ... For the Spanish language as spoken in Mexico, see Mexican Spanish. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


In Hawaiʻi substratum names are used for the yellow Japanese variety and the purple Okinawan variety, both of which are commonly available in the marketplace. The local Japanese names are widely recognized, with SatsumaimoSatsuma potato” used by recent Japanese immigrant families and yamaimo (“mountain potato”) by other groups. (Technically, yamaimo is the proper name in Japanese of the native yam; however, as in English, it is often used to refer to the sweet potato.) However, naming often depends on personal ancestry, with e.g. Sāmoan ʻumala among Sāmoans, Tagalog kamote among Filipinos, and Hawaiian ʻuala among Native Hawaiians. The orange-fleshed variety common in the mainland U.S. and sold alongside the Japanese and Okinawan cultivars is locally called "sweet potato" or "yam." The purple Okinawan sweet potato is sometimes confused with the purple yam called ube. In Vietnamese the tubers are called khoai lang and the leaves are called rau lang. This article is about the U.S. State. ... Satsuma (薩摩国; -no Kuni) was an old province of Japan that is now the western half of Kagoshima prefecture on the island of Kyushu. ... Binomial name Thunb. ... The Sāmoan or Samoan language is the traditional language of Samoa and American Samoa and is an official language in both political bodies. ... A Samoan American is an American who is of ethnic Samoan descent and may be from either the independent nation Samoa or the American territory of American Samoa. ... Tagalog (pronunciation: ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ... The Hawaiian language is an Austronesian language that takes its name from HawaiÊ»i, the largest island in the tropical North Pacific archipelago where it developed. ... Native Hawaiians (in Hawaiian, kānaka ōiwi or kānaka maoli) are member[s] or descendant[s] of the indigenous Polynesian people of the Hawaiian Islands.[2] Native Hawaiians trace their ancestry back to the first Marquesan and Tahitian settlers of Hawaii (possibly as early as AD 400), before the... Binomial name Dioscorea alata L. A piece of cake made with ube Ube (or ubi) is the Filipino word for purple yam (Dioscorea alata). ...


References and external links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sweet potato
  1. ^ Sweet potatoes
  2. ^ Berrin, Katherine & Larco Museum. The Spirit of Ancient Peru:Treasures from the Museo Arqueológico Rafael Larco Herrera. New York: Thames and Hudson, 1997.

"Leaflet No. 13 - 1990 - Sweet Potato" Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Larco Museum (Spanish: ) is located in the Pueblo Libre District in Lima, Peru. ... Thames & Hudson (also Thames and Hudson and sometimes T&H for brevity) are a publisher, especially of art and illustrated books, founded in 1949 by Walter and Eva Neurath. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
CGIAR: Research & Impact: Areas of Research: Sweet Potato (0 words)
Sweet potato varieties exist in many colors of skin and flesh, ranging from white to deep purple, although white and yellow-orange flesh are the most common.
The major obstacles to sweet potato growth in the tropics are pests and diseases such as the sweet potato weevil and viruse diseases.
Sweet potatoes are now being used in Africa to combat a widespread Vitamin A deficiency that results in blindness and even death for 250,000-500,000 African children a year.
Sweet Potato Facts and Recipes (1425 words)
As a main dish or prepared as a dessert, the sweet potato is a nutritious and economical food.
Freshly dug or uncured sweet potatoes are better boiled and used in dishes that include fruits or syrups.
If you are cutting calories, serve a plain sweet potato, cut down on margarine or butter and use skim milk or unsweetened orange juice as liquid when you prepare mashed sweet potatoes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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