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Encyclopedia > Swansea
City and County of Swansea
Dinas a Sir Abertawe
Swansea bay from Townhill
Swansea bay from Townhill

Coat of arms
Motto: Floreat Swansea
Location of the city of Swansea (Light Green) within Wales (Dark Green)
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country Wales
Ceremonial county West Glamorgan
Historic county Glamorganshire
Admin HQ Swansea Guildhall
Town charter 1158-1184
City status 1969
Government
 - Leader of
Swansea Council
Christopher Holley
 - Welsh Assembly and UK Parliament Consituencies Swansea East, Swansea West, Gower
 - European Parliament Wales
 - MPs Martin Caton (L), Sian James (L), Alan John Williams (L)
Area
 - Total 145.9 sq mi (378 km²)
Population
 - Total Unitary Authority area: 227,100, Ranked 3rd (2,006 est.)
Urban area within Unitary Authority: 169,880 (2,001)
Wider Urban Area: 270,506 (2,001)
 - Density 1,556.6/sq mi (601/km²)
 - Ethnicity 97.8% White
1.2% S. Asian
0.3% Afro-Caribbean
0.3% Chinese
Time zone GMT (UTC0)
 - Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)
Post codes SA1-SA7
Area code(s) 01792
ISO 3166-2 GB-SWA
ONS code 00NX
OS grid reference SS6593
NUTS 3 UKL18
Website: http://www.swansea.gov.uk/

Swansea (Welsh: Abertawe, "mouth of the Tawe") is a city and county in Wales. It is in the historic county boundaries of Glamorgan. Situated on the South Wales coast, the county area includes the Gower peninsula and the Lliw uplands. Swansea is the third most populous county in Wales after Cardiff and Rhondda Cynon Taff; and the second most populous city in Wales after Cardiff. According to Census 2001 data, Swansea was the 34th largest settlement in the United Kingdom,[1] and the 25th largest urban area[2] Swansea grew significantly during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, becoming a centre of heavy industry. Swansea is a city in Wales. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2592x813, 98 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Townhill is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a suburban district in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... Image File history File links Swansea Coat of Arms File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... one of the subdivisions of Wales File links The following pages link to this file: Swansea Categories: GFDL images ... This article is about the country. ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... This article is about the country. ... The Preserved counties of Wales are the current areas used in Wales for ceremonial purposes such as Lieutenancy. ... West Glamorgan as a preserved county since 2003. ... Wales has thirteen historic counties. ... Glamorgan or Glamorganshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ... In the United Kingdom and Canada a Royal Charter is a charter granted by the Sovereign on the advice of the Privy Council, which creates or gives special status to an incorporated body. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... The National Assembly for Wales (or NAW) (Welsh: Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru) was established in 1998, following a 1997 referendum in which a small majority of voters (but not the electorate) voted in favour of the Labour Governments plans for devolution. ... This is a list of the 646 constituencies currently represented in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom Parliament, as at the 2005 general election. ... Swansea East is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Swansea West is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Gower is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... This article is about the country. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Martin Caton (born June 15, 1951) is a Welsh Labour politician. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Siân Catherine James (born June 24, 1959, Morriston, Swansea) is the Labour MP for Swansea East. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Alan Williams (born October 14, 1930) is a Welsh politician for the Labour Party. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This is a list of principal areas of Wales ordered by population. ... The Swansea Urban Area is an area in South Wales used for population monitoring purposes. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article or section should be merged with ethnic group Ethnicity is the cultural characteristics that connect a particular group or groups of people to each other. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... GMT redirects here. ... // Greenwich Mean Time Western European Time Burkina Faso Bouvet Island Côte dIvoire The Gambia Ghana Greenland northeastern Danmarkshavn and surrounding area Guinea Guinea-Bissau Iceland Liberia Mali Mauritania Morocco Saint Helena (including Ascension Island and Tristan da Cunha) São Tomé and Príncipe Senegal Sierra Leone Togo... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving British Summer Time (BST) is the changing of the clocks in effect in the United Kingdom and Irish Summer Time (IST) in Republic of Ireland between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October each... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... The SA postcode area, also known as the Swansea postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Aberaeron, Ammanford, Boncath, Burry Port, Cardigan, Carmarthen, Clarbeston Road, Clynderwen, Crymych, Ferryside, Fishguard, Glogue, Goodwick, Haverfordwest, Kidwelly, Kilgetty, Lampeter, Llanarth, Llandeilo, Llandovery, Llandysul, Llanelli, Llanfyrnach, Llangadog, Llanwrda, Llanybydder, Milford Haven, Narberth... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... the River Tawe is a river in south Wales which meets the sea at Swansea (Abertawe in Welsh). ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... For local government purposes, Wales is divided into 22 unitary authorities. ... This article is about the country. ... Wales has thirteen historic counties. ... Glamorgan or Glamorganshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ... Approximate extent of South East Wales. ... Gower redirects here. ... This is a list of principal areas of Wales ordered by population. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... Rhondda Cynon Taff (Welsh: Rhondda Cynon T f) is a county borough in Glamorgan, South Wales. ... This is a list of the largest cities and towns of the United Kingdom ordered by population. ... A conurbation is formed when towns expand sufficiently that their urban areas join up with each other. ...


The name Swansea is often said to come from "Sweyn's Ey" ("ey" being the Old Norse word for "island"), but as there is no island at Swansea, a more likely explanation is that it comes from "Sweyn" (a corruption of the Viking name "Sven") and "sey" ("sey" being an Old Norse word that can mean "inlet"). Consequently it is pronounced Swan's-y [ˡswɒnzi]) not Swan-sea.[3] The name is to thought to have originated in the period when the Vikings settled along the South Wales coast (Swansea is thought to have developed from a Viking trading post). Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ...


The founder of Swansea is believed to be the Viking King of Denmark Sweyn Forkbeard who in 1013 conquered the Anglo-Saxons of Wessex and Mercia, and who controlled a vast empire including Southern England, Denmark and Norway. The earliest known form of the modern name is Sweynesse used in Swansea's first charter, which was granted sometime between 1158-1184 by William de Newburgh, 3rd Earl of Warwick. The charter gave Swansea the status of a borough, granting the townsmen, called burgesses certain rights to develop the area. A second charter was granted in 1215 by King John. In this charter, the name appears as Sweyneshe. The town seal which is believed to date from this period names the town as Sweyse.[4][5] Swansea was granted city status in 1969,[6] to mark Prince Charles's investiture as the Prince of Wales. The announcement was made by the prince on 3 July 1969, during a tour of Wales.[7] It obtained the further right to have a Lord Mayor in 1982.[8] Sweyn I Forkbeard (actually Svein Otto Haraldsson; in Danish, Svend Tveskæg, originally Svend Tjugeskæg or Tyvskæg) (circa 960 - February 3, 1014). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The Earl of Warwick is one of the oldest English earldoms. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Burgess originally meant a freeman of a borough or burgh. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ...

Contents

Geography

See also: List of places in Swansea

Three Cliffs Bay on the Gower peninsular of South Wales. ... Three Cliffs Bay on the Gower peninsular of South Wales. ... Categories: Stub | Bays | Swansea ... This is a list of places in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales // Administrative divisions Electoral wards See the article on electoral wards for an explanation of this list. ...

Boundaries

The "City and County of Swansea" local authority area is bordered by unitary authorities of Carmarthenshire to the north, and Neath Port Talbot to the east. Swansea is bordered by Swansea Bay to the south. Carmarthenshire (Welsh: ) is a one of thirteen historic counties and a principal area in Wales. ... Neath Port Talbot (Welsh: ) is a county borough in Glamorgan, south Wales. ... Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is an inlet of the Bristol Channel lying south of Swansea, Wales. ...


Physical description

Satellite photo of Swansea
Satellite photo of Swansea

The local government area is 378 km² in size, including a large amount of open countryside and a central urban and suburban belt. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x958, 157 KB) Swansea, Wales NASA World Wind screenshot. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x958, 157 KB) Swansea, Wales NASA World Wind screenshot. ...


Swansea can be roughly divided into four physical areas. To the North are the Lliw uplands which are mainly open moorland reaching the foothills of the Black Mountain. To the west is the Gower peninsula with its rural landscape dotted with small villages. To the east is the coastal strip around Swansea Bay. Cutting though the middle from the south east to the north west is the urban and suburban zone stretching from the Swansea city centre to the towns of Gorseinon (7mi) and Pontarddulais (11mi).[9] Llyn y Fan Fawr, below Fan Brycheiniog in the Black Mountain The Black Mountain (Welsh: Y Mynydd Du) is a mountain range in Mid and West Wales, forming the westernmost range of the Brecon Beacons National Park. ... Gower redirects here. ... Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is an inlet of the Bristol Channel lying south of Swansea, Wales. ... Swansea city centre, in the City and County of Swansea, Wales, lies slightly inland from the River Tawe and Swansea Bay. ... Gorseinon is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a town in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... Pontarddulais is a town in south Wales. ...

Rhossili Beach as seen from headland, Gower peninsula

The most populated areas of Swansea are Morriston and Sketty and the city centre. The chief urbanised area radiates from the city centre towards the north, south and west: along the coast of Swansea Bay to Mumbles; up the Swansea Valley past Landore and Morriston to Clydach; over Townhill to Cwmbwrla, Penlan, Treboeth and Fforestfach; through Uplands, Sketty, Killay to Dunvant; and east of the river from St. Thomas to Bonymaen, Llansamlet and Birchgrove. A second urbanised area is focused on a triangle defined by Gowerton, Gorseinon and Loughor along with the satellite communities of Penllergaer and Pontarddulais.[9] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1072 KB) A view from the headland of Rhossili in June of 2004. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1072 KB) A view from the headland of Rhossili in June of 2004. ... Rhossili is a small village on the southwestern tip of the Gower Peninsula near Swansea in Wales. ... Gower redirects here. ... Morriston (Welsh: Treforys) is a town in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... Sketty (Welsh: ) is a village near Swansea, South Wales. ... Swansea city centre, in the City and County of Swansea, Wales, lies slightly inland from the River Tawe and Swansea Bay. ... Mumbles village, Wales Mumbles (otherwise The Mumbles – Welsh Y Mwmbwls) is an extremely large village and adjacent headland stretching into Swansea Bay. ... The electoral ward of Landore, City and County of Swansea, South Wales, consists of some or all of the following areas, Bon-y-maen, Cwm, Landore, Pentre-chwyth, Swansea, Cadle, Cockett, Felindre, Fforest-fach, Llangyfelach, Tirdeunaw, Waunarlwydd, Clydach, Craigcefnparc, Morriston, Pant-lasau, Plasmarl, Vardre, Ynystawe. ... Clydach is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a town in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... The electoral ward of Townhill in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales, consists of some or all of the following areas: Cwm-Gwyn, Mayhill, Mount Pleasant, Townhill in the parliamentary constituency of Swansea West. ... Cwmbwrla is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a suburb in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... The electoral ward of Penderry, City and County of Swansea, South Wales, consists of some or all of the following areas, Cadle, Cockett, Felindre, Fforest-fach, Llangyfelach, Tirdeunaw, Waunarlwydd. ... Treboeth is a village in Llangyfelach, South Glamorgan, South Wales. ... This article is about the Suburb. ... The ward of Uplands is located in the city of Swansea. ... Sketty (Welsh: ) is a village near Swansea, South Wales. ... The electoral ward of Killay South, City and County of Swansea, South Wales consists of some or all of the following areas, Dunvant, Ilston, Killay, Sketty, Upper Killay. ... Dunvant is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a village in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... St. ... Llansamlet is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a suburb in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... Birchgrove is the name of a number of areas in a number of places. ... Gowerton is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a village in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... Gorseinon is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a town in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... Loughor (Welsh: Casllwchwr) is a town in the city of Swansea, traditional county of Glamorgan, south Wales. ... Penllergaer is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a village in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... Pontarddulais is a town in south Wales. ...


About three quarters of Swansea is bordered by the sea. The two largest rivers in the region are the Tawe which passes the city centre and the Loughor which flows on the northern border with Carmarthenshire. the River Tawe is a river in south Wales which meets the sea at Swansea (Abertawe in Welsh). ... The River Loughor (Welsh: Afon Llwchwr) has is source at an underground lake at the Black Mountain and meets the sea at the Loughor estuary the where it separates the south coast of Carmarthenshire with the north coast of the Gower Peninsula Categories: | | | ...


In the local authority area, the geology is complex, providing diverse scenery. The Gower peninsula was the first area in the United Kingdom to be designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Excluding the urbanised area in the south eastern corner of the county, the whole of the Gower peninsula is part of an AONB.[10] Swansea has numerous urban and country park lands. The region has featured regularly in the Wales in Bloom awards. An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is an area of countryside with significant landscape value in England, Wales or Northern Ireland, that has been specially designated by the Countryside Agency on behalf of the United Kingdom government; the Countryside Council for Wales on behalf of the Welsh Assembly Government...


The geology of the Gower peninsula ranges from carboniferous limestone cliffs along its southern edge from Mumbles to Worm's Head to the salt-marshes and dune systems of the Loughor estuary to the north. The eastern, southern and western coasts of the peninsular are lined with numerous sandy beaches both wide and small, separated by steep cliffs. The South Wales Coalfield reaches the coast in the Swansea area. This had a great bearing on the development of the city of Swansea and other towns in the county like Morriston. The inland area is covered by large swathes of grassland common overlooked by sandstone heath ridges including the prominent Cefn Bryn. The traditional agricultural landscape consists a patchwork of fields characterised by walls, stone-faced banks and hedgerows. Valleys cut through the peninsula and contain rich deciduous woodland.[11] Much of the county is hilly with the highest point of the county being Mynydd y Betws on the border with Carmarthenshire. Carboniferous Limestone is a type of limestone rock. ... Rhossili is a small village on the southwestern tip of the Gower Peninsula near Swansea in Wales. ... Looking out to the Loughor estuary from Rhossili The Loughor estuary is the estuary of the River Loughor, located between the Gower Peninsula and Carmarthenshire, south Wales. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... This article is about the geological formation. ... Heaths are anthropogenic habitats found primarily in northern and western Europe, where they have been created by thousands of years of human clearance of natural forest vegetation by grazing and burning on mainly infertile acidic soils. ... This article is about the use of the term in geography and physical geology. ... Cefn Bryn is a 5 mile long Old Red Sandstone ridge in the heart of the Gower Peninsula. ... For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ... Limber Pine woodland, Toiyabe Range, central Nevada Biologically, a woodland is a treed area differentiated from a forest. ... Mynydd y Betws is a mountain located on the border between Swansea and Carmarthenshire, south Wales. ... Carmarthenshire (Welsh: ) is a one of thirteen historic counties and a principal area in Wales. ...

Bracelet Bay, Mumbles and Swansea Bay, seen from the Mumbles Lighthouse.

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 225 pixelsFull resolution (1006 × 283 pixel, file size: 244 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bracelet bay, Mumbles and Swansea bay, from the Mumbles lighthouse © 2007 Mark Aldron I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 225 pixelsFull resolution (1006 × 283 pixel, file size: 244 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bracelet bay, Mumbles and Swansea bay, from the Mumbles lighthouse © 2007 Mark Aldron I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute...

Climate

Similar to the west of Britain, Swansea has a temperate climate. As part of a coastal region, Swansea experiences a milder climate than the mountains and valleys inland. This same location, though, leaves Swansea exposed to rain-bearing winds from the Atlantic: figures from the Met Office make Swansea the wettest city in Britain.[12] For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... Atlantic and North Atlantic redirect here. ... The Met Office (originally an abbreviation for Meteorological Office, but now the official name in itself), which has its headquarters at Exeter in Devon, is the United Kingdoms national weather service. ...

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Avg high °C 6 6 9 11 15 17 19 18 16 13 9 8
Mean °C 6 6 8 10 13 16 18 17 15 12 8 7
Avg low °C 4 4 7 8 12 14 16 16 13 11 8 6
Precipitation cm 7.07 5.19 4.51 4.91 3.63 4.22 5.07 5.03 5.53 8.08 7.09 7.11 67.44
Sources: uk.weather.com,[13] MSN News & Weather[14]

Demographics

The population in the unitary authority was 225,000. According to Census 2001 data, around 82% of the population were born in Wales and 13% born in England;[15] 13.4% were Welsh speakers.[16] Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...


The population of the Swansea urban area within the Unitary authority boundaries in 2001 was about 169,880. The other urban area within the Unitary Authority centered on Gorseinon had a population of 19,273 in 2001. However, the wider urban area including most of Swansea Bay has a total population of 270,506 (making it the 25th largest urban area in England and Wales).[17] Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is an inlet of the Bristol Channel lying south of Swansea, Wales. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ...


History

Oystermouth Castle, a venue for Shakesperian performances
Oystermouth Castle, a venue for Shakesperian performances
Main article: History of Swansea
See also: Lower Swansea valley

Archaeology on the Gower peninsula includes many remains from prehistoric times, passing through Stone Age, Bronze Age, and Iron Age. Prehistoric finds in the Swansea city area proper are rare. The Romans visited the area, as did the Vikings, whose name for the settlement on the river is used in English today. Image File history File links Oystermouth_Castle. ... Image File history File links Oystermouth_Castle. ... Oystermouth Castle Oystermouth Castle is located overlooking Swansea Bay on the east side of the Gower Peninsula near the Welsh village of Mumbles. ... The History of Swansea generally refers to the history of the town, not the considerably larger local government area. ... The Lower Swansea valley is a term widely used to describe the lower half of the valley of the River Tawe from approximately the level of Clydach down to Swansea Docks. ... For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... Stone Age fishing hook. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... Caerphilly Castle. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ...


Following the Norman Conquest, a marcher lordship was created: named Gower, it included land around Swansea Bay as far as the Tawe, and the manor of Kilvey beyond the Tawe as well as the peninsula itself. Swansea was designated its chief town, and subsequently received one of the earlier borough charters in Wales. Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... The Welsh Marches (Welsh: Y Mers) is an area along the border of England and Wales in the island of Great Britain. ... Gower was an ancient marcher lordship of Deheubarth, south-west Wales. ... Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is an inlet of the Bristol Channel lying south of Swansea, Wales. ... A city charter or town charter (generically, municipal charter) is a legal document establishing a municipality such as a city or town. ...


Swansea became an important port: some coal and vast amounts of limestone (for fertiliser) were being shipped out from the town by 1550. As the Industrial Revolution reached Wales, the combination of port, local coal, and trading links with the West Country, Cornwall and Devon, meant that Swansea was the logical place to site copper smelting works. Smelters were operating by 1720 and proliferated. Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Events February 7 - Julius III becomes Pope. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... The West Country is an informal term for the area of south-western England roughly corresponding to the modern South West England government region. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... Electric phosphate smelting furnace in a TVA chemical plant (1942) Chemical reduction, or smelting, is a form of extractive metallurgy. ... // Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ...


Following this, more coal mines (everywhere from north-east Gower to Clyne to Llangyfelach) were opened and smelters (mostly along the Tawe valley) were opened and flourished. Over the next century and a half, works were established to process arsenic, zinc and tin and to create tinplate and pottery. The city expanded rapidly in the 18th and 19th centuries, and was termed "Copperopolis". Surface coal mining in Wyoming in the United States of America. ... The electoral ward of Llangyfelach, City and County of Swansea, South Wales consists of some or all of the following areas, Fforest, Hendy, Bolgoed, Crofty, Gorseinon, Gowerton, Grovesend, Llanmorlais, Loughor, Pen-clawdd, Penllergaer, Pentrebach, Pontardulais, Pontlliw, Poundffald, Three Crosses, Cadle, Cockett, Felindre, Fforest-fach, Llangyfelach, Tirdeunaw, Waunarlwydd, Clydach, Craigcefnparc, Morriston... General Name, Symbol, Number arsenic, As, 33 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 15, 4, p Appearance metallic gray Standard atomic weight 74. ... General Name, symbol, number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Standard atomic weight 65. ... This article is about the metallic chemical element. ... Tinplate is sheet steel covered with a thin layer of tin. ... Pottery on display in Dilli Haat, Delhi, India. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


From the late 17th century to 1801, Swansea's population grew by 500% - the first official census indicated that with 6,099 inhabitants, Swansea had become significantly larger than Glamorgan's county town, Cardiff, and was the second most populous town in Wales behind Merthyr Tydfil (which had a population of 7,705). However, the census understated Swansea's true size, as much of the built-up area lay outside the contemporary boundaries of the borough; the total population was actually 10,117. Swansea's population was later overtaken by Merthyr in 1821 and by Cardiff in 1881, although in the latter year Swansea once again surpassed Merthyr.[18] Much of Swansea's growth was due to migration from within and beyond Wales - in 1881 more than a third of the borough's population had been born outside Swansea and Glamorgan, and just under a quarter outside Wales.[19] (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Glamorgan or Glamorganshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... Merthyr Tydfil (Welsh: ) is a town and county borough in Wales, with a population of about 55,000. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Through the 20th century, heavy industries in the town declined, leaving the Lower Swansea Valley filled with derelict works and mounds of waste products from them. The Lower Swansea Valley Scheme (which still continues) reclaimed much of the land: the present Enterprise Zone was the result, and of the many original docks, only those outside the city continue to work as docks; North Dock is now Parc Tawe and South Dock became the Marina. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... The Swansea Enterprise Park (Welsh: ) in Swansea, was the first enterprise zone in the United Kingdom, and the largest. ... The Maritime Quarter is a residential area of Swansea, South Wales located immediately South of the City Centre. ...


Little city centre evidence, beyond parts of the road layout, remains from medieval Swansea; its industrial importance made it the target of bombing, known as the Blitz in World War II, and the centre was flattened completely. ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

Swansea's Maritime Quarter
Swansea's Maritime Quarter

Whilst the city itself has a long history, many of the city centre buildings are post-war as much of the original centre was destroyed by World War II bombing on the 19th, 20th and 21st of February 1941 (the 'Three Nights Blitz').[20] Within the city centre, are the ruins of the castle, the Marina, the Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, Swansea Museum, the Dylan Thomas Centre, the Environmental Centre, and the Market, which is the largest covered market in Wales.[21] It backs onto the Quadrant shopping centre which opened in 1978 and the adjoining St David's Centre opened in 1982. Other notable modern buildings are the BT Tower (formerly the GPO tower) built around 1970, Alexandra House built in 1976, County Hall built in 1982. Swansea Leisure Centre opened in 1977; it has undergone extensive refurbishment which retained elements of the original structure and re-opened in March 2008. Behind it stands the National Waterfront Museum, opened in October 2005. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2250x1686, 178 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2250x1686, 178 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Maritime Quarter is a residential area of Swansea, South Wales located immediately South of the City Centre. ... Swansea Castle was founded by Henry de Beaumont in 1106 as the caput of the lordship of Gower. ... The Dylan Thomas Centre is an arts centre located in Swansea, Wales. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Waterfront Museum, Swansea or NWMS (Welsh:Amgueddfa genedlaethol y glannau) is a museum situated in Swansea, Wales, forming part of the National Museums and Galleries of Wales (NMGW). ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in October 28: Richard Smalley 26: Emil Kyulev 24: José Azcona del Hoyo 24: Rosa Parks 23: Stella Obasanjo 22: Liam Lawlor 22: Shirley Horn 20: Endon Mahmood 17: Ba Jin 10: Milton Obote 7: Charles...


On 27 June 1906, one of the strongest earthquakes ever recorded in the UK during the twentieth century struck Swansea with a strength of 5.2 on the Richter Scale. Earthquakes in the UK very rarely cause any structural damage as most occur away from heavily populated areas, but with the earthquake centred on Swansea many taller buildings were damaged.[22] is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ...


Culture

Brangwyn Hall main entrance
Brangwyn Hall main entrance
See also: List of cultural venues in Swansea and List of Swansea people

The Royal Institution of South Wales was founded in 1835 as the Swansea Literary and Philosophical Society. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 775 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1238 pixel, file size: 274 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Swansea Brangwyn Hall... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 775 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1238 pixel, file size: 274 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Swansea Brangwyn Hall... This is a list of cultural venues in the City and County of Swansea, Wales. ... This is a list of some people of note and of some notable individuals born in Swansea, alphabetically within categories. ... The Royal Institution of South Wales is an Welsh learned society founded in Swansea in 1835 as the Swansea Philosophical and Literary Society with objectives: The Cultivation and Advancement of the various Branches of Natural History, as well as the Local History of the Town and Neighbourhood, the Extension and... The Royal Institution of South Wales is an Welsh learned society founded in Swansea in 1835 as the Swansea Philosophical and Literary Society with objectives: The Cultivation and Advancement of the various Branches of Natural History, as well as the Local History of the Town and Neighbourhood, the Extension and...


Performing arts

Swansea Grand Theatre
Swansea Grand Theatre

There are a number of theatres in the city and the surrounding areas. The Grand Theatre in the centre of the city is a Victorian theatre which celebrated its centenary in 1997 and which has a capacity of a little over a thousand people. It was opened by the celebrated opera singer Adelina Patti and was refurbished from 1983-1987. The annual programme ranges from pantomime and drama to opera and ballet. A new wing of the Grand, the Arts Wing, has a studio suitable for smaller shows, with a capacity of about 200. The Taliesin building on the university campus has a theatre, opened in 1984. Other theatres include the Dylan Thomas Theatre (formerly the Little Theatre) near the marina, and one in Penyrheol Leisure Centre near Gorseinon. In the summer, outdoor Shakespeare performances are a regular feature at Oystermouth Castle, and Singleton Park is the venue for a number of parties and concerts, from dance music to outdoor Proms. Although Pontardawe is outside the city boundaries, the trip from Swansea to Pontardawe for the annual folk festival is a short one. Another folk festival is held on Gower.[23] Standing near Victoria Park on the coast road is the Patti Pavilion; this was the Winter Garden from Adelina Patti's Craig-y-Nos estate in the upper Swansea valley, which she donated to the town in 1918. It is used as a venue for music shows and fairs. The Brangwyn Hall is a multi-use venue with events such as the graduation ceremonies for Swansea University. Every autumn, Swansea hosts a Festival of Music and the Arts, when international orchestras and soloists visit the Brangwyn Hall. The Brangwyn Hall is praised for its acoustics for recitals, orchestral pieces and chamber music alike.[24]. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Grand Theatre is the most well known venue in Swansea for the performing arts located in the heart of the city. ... Patti as Marguerite in Faust, 1875. ... Owned and managed by the University of Wales, Swansea, Taliesin Arts Centre is a very popular venue presenting a wide variety of performances & exhibitions. ... This article is about the year. ... Gorseinon is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a town in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... Oystermouth Castle Oystermouth Castle is located overlooking Swansea Bay on the east side of the Gower Peninsula near the Welsh village of Mumbles. ... Sketty name of an electoral ward, a community and a suburb in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... A Promenade concert in the Royal Albert Hall, 2004. ... Looking north over Pontardawe Pontardawe (Welsh for bridge on the River Tawe) is a town in the Swansea valley (Welsh: Cwmtawe) in the county borough of Neath Port Talbot, traditional county of Glamorgan, south Wales. ... Brangwyn Hall Entrance The Brangwyn Hall (Welsh: ) is a concert venue in Swansea. ...


Swansea hosted the National Eisteddfod in 1863, 1891, 1907, 1926, 1964, 1982 and 2006. The 2006 event occupied the site of the former Velindre tinplate works to the north of the city and featured a strikingly pink main tent. The Eisteddfod (literally sitting) is a Welsh festival of literature, music, and song. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Welsh language

There are many Welsh-language chapels and churches in the area. Welsh-medium education is a popular and growing choice for both English- and Welsh-speaking parents, leading to claims in the local press in autumn 2004 that to accommodate demand, the council planned to close an English-medium school in favour of opening a new Welsh-medium school.[25] Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...


45% of the rural council ward Mawr speak Welsh, as do 38% of the ward of Pontarddulais. Clydach, Kingsbridge and Upper Loughor all have levels of more than 20%. By contrast, the urban St. Thomas has one of the lowest figures in Wales, at 6.4%, a figure only barely lower than Penderry and Townhill wards.[26] This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Pontarddulais is a name of an electoral ward and community of the City and county of Swansea, south Wales. ... Clydach is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a town in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... The electoral ward of Kingsbridge, City and County of Swansea, South Wales, consists of some or all of the following areas, Fforest, Hendy, Bolgoed, Crofty, Gorseinon, Gowerton, Grovesend, Llanmorlais, Loughor, Pen-clawdd, Penllergaer, Pentrebach, Pontardulais, Pontlliw, Poundffald, Three Crosses, Cadle, Cockett, Felindre, Fforest-fach, Llangyfelach, Tirdeunaw, Waunarlwydd. ... The electoral ward of Upper Loughor, City and County of Swansea, South Wales consists of some or all of the following areas, Fforest, Hendy, Bolgoed, Crofty, Gorseinon, Gowerton, Grovesend, Llanmorlais, Loughor, Pen-clawdd, Penllergaer, Pentrebach, Pontardulais, Pontlliw, Poundffald, Three Crosses. ... St. ... Penderry is the name of an electoral ward and a community in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... Townhill is the name of an electoral ward, a community and a suburban district in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ...


Notable people

People from Swansea are known locally as Swansea Jacks, or just Jacks. The source of this nickname is not clear. Some attribute it to Swansea Jack, the life-saving dog. Others point to Swansea's history as a port and the use of the word jack to indicate a sailor. Swansea Jack was a legendary dog, whose name lives on in the nickname given to natives of Swansea, Wales. ...


On the literary stage, the poet Dylan Thomas is perhaps the best-known. He was born in the town and grew up at 5 Cwmdonkin Drive, Uplands. There is a memorial to him in the nearby Cwmdonkin Park; his take on Swansea was that it was a "ugly lovely town". In the 1930s Thomas was a key member of a group of local artists, writers and musicians known as The Kardomah Gang. Dylan Marlais Thomas (27 October 1914 - 9 November 1953) was a Welsh poet. ... Cwmdonkin Park is an urban park situated in the Uplands area of Swansea, south Wales. ... The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the [[. In East Asia, the rise of militarism occurred. ... The Kardomah Gang was the name given to the various artists, musicians, poets and other writers, which frequented the Kardomah Café on Swanseas High Street, Wales, c. ...


Other former residents include:

Ivor John Allchurch MBE (October 16, 1929 - July 10, 1997) was a Welsh footballer. ... Keith Philip George Allen (born 2 June 1953) is a Welsh comedian, actor, singer and writer. ... Mary Balogh (rhymes with Kellogg, born Mary Jenkins on 1944 in Swansea, Wales) is a British-Canadian historical romance novelist. ... Rob Brydon (born Robert Brydon Jones, 3 May 1965, Swansea[1]) is a Welsh Actor, comedian and impressionist most famous for his role as Keith Barret in the BBC comedy Marion and Geoff and its spin-off The Keith Barret Show, as well as the host of panel quiz Rob... John Charles in his 2nd period as a Leeds United player John Charles, CBE (27 December 1931 – 21 February 2004) was a Welsh football player. ... Melvyn Charles (born 14 May 1935) is a Welsh former professional footballer. ... Christopher Coleman (born 10 June 1970, Swansea, Wales) is a football manager and former footballer. ... Robert Croft (born 25 May 1970) is an English cricketer. ... Mervyn Davies (Born 1946, Swansea)is a former Welsh Rugby player. ... Russell T Davies, interviewed for the documentary series Doctor Who Confidential in 2005. ... Charles Fisher (November 21st, 1914, Swansea - January 23rd, Bangkok) was a Welsh writer and poet. ... We dont have an article called Mike Gibbins Start this article Search for Mike Gibbins in. ... James Henry Govier was born on 1st August 1910, at Oakley, Buckinghamshire, the only son of Henry Govier and Mary Ann Govier (nee Measey). ... William Peter Ham (April 27, 1947 – April 23, 1975) was a Welsh singer and songwriter, best known as the leader of the ill-fated group Badfinger. ... John Hartson (born April 5, 1975, in Swansea, Wales) is a professional footballer,currently playing for Norwich City on loan from West Bromwich Albion. ... Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British businessman and Conservative Party politician. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Ian Hislop (born 13 July 1960) is the editor of British satirical magazine Private Eye, a team captain on the popular satirical current affairs quiz Have I Got News for You and a comedy scriptwriter. ... Swansea Jack was a legendary dog, whose name lives on in the nickname given to natives of Swansea, Wales. ... Leighton James born 16 February 1953 in Loughor, Glamorgan, Wales is a retired professional footballer. ... Robert Mark James (born Swansea, Wales, March 23, 1957, died February 18, 1998) was a Welsh international footballer who played for many teams including Swansea City, Stoke City and QPR. He was a talented utility player who contributed greatly to Swansea Citys rise from the Fourth Division to the... Alfred Janes (1911 - February, 1999) was a Welsh artist, best known as a member of the circle of Dylan Thomas. ... Andrew Jones (born in Whitby on September 6, 1988) is a Canadian counter-strike player. ... Daniel Jones (December 7, 1912 - April 23, 1993) was a Welsh composer of classical music. ... Jack Kelsey (November 19, 1929 – ?? March 1992) was a Welsh football goalkeeper. ... This article is about the former Welsh cricketer. ... Enzo Maccarinelli (born August 20, 1980 in Swansea, Wales) is a professional boxer in the cruiserweight division. ... Sir John Royden Maddox (born November 27, 1925 in Penllergaer, Swansea), a trained chemist and physicist, is a prominent science writer. ... Man are a legendary rock band from south Wales, originally the second incarnation of Welsh rock harmony group The Bystanders: Micky Jones, Clive John, Ray Williams and Jeffrey Jones. ... Sean Gerard Mathias (born 14 March 1956) is a British theatre director, film director, writer and actor. ... Terry Medwin (born 25 September 1932 in Swansea) is a former Welsh footballer. ... Andy Melville (born 29 November 1968 in Swansea, Wales) is a former Welsh professional football player. ... Richard Moriarty is a former international Wales rugby union player. ... Beau Nash (1674-1762), as Richard Nash was always known, was a celebrated dandy and leader of fashion in 18th century Britain. ... Alan Petherbridge (Born: 10 Sep 1927) Olympic athlete, and is a 9th dan Judo pratitioner, one of only four in the world. ... Dewi Phillips late in life. ... Flapdragon 16:02, 8 October 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Craig Quinnell (born July 9, 1975, Swansea) is a rugby player who plays for the Cardiff Blues and Wales. ... Scott Quinnell (born 20 August 1972 in Swansea) is a former Welsh international rugby union player, who was a Number 8 for Wales, Llanelli RFC, the Llanelli Scarlets and the Lions. ... Ceri Richards (1903 - November 9, 1971), was a Welsh painter. ... Dean Saunders (born 21 June 1964 in Swansea) was a Welsh footballer and was a prolific forward. ... Sir Harry Donald Secombe, CBE (8 September 1921–11 April 2001) was a Welsh entertainer with a noted fine tenor singing voice and a talent for comedy. ... // The Storys are a six piece band from South Wales who formed in Spring 2003. ... Haydn Tanner (born 9 January 1917 in Penclawdd) is a former Welsh rugby union player who also played for the British and Irish Lions. ... Gary Taylor (born October 14, 1961) is a former strongman from Wales who won the Worlds Strongest Man contest in 1993. ... Wynford Vaughan-Thomas (1908-1987) was born Wynford Lewis John Thomas in Swansea in 1908. ... Vernon Watkins (1906 – 1967) was a Welsh poet, and a painter. ... For the English boxer, see Rowan Anthony Williams. ... Shane Mark Williams (born 26 February 1977 in Swansea) is a Welsh rugby union player who plays as a wing for the Ospreys club and Wales but who can also play scrum-half or fly-half. ... Terry Williams (born 1948) is a Welsh rock drummer, whose resume includes Paul McCartney, BB King, and Bob Dylan. ... Catherine Zeta-Jones (born 25 September 1969) is an Academy Award-winning Welsh actress based in the United States. ...

Sport

Further information: Swansea City A.F.C., Swansea RFC and Ospreys (rugby team) for more about Swansea's major sports clubs

There are a number of sporting venues in Swansea. St Helen's is a cricket and rugby ground. It is the home of Swansea RFC and Glamorgan County Cricket Club play some matches there.[1] It was in this ground that Sir Garfield Sobers hit six sixes in one over: the first time this was achieved in a game of first-class cricket. The final ball landed on the ground past the Cricketers' pub just outside the ground.[27] The stadium is metres from the coast of Swansea Bay. Strong local rivalries exist between Swansea and Cardiff in football and between Swansea and Llanelli in rugby. Swansea City AFC (Welsh: Clwb Pêl-droed Dinas Abertawe) is a Welsh football team currently playing in the Football League League One. ... Swansea Rugby Football Club is a Welsh rugby union team which plays in the Welsh Premier Division. ... Official website www. ... St Helens Rugby and Cricket Ground is a world famous spectator sports venue in Swansea, Wales. ... Swansea Rugby Football Club is a Welsh rugby union team which plays in the Welsh Premier Division. ... Glamorgan County Cricket Club is one of the 18 major county clubs which make up the English and Welsh domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county of Glamorgan aka Glamorganshire (Welsh: ). Glamorgan CCC is the only Welsh first-class cricket club. ... For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket portal. ... A first-class cricket match is one of three or more days duration between two sides of eleven players officially adjudged first-class. ... Current season Cardiff City Football Club (Welsh: Clwb Pêl-droed Dinas Caerdydd) is a football team based in Cardiff. ... Official website www. ...


Swansea has three clubs that play in Welsh Football League - Garden Village, Morriston Town and West End. Swansea also has one of the largest Saturday local football leagues in the country, second only to the one in Birmingham at its peak.[citation needed] The Welsh Football League is a club football league in Wales, immediately below the Welsh Premier League in the Welsh football league system. ... Garden Village Football Club is a football club, based in Swansea, south west Wales and currently playing in the Second Division of the Welsh Football League. ... West End Football Club are a football team, based in Swansea, and play in the Second Division of the Welsh Football League. ...

Swansea City A.F.C. moved from the Vetch Field to the new Liberty Stadium at the start of the 2005-2006 season, winning promotion to League One in their final year at their old home. The first game at the new stadium was a football friendly against Fulham which ended 1-1 on 23 July. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x603, 297 KB) This file has been released into the by its author, Alexander Jones. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x603, 297 KB) This file has been released into the by its author, Alexander Jones. ... The Liberty Stadium, formerly the New Stadium and White Rock, is a purpose-built sports and concert arena and conferencing venue in the Landore area of Swansea, Wales. ... Swansea City F.C. are a Welsh football team currently playing in Football League Two. ... Official website www. ... Swansea City AFC (Welsh: Clwb Pêl-droed Dinas Abertawe) is a Welsh football team currently playing in the Football League League One. ... The Liberty Stadium, formerly the New Stadium and White Rock, is a purpose-built sports and concert arena and conferencing venue in the Landore area of Swansea, Wales. ... Current season For details on the current season, see Fulham F.C. season 2007-08 Fulham Football Club are an English football team based in Fulham, in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2003, Swansea RFC merged with Neath RFC to form the Neath-Swansea Ospreys rugby club. Swansea RFC remain at St Helen's in semi-professional form, but the Ospreys moved to the then-named New Stadium in Landore for the start of the 2005-2006 season. The final Ospreys match at St Helen's was played on the same day as the final Swans league game at the Vetch on 30 April 2005. Neath-Swansea rugby games used to be hotly-contested matches, such that there was some debate about whether a team incorporating both areas was possible. In fact the Neath-Swansea Ospreys seem to be the most successful club since Welsh rugby's reorganisation and came fifth in the Celtic League in their first year of existence and won that league in their second year. Swansea Rugby Football Club is a Welsh rugby union team which plays in the Welsh Premier Division. ... Official website www. ... Official website www. ... The Liberty Stadium, formerly the New Stadium and White Rock, is a purpose-built sports and concert arena and conferencing venue in the Landore area of Swansea, Wales. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Celtic League, currently known as the Magners League for sponsorship reasons, is an annual rugby union competition involving regional sides from Ireland, Scotland and Wales. ...


Swansea's rugby league side play seven miles out of the county in the small town of Ystalyfera. They are known as the Swansea Valley Miners but were formed as the Swansea Bulls in 2002. Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Mynydd Y Ddarren Ystalyfera (Grid reference SN767089) is a rural village in the of South Wales, UK. It is situated on the River Tawe in the County of Neath Port Talbot, or more traditionally, West Glamorgan. ...


The Swansea Bowls Stadium opened in early 2008. The stadium will host the World Indoor Singles and Mixed Pairs Championship from 16 April to 20 April 2008.


Religion

Swansea, like Wales in general, has seen many non-conformist religious revivals. In 1904, Evan Roberts, a miner from Loughor (Llwchwr), just outside Swansea, was the leader of what has been called one of the world's greatest Protestant religious revivals. Within a few months about 100,000 people were converted. This revival in particular had a profound effect on Welsh society. The "Welsh Revival" of 1904 is acknowledged as having been an instigator of, and a major influence on the twentieth century's Pentecostal movement. One of its first overseas influences was seen in the African American church: the Azusa Street Revival, beginning 9 April 1906 at Los Angeles, USA. It has been said that 25% of the world's Christians (usually Protestant Pentecostals or Charismatics) are Christians as a direct result of the 1904 revival in Swansea. Evan John Roberts (June 8, 1878-September 29, 1951), was a leading figure of the 1904-1905 Welsh Revival who suffered many set-backs in his later life. ... Loughor (Welsh: Casllwchwr) is a town in the city of Swansea, traditional county of Glamorgan, south Wales. ...


Governance

City and County of Swansea Guildhall
City and County of Swansea Guildhall

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (828x615, 29 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (828x615, 29 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Local government

Main article: City and County of Swansea council

Traditionally, Swansea refers to the City of Swansea which is the settlement around the Tawe estuary. Today it also refers to one of the Subdivisions of Wales under the name of the 'City and County of Swansea' (Welsh: Dinas a Sir Abertawe).[28] the River Tawe is a river in south Wales which meets the sea at Swansea (Abertawe in Welsh). ... For local government purposes, Wales is divided into 22 unitary authorities. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...


Swansea was once a staunch Labour stronghold. Up until 2004, they had overrall control of Swansea for 24 years.[29] The Liberal Democrats are the largest group in the administration that took control of Swansea Council in the 2004 local elections. For 2007/2008, the Lord Mayor of Swansea is councillor Susan Waller. The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ...


Welsh politics

The National Assembly constituencies are: Established 1999 by the Government of Wales Act 1998 Presiding Officer Lord Elis-Thomas AM (Plaid) Since May 12, 1999 Deputy Presiding Officer Rosemary Butler AM (Lab) Leader of the House Carwyn Jones AM (Lab) Chief Executive and Clerk to the Assembly Claire Clancy Political parties 6 Welsh Labour (26...

The city is also part of the South Wales West regional constituency and is served by Peter Black AM, Alun Cairns AM, Dai Lloyd AM and Bethan Jenkins AM. Gower is a constituency of the National Assembly for Wales. ... Edwina Hart (born 1957) is the the Welsh Assembly Government Minister for Social Justice and Regeneration. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Swansea East is a constituency of the National Assembly for Wales. ... Valerie (Val) Lloyd born in Swansea, is a Welsh Labour Party politician who has been a Member of the National Assembly for Wales for Swansea East since 2001. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Swansea West is a constituency of the National Assembly for Wales. ... Andrew Davies (born 5 May 1952 in Hereford) is a Labour politician; currently Minister for Finance and Public Service Delivery in the Welsh Assembly Government and member for the constituency of Swansea West in the National Assembly for Wales. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... South Wales West is an electoral region of the National Assembly for Wales, consisting of seven constituencies. ... Peter Black (born 1960) is a Welsh Liberal Democrat politician, and Member of the Welsh Assembly for South Wales West Region. ... Alun Cairns is a member of the National Assembly for Wales for the Welsh Conservative Party in the South Wales West region. ... Dr David Rhys Lloyd (known as Dai Lloyd) (born in Tywyn, Gwynedd, 1956) is a Welsh politician. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


UK politics

The UK parliamentary constituencies in Swansea are: Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist...

Gower is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Martin Caton (born June 15, 1951) is a Welsh Labour politician. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Swansea East is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Siân Catherine James (born June 24, 1959, Morriston, Swansea) is the Labour MP for Swansea East. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Swansea West is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Alan John Williams (born 14 October 1930, Caerphilly) is a Welsh politician and Labour Member of Parliament for Swansea West since the 1964 general election. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...

International links

The City & County of Swansea is twinned with: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Connections with: Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Mannheim is a city in Germany. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Aquitaine Region flag Coat of arms The location of Pau is shown on this map of the historical and cultural area of Gascony. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... This article is about the city in the Republic of Ireland. ...

Friendship link with: Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Ferrara is a city in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, capital city of the province of Ferrara. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... The cityhall of Ã…rhus. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Nantong (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; former names: Nan-tung, Nantung, Tungzhou, or Tungchow) is a prefecture-level city in Jiangsu province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

Future plans

Swansea City Centre is undergoing a transformation until 2015. £1 Billion are to be spent on improvements. A large area of the city is earmarked to be redeveloped with companies planning a new area of the city centre which would involve the demolition of the dilapidated St Davids shopping centre which has three or four traders, about 13% of the retail space in the centre and the Quadrant Shopping Centre. The result of this and the relocation of the Tesco Superstore near to the city's Sainsbury's store in Parc Tawe would mean that the new Centre would be almost four times the size of the Quadrant Centre. The city centre is also being brightened up with street art and new walkways along with the first phase of the David Evans - Castle Street development. Green spaces are also being added along with the further addition of Quadrant Square and Grand Theatre Square which are planned. Redevopment of the Oxford Street car park and Lower Oxford Street arcades are also planned.[30]


At the sea front, Meridian Quay is now Wales's tallest building at a height of over 80 metres; upon completion in 2009 it is planned to be 107 metres in height. It is still under construction adjacent Swansea Marina. [31] The Maritime Quarter is a residential area of Swansea, South Wales located immediately south of the city centre. ...


Economy

The Technium centre, one of the first of the new buildings built as part of the SA1 development scheme at Swansea Docks
The Technium centre, one of the first of the new buildings built as part of the SA1 development scheme at Swansea Docks
Main article: Economy of Swansea

Swansea originally developed as centre for metals and mining, especially the copper industry, from the beginning of the 18th century. The industry reached its apogee in the 1880s, when 60% of the copper ores imported to Britain were smelted in the Lower Swansea valley. However, by the end of the Second World War these heavy industries were in decline, and over the post-war decades Swansea shared in the general trend towards a post-industrial, service sector economy. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... Swansea Docks is an Atlantic shipping port in Swansea, south Wales. ... Swansea initially grew as a centre of the metallurgical industry in the 18th century. ... For alternative meanings see metal (disambiguation). ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... The Lower Swansea valley is a term widely used to describe the lower half of the valley of the River Tawe from approximately the level of Clydach down to Swansea Docks. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... A post-industrial society is a proposed name for an economy that has undergone a specific series of changes in structure after a process of industrialization. ... The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ...


Today, the most important economic sectors in Swansea are public administration, education and health; distribution, hotels and restaurants; and banking, finance and insurance. Much large scale private sector economic activity in the city consists of either manufacturing, call centres or other commercial back office functions including outsourcing. In addition to being a holiday resort, Swansea is also a commercial centre, and the recently regenerated dock areas are home to some cutting-edge hi-tech industries. One of the best-known employers in Swansea is the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency. Relative to the UK as a whole, Swansea (and Wales) lacks high quality professional and managerial jobs in the private sector, reflecting a phenomenon often described as a 'branch factory' economy where companies locate production or service delivery facilities in one area while placing head office functions elsewhere. However, while average earnings in Swansea are below the Welsh and UK figures, this does not necessarily reflect a gap in living standards since the cost of living varies geographically. Public Administration can be broadly described as the development, implementation and study of government policy. ... Health care or healthcare is one of the worlds largest and fastest growing professions. ... Look up distribution in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A hotel is an establishment that provides lodging, usually on a short-term basis. ... A typical restaurant in uptown Manhattan A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to be consumed on the premises. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... The field of finance refers to the concepts of time, money and risk and how they are interelated. ... The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company is one of the largest New York based life insurance companies Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ... The private sector of a nations economy consists of all that is outside the state. ... Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... A call centre (Commonwealth English) or call center (AmE) is a centralised office of a company that answers incoming telephone calls from customers or that makes outgoing telephone calls to customers (telemarketing). ... Office types Class A office space Back office Front office Mobile office Paperless office Serviced office Small office/home office Virtual office A back office is a part of most corporations where tasks dedicated to running the company itself take place. ... Outsourcing is subcontracting a process, such as product design or manufacturing, to a third-party company. ... The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (the DVLA) is an agency of the Department for Transport in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about people called professionals. ... For other uses, see Management (disambiguation). ... Head Office is a 1985 comedy film. ... Income, generally defined, is the money that is received as a result of the normal business activities of an individual or a business. ... The Standard of living refers to the quality and quantity of goods and services available to people. ... For other uses, see The Cost of Living. ...


Education

The Swansea observatory
The Swansea observatory

Swansea University has a campus in Singleton Park overlooking Swansea Bay. Its engineering department is recognised as a centre of excellence with pioneering work on computational techniques for solving engineering design problems.[32] The Department of Physics is renowned for its research achievements at the frontiers of Theoretical Physics, particularly in the areas of Elementary Particle Physics and String Theory. And many other departments such as History and German were awarded an "Excellent" in the last inspection. The university was awarded the Times Higher Education Supplement Award for the UK's "best student experience" in 2005.[33] Other establishments for further and higher education in the city include Swansea Metropolitan University and Swansea College, with Gorseinon College seven miles outside the city. Swansea Metropolitan University (formerly Swansea Institute of Higher Education) is particularly well-known for its Architectural Glass department; stained glass being a long time speciality. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Swansea obsevatory The Swansea observatory (also known as the Marina Towers Observatory) is located in the Maritime Quarter of Swansea, south Wales. ... Swansea University (Welsh: Prifysgol Abertawe) is located in Swansea, Wales, United Kingdom. ... Sketty name of an electoral ward, a community and a suburb in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... HIStory – Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double album by American singer Michael Jackson released in June 1995 and remains Jacksons most conflicting and controversial release. ... Swansea College Logo Swansea College is a further education college in Swansea. ... Coleg Gorseinon College Logo Coleg Gorseinon College was established in 1955 as a mining college for the local area, by 1982 the college became a tertiary college and was incorporated in 1993. ...


In the local authority area, there is one nursery school; six infant schools and five junior schools. There are 77 primary schools, nine of which are Welsh-Medium, and six of which are voluntary aided. There are 15 comprehensive schools under the remit of the local education authority, of which two are Welsh-medium. In addition, there are six special schools.[34] Medium of instruction is the language that is used in teaching. ...


The oldest school in Swansea is Bishop Gore School. The largest comprehensive school in Swansea is the Olchfa School. There is one Roman Catholic comprehensive school in the county - Bishop Vaughan Catholic Comprehensive School. The Welsh medium schools are Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Gŵyr and Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Bryn Tawe. Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Bryn Tawe opened in 2003, and is one of the leading schools in Britain in all aspects of education with its advanced technology.[citation needed] Bishop Gore is a secondary school in Swansea, Wales established in 1682. ... Olchfa School is the largest comprehensive school in Swansea, south Wales. ... Ysgol Bryn Tawe is a Welsh-language comprehensive school based in Penlan, Swansea, southwest Wales, that opened in 2003. ...


Independent schools in Swansea include Ffynone House School, Oakleigh House School and Craig-y-Nos School. Ffynone House School is a posh secondary school in Swansea where posh families send their posh children. ...


Local media

The local newspaper is the South Wales Evening Post. There is also a local free newspaper called the Swansea Herald, along with the local papur bro (Welsh-language newspaper) called Wilia. The South Wales Evening Post is a newspaper that serves the south of Wales. ... The Swansea Herald of Wales is a free local weekly newspaper distributed in the Swansea area of south Wales. ...


Swansea is served by three local radio stations, The Wave on 96.4 FM, Swansea Sound on 1170 AM and Swansea Bay Radio on 102.1 FM. Swansea University also run its own radio station, Xtreme Radio, on 1431 AM. The area is also covered by the two South Wales regional station - Real Radio on 106.0 FM and Xfm South Wales on 107.3 FM, as well as by the national services - BBC Radio Wales on 93.9 FM and Welsh language service BBC Radio Cymru on 104.2 FM. 96. ... Swansea Sound is a radio station based in Swansea, Wales. ... Swansea Bay Radio is an independent local radio station (ILR) located in Swansea, Wales, UK. It launched on 5 November 2006. ... Xtreme Radio is the official name for the radio station run by Swansea University Students Union. ... Approximate extent of South East Wales. ... Real Radio is a brand of regional radio stations in the United Kingdom owned by GMG Radio. ... Xfm South Wales is a regional radio station broadcasting alternative music to the South Wales area from Cardiff where it is based with sister station Red Dragon. ... BBC Radio Wales is the BBCs national radio station broadcasting to Wales in the English language. ... BBC Radio Cymru is BBC Wales Welsh language radio station, broadcasting throughout Wales on FM since 1979. ...


Swansea is one of the few regions in Wales with reasonable digital radio coverage,[35] and this was improved further in January 2005 with the launch of the Swansea DAB multiplex, which carries seven services including The Wave, Swansea Sound, BBC Radio Wales and BBC Radio Cymru. The regional services Real Radio and Xfm South Wales are available digitally in the area via the MXR Severn Estuary multiplex. Digital radio is also broadcast via the Astra Satellite[36] and terrestrial freeview Radio Wales and others can be received this way. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB), also known as Eureka 147, is a technology for broadcasting of audio using digital radio transmission. ... MXR Severn Estuary is a regional commercial digital radio multiplex in the United Kingdom, which serves the West of England and South Wales, including Bristol, Bath, Weston-super-Mare, Cardiff, Newport, Swansea, the South Wales Valleys and north Somerset. ...


Swansea is primarily served terrestrially by the Kilvey Hill transmitter, which provides digital terrestrial TV and DAB as well as analogue radio and TV. It is also in the catchment area of the Wenvoe transmitter (based in the Vale of Glamorgan) and the Carmel transmitter in Carmarthenshire. Shot from Trawler Road in the Maritime Quarter with Kilvey Hill in the background Kilvey Hill is a hill to the east of Swansea city centre. ... Wenvoe Transmitter The transmitter seen in the distance from Barry The Wenvoe transmitting station is a facility for broadcasting and telecommunications situated at Culverhouse Cross, Wenvoe in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales in the UK. It comprises a 225 metre (738 ft) guyed mast with antennas attached at various heights... For other uses, see Vale of Glamorgan (disambiguation). ... Carmarthenshire (Welsh: ) is a one of thirteen historic counties and a principal area in Wales. ...


Swansea plays host to the BeyondTV Film Festival. BeyondTV is annual event organised by independent filmmakers Undercurrents to showcase the best of activism filmmakers. Independent filmmakers Undercurrents and Studio8 are based in Swansea. Swansea plays host to the BeyondTV International Film Festival. ... An independent film, or indie film, is a film that is produced outside of the studio system. ... Undercurrents is an alternative video news network which began with the UK distribution of videotapes shot by volunteers. ...


Swansea has lately also been host to the annual Swansea Bay Film Festival and past winning directors have included Gareth Evans, Anthony James, Alun D Pughe and Andrew Jones (filmmaker). Andrew Jones (born in Whitby on September 6, 1988) is a Canadian counter-strike player. ...


Swansea has been used as a filming location for the film Twin Town and the TV serials Mine All Mine and Doctor Who.[37] This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ... Mine All Mine was a 2004 television miniseries on Britains ITV1 network. ... This article is about the television series. ...


Public Services

Swansea is policed by the South Wales Police. Their regional headquarters for the Swansea area is Cockett Police station. Ambulance services are provided by the Wales Ambulance Service, and Fire services provided by the Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service. Swansea Airport is one of 3 Wales Air Ambulance bases in Wales along with Welshpool and Caernarfon.[2] Local public healthcare services are operated by Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University NHS Trust who operate two hospitals in Swansea with Accident and Emergency services: Singleton Hospital and Morriston Hospital. Waste management services are coordinated by the local council which deals with refuse collection and recycling, and operate 5 civic amenity sites. The electricity distribution network operator supplying Swansea is Western Power Distribution. Welsh Water provides drinking water supply and wastewater services to Swansea. There is a water treatment works at Crymlyn Burrows. Reservoirs which supply Swansea include the Cray reservoir and the Lliw Reservoirs, which are operated by Welsh Water. South Wales Police (Welsh: ) is one of the four Home Office police forces in Wales. ... The Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service (Welsh Gwasanaeth Tân ac Achub Canolbarth a Gorllewin Cymru) is the fire and rescue service covering the Welsh principal areas of Carmarthenshire, Ceredigion, Neath Port Talbot, Pembrokeshire, Powys and Swansea. ... Swansea Airport (IATA: SWS, ICAO: EGFH) is a minor airport located at Fairwood Common on the Gower Peninsula to the west of Swansea. ... Welshpool Airport (IATA: N/A, ICAO: EGCW) is located 2 nautical miles (3. ... Caernarfon Airport (IATA: N/A, ICAO: EGCK) is located 4 nautical miles (7. ... The emergency department (ED), sometimes termed the emergency room (ER), emergency ward (EW), accident & emergency (A&E) department or casualty department is a hospital or primary care department that provides initial treatment to patients with a broad spectrum of illnesses and injuries, some of which may be life-threatening and... Singleton Hospital is a hospital located in Sketty Lane, Swansea, Wales. ... Morriston Hospital is an 850 bed hospital located in Cwmrhydyceirw near Morriston, south Wales. ... For the company, see Waste Management, Inc. ... A civic amenity site (or CA site)is a facility where the public can dispose of household waste and also often containing recycling points. ... Electricity (from New Latin Ä“lectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ... Distribution Network Operators (DNOs) are companies licenced to distribute electricity in Great Britain by the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets. ... WPD is the trading identity of two electricity distribution companies - WPD South West (operating in South West England) and WPD South Wales (operating in South Wales). ... Dwr Cymru / Welsh Water (DCWW) is a company which supplies drinking water and wastewater services to most of Wales and parts of western England. ... Tap water Mineral Water Water of sufficient quality to serve as drinking water is termed potable water whether it is used as such or not. ... Wastewater is any water that has been adversely affected in quality by anthropogenic influence. ... The Cray Reservoir project was initiated by the Swansea Corporation, in response to increasing water demand from its area; it was completed in 1907. ...


Public order

View of Swansea Bay from the Townhill. The Mumbles can be seen in the distance. The Uplands suburb can be seen in the foreground.
View of Swansea Bay from the Townhill. The Mumbles can be seen in the distance. The Uplands suburb can be seen in the foreground.

There was a high rate of car crime during the 1990s. The BBC has described Swansea as a "black spot for car crime",[38] for example. However, over the past few years, there seems to have been a decline in car crime, possibly due to national media awareness or economic trends. Car crime is a central theme in the film Twin Town, which is set in and around Swansea. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2592x813, 98 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2592x813, 98 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is an inlet of the Bristol Channel lying south of Swansea, Wales. ... Mumbles village, Wales Mumbles (otherwise The Mumbles – Welsh Y Mwmbwls) is an extremely large village and adjacent headland stretching into Swansea Bay. ... The ward of Uplands is located in the city of Swansea. ... This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...


The football violence that Swansea experienced during the 1970s-1990s has considerably reduced, the only major clashes occurring between Swansea City supporters and Cardiff City supporters. Many matches between these sides have ended in violence in both Swansea and Cardiff. These two clubs have a long history of intense rivalry,[39] being described in the media as tribal.


Swansea is also experiencing a growing drug problem, with teenage heroin use on the rise.[40]


Transport

See also: Transport in Wales, History of Swansea, and Wikitravel:Swansea

The M4 motorway crosses though Swansea (junctions 44 to 47 inclusive). The A48, formerly a trunk road, passes through the north of the city centre, through Llansamlet and past Morriston. Park and Ride services are operated from car parks at Landore, Fabian Way and Fforestfach. During busy periods of the year, additional Park and Ride services are operated from the Brynmill recreation ground. This article is about means of transport in Wales. ... The History of Swansea generally refers to the history of the town, not the considerably larger local government area. ... The M4 motorway is a motorway in Great Britain linking London with Wales. ... The A48 is a major trunk road in Britain. ... a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ... The electoral ward of Landore, City and County of Swansea, South Wales, consists of some or all of the following areas, Bon-y-maen, Cwm, Landore, Pentre-chwyth, Swansea, Cadle, Cockett, Felindre, Fforest-fach, Llangyfelach, Tirdeunaw, Waunarlwydd, Clydach, Craigcefnparc, Morriston, Pant-lasau, Plasmarl, Vardre, Ynystawe. ... The council ward of Brynmill is located in the city of Swansea, south Wales. ...


Bus routes within Swansea are predominately by First and Veolia Transport Cymru with most originating from Swansea Bus Station. Veolia Transport Cymru operates the rural services around the Gower peninsula and the Lliw Valley branded Gower Explorer and Lliw Link respectively. First, however, intends to introduce a service of 37-seater[41] hybrid buses on one set route between Morriston Hospital and the Civic Centre, which will supposedly speed up journeys and minimise delays by having passengers pay for their tickets at bus stops before boarding. First operates a shuttle bus (Service 100) to Cardiff Central bus station calling at Bridgend Designer Outlet. Swansea is on the X40 Cardiff to Aberystwyth TrawsCambria bus route connecting the west and south of Wales. National Express serves Swansea operating eastbound to Heathrow Airport, Gatwick Airport, London, Birmingham, Cardiff and Bristol, and westbound to Llanelli, Carmarthen and Haverfordwest. First Cymru Buses Ltd. ... Veolia Transport Cymru is a division of the Veolia Transport group. ... The Quadrant Bus Station is the main bus public-transport hub for Swansea, south Wales. ... Veolia Transport Cymru is a division of the Veolia Transport group. ... First Cymru Buses Ltd. ... Morriston Hospital is an 850 bed hospital located in Cwmrhydyceirw near Morriston, south Wales. ... First Cymru Buses Ltd. ... The east end of Cardiff Central Bus Station Cardiff Central Bus Station is the only bus station in Cardiff, Wales. ... The McArthur Glen Bridgend Designer Outlet is a commercial development in Bridgend, Wales, United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... , Aberystwyth (IPA: , South Welsh: ) (in English: Mouth of the Ystwyth) is a historic market town, administrative centre and holiday resort within Ceredigion, Wales. ... TrawsCambria is a brand name applied to a network of long- and middle-distance express bus routes in Wales which are sponsored by the Welsh Assembly Government. ... National Express coach on route 561 National Express is the brand under which the majority of long distance bus and coach services in the United Kingdom are marketed, and also the company that manages this network and operates some of the services. ... London Heathrow Airport (IATA airport code: LHR, ICAO airport code: EGLL, and often simply Heathrow) is the United Kingdoms busiest and best-connected airport. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA Airport Code: LGW, ICAO Airport Code: EGKK) is Londons second airport and the second largest airport in the UK after Heathrow. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British city. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the English city. ... For the parliamentary constituency of Llanelli, see Llanelli (UK Parliament constituency) For the Llanelli Rural area, see Llanelli Rural Llanelli (English: ), the largest town in the county of Carmarthenshire and West Wales, sits on the Burry estuary on the west Wales coast, approximately 13 miles west of the city of... , Carmarthen (Welsh Caerfyrddin - caer fort + Myrddin Moridunum, Merlin [origin disputed]) is the county town of Carmarthenshire, Wales. ... Haverfordwest (Welsh: Hwlffordd) is the county town of Pembrokeshire, in south-west Wales. ...


There are four dedicated cycle routes in the county area:

  • Swansea Bay: The Maritime Quarter to the Knab Rock near the Mumbles Pier.
  • Clyne Valley Country Park: Blackpill to Gowerton forming part of National Cycle Route 4.
  • Along the east bank of the River Tawe forming the start of National Cycle Route 43, which continues northwards to Builth Wells.
  • Adjacent to the Fabian Way: Forming part of National Cycle Route 4 and extending as the Celtic Trail to Chepstow and (eventually) London.

A new bridge was completed in November 2007 over the Fabian Way. It provides a new express bus-only lane incorporating a shared-use pedestrian and cycle way. The bus lane serves the Fabian Way Park and Ride facility. Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is an inlet of the Bristol Channel lying south of Swansea, Wales. ... The Maritime Quarter is a residential area of Swansea, South Wales located immediately South of the City Centre. ... The Mumbles Pier is a 225m long Victorian pier built in 1898. ... The first section of the NCN to be built was the Bristol and Bath Railway Path, opened in 1984. ... the River Tawe is a river in south Wales which meets the sea at Swansea (Abertawe in Welsh). ... Builth Wells (Welsh: ) is a town in Powys, traditional county of Brecknockshire, mid Wales, lying on the River Wye. ...

Swansea railway station, is located 10 minutes from Swansea Bus Station by foot. Services calling at Swansea operate to Llanelli, Carmarthen, Milford Haven and Haverfordwest, Shrewsbury to the north, and Cardiff Central (for connections to England and beyond), Newport High Street and London Paddington to the east. There are also stations in Gowerton, Llansamlet and in Pontarddulais which are served by Arriva Trains Wales. Image File history File links Swansea-highst-railway. ... Image File history File links Swansea-highst-railway. ... Swansea railway station is the railway station for Swansea, South Wales. ... Swansea railway station is the railway station for Swansea, South Wales. ... The Quadrant Bus Station is the main bus public-transport hub for Swansea, south Wales. ... For the parliamentary constituency of Llanelli, see Llanelli (UK Parliament constituency) For the Llanelli Rural area, see Llanelli Rural Llanelli (English: ), the largest town in the county of Carmarthenshire and West Wales, sits on the Burry estuary on the west Wales coast, approximately 13 miles west of the city of... , Carmarthen (Welsh Caerfyrddin - caer fort + Myrddin Moridunum, Merlin [origin disputed]) is the county town of Carmarthenshire, Wales. ... This article is about the town. ... Haverfordwest (Welsh: Hwlffordd) is the county town of Pembrokeshire, in south-west Wales. ... For other places with the same name, see Shrewsbury (disambiguation). ... Cardiff Central railway station (Welsh: Caerdydd Canolog) is a major British railway station in Cardiff, Wales. ... Paddington station or London Paddington is the name of a major railway station in the Paddington area of London, which is the London terminus for long distance trains to the West of England and South Wales and some West London commuter services. ... Gowerton railway station serves the village of Gowerton, City and County of Swansea. ... Llansamlet railway station is a minor railway station in Llansamlet, City and County of Swansea, Wales. ... Pontarddulais railway station serves the town of Pontarddulais in South Wales. ... Arriva Trains Wales (Welsh: ) is a train operating company that operates urban and inter urban passenger services in Wales and the Welsh Marches. ...


Swansea is served by Cardiff International Airport, 44 miles east, in the Vale of Glamorgan, which provides scheduled domestic and international flights. It is approximately 40 minutes away by road or 70 minutes by rail. Swansea Airport is a minor airport situated in the Gower providing recreational flights only. Further development of the airport is strongly resisted by the local communities and environmental groups. Pembrey Airport, 17 miles to the west offers charter flights to a few European destinations. Cardiff International Airport (Welsh: Maes Awyr Rhyngwladol Caerdydd) (IATA: CWL, ICAO: EGFF) is a major British airport located in the town of Rhoose, Vale of Glamorgan, approximately 12 miles (19 km) south-west of the Welsh capital, Cardiff, serving all of South and Mid Wales. ... For other uses, see Vale of Glamorgan (disambiguation). ... Swansea Airport (IATA: SWS, ICAO: EGFH) is a minor airport located at Fairwood Common on the Gower Peninsula to the west of Swansea. ... Gower redirects here. ... Pembrey Airport is located in Pembrey Carmarthenshire, in Wales. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Mumbles railway and tram

The Swansea and Mumbles Railway was built in 1804 to move limestone from the quarries of Mumbles to Swansea and to the markets beyond. It carried the world's first fare-paying railroad passengers on the day the British Parliament abolished the transportation of slaves from Africa. It later moved from horse power to steam locomotion, and finally converting to electric trams, before closing in January 1960, in favour of motor buses. [2]. At the time of the railway's decommissioning, it had been the world's longest serving railway and it still holds the record for the highest number of forms of traction of any railway in the world - horse-drawn, sail power, steam power, electric power, diesel and petrol. The Swansea and Mumbles Railway was the worlds first public passenger railway[1]. Originally built in 1804 to move limestone from the quarries of Mumbles to Swansea and to the markets beyond, it carried its first passengers on the day the British Parliament abolished the transportation of slaves from... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There are some groups trying to bring trams back to Swansea one example is Trams4Swansea.[42]


Leisure and tourism

Another shot of the marina from Trawler Road
Another shot of the marina from Trawler Road

The beaches at Langland, Caswell and Limeslade are used by swimmers and tourists with children, whereas Swansea Bay tends to attract water-sport enthusiasts. Coastal paths connect most of the Gower bays and Swansea Bay itself, and can attract hikers to the countryside views throughout the year. Although little known on the tourist map, areas north of Swansea offer various panoramas of mountain landscapes. The former fishing village of Mumbles (located on the western edge of Swansea Bay) has a Victorian pier and a number of restaurants, pubs and coffee shops. The promenade at Mumbles offers a panoramic view of Swansea Bay. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1403 KB) Another shot of the Marina taken from a fouth story flat on Trawler Road File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Swansea Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1403 KB) Another shot of the Marina taken from a fouth story flat on Trawler Road File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Swansea Metadata This file... Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is an inlet of the Bristol Channel lying south of Swansea, Wales. ... Mumbles village, Wales Mumbles (otherwise The Mumbles – Welsh Y Mwmbwls) is an extremely large village and adjacent headland stretching into Swansea Bay. ... Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is an inlet of the Bristol Channel lying south of Swansea, Wales. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... The Mumbles Pier is a 225m long Victorian pier built in 1898. ...


Attractions

On the Waterfront [3], Swansea Bay has a five mile (8 km) sweep of coastline which features a beach, promenade, children's lido, leisure pool, marina and maritime quarter featuring the newest and oldest museums in Wales - the National Waterfront Museum and Swansea Museum. Also situated in the maritime quarter is the Dylan Thomas Centre which celebrates the life and work of the author with its permanent exhibition 'Dylan Thomas - Man and Myth'. The centre is also the focal point for the annual Dylan Thomas Festival (27 October - 9 November). The SA1 Waterfront area is the latest development for living, dining and leisure. Swansea Bay, Mumbles and Gower are home to various parks and gardens and almost 20 nature reserves. Clyne Gardens is home to a collection of plants set in parkland and host to 'Clyne in Bloom' in May. Singleton Park has acres of parkland, a botanical garden, a boating lake with pedal boats, and crazy golf. Plantasia is a tropical hothouse pyramid featuring three climatic zones, housing a variety of unusual plants, including several species which are extinct in the wild, and monkeys, reptiles, fish and a butterfly house. Other parks include Cwmdonkin Park, where Dylan Thomas played as a child, and Victoria Park which is close to the promenade on the seafront. The National Waterfront Museum, Swansea or NWMS (Welsh:Amgueddfa genedlaethol y glannau) is a museum situated in Swansea, Wales, forming part of the National Museums and Galleries of Wales (NMGW). ... The Swansea Museum in Swansea is the oldest museum in Wales. ... The Dylan Thomas Centre is an arts centre located in Swansea, Wales. ... Sketty name of an electoral ward, a community and a suburb in the City and County of Swansea, South Wales. ... The Plantasia is a large public greenhouse located in the Parc Tawe retail park, Swansea and is the largest public greenhouse in Wales. ... Cwmdonkin Park is an urban park situated in the Uplands area of Swansea, south Wales. ...


Activities

Swansea has a range of outdoor activities like swimming, sailing, water skiing, surfing, sea angling, canoeing, rowing, hiking and cycling. Part of the Celtic Trail and the National Cycle Network, Swansea Bay provides a range of traffic-free cycle routes including routes along the seafront and through Clyne Valley Country Park. The Cycling Touring Club CTC has a thriving local group in the area [4]. Swansea Bay, Mumbles and Gower have a selection of golf courses. Swansea also attracts surfing, windsurfing, kitesurfing, kite buggying, sailing, canoeing, waterskiing and fishing enthusiasts. Swimmer redirects here. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... // Water skiing began in 1922 when Ralph Samuelson strapped two boards to his feet and rigged a clothesline up to his boat on Lake Pepin in Lake City, Minnesota. ... For other uses, see Surfing (disambiguation). ... Angling. ... Canoeing is the recreational or sporting activity of paddling a canoe or kayak. ... Rowing in the Amstel River by a student rowing club. ... Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... Cycling is the use of bicycles, or - less commonly - unicycles, tricycles, quadricycles and other similar wheeled human powered vehicles (HPVs) as a means of transport, a form of recreation or a sport. ... The Celtic Trail cycle route (NCR 47, 4) is a dedicated cycle route crossing south Wales, covering some 377 miles. ... The first section of the NCN to be built was the Bristol and Bath Railway Path, opened in 1984. ... CTC may stand for: Calcutta Tramways Company California Commission on Teacher Credentialing Canada Tibet Committee Canadian Tire Corporation Canadian Tourism Commission Capital Terminus Collective Carbon tetrachloride Celebrate the Century, a postage stamp series published by the United States Postal Service Central Texas College Central de Trabajadores de Cuba, Workers Central...


Prior to closure in 2003, Swansea Leisure Centre was one of the top ten visitor attractions in the UK. It has been redeveloped as an indoor waterpark[43] and was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 7 March 2008.[44]. The Wales National Pool is based in Swansea.[45] Swansea Leisure Centre is a leisure centre located in the city centre of Swansea, Wales. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... The Wales National Pool in the Sketty area of Swansea, south Wales is a 50m swimming pool built to FINA standards. ...


Nightlife

Swansea has a range of bars, clubs and restaurants within the city centre. The majority of bars and clubs are situated on Wind Street, which has a large number of mainstream chains with different atmospheres and music genres such as Varsity, Walkabout and Aspers Casino. Most Wednesdays and Thursdays are popular with students, although Thursday is the 'official' student night, with many bars offering a discount.[citation needed] There are clubs situated on the Kingsway such as Jumping Jaks, Flares and Escape. Oceana opened their largest UK venue on Swansea's Kingsway in April 2008. An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources, so as to avoid it being considered... The Varsity chain of public houses is owned and operated by Barracuda. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources, so as to avoid it being considered... Oceana is a large and successful chain of nightclubs in the United Kingdom. ...


There are also alternative bars and clubs located in the city centre, with some having live music from local bands. The Office, Sin City, Crowleys, Milkwood Jam and Inferno are the rock clubs sometimes playing live music. There is also a Jazz club, Jazzland. This article is about the genre. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ...


The gay club and bar scene in Swansea is mostly based along High Street. Venues include the clubs Hush and 2-10 and the bars Champers, The Kings and Exchange, which is located on The Strand nearer Wind Street.


Beaches

Sunset over Swansea Bay.
Sunset over Swansea Bay.

Oxwich Bay on the Gower peninsula was named the most beautiful beach in Britain by travel writers who visited more than 1,000 around the world in search of the perfect sands (2007). The Travel Magazine praised Oxwich for "magnificent and unspoilt" scenery and as a "great place for adults and children to explore". It boasts over three miles (5 km) of soft, golden sands, making it the ideal family getaway. Not surprisingly, The Guardian voted it one of Britain's top 10 sandy beaches (2007). The Independent newspaper hailed Rhossili Bay as "the British supermodel of beaches" (2006) and the best beach in Britain for breathtaking cliffs (2007), whilst The Sunday Times listed it as one of the 25 best beaches in the world (2006). Thanks to its clear air and lovely golden sand, this romantic stretch of sand was voted the best place in the UK to watch the sun set (Country Living magazine 2005) and one the top romantic spots in the country (The Guardian 2007). Nearby Llangennith Beach, with its soft sands, consistent beach break and great facilities, was listed as the best place to learn how to surf in Britain by The Observer (2006) and one of the 10 'classic surfing beaches by The Guardian (2007). Gower also claims Britain's Best Beach, Three Cliffs Bay. The Gower landmark topped the BBC Holiday Hit Squad nationwide competition (2006) and was voted Britain's best camping beach by The Independent thanks to its superb setting and quiet location (2007). Three Cliffs Bay also made the final of the ITV series Britain's Favourite View - the only nomination in Wales and backed by singer Katherine Jenkins. Nearby Brandy Cove came sixth in an online poll to find the UK's top beach for the baby boomer generation (2006). Beaches which won 2006 Blue Flag Beach Awards are: Bracelet Bay, Caswell Bay, Langland Bay, Port Eynon Bay and Swansea Marina (one of the few Blue Flag Marinas in Wales). All of these beaches also won a Seaside Award 2006. Limeslade was awarded the Rural Seaside Award and the Green Coast Award. Other Green Coast Awards went to Pwll Du, Rhossili Bay and Tor Bay. Oxwich Bay is a bay on the south of the Gower peninsula, Wales. ... Gower redirects here. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Rhossili (grid reference SS416880) is a small village on the southwestern tip of the Gower Peninsula near Swansea in Wales. ... For other uses, see The Sunday Times (disambiguation). ... Country Living is a lifestyle magazine published by the Hearst Corporation. ... Categories: Stub | Bays | Swansea ... Categories: Stub | Bays | Swansea ... Katherine Jenkins (born 29 June 1980 in Neath, Wales[1]) is an award-winning Welsh mezzo-soprano. ... Brandy Cove is a very small beach that is much less accessible than Caswell Bay immediately to the east. ... Bracelet Bay is a bay on the south side of the Gower Peninsula, South Wales, just to the southwest of Swansea Bay. ... Caswell Bay is a popular holiday resort in the south east of the Gower Peninsula. ... Langland Bay is a popular coastal holiday resort near Mumbles, Swansea. ... Port Eynon is the name of a village and a community in the city and county of Swansea, south Wales. ... The electoral ward of Oystermouth, City and County of Swansea, South Wales consists of some or all of the following areas, Bishopston, Black Pill, Cheriton, Fairyhill, Horton, Knelston, Landimore, Llanddewi, Llangennith, Llanmadoc, Llanrhidian, Middleton, Newton, Nicholaston, Oldwalls, Overton, Oxwich Green, Oxwich, Parkmill, Penmaen, Pennard, Penrice, Port Eynon, Reynoldston, Rhossili, The... Rhossili (grid reference SS416880) is a small village on the southwestern tip of the Gower Peninsula near Swansea in Wales. ... Three Cliffs Bay on the Gower Peninsula of South Wales The Castle at Three Cliffs called Pennard Castle Three Cliffs Bay (grid reference SS535876), otherwise Three Cliff Bay, is a bay on the south coast of the Gower Peninsula near the City of Swansea, Wales. ...


References

  1. ^ Census 2001: Key Statistics for urban areas in England and Wales. ONS (2004). Retrieved on 2008-05-24.
  2. ^ Graham Pointer. The UK’s major urban areas: Chapter 3. ONS. Retrieved on 2008-05-24.
  3. ^ (2007-07-26) in Glanmor Williams: Swansea, An Illustrated History. Christopher Davies. ISBN 0-7154-0714-7. 
  4. ^ Swansea Timeline (English). Genuki (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-29.
  5. ^ Swansea (English). Classic Encyclopedia (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-29.
  6. ^ London Gazette, issue no. 44986, 12 December 1969
  7. ^ Prince announces city status for Swansea. The Times. 4 July 1969.
  8. ^ London Gazette, issue no. 48932, 25 March 1982
  9. ^ a b Physical Description (English). City and County of Swansea (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  10. ^ Gower Heritage Centre. One Big Garden (2005). Retrieved on 2008-05-26.
  11. ^ Student information - Swansea geography (English). City and County of Swansea (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  12. ^ Soggiest city in Britain pays high price for rain (English). icWales (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  13. ^ uk.weather.com Monthly Climate Statistics: Swansea united Kingdom (English). uk.weather.com (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-25.
  14. ^ Swansea, Wales (English). MSN News & Weather (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-25.
  15. ^ 2001 Census Socio ­ Economic Profile
  16. ^ Swansea City and County: Population 2004 Mid Year Estimates, Population Estimates Unit, ONS. Crown Copyright. (English). City and County of Swansea (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  17. ^ News Release: Urban Areas in Wales (English). National Statistics Office (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  18. ^ The Welsh Academy Encyclopedia of Wales. Cardiff: University of Wales Press 2008
  19. ^ Rosser, C. and Harris, C.C. (1998) The Family and Social Change: A Study of Family and Kinship in a South Wales Town. Routledge
  20. ^ Swansea's Three Nights Blitz. BBC (2005-09-03). Retrieved on 2008-05-24.
  21. ^ Tourism joins shopping at market (English). BBC News (2003). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  22. ^ The Swansea Earthquake of 27 June 1906 (English). British Geological Survey (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  23. ^ The Living Tradition Festival Listing, 2007 (English). The Living Tradition (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  24. ^ Brangwyn Hall & The Empire Panels (English). BBC (2006). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  25. ^ South Wales Evening Post, September 8, 2004, and subsequent issues.
  26. ^ Results of the 2001 Census of Population on the Language in Electoral Wards (English). Welsh Language Board (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  27. ^ Two pieces of Welsh sporting history auctioned (English). icWales.co.uk (2006). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  28. ^ see Swansea City and County and National Council on Archives: Rules for the Construction of place names
  29. ^ Council leader resigns after defeat (English). BBC News (2004). Retrieved on 2007-07-29.
  30. ^ City Centre Strategic Framework (English). City and County of Swansea (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  31. ^ Work Begins On Wales Tallest. Skyscrapernews.com (2006-06-26). Retrieved on 2008-05-24.
  32. ^ Academic Expertise (English). WDA (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.; Knowledge Transfer from the Civil and Computational Engineering Centre and Future Interaction Technologies (English). Swansea University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  33. ^ Award winners announced! (English). The Times Higher Education Supplement (2005). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  34. ^ List of Schools 2006/2007 (English). City and County of Swansea (2006). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  35. ^ Minutes of the Meetings Held at Broadcasting House, Llandaff, Friday 9 December 2005 (English). BBC (2004). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  36. ^ Astra 2A at 28.2°E. Lyngsat. Retrieved on 2008-05-24.
  37. ^ Robin Turner (2004-09-22). Ex-Doctor 'may return as villain'. icWales.co.uk. Retrieved on 2008-05-24.
  38. ^ Police 'not soft' on car crime (English). BBC News (2002). Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  39. ^ British Hooligan Scene (English). view from the terrace (1997). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  40. ^ Young 'turning to cheaper heroin' (English). BBC News (2006). Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  41. ^ The Wright Group
  42. ^ Rob Speht (2007-09-03). Trams4Swansea. Rob Speht. Retrieved on 2008-05-24.
  43. ^ Swansea Leisure Centre to shut (English). BBC News (2003). Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  44. ^ Swansea's New Leisure Centre (English). City and County of Swansea (2007). Retrieved on 2007-12-06.
  45. ^ National Pool 'not just for elite' (English). BBC News (2004). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.

ONS may stand for: Oberste Nationale Sportbehörde, former German motor racing governing body, now Deutscher Motor Sport Bund (DMSB) Object Naming Service Office for NATO Standardization Office National de la Statistique (Mauritania, ons. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ONS may stand for: Oberste Nationale Sportbehörde, former German motor racing governing body, now Deutscher Motor Sport Bund (DMSB) Object Naming Service Office for NATO Standardization Office National de la Statistique (Mauritania, ons. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wales Portal

City and County of Swansea: Image File history File links Portal. ...

History: Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ...

Coordinates: 51°37′N, 3°57′W This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... This article is about the country. ... , Bangor, in north Wales, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... For the council, see Lisburn City Council. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Swansea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3280 words)
Swansea (Welsh: Abertawe, "mouth of the Tawe") is a city and county in South Wales, situated on the coast immediately to the east of the Gower Peninsula.
Swansea was granted city status in 1969, to mark Prince Charles's investiture as the Prince of Wales.
Swansea is one of the few regions in Wales with reasonable digital radio coverage: this was improved in January 2005 with the launch of the Swansea DAB multiplex which is located on the top of Kilvey Hill.
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