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Encyclopedia > Sweet Home Alabama (song)
"Sweet Home Alabama"
"Sweet Home Alabama" cover
Single by Lynyrd Skynyrd
from the album Second Helping
Released 1974
Genre Southern Rock
Length 04:45
Writer(s) Ed King, Gary Rossington, Ronnie Van Zant
Producer(s) Al Kooper
Peak chart positions
  • #8 (US) (1974)
Lynyrd Skynyrd singles chronology
"Don't Ask Me No Questions" "Sweet Home Alabama"
(1974)
"Free Bird" (reissue)
(1975)

"Sweet Home Alabama" is a song by Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd that first appeared in 1974 on their second album, Second Helping. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Skynyrd-Sweet-Home-Alabama. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... Lynyrd Skynyrd (pronounced lÄ•h-nérd skin-nérd) (or IPA pronunciation: ) is a U.S. Southern rock band. ... Second Helping is a 1974 (see 1974 in music) album by Lynyrd Skynyrd. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Southern rock is a sub genre of rock music. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... Ed King Ed King (born September 14, 1949 in Glendale, California) is an American musician. ... Gary Rossington (born December 4, 1951 in Jacksonville, Florida) is a founding member and lead guitarist of Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd. ... Ronald Wayne Ronnie Van Zant (January 15, 1948 – October 20, 1977) was the lead vocalist, primary lyricist, and a founding member of the Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... // A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Lynyrd Skynyrd (pronounced lÄ•h-nérd skin-nérd) (or IPA pronunciation: ) is a U.S. Southern rock band. ...   is an anthemic song by the American Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd. ... Southern rock is a sub genre of rock music. ... Lynyrd Skynyrd (pronounced lÄ•h-nérd skin-nérd) (or IPA pronunciation: ) is a U.S. Southern rock band. ... Second Helping is a 1974 (see 1974 in music) album by Lynyrd Skynyrd. ...


"Sweet Home Alabama" was an answer to two controversial songs, "Southern Man" and "Alabama" by Neil Young, which were critical of social conditions in the South. "We thought Neil was shooting all the ducks in order to kill one or two," said Ronnie Van Zant at the time (Dupree 1974).
Van Zant's musical response, however, was equally controversial, with references to Alabama Governor George Wallace and the Watergate scandal. Despite (or perhaps because of) the debate, the song has become one of the most popular examples of Southern rock. It reached the top ten of the US charts in 1974 and was the band's second hit single. [1] This is an incomplete list. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Harvest is an album by Neil Young, which was the best-selling album of 1972. ... Neil Percival Young[1] OM (born November 12, 1945, Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, guitarist, and film director from Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... George Corley Wallace, Jr. ... The Watergate scandal was a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at a Watergate Office Building in Washington, D.C. by members of Richard Nixons administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ... Southern rock is a sub genre of rock music. ...

Contents

The Song and the Band's Career

"Sweet Home Alabama" was a major chart hit for a band whose previous singles had "lazily sauntered out into release with no particular intent." The hit led to two TV rock-show offers, which the band turned down. (Dupree 1974)


Creation and recording

At a band practice shortly after bassist Ed King had switched to guitar, King heard fellow guitarist Rossington playing a guitar riff that inspired him (in fact, this riff is still heard in the final version of the song and is played during the verses as a counterpoint to the main D-C+9-G chord progression). In interviews, Ed King has said that, during the night following the practice session, the chords and two main guitar solos came to him in a dream, note for note. King then introduced the song to the band the next day, and a hit was born. Also written at this session was the track that would follow "Alabama" on the Second Helping album, "I Need You." Second Helping is a 1974 (see 1974 in music) album by Lynyrd Skynyrd. ...


A live version of the track on the compilation album "Collectybles" places the writing the song during the late summer of 1973, as the live set available on the album is dated October 30, 1973.


The track was recorded at Studio One in Doraville, Georgia, using just King, bassist Wilkeson, and drummer Burns to lay down the basic backing track. Ed King used a Marshall amp belonging to Allen Collins. The guitar used on the track was a late-1960's Fender Stratocaster. However, King has said that guitar was a pretty poor model and had bad pickups, forcing him to turn the amp up all the way to get decent volume out of it. This guitar is now displayed at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum in Cleveland, Ohio. Doraville is a city located in DeKalb County, Georgia. ... “Stratocaster” redirects here. ...


Interesting to note is that the famous "Turn it up" line uttered by Van Zant in the beginning was not intended to be in the song. Ronnie was just asking producer Al Kooper and engineer Rodney Mills to turn up the volume in his headphones so that he could hear the track better. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


Following the two "woo's" at the start of the piano solo, Van Zant can be heard ad-libbing "My, Montgomery's got the answer." The duplicate "my" was produced by Kooper turning off one of the two vocal takes.


There is also a semi-hidden vocal line in the second verse after the "Well, I heard Mr. Young sing about her" line (at approximately 0:50). In the left channel, you can hear the phrase "Southern Man" being sung lightly. This was producer Al Kooper doing a Neil Young impression and was just another incident of the band members messing around in the studio while being recorded.


The count-in heard in the beginning of the track is spoken by Ed King. The count-in to the first song on an album was a signature touch that producer Kooper usually put on albums that he made.


Ironically, none of the three writers of the song were originally from Alabama. Ronnie Van Zant and Gary Rossington were both born in Jacksonville, Florida. Ed King was from Glendale, California. Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Ronald Wayne Ronnie Van Zant (January 15, 1948 – October 20, 1977) was the lead vocalist, primary lyricist, and a founding member of the Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd. ... Gary Rossington (born December 4, 1951 in Jacksonville, Florida) is a founding member and lead guitarist of Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd. ... Nickname: Motto: Where Florida Begins Location in the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Duval Government  - Mayor John Peyton (R) Area  - City  885 sq mi (2,264. ... Nickname: Location of Glendale within Los Angeles County and the State of California. ...


Political references

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In conjunction with the defense of the South, the song contains political references which have caused controversy, particularly this verse: Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ...

In Birmingham, they love the governor
Now we all did what we could do
Now Watergate does not bother me
Does your conscience bother you?
Tell the truth

Some deny the song expresses support for Wallace's politics, interpreting the lyrics as saying that the band did all they could do to keep Wallace out of office. They argue that a jeer "Boo, boo, boo!" can be heard after the line "In Birmingham, they love the governor" and they interpret this as an attack on Wallace. In 1975, Van Zant said: "The lyrics about the governor of Alabama were misunderstood. The general public didn't notice the words 'Boo! Boo! Boo!' after that particular line, and the media picked up only on the reference to the people loving the governor" (Ballinger 2002:78). Footage of concerts where they performed the song also confirms the presence of this line (Lyve from Steeltown). Although again this is an area for contention, particularly when regarding the lines "Sweet home Alabama, Oh sweet home baby, Where the skies are so blue, And the governer's true."


Various band members have denied that the song endorses segregation; in a recent radio interview, surviving members stated the last line "Montgomery got the answer" was a reference to the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches led by Martin Luther King, Jr. John Lewis (on right in trench coat) and Hosea Williams (on the left) lead marchers across the Edmund Pettus Bridge, March 7, 1965 The Selma to Montgomery marches, which included Bloody Sunday, were three marches that marked the political and emotional peak of the American civil rights movement. ... “MLK” redirects here. ...


Fans and music historians also argue that the band was clearly sympathetic to African-Americans during the Civil Rights movement, citing the songs "Things Goin' On", and "The Ballad of Curtis Loew"[sic], in addition to their obvious admiration for the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section (which recorded numerous Soul and R&B classics) as prime examples of the group's true political leanings. Things Goin On was written in 1973 by Ronnie Van Zant and Gary Rossington, the lead vocalist and guitarist from Lynyrd Skynyrd. ... The Ballad of Curtis Loew [sic] is a song written by Allen Collins and Ronnie Van Zant and performed by Lynyrd Skynyrd. ... The Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section was based in the Alabama town Muscle Shoals, the site of legendary recording studios and home to many skilled musicians. ...


Another claim often made is that the third line of the above verse is downplaying the Watergate scandal. Again, many fans disagree, interpreting the line as either a reminder to critics that the South is not alone in having scandals or as a statement that corruption in politics is nothing exceptional.[citation needed] Another theory is that Van Zant was simply saying that the Watergate scandal was nothing that concerned him because he (and the South) had their own problems. The Watergate scandal was a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at a Watergate Office Building in Washington, D.C. by members of Richard Nixons administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ...


The general consensus today regarding the song (and the band's) political leanings is that the group was actually more "liberal" in their social/political beliefs than they were given credit for during their heyday. In fact, one can argue that because the band was proudly Southern, this indicated to many "Yankee" listeners that the group must surely be conservative. This, of course, is the very thing that Lynyrd Skynyrd strived to dispell in many of their songs (many of which were pro-equality, anti-gun, etc). Their message, typically was one of "just because I am from the South, does not indicate that I am a racist nor a close minded fool". The lyrics of "Sweet Home Alabama" are often hotly debated for this very reason.


Muscle Shoals, Alabama based Drive-By Truckers also use similar, pro-Southern themes in their recordings, influenced by Lynyrd Skynyrd in this regard. Like Lynyrd Skynyrd, they are also critically praised. Muscle Shoals is a city, famous for its music and contributions to American popular music, in Colbert County, Alabama, USA. As of the 2000 census, the population of the city is 11,924, and is included in The Shoals MSA. // Muscle Shoals is located at (34. ... Drive-By Truckers are a rock/alt-country/cowpunk (their website actually calls them a psychobilly band) band based in Athens, Georgia, though three out of five members (Mike Cooley, Patterson Hood, and Shonna Tucker) originally hail from The Shoals region of Northern Alabama. ...


Muscle Shoals

One verse of the song includes the line "Now Muscle Shoals has got the Swampers/And they've been known to pick a song or two." This refers to the Alabama town Muscle Shoals, Alabama, a legendary location for recording popular music due to the "sound" crafted by local recording studios and back-up musicians. "The Swampers" referred to in the lyrics included (among others) Jimmy Johnson, David Hood, Barry Beckett, Roger Hawkins, Eddie Hinton, Pete Carr and Spooner Oldham who crafted the "Muscle Shoals Sound". Sometimes recording under the identity of the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, these musicians included Jimmy Johnson (guitar), Roger Hawkins (drums), David Hood (bass), and Barry Beckett (keyboards), and they were inducted into the Alabama Hall of Fame in 1995 for a "Lifework Award for Non-Performing Achievement." The nickname "The Swampers" was given to the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section by singer/songwriter Leon Russell. Muscle Shoals is a city, famous for its music and contributions to American popular music, in Colbert County, Alabama, USA. As of the 2000 census, the population of the city is 11,924, and is included in The Shoals MSA. // Muscle Shoals is located at (34. ... Jimmy Johnson is a member of the legendary Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section that was attached to FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama for an extended period in the 60s and 70s. ... David Hood is a world class bassist from Muscle Shoals, Alabama. ... Roger Hawkins is an American drummer known for playing in the hit making machine The Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section of Alabama. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Dewey Lyndon Spooner Oldham is an American songwriter and session musician. ... The Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section was based in the Alabama town Muscle Shoals, the site of legendary recording studios and home to many skilled musicians. ... Jimmy Johnson is a member of the legendary Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section that was attached to FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama for an extended period in the 60s and 70s. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Roger Hawkins is an American drummer known for playing in the hit making machine The Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section of Alabama. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... David Hood is a world class bassist from Muscle Shoals, Alabama. ... Fender Precision Bass Bass Guitar is a commonly spoken phrase used to refer to the electric bass and horizontal acoustic basses, a stringed instrument similar in design to the electric guitar, but larger in size, commonly fretted and sometimes fretless and with a lower range. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ...


Part of the reference comes from the 1971-1972 demo reels that Lynyrd Skynyrd had recorded in Muscle Shoals with Johnson as a producer/recording engineer. Johnson helped refine many of the songs first heard publicly on the "Pronounced" album, and it was Van Zant's "tip of the hat" to Johnson for helping out the band in the early years and essentially giving the band its first break.


Lynyrd Skynyrd remains connected to Muscle Shoals having since recorded a number of works in the city and making it a regular stop on their concert tours.


Versions

  • Hank Williams, Jr. performs this song on his 1987 live album, Hank Live.
  • In addition to the original appearance on Second Helping, the song has appeared on numerous Lynyrd Skynyrd collections and live albums. The song also appeared on the famous late night talk show The Tonight Show. A few covers have appeared, notably a slowed-down rock version by Big Head Todd and the Monsters, as well as a more faithful version by the Charlie Daniels Band and an altered version by the country group Alabama (who changed the lyrics involving the Watergate scandal with a verse talking about Alabama football). The song even spawned a 2004 hip hop version by Alabama-based rap/hip-hop group Boyz After Money Always, which was performed at the Comedy Central Roast of Jeff Foxworthy. Former Saturday Night Live band leader G.E. Smith led the backing band for this performance.
  • Eminem performs a pseudo-rap version of this song in the film 8 Mile with one of his co-stars.
  • Perhaps the most unusual rendition of the song is by the surrealist Finnish rock group Leningrad Cowboys, featuring the Red Army Choir on the choruses.
  • Argentine rock singer Javier Calamaro realeased a song in Spanish called "Sweet Home Buenos Aires", with the music of this song. Later, argentine rock icon Charly García, released the song in his album "Demasiado ego" with Calamaro as a guest. He usually performs this song after playing "Encuentro con el diablo", from his former band Serú Girán, which has a strong likeness to the Lynyrd Skynyrd song.
  • Argentine band Patricio Rey y sus Redonditos de Ricota (a.k.a. Redonditos de Ricota or Los Redondos) play a song named Caña Seca y un Membrillo, which has a big likeness to Sweet Home Alabama.
  • Band Moonshine Bandits did a rap-rock remake of this song called "Sweet Home California".
  • Spanish band Siniestro Total did a semi-parodic cover of this song called "Miña terra galega", in a reference to their homeland Galicia.
  • Jewel (singer) covered the song which for the movie Sweet Home Alabama.

This article is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... See also: 1986 in country music, 1987 in music, other events of 1987, 1988 in country music, 1980s in music and the List of years in Country Music // Events Top Hits of the Year No. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Big Head Leo & the Monsters is a rock band formed in 1986 in Colorado. ... Charles Edward Daniels (born October 28, 1936) is a very popular country singer. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Watergate building. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90 minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City that has been broadcast live by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ... He was the lead guitarist in the band Hall N Oates. ... Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), better known as Eminem or Slim Shady, is a Grammy and Academy Award-winning American rapper, record producer and actor from the Detroit, Michigan area. ... 8 Mile stars Eminem (Marshall Mathers) as the young white rapper Jimmy Smith Jr. ... The band. ... The Red Army Choir (Choir Aleksandrov) is a performing ensemble that served as the official army choir of the former Soviet Unions Red Army. ... Charly García (born Carlos Alberto García Moreno in Buenos Aires on October 23, 1951) is an influential artist in the history of rock and roll in Argentina. ... Serú Girán is one the most important bands of Rock Nacional (Argentine Rock). ... Patricio Rey y Sus Redonditos de Ricota was a rock band originally from La Plata, Argentina whose tours in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s drew a cult-like following that mirrored The Grateful Dead frenzy in the United States. ... Patricio Rey y Sus Redonditos de Ricota was a rock band originally from La Plata, Argentina whose tours in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s drew a cult-like following that mirrored The Grateful Dead frenzy in the United States. ... Patricio Rey y Sus Redonditos de Ricota was a rock band originally from La Plata, Argentina whose tours in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s drew a cult-like following that mirrored The Grateful Dead frenzy in the United States. ... Rap rock is a hybrid of rap and rock music. ... There are two well-known places called Galicia: Galicia, one of Spains autonomous communities. ... Jewel Kilcher[1] (born May 23, 1974)[2] is an American Grammy Award-nominated singer, songwriter, actress, poet and philanthropist, generally known just by her first name, Jewel. ...

In the Media and Popular Culture

  • In Con Air, the song plays over a scene in which Steve Buscemi's character, Garland Greene, defines irony as "a bunch of idiots dancing around on a plane to a song made famous by a band that died in a plane crash." A cover of this song was featured in the HBO movie Boycott about the Montgomery Bus Boycott that was a pivotal event in the Civil Rights Movement.
  • A version of this song is used in an advertisement for KFC chicken.
  • The band's tragic end is also well known in American popular culture. Singer-songwriter Warren Zevon's song "Play It All Night Long" references "Sweet Home Alabama" and the 1977 plane crash:

"Sweet home Alabama"

Play that dead band's song
Turn those speakers up full blast
Play it all night long Classic rock was originally conceived as a radio station programming format which evolved from the album oriented rock (AOR) format in the early-1980s. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... To Die For is a 1995 film written by Buck Henry, based on the novel of the same name by Joyce Maynard (ISBN 0595269397), and directed by Gus Van Sant. ... The Texas Chainsaw Massacre is a 2003 film, a re-imagining of the 1974 film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. ... For other uses, see Conair. ... 8 Mile stars Eminem (Marshall Mathers) as the young white rapper Jimmy Smith Jr. ... For the main character of the same name, see Forrest Gump (character) Forrest Gump is a 1994 drama film based on a 1986 novel by Winston Groom and the name of the title character of both. ... Joe Dirt is a 2001 comedy film starring David Spade, Dennis Miller, Christopher Walken, Brittany Daniel, Jaime Pressly, Erik Per Sullivan and Kid Rock. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... For other uses, see Conair. ... Steven Vincent Buscemi (born December 13, 1957) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American actor and film director. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship campus of the University of Alabama System. ... Shaun Alexander (born August 30, 1977 in Florence, Kentucky) is an American football player in the National Football League. ... City Seattle, Washington Team colors Pacific Blue, Navy Blue, Neon Green, White Head Coach Mike Holmgren Owner Paul Allen General manager Tim Ruskell Mascot Blitz, and Taima the augur hawk League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1976–present) American Football Conference (1977-2001) AFC West (1977-2001) National Football Conference... PS2 can mean: PlayStation 2 (Sony PS2), sixth-generation video game console PS/2 (IBM Personal System/2 office PCs, or the interface standard for mice and keyboards that the PS/2 series set) Phantasy Star II, second in the Phantasy Star seiries of video games. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... NASCAR Thunder 2002 is a racing simulator video game developed by EA Tiburon and published by EA Sports and released on August 8, 2001 for the PlayStation, Playstation 2, and Xbox. ... current EA Sports logo EA Sports is a brand name used by Electronic Arts since 1993 to distribute games based on sports. ... Talladega Superspeedway is a motorsports complex located in Talladega, AL. It was constructed in the 1960s in place of abandoned airport runways by International Speedway Corporation, a business controlled by NASCARs founding France family along with Daytona International Speedway and several other racetracks. ... This is a trivia section. ... KFC, or Kentucky Fried Chicken, is a fast food restaurant chain based in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Warren William Zevon (January 24, 1947 – September 7, 2003) was an American rock and roll musician and songwriter. ...

Recognition and Awards

  • In May 2006, National Review ranked the song #4 on its list of "50 greatest conservative rock songs."
  • In July 2006, CMT ranked it #1 of the "20 Greatest Southern Rock songs."
  • In 2004, the song was ranked #398 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.
  • In 2007, Nascar used portions of the song mixed with rap music for an ad.
  • In 2007, the song was used in the Top Gear Greatest Driving Songs album.

National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... Country Music Television, or CMT as it usually called, is an American country music oriented cable television channel. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time was the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2004. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... The current format of Top Gear is a BAFTA[1] and Emmy Award-winning BBC television series about motor vehicles, mainly cars. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ...

Personnel

  • Ronnie Van Zant - Double-Tracked Lead Vocals
  • Ed King - Lead guitar, Solo guitar, backing vocals (first "woo" at the end of the last chorus)
  • Leon Wilkeson - Bass guitar, backing vocals (second "woo" at the end of the last chorus)
  • Bob Burns - Drums
  • Billy Powell - Piano
  • Allen Collins - Rhythm Guitar (left channel)
  • Gary Rossington - Rhythm guitar (right channel), Acoustic guitar (left channel)
  • Al Kooper - Producer, backing vocals (left channel)
  • Clydie King, background vocals
  • Merry Clayton, background vocals

This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Clydie King is an American singer best known for her session work as a backing vocalist. ... Merry Clayton (born December 25, 1948 in Gert Town, New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American gospel singer. ...

See Also

Muscle Shoals is a city, famous for its music and contributions to American popular music, in Colbert County, Alabama, USA. As of the 2000 census, the population of the city is 11,924, and is included in The Shoals MSA. // Muscle Shoals is located at (34. ... The Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section was based in the Alabama town Muscle Shoals, the site of legendary recording studios and home to many skilled musicians. ...

References

This article is about the magazine. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Neil Young News: American Idol drops Neil Young verse from "Sweet Home Alabama" (1557 words)
"Sweet Home Alabama" "was and is a strident anthem about the pride of a region and the politics of a particular place and time", writes Kevin McDonough in The Morning Call.
Seems to me that this song, sans 'that verse', has become a favorite of the favorite sons of Alabama, be they fl or white or any other skin-tone, to tout all that is good, in their eyes, about their home state.
The rest of the song is simply a celebration of the state and family and the feeling that there were and are "good people in Alabama" as Van Zant is heard to say in the song's live version.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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