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Encyclopedia > Swarthmore College

Swarthmore College

Motto None
Established 1864
Type Private
Endowment US$1.2 billion
President Alfred Bloom
Staff 163
Undergraduates 1,479
Location Swarthmore, PA, United States
Campus Suburban
Colors Garnet and Gray
Mascot Phoenix
Website swarthmore.edu

Swarthmore College is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States with an enrollment of about 1,450 students. The college is located in the borough of Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, 11 miles (17.7 km) southwest of Philadelphia. This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Alfred (Al) Bloom is currently the president of Swarthmore College. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Swarthmore is a borough in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Swarthmore is a borough in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


The school was founded in 1864 by a committee of Quakers who were members of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends. Swarthmore dropped its religious affiliation and became officially non-sectarian in the early 20th century. The college has been coeducational since its founding. Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends or simply Philadelphia Yearly Meeting or PYM is the central organizing body for Quaker meetings in the Philadelphia, PA, USA area. ... -1... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women at the same school facilities. ...


Swarthmore is known for its rigorous academics, symbolized and maintained by the faculty's resistance to grade inflation. [1] [2] [3] The college is, after normalization for institution size, the third largest baccalaureate source of doctoral degree recipients in the United States, and the largest such source with a liberal arts curriculum. [4] It has consistently ranked among the top three liberal arts colleges in the U.S. News and World Report rankings since the rankings' inception. Grade inflation is an issue in U.S. education and in GCSEs in England and Wales. ... In one usage in statistics, normalization is the process of removing statistical error in repeated measured data. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... A doctorate is an academic degree of the highest level. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ...


"Swarthmore" can be pronounced with the first "r" either vocalized or dropped due to differences in rhotic and non-rhotic accents. English pronunciation is divided into two main accent groups, the rhotic and non-rhotic, depending on when the phoneme (the letter r) is pronounced. ...


Swarthmore's campus is home to the Scott Arboretum. Scott Arboretum (357 acres) is an arboretum located across the campus of Swarthmore College, 500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. ...

Contents

History

The name "Swarthmore" has its roots in early Quaker history. In England, Swarthmoor Hall in Cumbria was the home of Thomas and Margaret Fell in 1652 when George Fox, fresh from his epiphany atop Pendle Hill in 1651, came to visit. The visitation turned into a long association as Fox persuaded Thomas and Margeret Fell and the inhabitants of the nearby village of Fenmore of Friendly, and Swarthmoor was used for the first Friends' meetings. Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... Swarthmoor Hall was the home of Margaret Fell, a 17th Century English Quaker. ... Cumbria (IPA: ), is a shire county in the extreme North West of England. ... For other persons named George Fox, see George Fox (disambiguation). ... Pendle Hill (summit 557 m above mean sea level) is located in the north-east of Lancashire, England, near the towns of Burnley, Colne, Nelson and Clitheroe. ...


The school was founded in 1864 by a committee of Quakers who were members of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends. Edward Parrish was its first president. A more detailed history of Swarthmore can be found at Swarthmore.edu.


Solomon Asch and Wolfgang Köhler were two noted psychologists who were professors at Swarthmore. Asch joined the faculty in 1947 and served until 1966, while Köhler came to Swarthmore in 1935 and served until his retirement in 1958. The Asch conformity experiments took place at Swarthmore. Solomon E. Asch (September 14, 1907 - February 20, 1996) was a world-renowned American Gestalt psychologist and pioneer in social psychology. ... Wolfgang Köhler (Reval (now Tallinn), Estonia, January 21, 1887 - New Hampshire, June 11, 1967) was a German gestalt psychologist. ... The Asch conformity experiments, published in 1951, were a series of studies that starkly demonstrated the power of conformity in groups. ...


Academics

Parrish Hall contains the admissions, housing, and financial aid offices, along with dormitories on the upper floors.

In its most recent college ranking, U.S. News & World Report ranked Swarthmore as the number-three liberal arts college, with an overall score of 98/100, behind Williams and Amherst, respectively. Swarthmore is regularly cited as one of the "Little Ivies." Swarthmore's endowment (at the end of FY2005) was about $1.169 billion, ranking 45th amongst all institutions of higher education in the United States. Endowment per student is $766,500, 12th in the U.S. ("The Rich Get Richer". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved on 2006-06-25.). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2393 KB) Summary Parrish Hall at the center of the Swarthmore College campus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2393 KB) Summary Parrish Hall at the center of the Swarthmore College campus. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Williams College is a private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Amherst College is a private, independent, elite[1][2] liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Little Ivies is a colloquialism referring to a group of small, selective[1] American colleges and universities; however, it does not denote any official organization. ... // *Denotes the aggregate of a cluster of institutions (university system) This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The school is particularly notable for its Oxford tutorial-inspired Honors Program, which allows students to take double-credit seminars from their junior year and often write extensive honors theses. Seminars are usually composed of four to eight students. Students in seminars will usually write at least three ten-page papers per seminar, and often one of these papers is expanded into a 20-30 page paper by the end of the seminar. At the end of their senior year, Honors students take oral and written examinations conducted by outside experts in their field. Around one student in each discipline is awarded "Highest Honors"; others are either awarded "High Honors" or "Honors"; rarely, a student is denied any Honors altogether by the outside examiner. Each department usually has a grade threshold for admittance to the Honors program. The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... // Academia In British academic parlance, a tutorial is a small class of one, or only a few, students, in which the tutor (a professor or other academic staff member) gives individual attention to the students. ... A thesis (from Greek position) is an intellectual proposition. ...


Unusual for a liberal arts college, Swarthmore has an engineering program; at the end of four years, students are granted a B.S. in Engineering. Other notable programs include minors in peace and conflict studies, cognitive science, and interpretation theory. Engineering is the design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Peace and conflict studies can be defined as the inter-disciplinary inquiry into war as human condition and peace as human potential, as an alternative to the traditional Polemology (War Studies) and the strategies taught at Military academies. ... Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ... In the humanities and social sciences, critical theory has two quite different meanings with different origins and histories, one originating in social theory and the other in literary criticism. ...


Swarthmore is a member of the Tri-College Consortium (or TriCo) with nearby Bryn Mawr College and Haverford College, which allows students from any of the three to cross-register for courses at any of the others. The consortium as a whole is additionally affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania and students are able to cross-register for courses there as well. “Bryn Mawr” redirects here. ... Haverford College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ...


Though students and faculty tout the College's relative lack of grade inflation,[5] Swarthmore's average undergraduate GPA increased from 2.83 in 1973 to 3.24 in 1997[6]. Swarthmore argues that the methodology overstates the change [7].


Since the 1970s, Swarthmore students have won 25 Rhodes Scholarships, 8 Marshall Scholarships, 135 Fulbright Scholarships, 21 Truman Scholarships, 13 Luce Scholarships, 68 Watson Fellowships, 3 Soros Fellowships, and 1 Mitchell Scholarship. Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... The official logo of the Marshall Scholarship is a blended image of the US and UK flags. ... ... President Harry S. Truman The Harry S. Truman Scholarship is a federal scholarship granted to U.S. college juniors for demonstrated leadership potential and a commitment to public service. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The Henry Luce Foundation. ... The Thomas J. Watson Fellowship is a grant that enables graduating seniors to pursue a year of independent study outside the United States. ... The George J. Mitchell Scholarship is an award given to 12 young Americans annually for one year of graduate study in Ireland. ...


Tuition and Finances

The total cost of tuition, fees, room, and board for a student entering in the fall of 2006 was $43,532 (tuition and fees were together $33,232).


Swarthmore's endowment at the end of FY2005 was approximately $1.169 billion, ranking 45th amongst all institutions of higher education in the United States, and fifth amongst liberal arts colleges. Endowment per student was $766,500 for 2004-2005, 12th in the U.S. amongst all institutions of higher education and ahead of both Amherst and Williams. ("The Rich Get Richer". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved on 2006-06-25.). For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Operating revenue for the 2004-2005 school year was $104,489,000, over 42% of which was provided by the endowment. As is the case with most every elite institution of higher education, actual costs as measured on a per-student basis far exceed revenue from tuition and fees, and so Swarthmore's endowment serves to offset ever-rising costs of education, subsidizing every student's education at Swarthmore--even those paying full tuition. For the 2005-2006 year, tuition, fees, and room & board charges ($41,280) fell well short of the actual cost of education per student, which was approximately $70,300.


Swarthmore recently completed a $230 million capital campaign, christened "The Meaning of Swarthmore" and underway officially since the fall of 2001. President Bloom declared the project completed on October 2, 2006, three months ahead of schedule. 87% of the college's alumni participated in the effort. October 2 is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Campus

The campus consists of 357 acres, based on a north-south axis anchored by Parrish Hall, which houses numerous administrative offices and student lounges, as well as two floors of student housing. The campus radio station WSRN-FM broadcasts from the top. Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... WSRN-FM, The Worldwide Swarthmore Radio Network, is Swarthmore Colleges official campus radio station, and the second oldest college radio station in the United States. ...


From the SEPTA Swarthmore commuter train station and the ville of Swarthmore to the south, the oak-lined Magill Walk leads north up a hill to Parrish. The campus is also coterminous with the Scott Arboretum, cited by some as a main staple of the campus's renowned beauty.[citation needed] SEPTA redirects here. ... Swarthmore is a station along the SEPTA R3 line, the former Pennsylvania West Chester Line. ...


The majority of the buildings housing classrooms and department offices are located to the north of Parrish, as is Woolman dormitory. McCabe Library is to the east of Parrish, as are the dorms of Willets, Mertz, Worth, and Alice Paul. To the west are the dorms of Wharton, Dana, and Hallowell, along with the Scott Amphitheater. The Crum Woods generally extend westward from the campus, toward the Crum Creek. South of Parrish are Sharples dining hall, the two non-residential fraternities (Phi Psi and Delta Upsilon), and various other buildings. Palmer, Pittenger, and Roberts dormitories are south of the railroad station, as are the athletic facilities, while Mary Lyon dorm is off-campus to the southwest.[8]


Clubs and organizations

There are more than 100 chartered clubs and organizations at Swarthmore, in addition to many other unchartered groups. Clubs and organizations are a fundamental part of the College, and the center of many students' energies and social life. This extracurricular involvement contributes to the frequent characterization of Swarthmore students as both motivated and overworked.


Only two Greek organizations exist on the campus in the form of the fraternities Delta Upsilon and Phi Omicron Psi. The latter of the two is a non-national Greek society which broke away from Phi Kappa Psi following disagreements with national policies. Notably lacking are sororities, which were abandoned in the 1930's following student outrage to discrimination within the sorority system.[9] Interest in resurrecting sorority life has recently returned with an all-female student group known as LaSS (The Ladies Soiree Society) organizing campus wide charity events and social functions.[10] Delta Upsilon (ΔΥ) is an international exclusively male fraternity, founded in 1834, which is committed to Building Better Men through their four founding principles: friendship, character, culture, & justice. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ...


Sports

Swarthmore offers the full panoply of sporting teams. Varsity teams include badminton, baseball, basketball, cross country, field hockey, golf, lacrosse, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, track and field and volleyball. Notably lacking among these teams is football, which was controversially eliminated in 2000, along with wrestling and initially badminton. The Board of Managers offered a number of reasons for eliminating football, including lack of athletes on campus and difficulty of recruiting.[11][12] Swarthmore also offers a number of club sport options, including rugby, frisbee, cycling, and fencing. The Danish Olympic badminton player Peter Gade Badminton is a racquet sport played by either two opposing players (singles) or two opposing pairs (doubles), who take positions on opposite halves of a rectangular court that is divided by a net. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10-foot high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... The Minnesota State High school Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... Golf is a sport in which individual players or teams of players strike a ball into a hole using several types of clubs. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ...


Publications

The main student newspaper at Swarthmore is The Phoenix[13], a weekly school-sponsored newspaper published every Thursday, except during exam and vacation time. Some staff positions are paid a token amount. The newspaper was founded in 1881, with online editions beginning in 1995. Its current tabloid format is more similar to a newsmagazine than a newspaper, with a color front cover. Two thousand copies, free of charge, are distributed across the college campus and to the borough of Swarthmore. The newspaper is printed at The Delaware County Daily Times in Primos, Pennsylvania. Its online website is hosted by the Swarthmore College Computer Society, with bandwidth-search engine capability provided by the Swarthmore College Information Technology Services. In 2000, The Phoenix was an Online Pacemaker for the Associated Collegiate Press award. Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Swarthmore is a borough in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... The Swarthmore College Computer Society, or SCCS, is a campus organization at Swarthmore College, a small liberal arts college in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Pacemaker Awards are awards for excellence in American student journalism, given annually since 1927. ... The Associated Collegiate Press (official site) is the largest and oldest national membership organization for college student media in the United States. ...


The Daily Gazette[14] is another student newspaper; unlike The Phoenix, it is a daily electronic "paper" and is independent of both the administration and student government. Its coverage includes news, arts, and daily sports reporting. The first issues were distributed through e-mail during the fall semester of 1996, with an online edition soon following. In recent years, the circulation of the Daily Gazette has surpassed the Phoenix, with 2300 subscribers. The Agora is another small student newspaper with a liberal, activist outlook, though it is published only sporadically. Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


There are a number of magazines at Swarthmore, most of which are published biannually at the end of each semester. One is Spike, Swarthmore's humor magazine. The others are literary magazines, including Small Craft Warnings, which publishes poetry, fiction and artwork; Scarlet Letters, which publishes women's literature; Enie, for Spanish literature; OURstory, for literature relating to diversity issues; Bug-Eyed Magazine, a very limited-run science fiction/fantasy magazine published by Psi Phi, formerly known as SWIL; Remappings (formerly "CelebrASIAN"), published by the Swarthmore Asian Organization; Alchemy, a collection of academic writings published by the Swarthmore Writing Associates; Mjumbe, published by the Swarthmore African-American Student Society; and a magazine for French literature. An erotica magazine, ! (pronounced "bang") was briefly published in 2005 in homage to an earlier publication, Untouchables. Most of the literary magazines print approximately 500 copies, with around 100 pages. Erotica (from the Greek language Eros - love) — refers to works of art, including literature, photography, film, sculpture and painting, that deal substantively with erotically stimulating or arousing descriptions. ...


Radio

WSRN 91.5 FM is the college radio station. It has a mix of indie, rock, hip-hop, folk, world, and classical music, as well as a number of radio talk shows. At one time, WSRN had a significant news department, and covered events such as the "Crisis of '69"[15] extensively. Many archived recordings of musical and spoken word performances exist, such as the once-annual Swarthmore Folk Festival.[16] Today WSRN focuses virtually exclusively on entertainment, though it has covered significant news developments such as the athletic cuts in 2000[17] and the effects of 11 September 2001 on campus. In popular music, indie music (from independent) is any of a number of genres, scenes, subcultures and stylistic and cultural attributes, characterised by perceived independence from commercial pop music and mainstream culture and an autonomous, do-it-yourself (DIY) approach. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... “Folk song” redirects here. ... World music is, most generally, all the music in the world. ... This article discusses classical music in the first sense (see below). ... A talk show (U.S.) or chat show (Brit. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Activism

Swarthmore is also known as a center of social and political activism.[citation needed] The college has recently received significant coverage due to two student groups founded in 2004, the Genocide Intervention Network (now an independent non-student group) and War News Radio. Swarthmore's political landscape is generally considered fairly left-wing, though student activism is far less than it was in the heyday of the protest culture of the 1960s. Recent high-profile campaigns included a living wage organization (Swarthmore Living Wage & Democracy Campaign), actions surrounding the electronic voting machine manufacturer Diebold Election Systems by campus groups FreeCulture.org and Why War?, and a "Kick Coke" campaign aimed at replacing soda machines offering Coca-Cola with alternative products. The Kick-Coke campaign had a recent victory in November 2006 when the College agreed to cut its contract with Coca-Cola. shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Genocide Intervention Network (or GI-Net) is a non-profit organization that envisions a world in which the global community is willing and able to protect civilians from genocidal violence. ... Electronic voting machine by Diebold Election Systems used in all Brazilian elections and plebiscites. ... Diebold Elections Systems is a subsidiary of Diebold that makes and sells voting machines. ... FreeCulture. ... Why War?, originally started by students of Swarthmore College in October 2001, is an anti-war organization working to activate a broad, global movement for peace and justice based on the principles of nonviolence. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ...


Alumni

Swarthmore's alumni include five Nobel Prize winners (second highest number of Nobel Prize winners per graduate in the U.S.), most recently John C. Mather, who graduated in 1968. Swarthmore also has eight MacArthur Foundation fellows and hundreds of prominent figures in law, art, science, business, politics, and other fields. The following is a list of notable people associated with Swarthmore College. ... Nobel Prize medal. ... John Cromwell Mather (b. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a major private grant-making foundation based in Chicago that has awarded more than US$3 billion since its inception in 1978. ...

Other prominent alumni include Congressman Christopher Van Hollen, Senator Carl Levin of Michigan (1956), musical composer and satirist Peter Schickele (1957), astronomer Sandra M. Faber (1966), The Corrections author Jonathan Franzen (1981), Caltech president and Nobel laureate David Baltimore (1960), Georgetown University Law Center Dean T. Alexander Aleinikoff (1974), and Justin Hall (1998), widely considered to be the first blogger. Wall Street magnate and Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. founder Jerome Kohlberg, Jr. (1946) founded the Philip Evans Scholarship Foundation in 1986 at Swarthmore. Suffragist and National Women's Party founder Alice Paul graduated in 1905. The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... James Albert Michener (February 3, 1907? - October 16, 1997) was the American author of such books as Tales of the South Pacific (for which he won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1948), Hawaii, The Drifters, Centennial, The Source, The Fires of Spring, Chesapeake, Caribbean, Caravans, Alaska, Texas, and Poland. ... Copyright symbol Copyright is a set of exclusive rights regulating the use of a particular expression of an idea or information. ... Robert B. Zoellick Robert Bruce Zoellick (IPA: ) (born July 25, 1953) is an American politician and (effective July 1, 2007) the eleventh president of the World Bank. ... Paul Dundes Wolfowitz (born December 22, 1943) is an American former academic and government official. ... ... Christopher Chris Van Hollen, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Carl Milton Levin (born June 28, 1934) is a Democratic United States Senator from Michigan and is the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Armed Services. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Peter Schickele (born Johann Peter Schickele, July 17, 1935) is an American composer, musical educator and parodist, perhaps best known for his comedy music albums featuring music he wrote as P. D. Q. Bach. ... Sandra Moore Faber (1944 - ) is a professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz and works at the Lick Observatory. ... The Corrections is a novel of social criticism by American author Jonathan Franzen. ... Jonathan Franzen (born August 17, 1959) is an award-winning American novelist and essayist. ... California Institute of Technology The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... David Baltimore (b. ... The schools original sign, preserved on the north quad of the present-day campus. ... T. Alexander Aleinikoff was named the Dean of the Georgetown University Law Center in 2004. ... Justin Hall, 2007 Justin Hall (born December 16, 1974 in Chicago, Illinois), is an American freelance journalist who is best known as a pioneer blogger (internet-based diarist), and for writing reviews from game conferences such as E3 and the Tokyo Game Show. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co (commonly referred to as KKR) is a New York City-based private equity firm that focuses primarily on late stage leveraged buyouts. ... Jerome Kohlberg, Jr. ... The Philip Evans Scholarship Foundation is a scholarship program at Swarthmore College that is committed to empowering students to develop themselves as critical thinkers, compassionate citizens, and engaged participants in local and world affairs. ... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette was given to members of the womens suffrage movement in the United Kingdom and United States, particularly in the years prior to World War I. The name was the Womens Social and Political Union (founded in 1903). ... National Womans Party - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Alice Paul, 1901. ...


Points of interest

Scott Arboretum (357 acres) is an arboretum located across the campus of Swarthmore College, 500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. ...

See also

The Swarthmore College Computer Society, or SCCS, is a campus organization at Swarthmore College, a small liberal arts college in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. ... The following is a list of notable people associated with Swarthmore College. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Swarthmore College: Information from Answers.com (1928 words)
Swarthmore is regularly cited as one of the "Little Ivies." Swarthmore's endowment (at the end of FY2005) was about $1.169 billion, ranking 45th amongst all institutions of higher education in the United States.
Swarthmore is a member of the Tri-College Consortium (or TriCo) with nearby Bryn Mawr College and Haverford College, which allows students from any of the three to cross-register for courses at any of the others.
Though students and faculty tout the College's relative lack of grade inflation,[1] Swarthmore's average undergraduate GPA increased from 2.83 in 1973 to 3.24 in 1997[2].
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Swarthmore College (1181 words)
Swarthmore College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college in the United States.
Swarthmore is a member of the Tri-College consortium of liberal arts colleges, along with Bryn Mawr College and Haverford College.
Swarthmore's alumni include five recipients of the MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (sometimes referred to as "the genius awards") and four Nobel laureates, most recently Edward C. Prescott of the class of 1962.
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