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Encyclopedia > Sviatoslav Richter
Sviatoslav Richter

Background information
Birth name Sviatoslav Teofilovich Richter
Born March 20 [O.S. March 7] 1915
Zhytomyr, Ukraine
Died August 01, 1997 (aged 82)
Moscow, Russia
Genre(s) Classical
Occupation(s) Pianist
Instrument(s) Piano
Years active 1934-1996

Sviatoslav Teofilovich Richter (Russian: Святосла́в Теофи́лович Ри́хтер, Svjatoslav Teofilovič Rikhter) (March 20 [O.S. March 7] 1915August 1, 1997) was a Soviet pianist, widely recognized as one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century. He was well known for the depth of his interpretations, virtuoso technique and vast repertoire. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style or O.S. is a designation indicating that a date conforms to the Julian calendar, formerly in use in many countries, rather than the Gregorian calendar, currently in use in most countries. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Location Map of Ukraine with Zhytomyr highlighted. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style or O.S. is a designation indicating that a date conforms to the Julian calendar, formerly in use in many countries, rather than the Gregorian calendar, currently in use in most countries. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...

Contents

Biography

Richter was born in Zhytomyr, Ukraine to a German expatriate father and a Russian mother.[1] He grew up in Odessa. Unusually, he was largely self-taught although his father who was a pianist and organist, and one of his father's pupils, a Czech harpist, provided him with a basic education in music.[2] Even at an early age, Richter was an excellent sight-reader, and regularly practiced with local opera and ballet companies. He developed a lifelong passion for opera, vocal and chamber music that found its full expression in the festivals he established in Grange de Meslay, France, and in Moscow, at the Pushkin Museum. He started to work at the Odessa Opera where he accompanied the rehearsals.[3] Location Map of Ukraine with Zhytomyr highlighted. ... ODESSA (German: Organisation der ehemaligen SS-Angehörigen, Organization of Former SS Members) is the name commonly given to an international Nazi network alleged to have been set up towards the end of World War II by a group of SS officers. ... Ivan Vladimirovich Tsvetaev (1847-1913) The Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts (Russian: Музей изобразительных искусств им. А.С. Пушкина) is the largest museum of European art in Moscow, located in the Volkhonka street, just opposite the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour. ... The Odessa Opera Theater. ...


Early career

On March 19, 1934, Richter gave his first recital, at the engineer club of Odessa; but he did not formally start studying piano until three years later, when he decided to seek Heinrich Neuhaus, a famous pianist and piano teacher, at the Moscow Conservatory. During Richter's audition for Neuhaus, Neuhaus apparently whispered to a fellow student "this man's a genius". Although Neuhaus taught many great pianists, including Emil Gilels and Radu Lupu, it is said that he considered Richter to be "the genius pupil, for whom he had been waiting all his life", while conceding that he had taught Richter "nothing". ODESSA (German: Organisation der ehemaligen SS-Angehörigen, Organization of Former SS Members) is the name commonly given to an international Nazi network alleged to have been set up towards the end of World War II by a group of SS officers. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Heinrich Gustavovich Neuhaus (April 12, 1888 – October 10, 1964) was a Soviet pianist and pedagogue of German extraction. ... The Moscow Conservatory (Московская Государственная Консерватория им. П.И.Чайковского) is a prominent music school in Russia. ... Emil Grigoryevich Gilels (Russian: Эми́ль Григо́рьевич Ги́лельс, Emili Gregorievič Gilelis; October 19, 1916 – October 14, 1985) was a Soviet pianist. ... Radu Lupu (born November 30, 1945 in Galati) is a Romanian pianist. ...


Early in his career, Richter also tried his hand at composing, and it even appears that he played some of his compositions during his audition for Neuhaus. He gave up composition shortly after moving to Moscow. Years later, Richter explained this decision as follows: "Perhaps the best way I can put it is that I see no point in adding to all the bad music in the world".[4]


In 1940, while still a student, Richter gave the first public performance of the Sonata No. 6 by Sergei Prokofiev, a composer with whose works he was ever after associated. He also became known for skipping compulsory political lessons at the conservatory and being expelled twice during his first year. Always a political outsider in the Soviet Union, he never joined the Communist Party. A piano sonata is a sonata written for unaccompanied piano. ... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: , Sergej Sergejevič Prokofijev; April 27 (April 151 O.S.), 1891–March 5, 1953) was a Russian and Soviet composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. ... The Communist Party of the Soviet Union ( Russian: Коммунисти́ческая Па́ртия Сове́тского Сою́за = &#1050...


Behind the Iron Curtain

As much as can be expected of the early- to mid-twentieth century Soviet Union, Richter was openly gay in that his homosexuality was not unknown to those who knew him well. This fact as much as any other is what caused him to be somewhat private and withdrawn.[5]


Richter met the soprano Nina Dorliak in 1945. Shortly thereafter, Richter accompanied her in a program that included songs by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and Prokofiev. "This was the first meeting in an association that would last the rest of their lives. Richter and Dorliak were never officially married, but they were constant companions. She was the practical counterbalance to his impulsive nature. She would wind his watch for him, remind him of appointments, and manage his professional commitments."[6] Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: , Nikolaj Andreevič Rimskij-Korsakov), also Nikolay, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 6 (N.S. March 18), 1844 – June 8 (N.S. June 21) 1908) was a Russian composer, one of five Russian composers known as The Five, and was later a...


In 1949 he won the Stalin Prize, which led to extensive concert tours in Russia, Eastern Europe and China. Richter gave his first concerts ouside the Soviet union in Czechoslovakia in 1950.[7] In 1952, Richter was invited to play Franz Liszt in the all-Russian remake of the 1946 Glinka movie, also Russian, of the life of Mikhail Ivanovich Glinka, called Kompozitor Glinka (Russian: Композитор Глинка, "Glinka The Composer"). The title role was played by Boris Smirnov. Stalin Prize medal State Prize medal The USSR State Prize (Russian:Госуда́рственная пре́мия СССР) was the Soviet Unions highest civilian honour. ... “Liszt” redirects here. ... In film, a remake is a newer version of a previously released film or a newer version of the source (play, novel, story, etc. ... Mikhail Ivanovich Glinka (Михаи́л Ива́нович Гли́нка) (June 1, 1804 – February 15, 1857) was a Russian composer. ... Boris Smirnov is the name of the following people: Boris Alexandrovich Smirnov (actor) (1908–1982), a Soviet actor Boris Alexandrovich Smirnov (painter) (1903–1986), a Soviet painter Boris Alexandrovich Smirnov (pilot) (1910-1984), a Soviet aircraft pilot and Hero of the Soviet Union Category: ...


In 1960, Richter defied the authorities when he performed at Boris Pasternak's funeral.[8] Boris Leonidovich Pasternak (Russian: ) (February 10 [O.S. January 29] 1890 – May 30, 1960) was a Nobel Prize-winning Russian poet and writer, in the West best known for his epic novel Doctor Zhivago. ...


Beyond the Iron Curtain

The West first became aware of Richter through recordings made in the 1950s. One of Richter's first advocates in the West was Emil Gilels, who stated during his first tour of the United States that the critics (who were giving him (Gilels) rave reviews) should "wait until you hear Richter."[9] Emil Grigoryevich Gilels (Russian: Эми́ль Григо́рьевич Ги́лельс, Emili Gregorievič Gilelis; October 19, 1916 – October 14, 1985) was a Soviet pianist. ...


Richter's first concerts in the West took place in May 1960, when he was allowed to play in Finland. That same year, Richter was finally permitted to play in the United States. His U.S. debut occurred on October 15, 1960, in Chicago, where Richter played Johannes Brahms's Second Piano Concerto accompanied by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Erich Leinsdorf, creating a sensation. In a review, noted music Chicago Tribune critic Claudia Cassidy, who was known for her unkind reviews of established artists, recalled Richter first walking on stage hesitantly, looking vulnerable (as if about to be "devoured"), but then sitting at the piano and dispatching "the performance of a lifetime".[10] Richter's 1960 tour of the United States culminated in a series of concerts at Carnegie Hall.[11] Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of the Romantic period. ... The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, based in Chicago, Illinois, is one of the leading orchestras in the world. ... Erich Leinsdorf (February 4, 1912 - September 11, 1993) was a conductor. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Claudia Cassidy (1899 - 1996), born in Shawneetown, Illinois, was a music, dance, and drama critic. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ...


Richter, however, claimed to dislike performing in the United States[12]. Following a 1970 incident at Alice Tully Hall in New York City, when Richter's performance alongside David Oistrakh was disrupted by anti-Soviet protests, Richter vowed never to return.[9] Rumors of an alleged return to Carnegie Hall surfaced in the last years of Richter's life, although it is not clear if there was any truth behind them.[13] David Fyodorovich Oistrakh (Russian: , David Fiodorovič Ojstrah; September 30 [O.S. September 17] 1908 – October 24, 1974) was a Jewish Soviet violinist who made many recordings and was the dedicatee of numerous violin works. ...


In 1961, Richter played for the first time in London. His first recital, pairing works of Haydn and Prokofiev, was received with hostility by British critics. Notably, Neville Cardus concluded that Richter's playing was "provincial", and wondered why Richter had been invited to play in London, given that London had plenty of "second class" pianists of its own. Following a July 18, 1961 concert, where Richter performed both of Franz Liszt's piano concertos, the critics reversed course.[14] (Franz) Joseph Haydn (in German, Josef; he never used the Franz) (March 31, 1732 – May 31, 1809) was a leading composer of the classical period. ... Sir Neville Cardus (2 April 1889 - 27 February 1975) was a celebrated British journalist. ... “Liszt” redirects here. ...


Later years

While he very much enjoyed performing for an audience, Richter hated planning concerts years in advance, and in later years took to playing on very short notice in small, most often darkened halls, with only a small lamp lighting the score. Richter claimed that this setting helped the audience focus on the music being performed, rather than on extraneous and irrelevant matters such as the performer's grimaces and gestures.[15]


In 1986, Richter embarked on a six-month tour of Siberia, possibly giving as many as 150 recitals, at times performing in small towns that did not even have a concert hall. It is said that after one such concert, the members of the audience who had never before heard classical music performed, gathered in the middle of the hall and started swaying from side to side to celebrate the performer.[16] In his last years, it is said that Richter contemplated giving concerts free of charge.[17]


An anecdote illustrates Richter's approach to performance in the last decade of his life. After reading a biography of Charlemagne (Richter was an avid reader), Richter had his secretary send a telegram to the director of the theater in Aachen, a town reputed to have been Charlemagne's birthplace, stating "The Maestro has read a biography of Charlemagne and would like to play at Aquisgrana". The performance took place shortly thereafter.[18] Charlemagne and Pippin the Hunchback. ... Oche redirects here; in darts the oche is the line from which players must throw. ...


In the late 1980s, Richter's technique declined to some extent, partly because he lost some of his stamina due to old age and because of heart problems.[19] This aging process continued through the 1990s, causing Richter great frustration.[20] As late as 1995, however, he continued to perform some of the most demanding pieces in the pianistic repertoire, including Maurice Ravel's Miroirs cycle, Sergei Prokofiev's Second Sonata and Frederic Chopin's etudes and Fourth Ballade.[21][22] Maurice Ravel. ... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: , Sergej Sergejevič Prokofijev; April 27 (April 151 O.S.), 1891–March 5, 1953) was a Russian and Soviet composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. ... Frédéric-François Chopin as portrayed by Eugène Delacroix in 1838. ...


Richter's last recorded orchestral performance was of three Mozart concerti in 1994 with Japan Shinsei Symphony Orchestra with his old friend, Rudolf Barshai, conducting.[23] Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Rudolf Barshai born on September 28, 1924 in Stanitsa Lobinskaya, Russia. ...


Richter's last recital was a private gathering in Lübeck, Germany, on 30 March 1995. The program consisted of two Haydn sonatas and Max Reger's variations and fugue on a theme by Beethoven, a piece for two pianos, which Richter performed with pianist Andreas Lucewicz.[24] (Franz) Joseph Haydn (in German, Josef; he never used the Franz) (March 31, 1732 – May 31, 1809) was a leading composer of the classical period. ... Johann Baptist Joseph Maximilian Reger (March 19, 1873 – May 11, 1916) was a German composer, organist, pianist and teacher. ...


Richter died in his home outside Moscow from a heart attack, after a long period of depression caused by his inability to perform in public. At the time of his death, Richter was learning Schubert's Fünf Klavierstucke, D. 459.[25] For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... For the crater on the moon, see Schubert (crater) Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828), was an Austrian composer. ...


Repertoire

As Richter once put it, "My repertory runs to around eighty different programs, not counting chamber works."[26] Indeed, Richter's repertoire ranged from Handel and Bach to Karol Szymanowski, Alban Berg, Anton Webern, Igor Stravinsky, Bela Bartok, Paul Hindemith, Benjamin Britten, and George Gershwin, although with many omissions such as Bach's Goldberg Variations, Beethoven's Waldstein and Moonlight sonatas and Fourth and Fifth piano concertos, Schubert's A-major sonata D. 959, Prokofiev's Third piano concerto, and Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No. 3.[27] HANDEL was the code-name for the UKs National Attack Warning System in the Cold War. ... In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Karol Szymanowski Karol Szymanowski Karol Maciej Korwin-Szymanowski (October 6, 1882–March 28, 1937) was a Polish composer and pianist. ... Portrait of Alban Berg by Arnold Schoenberg, c. ... Anton Webern (December 3, 1883 – September 15, 1945) was an Austrian composer and conductor. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... B la Bart k (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a composer, pianist and collector of East European folk music. ... Paul Hindemith aged 28. ... Edward Benjamin Britten, Baron Britten, OM CH (November 22, 1913 Lowestoft, Suffolk - December 4, 1976 Aldeburgh, Suffolk) was a British composer, conductor, and pianist. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, original title Aria mit verschiedenen Veränderungen[1] published as Clavierübung, bestehend in einer Aria. ... The Piano Sonata No. ... Ludwig van Beethovens Piano Concerto No. ... Ludwig van Beethovens Piano Concerto No. ... Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Piano Concerto No. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Piano Concerto No. ...


Richter worked tirelessly to learn new pieces. For instance, in the late 1980s, Richter learned Brahms's Paganini and Handel variations and in the 1990s, he learned several of Debussy's etudes, piano concertos by Saint-Saëns, Gershwin, Mozart, as well as sonatas by Bach and Mozart which he had not previously included in his programs. Indeed, Richter was learning new music even at the time of his death.[28] Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of classical music. ... Claude Debussy Claude Achille Debussy (August 22, 1862 – March 25, 1918), composer of impressionistic classical music. ... Charles Camille Saint-Saëns (IPA: [ʃaʁl. ... George Gershwin photograph by Edward Steichen in 1927. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ...


Central to his repertoire were the works of Franz Schubert, Robert Schumann, Beethoven, J.S. Bach (he is said to have learned the second book of Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier by heart in one month,[29] Chopin, Liszt, Prokofiev, Claude Debussy and many others.[27] Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. ... For others with the same name see Robert Schumann (disambiguation). ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... “Bach” redirects here. ... Title-page of Das wohltemperirte Clavier A flat major (As-dur) fugue from the second part of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (manuscript) The Well-Tempered Clavier (in the original German: Das wohltemperierte Clavier[1]) is a collection of solo keyboard music composed by Johann Sebastian Bach. ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ...


He gave the premiere of Prokofiev's Sonata No. 7, which he learned in four days, and no. 9, which Prokofiev dedicated to Richter. Apart from his solo career, he also performed chamber music with partners such as Mstislav Rostropovich, Rudolf Barshai, David Oistrakh, Oleg Kagan, Yuri Bashmet, Natalia Gutman, Zoltan Kocsis, Elisabeth Leonskaya, Benjamin Britten and members of the Borodin String Quartet. Richter also oftentimes accompanied singers such as Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Peter Schreier, Galina Pisarenko and, of course, his long-time companion Nina Dorliak.[30] Chamber music is a form of classical music, written for a small group of instruments which traditionally could be accommodated in a palace chamber. ... Mstislav Leopoldovich Rostropovich KBE (Russian: Мстисла́в Леопо́льдович Ростропо́вич, Mstislav Leopoldovič Rostropovič, IPA pronunciation ), (March 27, 1927 – April 27, 2007), known to close friends as “Slava”, was a cellist and conductor. ... Rudolf Barshai born on September 28, 1924 in Stanitsa Lobinskaya, Russia. ... David Fyodorovich Oistrakh (Russian: , David Fiodorovič Ojstrah; September 30 [O.S. September 17] 1908 – October 24, 1974) was a Jewish Soviet violinist who made many recordings and was the dedicatee of numerous violin works. ... Yuri Bashmet (Russian: Юрий Башмет, Ukrainian: Юрій Башмет, (24 January 1953, in Rostov-on-Don, Russia), Moscow-based contemporary conductor and viola soloist. ... Natalia Gutman is a cellist. ... Zoltán Kocsis (born 1952 Budapest, Hungary) is a pianist, conductor, and composer. ... Edward Benjamin Britten, Baron Britten, OM CH (November 22, 1913 Lowestoft, Suffolk - December 4, 1976 Aldeburgh, Suffolk) was a British composer, conductor, and pianist. ... The Borodin Quartet is string quartet that was founded in 1945 in the former Soviet Union. ... The German baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (born May 28, 1925) is regarded by many as the finest Lieder singer of his generation, if not of the last century. ... Peter Schreier (born July 29, 1935) is a German tenor and conductor. ...


Approach to performance

Richter explained his approach to performance as follows: "The interpreter is really an executant, carrying out the composer's intentions to the letter. He doesn't add anything that isn't already in the work. If he is talented, he allows us to glimpse the truth of the work that is in itself a thing of genius and that is reflected in him. He shouldn't dominate the music, but should dissolve into it."[31] Or, similarly: "I am not a complete idiot, but whether from weakness or laziness have no talent for thinking. I know only how to reflect: I am a mirror . . . Logic does not exist for me. I float on the waves of art and life and never really know how to distinguish what belongs to the one or the other or what is common to both. Life unfolds for me like a theatre presenting a sequence of somewhat unreal sentiments; while the things of art are real to me and go straight to my heart."[32]


Richter's belief that musicians should "carry ... out the composer's intentions to the letter," led him to be critical of others and, most often, himself.[33] After attending a recital of Murray Perahia, where Perahia performed Chopin's Third Piano Sonata without observing the first movement repeat, Richter asked him backstage to explain the omission.[34] Similarly, after Richter realized that he had been playing a wrong note in Bach's Italian Concerto for decades, he insisted that the following disclaimer/apology be printed on a CD containing a performance thereof: "Just now Sviatoslav Richter realized, much to his regret, that he always made a mistake in the third measure before the end of the second part of the 'Italian Concerto'. As a matter of fact, through forty years -- and no musician or technician ever pointed it out to him -- he played 'F-sharp' rather than 'F'. The same mistake can be found in the previous recording made by Maestro Richter in the fifties." [35] Murray Perahia (b. ... Frédéric Chopin composed his Piano Sonata No. ... In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ...


Recordings

Despite his large discography, Richter disliked the recording process,[36] and most of Richter's recordings orginate from live performances. Thus, his live recitals from Sofia (1958), Leipzig (1963), Warsaw (1972), Aldeburgh (multiple years), Prague (multiple years), Salzburg (1977) and Amsterdam (1986), are hailed as some of the finest documents of his playing, as are other myriad live recordings issued prior to and since his death on labels including Music & Arts, BBC Legends, Philips and Russian Revelation. This article is about the capital of Bulgaria. ... Leipzig ( ; Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk from the Sorbian word for Tilia) is, with a population of over 506,000, the largest city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. ... Motto: Contemnit procellas (It defies the storms) Semper invicta (Always invincible) Coordinates: , Country  Poland Voivodeship Masovia Powiat city county Gmina Warszawa Districts 18 boroughs City Rights turn of the 13th century Government  - Mayor Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz (PO) Area  - City 516. ... Map sources for Aldeburgh at grid reference TM4656 Aldeburgh is a town in Suffolk, East Anglia, England; it is located on the Alde river at 52° North, 1° East 1. ... Nickname: Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: , Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area  - City 496 km²  (191. ...   (Austro-Bavarian: SÃ¥izburg) is the fourth-largest city in Austria and the capital of the federal state of Salzburg. ... Nickname: Motto: Heldhaftig, Vastberaden, Barmhartig (Valiant, Determined, Compassionate) Location of Amsterdam Coordinates: , Country Province Government  - Mayor Job Cohen (PvdA)  - Aldermen Lodewijk Asscher Hennah Buyne Carolien Gehrels Tjeerd Herrema Maarten van Poelgeest Marijke Vos  - Secretary Erik Gerritsen Area [1][2]  - City 219 km²  (84. ...


Other critically acclaimed live recordings by Richter include performances of Scriabin's selected etudes, preludes and sonatas (multiple performances, different years), Schumann's C-major Fantasy (multiple performances, different years), Beethoven's Appassionata sonata (Moscow, 1960), Schubert's B-flat sonata (multiple performances, different years), Ravel's Miroirs (Prague, 1965), Liszt's b-minor sonata (multiple performances, 1965-66), Beethoven's Hammerklavier sonata (multiple performances, 1975) and selected preludes by Rachmaninov (multiple performances, different years) and Debussy (multiple performances, different years).[37] Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin (Алекса́ндр Никола́евич Скря́бин; sometimes transliterated as Skryabin) (January 6, 1872 – April 27, 1915) was a Russian composer and pianist. ... Schumann is the name of several notable people: Robert Schumann (1810 - 1856), German composer (husband of composer Clara Schumann) Clara Wieck Schumann (1819 - 1896), German pianist and composer, (wife of composer Robert Schumann) Georg Schumann (1886 - 1945), German Communist and resistance fighter against the Nazis Georg Schumann (1866 - 1952), German... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... For the crater on the moon, see Schubert (crater) Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828), was an Austrian composer. ... Franz Liszt (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a virtuoso pianist and composer. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff, also Sergey Rachmaninov or Serge Rakhmaninov (Серге́й Васи́льевич Рахма́нинов), (April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist... Claude Debussy Claude Achille Debussy (August 22, 1862 – March 25, 1918), composer of impressionistic classical music. ...


However, despite his professed hatred for the studio, Richter took the recording process quite seriously.[38] For instance, after a long recording session for Schubert's Wanderer Fantasy, for which he had used a Bösendorfer piano, Richter listened to the tapes and, dissatisfied with his performance, told the recording engineer "Well, I think we'll remake it on the Steinway after all".[39] Similarly, during a recording session for Schumann's Toccata, Richter reportedly chose to play this piece (which Schumann himself considered "unplayable") several times in a row, without taking any breaks, in order to preserve the spontaneity of his interpretation.[citation needed] For the crater on the moon, see Schubert (crater) Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828), was an Austrian composer. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Steinway & Sons is a piano manufacturing firm, currently based in New York and Hamburg, Germany. ... Schumann is the name of several notable people: Robert Schumann (1810 - 1856), German composer (husband of composer Clara Schumann) Clara Wieck Schumann (1819 - 1896), German pianist and composer, (wife of composer Robert Schumann) Georg Schumann (1886 - 1945), German Communist and resistance fighter against the Nazis Georg Schumann (1866 - 1952), German... Schumann is the name of several notable people: Robert Schumann (1810 - 1856), German composer (husband of composer Clara Schumann) Clara Wieck Schumann (1819 - 1896), German pianist and composer, (wife of composer Robert Schumann) Georg Schumann (1886 - 1945), German Communist and resistance fighter against the Nazis Georg Schumann (1866 - 1952), German...


According to Falk Schwartz and John Berrie's 1983 article "Sviatoslav Richter -- A Discography",[40] in the 1970s Richter announced his intention of recording his complete solo repertoire "on some 50 discs". This "complete" Richter project did not come to fruition, however, although twelve LPs worth of recordings were pressed between 1970 and 1973, and were subsequently re-issued (in CD format) by Olympia (various composers, 10 CDs) and RCA (Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier). In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ... Title-page of Das wohltemperirte Clavier A flat major (As-dur) fugue from the second part of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (manuscript) The Well-Tempered Clavier (in the original German: Das wohltemperierte Clavier[1]) is a collection of solo keyboard music composed by Johann Sebastian Bach. ...


In 1961, Richter's recording with Erich Leinsdorf and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra of the Brahms Piano Concerto no. 2 won the Grammy Award for Best Classical Performance - Concerto or Instrumental Soloist. That recording is still considered a landmark (despite Richter's claim he was dissatisfied with it)[41], as are his studio recordings of Schubert's Wanderer Fantasy, Liszt's two Piano Concertos, Rachmaninov's Second Piano Concerto and Schumann's Toccata, among many others.[42] The 3rd Grammy Awards were held in 1961. ... Erich Leinsdorf (February 4, 1912 - September 11, 1993) was a conductor. ... The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, based in Chicago, Illinois, is one of the leading orchestras in the world. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of the Romantic period. ... The Piano Concerto No. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with orchestra) has been awarded since 1959. ... For the crater on the moon, see Schubert (crater) Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828), was an Austrian composer. ... Franz Liszt (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a virtuoso pianist and composer. ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff, also Sergey Rachmaninov or Serge Rakhmaninov (Серге́й Васи́льевич Рахма́нинов), (April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist... Schumann is the name of several notable people: Robert Schumann (1810 - 1856), German composer (husband of composer Clara Schumann) Clara Wieck Schumann (1819 - 1896), German pianist and composer, (wife of composer Robert Schumann) Georg Schumann (1886 - 1945), German Communist and resistance fighter against the Nazis Georg Schumann (1866 - 1952), German...


Honours and awards

The Léonie Sonning Music Prize, or Sonning Award, which is recognized as Denmarks highest musical honor, is given annually to an international musician. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...

Quotations

Memorable statements about Richter

The Italian critic Piero Rattalino has asserted that the only pianists comparable to Richter in the history of piano performance were Franz Liszt and Feruccio Busoni.[44] “Liszt” redirects here. ... Ferruccio Busoni Ferruccio Busoni (April 1, 1866 – July 27, 1924) was an Italian composer, pianist, music teacher and conductor. ...


Glenn Gould called Richter one of "the most powerful musical communicators of our time".[45] Glenn Gould rehearsing in 1974. ...


Van Cliburn attended a Richter recital in 1958 in the Soviet Union. He reportedly cried during the recital and, upon returning to the United States, described Richter's playing as "the most powerful piano playing I have ever heard".[46] Cliburn playing in the final round of the First International Tchaikovsky Piano Competition Harvey Lavan Cliburn Jr. ...


Artur Rubinstein described his first exposure to Richter as follows: "It really wasn't anything out of the ordinary. Then at some point I noticed my eyes growing moist: tears began rolling down my cheeks." [47] Arthur Rubinstein photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Artur Rubinstein (January 28, 1887 – December 20, Polish pianist best known for his performances of Chopin and his championing of Spanish music. ...


Heinrich Neuhaus described Richter as follows: "His singular ability to grasp the whole and at the same time miss none of the smallest details of a composition suggests a comparison with an eagle who from his great height can see as far as the horizon and yet single out the tiniest detail of the landscape." [48] Heinrich Gustavovich Neuhaus (April 12, 1888 – October 10, 1964) was a Soviet pianist and pedagogue of German extraction. ...


Dmitri Shostakovich wrote of Richter: "Richter is an extraordinary phenomenon. The enormity of his talent staggers and enraptures. All the phenomena of musical art are accessible to him." [49] Dmitri Shostakovich   (Russian: , Dmitrij Dmitrievič Å ostakovič) (September 25 [O.S. September 12] 1906–August 9, 1975) was a Russian composer of the Soviet period. ...


Vladimir Sofronitsky proclaimed that Richter was a "genius", prompting Richter to respond that Sofronitsky was a "god".[50] Vladimir Sofronitsky (May 8/April 25, 1901–August 26, 1961), Russian pianist and a pupil, follower, and son-in-law to Alexander Scriabin. ...


Vladimir Horowitz said: "Of the Russian pianists, I like only one, Richter" [51] Vladimir Samoylovich Horowitz (Russian: ; Ukrainian: ) (1 October 1903 – 5 November 1989) was a Russian-American classical pianist. ...


Pierre Boulez wrote of Richter: "His personality was greater than the possibilities offered to him by the piano, broader than the very concept of complete mastery of the instrument."[52] Pierre Boulez Pierre Boulez (IPA: /pjɛʁ.buˈlɛz/) (born March 26, 1925) is a conductor and composer of classical music. ...


Noted Gramophone critic Bryce Morrison described Richter as follows: "Idiosyncratic, plain-speaking, heroic, reserved, lyrical, virtuosic and perhaps above all, profoundly enigmatic, Sviatoslav Richter remains one of the greatest recreative artists of all time." [53]


Memorable statements by Richter

On listening to Bach: "It does no harm to listen to Bach from time to time, even if only from a hygienic standpoint."[54] In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ...


On Scriabin: "Scriabin isn't the sort of composer whom you'd regard as your daily bread, but is a heady liqueur on which you can get drunk periodically, a poetical drug, a crystal that's easily broken."[55] Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin (Алекса́ндр Никола́евич Скря́бин; sometimes transliterated as Skryabin) (January 6, 1872 – April 27, 1915) was a Russian composer and pianist. ...


On picking small venues for performance: "Put a small piano in a truck and drive out on country roads; take time to discover new scenery; stop in a pretty place where there is a good church; upload the piano and tell the residents; give a concert; offer flowers to the people who have been so kind as to attend; leave again."[56]


On his plan to perform without a fee: "Music must be given to those who love it. I want to give free concerts; that's the answer."[57]


Trivia

Richter had a prodigious memory, but following a couple of memory lapses in the late 1970s, he refused to perform without the score in front of him.[58]


Richter refused to play piano transcriptions in concert,[59] although on occasion he would perform opera transcriptions for his friends. In the 1940s, he apparently performed his own transcription of Wagner's Tristan und Isolde for a group of friends in one sitting.[60] Similarly, after being a witness at Riccardo Muti's wedding, Richter played from memory the entire first act of Puccini's Madama Butterfly for a small group of wedding guests.[61] Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Tristan und Isolde (Tristan and Isolde) is an opera in three acts by Richard Wagner to a German libretto by the composer, based largely on the romance by Gottfried von Strassburg, which in turn was based on the story of Tristan and Iseult as told in French by Thomas of... Riccardo Muti (born July 28, 1941, in Naples) is an Italian conductor best known for being the Music Director of Milans La Scala opera house, a position he held from 1986 to 2005, and of The Philadelphia Orchestra from 1980 to 1992. ... Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... Madama Butterfly (Madame Butterfly) is an opera in three acts (originally two acts) by Giacomo Puccini, with an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa. ...


He owned two Hamburg-made Steinway pianos[62] and was also fond of Bechstein and Bösendorfer[63] pianos. Starting at some point in the late 1970s, however, Richter began to perform on Yamaha pianos.[64] Steinway & Sons is a piano manufacturing firm, currently based in New York and Hamburg, Germany. ... There are several people named Bechstein: Johann Matthäus Bechstein (1757 - 1822) was a German naturalist and forester. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Yamaha may refer to: Yamaha Corporation – A manufacturer of a diverse range of musical instruments and electronics. ...


Richter had unusually large hands, capable of taking a twelfth.[65] David Dubal wrote of them, "What amazing hands - they seemed to be made of marble; his fifth finger was fearsome in its physical strength."[66]


Richter's favorite composers were Chopin, Debussy and Wagner.[67] His favorite piano concertos were the first concerto of Beethoven and the A-minor concerto of Robert Schumann.[68] Fr̩d̩ric Fran̤ois Chopin as portrayed by Eug̬ne Delacroix in 1838. ... Claude Debussy Claude Achille Debussy (August 22, 1862 РMarch 25, 1918), composer of impressionistic classical music. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 РMarch 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... For others with the same name see Robert Schumann (disambiguation). ...


During the taping of the documentary titled "Enigma", Richter claimed he never practiced more than 2 or 3 hours a day (except when he had to learn a piece on short notice). That statement, however, is demonstrably false. In fact, it is known that Richter routinely practiced for more than 10 hours a day, obsessively laboring over details, which may reflect Richter's constantly self-deprecating nature.[citation needed]


Richter was a very private man, who hated the telephone and disliked flying.


Richter was a very generous person, and would oftentimes dedicate recitals to the memory of his friends (e.g., Oleg Kagan, Heinrich Neuhaus, Artur Rubinstein, etc.). For instance, in 1992, upon learning of Marlene Dietrich's death, Richter dedicated a recital (for which he wrote the program by hand) to her memory, and sent 600 white and pink roses as sign of condolence.[69] Heinrich Gustavovich Neuhaus (April 12, 1888 – October 10, 1964) was a Soviet pianist and pedagogue of German extraction. ... Arthur Rubinstein photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Artur Rubinstein (January 28, 1887 – December 20, Polish pianist best known for his performances of Chopin and his championing of Spanish music. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer, and entertainer. ...


Richter was most often very courteous, although his notebooks published in 2001 (in edited form) reveal that he could be disparaging of other musicians.


Richter battled chronic depression throughout his life, and at times found unusual ways to deal with it.[70]


Media

  • Wanderer fantasy
    In this 1963 studio recording of Schubert's Wanderer fantasy, Richter demonstrates his barnstorming technique and ability to control all aspects of his playing to bring out the structural features of a work as he moves from the end of the third movement into the beginning of the finale.
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

Image File history File links Richter_wanderer. ... Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Famous Germans from Russia. Sherri Steele. Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  2. ^ Monsaingeon, pp. 12-14
  3. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 20
  4. ^ Kevin Bazzana - Sviatoslav Richter (1915-1997), Notes to Richter in Leipzig, Music & Arts CD 1025.
  5. ^ Benjamin Ivry. "from Russia with (forbidden) love", salon, 5 January 2005. Retrieved on 2007-09-08. 
  6. ^ Geffen 1999
  7. ^ Sviatoslav Richter Chronology - 1950. trovar.com (22 February 2001). Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  8. ^ Coleman, Alexander (October 1997). "Sviatoslav Richter, 1915-1997". The New Criterion 16 (2). Retrieved on 2007-09-08. 
  9. ^ a b Michael Kimmelman. "The Reputation Is Legendary, The Playing Unpredictable", The New York Times, 22 June 1997. Retrieved on 2007-08-28. 
  10. ^ Claudia Cassidy, Chicago Tribune, 1960.
  11. ^ http://www.trovar.com/str/dates/a1960.html.
  12. ^ "America is standardized. It's all the same. I don't like it" says Richer in Monsaingeon's documentary "Richter, The Enigma", op.cit.
  13. ^ Kevin Bazzana - Sviatoslav Richter (1915-1997), Notes to Richter in Leipzig, Music & Arts CD 1025
  14. ^ David Fanning, Notes to Sviatoslav Richter performs Chopin and Liszt, BBC Legends CD 2000.
  15. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 108, "That's why I now play in the dark, to empty my head of all non-essential thoughts and allow the listener to concentrate on the music rather than on the performer. What's the point of watching a pianist's hands or face, when they only express the efforts being expended on the piece?"
  16. ^ Transsiberian Express, Le Monde de la musique, May 1989.
  17. ^ Kevin Bazzana - Sviatoslav Richter (1915-1997); Bruno Monsaingeon: Introduction to Sviatoslav Richter -- Notebooks and Conversations p. XX.
  18. ^ Piero Rattalino, Sviatoslav Richter - Il Visionario.
  19. ^ Piero Rattalino, Sviatoslav Richter - Il visionario.
  20. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 345, "Here I play like a student -- diligently, but with no artistry"; p. 350, "I don't like what I'm doing".
  21. ^ Sviatoslav Richter Recital, Museo Del Prado, Madrid. Sviatoslav Richter Chronology. trovar.com (16 February 1995). Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  22. ^ Sviatoslav Richter Recital, Santuario de la Bien Aparecida, Santander, Spain. Sviatoslav Richter Chronology. trovar.com (18 January 1995). Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  23. ^ www.trovar.com/str/dates/a1994.html
  24. ^ http://www.trovar.com/str/dates/a1995.html
  25. ^ http://www.richtercompetition.com/en_richter6.html
  26. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 143.
  27. ^ a b Monsaingeon, pp. 383-406.
  28. ^ http://www.richtercompetition.com/en_richter6.html.
  29. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 48
  30. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 413.
  31. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 153.
  32. ^ Mervyn Horder (May 1994). A Richter Rehearsal at the Barbican,. Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  33. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 153.
  34. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 313 ("When I asked him why he didn't do the repeat of the exposition in the B minor Sonata, he seemed surprised and exclaimed 'But no one does it'".).
  35. ^ Richter's comment on inner sleeve of Stradivarius CD 33323.
  36. ^ Falk Schwartz & John Berrie, Sviatoslav Richter -- A Discogrpahy, Recorded Sound, July 1983 ("[Richter] repeated[ly] assert[s] that he dislikes the recording studio").
  37. ^ Review Digest for Performances by Sviatoslav Richter. ClassicsToday. Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  38. ^ Falk Schwartz & John Berrie, Sviatoslav Richter -- A Discography, Recorded Sound, July 1983.
  39. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4149810,00.html
  40. ^ Recorded Sound, July 1983.
  41. ^ Bruno Monsaingeon, Sviatoslav Richter -- Notebooks and Conversations, p. 108 ("There was also the recording of Brahms's Second Concerto with Erich Leinsdorf, one of my words records, even though people still praise it to the skies. I can't bear it.")
  42. ^ See, e.g., www.classicstoday.com.
  43. ^ http://www.trovar.com/str/dates/OXFORD.htm.
  44. ^ See Piero Rattalino, Pianisti e Fortisti, Il terzo Uomo ("How many pianists can claim today to be at [Richter's] level? How many are his peers, in the whole history of piano playing? Although I may appear unduly selective, only two names come to mind: Franz Liszt and Feruccio Busoni. The first was born in 1811; the second in 1866, fifty-one years later. And Richter was born in 1915, forty-nine years after Busoni.).
  45. ^ Bruno Monsaingeon, The Enigma (film biography of Richter).
  46. ^ http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/1997/year.ender/obit/arts/index.html.
  47. ^ Bruno Monsaingeon, The Enigma (film biography of Richter).
  48. ^ Portrait of an Artist, by Heinrich Neuhaus, available at http://www.trovar.com/str/neuhaus.html.
  49. ^ Foreword to V.I. Delson, Sviatoslav Richter, Moscow 1961, partial translation available at www.sonybmgmasterworks.com/artists/sviatoslavrichter/.
  50. ^ http://www.sofronitsky.com/.
  51. ^ Harold C. Schonberg, Horowitz -- His Life and Music, Simon & Schuster, 1992.
  52. ^ http://www.richtercompetition.com/en_richter6.html.
  53. ^ Bryce Morrison, Gramophone review of Sviatoslav Richter's Schumann EMI CD 62961.
  54. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 196.
  55. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 267.
  56. ^ Alain Lompech - A Free Spirit Among Artists, A Protean Pianist, Notes to Richter Performs Beethoven, Philips 438 624-2.
  57. ^ Bruno Monsaingeon: Introduction to Sviatoslav Richter -- Notebooks and Conversations p. XX.
  58. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 140; id. p. 142 ("Following an absolutely frightful concert that I gave at the Fetes Musicales de Touraine, when I played eight of Liszt's Transcendental Studies, and a recital in Japan, where I took fright even before launching into Beethoven's op. 106 Sonata, I made up my mind never again to play without a score.").
  59. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 115.
  60. ^ Bruno Monsaingeon, Richter -- The Enigma.
  61. ^ See Piero Rattalino, Notes to Richter performs Weber, Brahms and Prokofiev, Ermitage CD ERM 113.
  62. ^ http://www.richtercompetition.com/en_richter6.html.
  63. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4149810,00.html.
  64. ^ http://www.yamaha.co.jp/english/product/piano/about/r_f_e/r_f_e.html; Bruno Monsaigeon, Sviatoslav Richter - The Enigma; Mervyn Horder, A Richter Rehearsal at the Barbican, Contemporary Review, May 1994, available at http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G1-16044498.html.
  65. ^ V.I. Delson, Sviatoslav Richter, Moscow 1961, p. 50
  66. ^ David Dubal, The Art of the Piano, Third Edition (2004), Amadeus Press
  67. ^ Alexander Melnikov, Notes to Sviatoslav Richter Performs Debussy and Chopin, BBC Legelds 4021-2.
  68. ^ Monsaingeon, p. 327.
  69. ^ Sviatoslav Richter. Live Classics. Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  70. ^ For instance, in 1974 "it was impossible for [Richter] to live without a plastic lobster that [he] took with [him] everywhere," except when giving a concert.http://www.nytimes.com/books/01/06/17/reviews/010617.17rothstt.html

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Monsaingeon, Bruno (2001). Sviatoslav Richter: Notebooks and Conversations. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0571205534. 
  • Monsaingeon, Bruno (1998), Richter, the Enigma. Video interview-documentary, [1].

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sviatoslav Richter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (757 words)
Sviatoslav Richter was widely recognized as one of the great pianists of the 20th century, and some consider him to be the greatest of all [1].
Richter was born in Zhitomir (in the territory of modern Ukraine) to a German expatriate father and a Russian mother [2].
Richter met the soprano Nina Dorliak in 1945 when he accompanied her in a program that included songs by Rimsky-Korsakov and Prokofiev.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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