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Encyclopedia > Sussex County, New Jersey
Sussex County, New Jersey
Seal of Sussex County, New Jersey
Map
Map of New Jersey highlighting Sussex County
Location in the state of New Jersey
Statistics
Formed 8 June 1753
Seat Newton
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

1,388 km² (536 mi²)
1,350 km² (521 mi²)
38 km² (15 mi²), 2.75%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

144,166
103.9 persons per km² (276.7 persons per mi²)/km² 
Website: www.sussex.nj.us

The County of Sussex (also known as Sussex County) is the northernmost county in the State of New Jersey. Founded on 8 June 1753 by an order of Jonathan Belcher (1689-1757), Royal Governor of New Jersey (1747-1757) and his council, it originally contained all the land north and west of the Musconetcong River, including the area of the present-day Warren County (created from the southwestern half of Sussex County in 1824). At present, it is the fourth largest county in New Jersey by area. The county seat of Sussex County is the Town of Newton6. Image File history File links Sussex_Seal. ... Image File history File links Map_of_New_Jersey_highlighting_Sussex_County. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... View of Newton. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      A state of the United States is any one of the fifty subnational entities referred to... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Jonathan Belcher (1682-1757) was colonial governor of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and New Jersey. ... The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... The Musconetcong River is a tributary of the Delaware River, approximately 44 mi (71 km) long, in northwestern New Jersey in the United States. ... Warren County is a county located in the state of New Jersey. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... View of Newton. ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of encyclopedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ...


Though lacking much historical evidence, local tradition asserts that in the 1650s, Dutch adventurers from New Amsterdam started mines in nearby Pahaquarry Township, building the Old Mine Road to transport copper ore to Esopus on the Hudson River. Sources indicate that first settlement by European colonists began circa 1690-1710, by Dutch settlers from New York along the Delaware River, and in the decades subsequent, Palatine Germans via Philadelphia, and English colonists from New England, Long Island, Newark, and Salem County, New Jersey. New Amsterdam (Dutch: Nieuw Amsterdam) was the name of the 17th century town which grew outside of Fort Amsterdam on Manhattan Island in the New Netherland territory (1614–1674) which was situated between 38 and 42 degrees latitude as a provincial extension of the Dutch Republic since 1624. ... Pahaquarry Township was a Township that was located in Warren County, New Jersey. ... Old Mine Road is the oldest continuously-used road in the United States. ... Copper ores may refer to: Bornite Cuprite Tennantite Tetrahedrite Category: ... Kingston is a city in Ulster County, New York, United States. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river running mainly through New York State but partly forming the boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. ... NY redirects here. ... The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ... The Rhenish Palatinate (Rheinpfalz, sometimes Lower Palatinate or Niederpfalz) occupies rather more than a quarter of the German Bundesland (federal state) of Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz) and contains the towns of Ludwigshafen, Kaiserslautern, Neustadt an der Weinstrasse, Pirmasens, Landau and Speyer. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Cradle of Liberty, the City That Loves You Back, the Quaker City, The Birthplace of America Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... This article is about Long Island in New York State. ... Nickname: The Brick City Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area    - City 67. ... Salem County is a county located in the state of New Jersey. ...


Early industry and commerce chiefly centered around agriculture, iron mining, shifting during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to focus on several factories and the mining of zinc. Today, Sussex County features a mix of rural farmland, forests and suburban development at the western extent of the New York metropolitan area. Though agriculture (chiefly dairy farming) is on the decline and because the county hosts little light industry, Sussex County is considered a "bedroom community" as most residents commute to neighboring counties (Bergen, Essex and Morris Countiesor to New York City for work. The El Chino Mine located near Silver City, New Mexico is an open-pit copper mine Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually (but not always) from an ore body, vein, or (coal) seam. ... This article is about mineral extraction. ... General Name, Symbol, Number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Atomic mass 65. ... Rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities. ... Farmland can have several meanings: See: Farm for a general discussion of farming Farmland, Indiana, a town in the United States Farmland (cooperative), an agricultural cooperative This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about forests as a massing of trees. ... The New York metropolitan area is the most populous in the United States and the fourth most populous in the world (after Tokyo, Seoul, and Mexico City). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Commuters waiting for the morning train in Maplewood, New Jersey A bedroom community, dormitory town, or commuter town is a community that is primarily residential in character, with most of its workers commuting to a nearby town or city to earn their livelihood. ... Bergen County is the most populous county of the state of New Jersey, United States. ... Essex County is a county located in the northeastern part of the state of New Jersey. ... Morris County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey, about 25 mi (40 km) west of New York City. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ...


As of the 2000 Federal decennial census, 144,166 persons resided in Sussex County of which nearly 95% were white. Sussex County is the 91st richest county in the United States with its per capita income being $26,992. (Redirected from 2000 United States census) The United States 2000 census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... American white woman with red hair and blue eyes French white man Austrian white woman with blond hair In the context of basic English usage, the term White people (also white race or whites) is used to denote ... a human group having light-coloured skin, especially of European ancestry. ...

Contents

History

Origin of the county's name

Sussex County was named by Royal Governor Jonathan Belcher (1689-1757) for Sussex in England which was the ancestral seat of His Grace, Thomas Pelham-Holles, first Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and first Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyne (1693-1768), who at the time was the Secretary of State for the Northern Department, and later the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1754-1756, 1757-1762). Pelham-Holles, whose office oversaw British affairs in North America, was Governor Belcher's political superior. During his term as Governor of New Jersey (1747-1757), Belcher named many municipalities in honour of important British political figures, most of whom were superior to him in rank or precedence. It is believed that he did so in order to curry political favor and regain a level of standing that was diminished from his scandalous removal from the Governorship of Massachusetts in 1741. Jonathan Belcher (1682-1757) was colonial governor of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and New Jersey. ... Sussex is a traditional county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Arms of Thomas Pelham-Holles Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and 1st Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyme (July 21, 1693 – November 17, 1768) was a British Whig statesman, whose official life extended throughout the Whig supremacy of the 18th century. ... The Secretary of State for the Northern Department was a position in the Cabinet of the government of the Kingdom of Great Britain up to 1782. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... British North America was an informal term first used in 1783, but uncommon before the Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839), called the Durham Report. ... A municipality is an administrative entity composed of a clearly defined territory and its population and commonly referring to a city, town, or village, or a small grouping of them. ... Politics of the United Kingdom take place in the framework of a parliamentary, representative democratic monarchy, in which the Prime Minister is the head of government. ... Look up Rank in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Generally, rank is a system of hierarchy used to classify like things. ... Precedence is a simple ordering, based on either importance or sequence. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ...


Sussex, in England, was notable historically as one of the seven kingdoms of the Heptarchy (A.D. 500–850), which were later unified under Egbert of Wessex (c. 770–839) into the Kingdom of England. The Kingdom of Sussex, (Suth Seaxe, i. ... A map showing the general locations of the Anglo-Saxon peoples around the year 600 Britain and Ireland around the year 802 Heptarchy (Greek: seven + realm) is a collective name applied to the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of the south and east of Great Britain during late antiquity and the early... Egbert (also Ecgbehrt or Ecgbert) (c. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right)1 Capital Winchester, then London from 11th century. ...


Establishment of Sussex County

The original provinces of West and East New Jersey are shown in yellow and green respectively. The Keith Line (1687) is shown in red, and the Coxe and Barclay Line (1688) is shown in orange
The original provinces of West and East New Jersey are shown in yellow and green respectively. The Keith Line (1687) is shown in red, and the Coxe and Barclay Line (1688) is shown in orange

Under the 1664 deed from Charles II of England to his brother Duke of York, and the subsequent deed from that granted New Jersey to Lord Berkeley and George Carteret, New Jersey's northern border was drawn from a line at 41 degrees North Latitude on the Hudson River to a point at 41 40' North on the Delaware River. This line which granted New Jersey a significant swath of land in present day Orange and Sullivan Counties in New York. The Provinces of East Jersey and West Jersey. ... The Provinces of East Jersey and West Jersey. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... James II of England/VII of Scotland (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) became King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685, and Duke of Normandy on 31 December 1660. ... See: Baron Berkeley (creations of 1066, 1295 and 1421) Viscount Berkeley (1481) Marquess of Berkeley (1488) Earl Berkeley (1679) Baron Berkeley of Rathdown (1661) Baron Berkeley of Stratton (1658) Baron Berkeley of Wynondham (1611) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise... Sir George Carteret (c. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river running mainly through New York State but partly forming the boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. ... The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ... The Orange County Government Center in Goshen, N.Y., designed by Paul Rudolph. ... Sullivan County is a county located in the state of New York. ... NY redirects here. ...


With the boundary between the Provinces of East Jersey and West Jersey undefined, the land area that became Sussex County was first, briefly, under the auspices of Essex County when it was established in 1682. After the settling of the border with the Keith Line (1687) and the subsequent Coxe-Barclay Line (1688), this area was under the control of the West Jersey Proprietors and given to Burlington County when it was established in 1696. Burlington County ceded all the lands north of the Assunpink Creek to Hunterdon County in 1711. In 1739, Hunterdon County cede the land north of the Musconetcong River—comprising the present-day Morris, Sussex and Warren Counties—to form Morris County. The original provinces of West and East New Jersey are shown in yellow and green respectively. ... The original provinces of West and East New Jersey are shown in yellow and green respectively. ... Essex County is a county located in the northeastern part of the state of New Jersey. ... Events March 11 – Chelsea hospital for soldiers is founded in England May 6 - Louis XIV of France moves his court to Versailles. ... Location in the state of New Jersey Formed 1694 Seat Mount Holly Area  - Total  - Water 2,122 km² (819 mi²) 38 km² (15 mi²) 1. ... The year 1696 had the earliest equinoxes and solstices for 400 years in the Gregorian calendar, because this year is a leap year and the Gregorian calendar would have behaved like the Julian calendar since March 1500 had it have been in use that long. ... Assunpink Creek is a tributary of the Delaware River in western New Jersey in the United States. ... Hunterdon County is a county located in the state of New Jersey. ... The Musconetcong River is a tributary of the Delaware River, approximately 44 mi (71 km) long, in northwestern New Jersey in the United States. ... Morris County is the name of several counties in the United States: Morris County, Kansas Morris County, New Jersey Morris County, Texas This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


In the years following the creation of Morris County, the area north and west of the Musconetcong River grew in population to several hundred settlers. Given the lack of roads and the long, arduous journey to attend to the courts, government and other business at Morristown, the county's seat, the residents of this area petitioned the provincial government to erect a new county. On 8 June 1753, Royal Governor Jonathan Belcher and his Council ordered the creation of the County of Sussex. The Musconetcong River is a tributary of the Delaware River, approximately 44 mi (71 km) long, in northwestern New Jersey in the United States. ... Nickname: Military Capital of the Revolution Location of Morristown in Morris County (L); Location of Morris County in New Jersey (R) Coordinates: Country United States State New Jersey County Morris Founded 1715 Incorporated 1865 Mayor Donald Cresitello (D; term ends December 31, 2009. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


At this time, Sussex County consisted of four municipalities that were founded before the establishment of the county: Walpack (1731), Newtown (1751), Hardwick (1751) and Greenwich Townships (1738). These townships would, over the next two hundred years, be carved into the twenty-four municipalities that comprise present-day Sussex County, and the twenty-two in present-day Warren County. Walpack Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... View of Newton. ... Hardwick Township is a township located in Warren County, New Jersey. ... Greenwich Township is the name of some places in the U.S. state of New Jersey: Greenwich Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey Greenwich Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey Greenwich Township, Warren County, New Jersey May also refer to: East Greenwich Township, New Jersey - Gloucester County This is a disambiguation page...


The first county seat was established on the lands of Jonathan Pettit, a local justice-of-the-peace and tavernkeeper in present-day Johnsonsburg in Frelinghuysen Township, then part of Hardwick Township. At the first meeting of the Board of Chosen Freeholders in 1754, monies were appropriated for the construction of a jail which was built from logs. This caused the village to be known as Log Gaol. Disputes between Pettit and the early county freeholders lead to the courts and county government to be held elsewhere in the subsequent years, including at the taverns of Thomas Woolverton (1719-1760) and Henry Hairlocker (1715-1777) in Newtown Township. In 1761, the Provincial Legislature and Royal Governor Josiah Hardy authorized the construction of a courthouse and jail on the Newton Township lands of Jonathan Hampton (1720-1777), a surveyor and merchant from Elizabethtown, one half-mile (0.85 km) from the tavern of Henry Hairlocker. This site, which became known as Sussex Court House, is presently the Town of Newton. Frelinghuysen Township is a township located in Warren County, New Jersey, USA. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 2,083. ... Hardwick Township is a township located in Warren County, New Jersey. ... The Board of Chosen Freeholders is the legislative body in each of the 21 counties in New Jersey. ... Map of Elizabeth in Union County Union County Court House Elizabeth is a City in Union County, New Jersey, in the United States. ... View of Newton. ...


In 1824, heeding the petitions of the southern residents of Sussex County, the State Legislature ordered a line drawn across the county from the mouth of the Flat Brook (where it enters the Delaware River) in Walpack Township, through the village of Yellow Frame in then Hardwick Township to a point on the county's eastern boundary, the Musconetcong River. The lands south of this line were ceded on 20 November 1824 to form Warren County, named for American Revolutionary War hero, Doctor Joseph Warren (1741-1775) who died leading American troops at the Battle of Bunker Hill on 17 June 1775. Flat Brook is a tributary of the Delaware River in Sussex County, New Jersey in the United States. ... The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ... Walpack Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Hardwick Township is a township located in Warren County, New Jersey. ... The Musconetcong River is a tributary of the Delaware River, approximately 44 mi (71 km) long, in northwestern New Jersey in the United States. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Warren County is a county located in the state of New Jersey. ... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, Dutch Republic, Spain, American Indians Kingdom of Great Britain, German mercenaries, Loyalists, American Indians Commanders George Washington, Comte de Rochambeau, Nathanael Greene, Bernardo de Gálvez Sir William Howe, Sir Henry Clinton, Lord Cornwallis (more commanders) The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the... Joseph Warren Dr. Joseph Warren (June 11, 1741 – June 17, 1775) was an American doctor and soldier, remembered for playing a leading role in American Patriot organizations in Boston and for his death as a volunteer private soldier while also serving as chief executive of the revolutionary Massachusetts government. ... Numerous places and things are named for this battle, see: Bunker Hill (disambiguation). ... June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (169th in leap years), with 197 days remaining. ... ...


The colonial period: 1690–1800

Native Americans, exploration, settlement, old mine road, Iron mining and forges, american revolution, french and indian war,


Early American period: 1800–1870

Rise of Industry: 1870-1950

Zinc Mining, Merriam Shoe Factory, Paper Mill, Wheatsworth,


More cows than people

Agriculture and developments. Hay forks, Lusscroft and artificial bovine insemination,


Transformation to "bedroom community": 1950–present

Government

Board of Chosen Freeholders

The County of Sussex is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders that consists of five members elected at-large to serve three-year terms. Seats are elected on a staggered basis over three years, with two seats available in the first year, two seats the following, and then one seat. All terms of office begin on 1 January and end on 31 December. The Board of Chosen Freeholders is the center of legislative and administrative responsibility for the County of Sussex. It is responsible for writing and adopting a budget and overseeing the spending of funds appropriated by that budget. The Board of Chosen Freeholders is the legislative body in each of the 21 counties in New Jersey. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Many county services do overlap those provided by municipalities within the county, however, the Board of Chosen Freeholders is responsible for the following tasks:

"Public Safety and Emergency Management, Community College and Technical School, the County Library System, Social Services, Youth Services, Community Service, Mental Health, Division of Senior Services, [The County] Nursing Home [formerly the Alms House], Environmental and Public Health Services, Mosquito Control, the Medical Examiner’s Office, the County Jail and Detention Center, Farmland and Open Space Preservation, Economic Development, Road and Bridge Maintenance and Repair, the Para Transit System and Transportation Planning, Solid Waste Planning, the County Master Plan, including Water Resource Planning." [1]

As of 2006, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Gary R. Chiusano (term ends 31 December 2008), Freeholder Deputy Director Harold J. Wirths (term ends 31 December 2007), Steven V. Oroho (term ends 31 December 2007), Glen Vetrano (Term ends 31 December 2009) and Susan M. Zellman (Term ends 31 December 2009). [2] The Board of County Freeholders is the legislative body for each of the 21 counties in New Jersey. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Constitutional Officers

As with each county in New Jersey, three elected positions, known as "constitutional officers" are required by the New Jersey State Constitution. The Constitution of the State of New Jersey is the basic governing document of the State of New Jersey. ...


The office of County Clerk, a position which is elected for a term of five years, is currently occupied by Erma Gormley (R). The office of County Surrogate, elected also for at term of five years, is currently occupied by Nancy Fitzgibbons (R). The County Sheriff, a position which has a term of three years, is currently Robert Untig (R). The term county clerk has been commonly applied, in several English-speaking countries, to an influential employee of a county administration. ... Probate Court is a court found in some juridictions which is primarily concerned with the proper distribution of the assets of a decedent. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Municipalities

Index map of Sussex County municipalities (click to see index key)

The following are Sussex County's 24 incorporated municipalities: Image File history File links Sussex_County,_New_Jersey_Municipalities. ... Image File history File links Sussex_County,_New_Jersey_Municipalities. ...

Andover Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Andover is a borough located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Branchville is a borough located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Byram Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Frankford Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Franklin is a borough located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Fredon Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Green Township is a Township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Hamburg is a borough located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Hampton Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Hardyston Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Hopatcong is a borough located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Lafayette Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey in the Skylands Region. ... Montague Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... View of Newton. ... Ogdensburg is a borough located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Sandyston Township is a small semi-rural Township located in the north-western part of the state in Sussex County, New Jersey, near the Pennsylvania border. ... Sparta Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Stanhope is a borough located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Stillwater Township is a township in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Sussex is a borough located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Map of Vernon Township. ... Walpack Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... Wantage Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ...

Politics

Sussex County is a predominantely Republican area, as among registered voters, affiliations with the Republican Party outpace those of the Democratic Party by a ratio of three to one. All five members of the county board of Chosen Freeholders, all three county-wide constitutional officers, and all except a few of the 108 municipal offices among the county's 24 municipalities are held by Republicans. Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      For other uses, see Republican Party (disambiguation) or GOP (disambiguation). ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ...


Geography

Physical geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,388 km² (536 mi²). 1,350 km² (521 mi²) of it is land and 38 km² (15 mi²) of it (2.75%) is water. High Point in this county is also the highest elevation in the state at 1,803 feet (549.5 m) above sea level. The county's lowest elevation is approximately 300 feet (90 m) above sea level along the Delaware River near Flatbrookville. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... For other uses, see High Point (disambiguation). ... The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ...


Much of the county is hilly, as the part of New Jersey most solidly within the Appalachian Mountains. However, the Great Valley of the Appalachians takes in a good deal of the eastern half of the county, allowing for land more amenable to agriculture. A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina Appalachia, the central and southern Appalachian Mountains of the United States, also including the Allegany and Cumberland Plateaus The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of North American mountains, partly in Canada, but mostly in the...


Climate

Adjacent Counties

Given Sussex County's location at the top of the state, it is bordered by counties in New Jersey as well as in neighboring New York and Pennsylvania. This region is often collectively known as the Tri-State Area.[3] The following counties are adjacent and continguous to Sussex County (in order starting with the northernmost and rotating clockwise):

The Orange County Government Center in Goshen, N.Y., designed by Paul Rudolph. ... Passaic County is a county located in the state of New Jersey. ... Morris County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey, about 25 mi (40 km) west of New York City. ... Warren County is a county located in the state of New Jersey. ... Monroe County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania, named for President James Monroe. ... Pike County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania. ...

Economy and other factors

Major Industries and Products

Taxes

Transportation

Sussex County is served by a number of roads connecting it to the rest of the state and to both Pennsylvania and New York. Interstate 80 passes through the extreme southern tip of Sussex County. Interstate 84 passes just yards north of Sussex County, but never enters New Jersey. Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... NY redirects here. ... Interstate 80 (abbreviated I-80) is the second-longest Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Interstate 84 (abbreviated I-84) is an interstate highway extending from Dunmore, Pennsylvania (near Scranton, Pennsylvania) at an intersection with Interstate 81 to Sturbridge, Massachusetts at an intersection with the Massachusetts Turnpike (Interstate 90). ...


New Jersey's Route 15, Route 23,Route 94, Route 181, Route 183, and Route 284 pass through the County, as does U.S. Route 206 New Jersey State Highway 15 is a state highway in New Jersey, United States. ... Route 23 is a state highway in New Jersey, United States. ... New Jersey State Highway 94 is a state highway in New Jersey, United States. ... Route 181 is a 7. ... New Jersey State Highway 183 is a state highway in New Jersey, United States. ... Route 284 is a 7. ... U.S. Highway 206 is a north-south United States highway in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, United States. ...


Television and Radio Broadcasting

Clear Channel Radio owns a cluster of 4 stations in the area.

  • 102.3 WSUS FM - Franklin. Format: Adult Contemporary
  • 103.7 WNNJ FM - Newton. Format: Classic Rock
  • 1360 WNNJ AM - Newton. Format: Oldies
  • 106.3 WHCY FM - Blairstown. Format: Hot Adult Contemporary (Not located in Sussex County.)

WSUS 102. ... WNNJ FM is a Class B FM radio station licensed to Newton, New Jersey broadcasting on 103. ... WNNJ is an AM radio station in Sussex County, New Jersey broadcasting on 1360 licensed to Newton. ... WHCY known as Max 106. ...

Crime

Heroin use has been on the rise and shows no signs of improvement despite efforts of law enforcement and community groups working to fight the problem.[4]. bitsjh peufhgisudhfgiuwdgpuwehguihweroughwiedhgiopuwehggggggggggggggrieuhgpieuqrhgiwehrgioruhilguheoiqhlfkjhoiduhflibh8oqughiqefhgouegieuhguiegneh;iurghpenrgpiehrgpuhpuihiuhhohouhiuhbjnrpdoiupbnephjdrbn;iefuhbpindf;ibghufpeiubgn;efuihgpiefj;hije[tr ...


Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 144,166 people, 50,831 households, and 38,784 families residing in the county. The population density was 107/km² (277/mi²). There were 56,528 housing units at an average density of 42/km² (108/mi²). The racial makeup of the county was 93.97% White, 2.24% Black or African American, 0.11% Native American, 1.71% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.74% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. 4.84% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of encyclopedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ...


There were 50,831 households out of which 39.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.00% were married couples living together, 8.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.70% were non-families. 18.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.24. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the county the population was spread out with 27.90% under the age of 18, 6.20% from 18 to 24, 31.50% from 25 to 44, 25.30% from 45 to 64, and 9.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 98.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.60 males.


The median income for a household in the county was $67,266, and the median income for a family was $73,335. Males had a median income of $50,395 versus $33,750 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,992. About 2.80% of families and 4.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.10% of those under age 18 and 5.40% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Education

The Sussex County Interscholastic League, or SCIL, is the high school athletic league for most high schools in the county. Sussex County Community College (commonly referred to as SCCC or SC3) is a two-year community college located at the intersection of County Route 519 and Plots Road in Newton, New Jersey, serving Sussex County, New Jersey. ... County Route 519 is a county highway in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... View of Newton. ... Sussex County Technical School is a county-wide technical high school in Sparta, New Jersey. ... High school is a name used in some parts of the world, and particularly in North America, to describe the last segment of compulsory secondary education. ... Sparta Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey. ... The Sussex County Interscholastic League, abbreviated SCIL, is a high school athletic conference located in Sussex County and Morris County, New Jersey. ...


Tourism and Recreation

State and Federal parks

Stokes State Forest is a New Jersey state park located partly in Sandyston Township, in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. ... High Point State Park is a state park located in Sussex County in the Skylands Region of Northwestern New Jersey, near the border with New York. ... Swartswood lake and the surround park Swartswood State Park was the first State Park established by the state of New Jersey in 1914. ... Wawayanda State Park is a state park in New Jersey. ... Kittatinny Valley State Park is located near Andover, New Jersey. ... Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, administered by the National Park Service, preserves almost 70,000 acres (283 km²) of land along the Delaware Rivers New Jersey and Pennsylvania shores. ...

Recreational Activities

Tourism

Sports Franchises

Augusta is the site of Skylands Park, a minor league baseball stadium, home of the Sussex Skyhawks. The Skyhawks play in the Can-Am League. Skylands Park was the former home of the New Jersey Cardinals (from 1994-2005), but the Cardinals moved to State College, Pennsylvania making room for the Skyhawks. Skylands Park is a baseball stadium located in Augusta, New Jersey. ... A Class A California League game in San Jose, California (1994) Minor baseball leagues are North American professional baseball leagues that compete at a level below that of Major League Baseball. ... The Sussex Skyhawks are a minor league baseball team based in Augusta, an area within Frankford Township, New Jersey, United States. ... The Canadian-American Association or Can-Am League is an independent minor league baseball league which operates in the Northeastern United States and the Canadian province of Québec. ... The New Jersey Cardinals were a class A short-season American minor league baseball team affiliated with the St. ... State College redirects here. ...


Notable people in or from Sussex County

Politics, military and public service

Thomas Oakley Anderson (3 July 1783 – 11 April 1844) was an American naval officer, noted for his contributions in the raiding party led by Stephen Decatur on 16 February 1804 to destroy the U.S. frigate Philadelphia which ran aground in Tripoli harbor during the First Barbary War. ... Scott Garrett (born July 9, 1959 in Englewood, New Jersey) has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives for the 5th New Jersey district since 2003. ... John William Griggs (July 10, 1849–November 28, 1927) was an American politician. ... Daniel Haines (January 6, 1801 - January 26, 1877) was an American jurist and Governor of New Jersey. ... Hugh Judson Kilpatrick (1836-1881) Hugh Judson Kilpatrick (14 January 1836 near Deckertown, New Jersey – 4 December 1881 in Santiago, Chile) was a officer in the Union army during the American Civil War achieving the rank of Brevet Major General, the United States Minister to Chile, and a failed political... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Ardolph Loges Kline (February 21, 1858 - October 13, 1930) was mayor of New York City in 1913, and served as U.S. Representative from New York (5th District) from 1921 to 1923. ... Sen. ... Benjamin Lundy Benjamin Lundy (January 4, 1789 – August 22, 1839) was an American Quaker abolitionist who established several anti-slavery newspapers and worked for many others. ... Assemblywoman Alison Littell McHose Alison Littell McHose (born May 24, 1965) has served in the New Jersey General Assembly since 2003 and represents the 24th legislative district. ... Nathaniel Pettit (June 12, 1724 – March 9, 1803) was a political figure in Upper Canada. ... Rodman McCamley Price (March 5, 1816 – June 7, 1894) was Governor of New Jersey from 1854 to 1857. ... John Rutherfurd (September 20, 1760 February 23, 1840) was an American politician and land surveyor. ... John Cleves Symmes (1742-1814) was a delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and later a pioneer in the Northwest Territory. ...

Arts, Letters, and Entertainment

Lou Dobbs (born September 24, 1945) is the anchor and managing editor of CNNs hour-long weeknight program Lou Dobbs Tonight, an editorial columnist, and host of a syndicated radio show. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Baron Nicolas Louis Alexandre de Gunzburg (December 12, 1904 – February 20, 1981) Parisian playboy, accomplished athlete, actor, producer, editor of Town & Country, Vogue, Harpers Bazaar and what some call the spiritual father of three top designers: Calvin Klein, Bill Blass and Oscar de la Renta who have all called... Janeane Garofalo Janeane Garofalo (born September 28, 1964 in Newton, New Jersey), is an American stand-up comedian, actress, political activist, writer and former co-host on Air America Radios The Majority Report. ... John Gibson John Gibson is a television talk show host, hosting the weekday edition of The Big Story and The John Gibson Show on Fox News Radio. ... Peter Aurness (born March 18, 1926 [1]), better known as Peter Graves, is an American actor. ... Aline Murray Kilmer (1 August 1888 in Norfolk, Virginia – 1 October 1941 in Stillwater, New Jersey), was an American poet, childrens book author, and essayist, and the wife and widow of poet and journalist Joyce Kilmer (1886-1918). ... Alfred Joyce Kilmer (6 December 1886 in New Brunswick, New Jersey (USA) – 30 July 1918 near Seringes, France) was an American journalist and poet; his best-known work is a poem entitled Trees (1913) which was first published in a collection entitled Trees and Other Poems in 1914. ... Homer Mensch Homer Mensch (November 14, 1914 in Sussex, New Jersey - December 9, 2005 in Manhattan, New York) was a prominent classical bassist who was a former member of the Pittsburgh Symphony, the New York Philharmonic, the New York Pops, and the NBC Symphony. ... Cover of Constitutional Chaos, by former judge and current Fox News judicial analyst Andrew P. Napolitano. ... William Pierson (1926-August 27, 2004) was an American television, motion picture and stage actor, best known for his raspy voice and his role as Marko the Mailman in the film Stalag 17. ... Jill Allyn Rosser (publishing under ) is a contemporary American poet. ...

Science, technology and medicine

Charles J. Fletcher is an American inventor and businessman, the original inventor of the Hovercraft and holder of over seventy patents. ... BHC SR-N4 The worlds largest car and passenger carrying hovercraft A hovercraft, or air-cushion vehicle (ACV), is a vehicle or craft that can be supported by a cushion of air ejected downwards against a surface close below it, and can in principle travel over any relatively smooth... Hudson Maxim (February 3, 1853–May 6, 1927), was a U.S. inventor and chemist who invented a variety of explosives, including smokeless gunpowder. ... Baltimore and Ohio locomotive #217, a type 4-6-0 camelback the Ross Winans, on display at the New York Worlds Fair on July 23, 1940. ...

Business

Newman E. Drake (1860 in Andover, New Jersey–1930 in Newton, New Jersey) was an American entrepreneur and philanthropist who founded Drakes, an American baking company now owned by Interstate Bakeries Corporation. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...

Sports

Lewis Vincent Benfatti (born March 9, 1971, in Green Pond, New Jersey) is a former professional American football player. ... Daniel Kass (born September 21, 1982) is a professional snowboarder from Vernon, New Jersey. ... Troy Murphy (born May 2, 1980 in Morristown, New Jersey) is a professional basketball player, currently playing power forward for the National Basketball Associations Golden State Warriors. ... Russell Sheriff Van Atta is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. ... Dave Yovanovits (born March 6, 1981 in Stanhope, New Jersey) is an American football player who currently plays guard for the Cleveland Browns. ...

Miscellaneous

Rev. ... Rutgers redirects here. ... Brooklyn Eagle, March 10, 1855 (partial) Brooklyn Eagle, March 20, 1855 William Poole, aka Bill The Butcher (July 1821 - March 8, 1855), was a member of the Bowery Boys street gang and the U.S. political party the Know-Nothings. ... Lucy Page Mercer Rutherfurd,(April 26, 1891-July 31, 1948) born in Washington,D.C..She was rumored to be the mistress of Franklin Roosevelt. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... William Henry Johnson, AKA Zip the Pinhead Zip the Pinhead, born William Henry Johnson, (1857 Liberty Corners, New Jersey – April 28, 1926 New York, New York) was an American freak show performer famous for his oddly tapered head. ...

References and other resources

Citations

  1. ^ Sussex County Board of chosen Freeholders, accessed 16 December 2006.
  2. ^ Sussex County Board of chosen Freeholders, accessed 16 December 2006.
  3. ^ N.B.: The term "Tri-State Area" also refers to the region surrounding New York City, including the states of New Jersey, New York and Connecticut.
  4. ^ The Human Cost of Heroin, New Jersey Herald, May 7, 2006

The letters NB can stand for Nb – the symbol for the chemical element Niobium Norwegian Bokmål language (ISO 639 alpha-2, nb) NB – the Canadian province of New Brunswick (Canada Post provincial abbreviation) NB, n. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Books and printed materials

  • Armstrong, William C. Pioneer Families of Northwestern New Jersey (Lambertville, New Jersey: Hunterdon House, 1979).
  • Cawley, James S. and Cawley, Margaret. Exploring the Little Rivers of New Jersey (New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1942, 1961, 1971, 1993). ISBN 0813506840
  • Chambers, Theodore Frelinghuysen. The Early Germans of New Jersey: Their History, Churches, and Genealogies (Dover, New Jersey, Dover Printing Company, 1895), passim.
  • Cummings, Warren D. Sussex County: A History (Newton, New Jersey: Newton Rotary Club, 1964). NO ISBN
  • Cunningham, John T. Railroad Wonder: The Lackawanna Cut-Off (Newark, New Jersey: Newark Sunday News, 1961). NO ISBN
  • Documents Relating to the Colonial, Revolutionary and Post-Revolutionary History of the State of New Jersey [Title Varies]. Archives of the State of New Jersey, 1st-2nd series. 47 volumes. (Newark, New Jersey: 1880-1949). NO ISBN
  • Honeyman, A. Van Doren (ed.). Northwestern New Jersey--A History of Somerset, Morris, Hunterdon, Warren, and Sussex Counties Volume 1. (Lewis Historical Publishing Co., New York, 1927). NO ISBN
  • Schaeffer, Casper M.D. (and Johnson, William M.). Memoirs and Reminiscences: Together with Sketches of the Early History of Sussex County, New Jersey. (Hackensack, New Jersey: Privately Printed, 1907). NO ISBN
  • Schrabisch, Max. Indian habitations in Sussex County, New Jersey Geological Survey of New Jersey, Bulletin No. 13. (Union Hill, New Jersey: Dispatch Printing Company, 1915). NO ISBN
  • Schrabisch, Max. Archaeology of Warren and Hunterdon counties Geological Survey of New Jersey, Bulletin No. 18. (Trenton, N.J., MacCrellish and Quigley co., state printers, 1917). NO ISBN
  • Snell, James P. History of Sussex and Warren Counties, New Jersey, With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers. (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1881). NO ISBN
  • Stickney, Charles E. Old Sussex County families of the Minisink Region from articles in the Wantage Recorder (compiled by Virginia Alleman Brown) (Washington, N.J. : Genealogical Researchers, 1988)
  • Thieme, Christopher D., On Crossroads and Signposts: An Etymology of Place Names in Sussex and Warren Counties, New Jersey. (New York: Newcastle Press, 2006). ISBN Pending

Maps and atlases

  • Map of Jonathan Hampton (1758) in the collection of the New Jersey Historical Society, Newark, New Jersey.
  • Hopkins, Griffith Morgan. Map of Sussex County, New Jersey. (1860) [Reprinted by the Sussex County Historical Society: Netcong, New Jersey: Esposito (Jostens), 2004.]
  • Beers, Frederick W. County Atlas of Warren, New Jersey: From actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers (New York: F.W. Beers & Co. 1874). [Reprinted by Warren County Historical Society: Harmony, New Jersey: Harmony Press, 1994].
  • Hagstrom Morris/Sussex/Warren counties atlas (Maspeth, New York: Hagstrom Map Company, Inc. 2004).

External links

County Government

  • Sussex County webpage.

Education


History and Tourism


News and Media

This box: view  talk  edit
Municipalities of Sussex County, New Jersey
(County Seat: Newton)
Boroughs Andover | Branchville | Franklin | Hamburg | Hopatcong | Ogdensburg | Stanhope | Sussex
Town Newton
Townships Andover Township | Byram Township | Frankford Township | Fredon Township | Green Township | Hampton Township | Hardyston Township | Lafayette Township | Montague Township | Sandyston Township | Sparta Township | Stillwater Township | Vernon Township | Walpack Township | Wantage Township
CDPs and other Communities Crandon Lakes | Highland Lake | Lake Mohawk | Vernon Valley
Rivers Clove Brook | Delaware River | Flat Brook | Lubbers Run | Musconetcong River | Papakating Creek | Paulins Kill | Pequannock River | Pequest River | Punkhorn Creek | Wallkill River | Wawayanda Creek
State of New Jersey
This box: view  talk  edit
Capital Trenton
Regions Central Jersey | Delaware Valley | Jersey Shore | Meadowlands | North Jersey | Pine Barrens | Shore Region | Skylands Region | South Jersey | New York metro area | Tri-State Region
Cities Atlantic City | Bayonne | Camden | Cherry Hill | Clifton | East Orange | Edison | Elizabeth | Hackensack | Hoboken | Jersey City | Linden | Long Branch | New Brunswick | Newark | Passaic | Paterson | Perth Amboy | Plainfield | Princeton | Toms River | Trenton | Union City | Vineland | In addition to the major cities listed, All Municipalities (by Population)
Counties Atlantic | Bergen | Burlington | Camden | Cape May | Cumberland | Essex | Gloucester | Hudson | Hunterdon | Mercer | Middlesex | Monmouth | Morris | Ocean | Passaic | Salem | Somerset | Sussex | Union | Warren

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sussex County, New Jersey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (819 words)
In the county the population is spread out with 27.90% under the age of 18, 6.20% from 18 to 24, 31.50% from 25 to 44, 25.30% from 45 to 64, and 9.10% who are 65 years of age or older.
Sussex County Community College is a two-year community college located at the intersection of County Route 519 and Plots Road in Newton.
Sussex County is served by a number of roads connecting it to the rest of the state and to both Pennsylvania and New York.
Sussex County, New Jersey, where we are (889 words)
Sussex County is situated at the extreme top of New Jersey and has always been off the beaten path due to it's rural nature.
Leaders of the new county met on November 20, 1753, to grant tavern licenses and to fix fees for liquor and provender.
In the spring of 1754, county fathers levied taxes of 100 pounds annually; most of it to pay bounties for the killing of wolves and panthers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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