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Encyclopedia > Sussex
Historic county of Sussex
Image:EnglandSussexTrad.png
Geography
Area: (1831) 907,920 acres (367,422 ha)
Rank: Ranked 13th
Administration
County town: Lewes
Chapman code: SSX

Sussex is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. It is bounded on the north by Surrey, east by Kent, south by the English Channel, and west by Hampshire, and is divided for local government into West Sussex and East Sussex and the City of Brighton and Hove. The city of Brighton & Hove was created a unitary authority in 1997; and was granted City status in 2000. Until then Chichester had been Sussex's only city. Sussex is the name of several places: United Kingdom: Sussex, England, an ancient kingdom; now East Sussex and West Sussex United States of America: Sussex, New Jersey Sussex, Wisconsin Sussex, Wyoming Sussex County, Delaware Sussex County, New Jersey Sussex County, Virginia Canada: Sussex, New Brunswick There is also a Sussex... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... one of the traditional counties of England File links The following pages link to this file: Sussex Categories: GFDL images ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a list of historic counties of England by area as at the 1831 census. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... This is about Lewes in England. ... Chapman codes are largely a superset of the ISO 3166-2:GB and BS 6879 codes identifying administrative divisions in the United Kingdom, Ireland and their surrounding islands, but covering historical divisions. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Kingdom of Sussex, (Suth Seaxe, i. ... This article is about the English county. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ... Brighton and Hove is a city on the south coast of England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... For the larger local government district, see Chichester (district). ...


The divisions of West Sussex and East Sussex were originally established in 1189, and had obtained separate administrations (Quarter Sessions) by the 16th century. This situation was recognised by the County of Sussex Act 1865. Under the Local Government Act 1888 the two divisions became two administrative counties (along with three county boroughs: Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings). [1] The Courts of Quarter Sessions or Quarter Sessions were periodic courts held in each county and county borough in England and Wales until 1972, when together with the Assize courts they were abolished by the Courts Act 1971 and replaced by a single permanent Crown Court of England and Wales. ... The Local Government Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. ... The division into counties is one of the larger divisions of England. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... For other places with the same name, see Eastbourne (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hastings (disambiguation). ...


The appellation Sussex remained in use as a ceremonial county until 1974, when the Lord-Lieutenant of Sussex was replaced with one each for East and West Sussex. The whole of Sussex has had a single police force since 1968. The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Flag of a Lord Lieutenant The title Lord Lieutenant is given to the British monarchs personal representatives around the United Kingdom, usually in a county or similar circumscription, with varying tasks throughout history. ...


Sussex still retains a strong local identity and the county's unofficial anthem is Sussex by the Sea. The county's motto, "We wun't be druv", reflects the strong-willed nature of its people in past centuries. Sussex's device shows six martlets. Sussex's county flower is the round-headed rampion, also known as the Pride of Sussex. Sussex are proud to have currently the best county cricket side in the country, Sussex County Cricket Club. June 16, the feast day of the county's patron saint St Richard, has been declared Sussex Day by West Sussex County Council.[2] Sussex by the Sea is a song written in 1907 by William Ward-Higgs. ... A coat of arms has been associated with the historic county of Sussex since the seventeenth century. ... A martlet is a type of heraldic bird similar to the swallow, but having no feet. ... A county flower is a flowering plant chosen to symbolise a county. ... Species See text. ... In the UK, County cricket is the domestic form of the sport of cricket that is considered to be first-class cricket. ... Sussex field against Derbyshire at Hove on 24 April 2005 The Arthur Gilligan stand at Hove The Pavilion at Hove Leaving the County Ground at Hove Sussex County Cricket Club is one of the 18 major county clubs which make up the English domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint Richard of Chichester (also known as Richard de Wych or variations thereof) (Droitwich, 1197 – 1253 in Dover) is a saint (canonized 1262) who was Bishop of Chichester. ...

Contents

Geography

Relief

The physical geography of Sussex relies heavily on its lying on the southern part of the Wealden anticline. The major features of that are the high lands which cross the county in a west to east direction: the Weald itself, and the South Downs. The former consists of clays and sands; the latter chalk. Between those two ridges, mainly in West Sussex, lies the ‘’Vale of Sussex’’; at the eastern end of the county is the valley of the River Rother, which flows into what was a long sea inlet to reach the sea at Rye Bay. A weald once meant a dense forest, especially the famous great wood once stretching far beyond the ancient counties of Sussex and Kent, England, where this country of smaller woods is still called the Weald. ... Near Beachy Head The South Downs is one of the two areas of chalk downland in southern England. ... The River Rother (originally named Limen) is one of the longest rivers in Kent, England. ... , Rye is a small hill top town and civil parish in East Sussex, England, on the River Rother, and at the western edge of the Walland Marsh, part of the Romney Marshes. ...


The Weald

The Weald runs in an easterly direction from St Leonard’s Forest, south-west of Crawley; and continues to Ashdown Forest. Its eastern extremity is in two sections, divided by the River Rother valley. The northern arm reaches the sea at Folkestone (in Kent); the southern at Fairlight Down east of Hastings, For other uses, see Crawley (disambiguation). ... A gate into Ashdown Forest at sunset Ashdown - a dark and mysterious forest Ashdown Forest in the county of East Sussex, in South East England is a large open area of heathland together with pine, birch and oak woodland in the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. ... The River Rother (originally named Limen) is one of the longest rivers in Kent, England. ... , Folkestone (IPA: ) is a coastal resort town in the Shepway district of Kent, England. ... For other uses, see Hastings (disambiguation). ...


Within the Weald lies Sussex's highest point, the pine-clad Black Down, close to the Surrey border at 917 ft (280 m). Another high point is in the part called Forest Ridges: a height of about 800 ft (240 m) is reached at Beacon Hill in the neighbourhood of Crowborough. A weald once meant a dense forest, especially the famous great wood once stretching far beyond the ancient counties of Sussex and Kent, England, where this country of smaller woods is still called the Weald. ... View of Blackdown, painted by Helen Allingham, 1902. ... Crowborough is the largest inland town in East Sussex, United Kingdom. ...


The High Weald, as the main area is known, gets its name from ’’wilderness’’ or forest, and it retains the highest proportion of ancient woodlands in the country. Around 1660 the total area under forest was estimated to exceed 200,000 acres (800 km²), and supplied the furnaces of the ironworks which formed an important industry in the county until the 17th century, and which survived even until the early years of the 19th century. Ironwork is any weapon, artwork, utensil or architectural feature made of iron especially used for decorative purposes. ...


South Downs

The South Downs start from a point near Petersfield in Hampshire . On entering Sussex, their summit is about 10 miles (16 km) from the sea. They run east for some 50 miles (80 km), gradually approaching the coast, and terminating in the bold promontory of Beachy Head near Eastbourne. Their average height is about 500 ft (150 m), though Ditchling Beacon is 813 ft (248 m) (the third highest summit) and many other summits exceed 700 ft (210 m). Petersfield is a market town in the English county of Hampshire, situated on the northern border of the South Downs. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... How the Beachy Head Lighthouse was built. ... For other places called Eastbourne, see Eastbourne (disambiguation). ... Ditchling Beacon is the third-highest point on the South Downs in south-east England, consisting of a large chalk hill with a particularly steep northern face, covered with open grassland and sheep-grazing areas. ...


Dry valleys are a feature of the Downs. One in particular, known as Devil's Dyke, north-west of Brighton, is a popular tourist and outdoor sports venue. The blue ice covering Lake Fryxell, in the Transantarctic Mountains, comes from glacial meltwater from the Canada Glacier and other smaller glaciers. ... View from Devils Dyke Devils Dyke is a V-Shaped valley on the South Downs Way in southern England, near Brighton and Hove. ...


Vale of Sussex

The Vale of Sussex is the lower undulating land which came into being when the softer clays between the Weald and the Downs were worn away. Crossing the Vale are most of the rivers in Sussex: those rising on the slopes of the Weald and cutting through the Downs to reach the sea (see Drainage).


The coastal plain

This is a fertile narrow belt from Chichester to Brighton. Once noted for market gardening, it is now heavily built-up into a sprawling coastal conurbation. The beaches along the coast vary from sandy to shingle: that factor, together with the mild climate of the coast, sheltered by the hills from north and east winds, have resulted in the growth of numerous resort towns, of which the most popular are (east to west) Hastings, Bexhill, Eastbourne, Seaford, Brighton, Shoreham-by-Sea, Worthing, Littlehampton and Bognor. For other uses, see Hastings (disambiguation). ... Bexhill is a small village in New_South_Wales, Australia. ... For other places with the same name, see Eastbourne (disambiguation). ... Seaford is the name of a place in the United Kingdom: Seaford, East Sussex Seaford is the name of some places in the United States of America: Seaford, Delaware Seaford, New York Seaford, Virginia Seaford is also a place in Victoria, Australia: Seaford, Victoria This is a disambiguation page &#8212... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex, England, is bordered on the north by the South Downs, on the west by the Adur valley and on the south by the River Adur and Shoreham Beach. ... For other uses, see Worthing (disambiguation). ... , Littlehampton also known as chavhmpton is a seaside resort town in the Arun District of West Sussex, England. ... Bognor Regis is a seaside resort town in West Sussex, England, and has a permanent population of about 20,000. ...


See also: Sussex coast. The Sussex Coast is the southern coast of Sussex in England. ...


Marshland

There are several areas of low-lying marshland along the coast; from west to east these are:

  • in the west of the county, south of Chichester, lying between Chichester Harbour and Pagham Harbour;
  • beyond Beachy Head, the ‘’Pevensey Levels’’;
  • beyond Hastings, the ‘’Pett Levels’’;
  • beyond Rye, the ‘’Walland Marsh’’ part of Romney Marsh.

All were originally bays; natural coastal deposition and man-made protective walls have given rise to alluvial deposition. For the larger local government district, see Chichester (district). ... , Rye is a small hill top town and civil parish in East Sussex, England, on the River Rother, and at the western edge of the Walland Marsh, part of the Romney Marshes. ... The Romney Marsh is a sparsely-populated wetland area in the counties of Kent and East Sussex in the south-east of England. ...


Drainage

The rivers wholly within the county are relatively short. All rise in the Weald (St Leonard’s Forest area) and, apart from the eastern River Rother, flow south to the English Channel, using gaps in the South Downs as they do so. The mouths of all have been affected by longshore drift, particularly during violent storms during the Middle Ages. From west to east they are: Longshore drift (sometimes known as shore drift, LSD or littoral drift) is a geological process by which sediments such as sand or other materials, move along a beach shore. ...

The Arun is a river in Sussex. ... The River Rother is a river which flows for thirty miles from Empshott in Hampshire to Stopham in West Sussex, where it joins the River Arun. ... , Horsham is a market town in West Sussex, England with a population of roughly 50,000. ... , Littlehampton also known as chavhmpton is a seaside resort town in the Arun District of West Sussex, England. ... The Adur is a river in Sussex (in England). ... Cuckfield High Street Cuckfield is a large village and civil parish in the Mid Sussex District of West Sussex, England. ... Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex, England, is bordered on the north by the South Downs, on the west by the Adur valley and on the south by the River Adur and Shoreham Beach. ... The River Ouse is a river in the county of West and East Sussex in England. ... Newhaven is a town in the Lewes District of East Sussex in England. ... Cuckmere Haven The Cuckmere River flows through the chalk landscape of the South Downs of East Sussex from the north of Heathfield to Exceat on the East Sussex coast. ... The Parish of Heathfield and Waldron is in East Sussex, some 16 miles from the coastal town of Eastbourne and 17 miles from the historic spa town of Royal Tunbridge Wells in Kent. ... The River Rother (originally named Limen) is one of the longest rivers in Kent, England. ... Bewl Water is a reservoir in the valley of the River Teise straddling the boundary between Kent and East Sussex. ... The Parish of Heathfield and Waldron is in East Sussex, some 16 miles from the coastal town of Eastbourne and 17 miles from the historic spa town of Royal Tunbridge Wells in Kent. ... , Rye is a small hill top town and civil parish in East Sussex, England, on the River Rother, and at the western edge of the Walland Marsh, part of the Romney Marshes. ...

Climate

South East England combines the highest average daytime temperatures found in the British Isles with the highest sunshine averages on the British mainland. There are between 25 and 30 inches (635-760 mm) of rainfall; and there can be high variation of temperature between day and night.


The climate of the coastal districts is strongly influenced by the sea, which because of its tendency to warm up slower than land, can result in cooler temperatures than inland in the summer. In the autumn months, the coast sometimes has higher temperatures. Rainfall during the summer months is mainly from thunderstorms and thundery showers; from January to March the heavier rainfall is due to south-westerly frontal systems. The coast has consistently more sunshine than the inland areas: sea breezes, blowing off the sea, clear any cloud from the coast.


Industries

Agriculture

Sussex has retained much of its rural nature: apart from the coastal strip, it has few large towns. Although in 1841 over 40% of the population were employed in agriculture (including fishing}, today less than 2% are so employed. There are still fishing fleets, notably at Rye and Hastings, but the number of boats is much reduced.


Historically, the fisheries were of great importance, including cod, herring, mackerel, sprats, plaice, sole, turbot, shrimps, crabs, lobsters, oysters, mussels, cockles, whelks and periwinkles. Bede records that St Wilfrid, when he visited the county in 681, taught the people the art of netfishing. At the time of the Domesday survey the fisheries were extensive, and no fewer than 285 salinae (saltworks) existed. The customs of the Brighton fishermen were documented in 1579. Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... For other uses, see Bede (disambiguation). ... Wilfrid (c. ... This article is about the 11th century census. ...


There are working harbours at Rye, Hastings, Newhaven and Shoreham; whilst Pagham and Chichester harbours cater for leisure craft, as does Brighton Marina.


Iron working

In medieval times the Weald was of national importance in the iron industry, and the remains of that industry are still to be seen in the form of Furnace ponds. The Wealden iron industry is the result of a combination of the natural materials being available for the making of iron. ...


Service industries

The string of holiday resorts, and the many tourist attractions, form part of the main economic base in Sussex. The presence of the University of Sussex and the University of Brighton provide employment for many more; whilst reasonable rail connections allow many people to work in London. The University of Sussex (also known colloquially as Sussex Uni) is an English campus university which is situated next to the East Sussex village of Falmer, and is four miles from Brighton. ... // University of Brighton Logo © University of Brighton The University of Brighton (formerly Brighton Polytechnic until its re-designation in 1992) is a multi-site university based in the city of Brighton & Hove (England). ...


"Borough English"

The custom of borough-English, by which land descends to the youngest son, prevailed to an extraordinary degree in Sussex, and no fewer than 140 manors have been catalogued in which it was found. Gavelkind tenure existed in Rye, in the large manor of Brede, and in Coustard manor (in Brede parish). Ultimogeniture, also known as postremogeniture or junior right, is the tradition of inheritance by the last-born of the entirety of a parents wealth, estate or office. ... Gavelkind was a peculiar system of land tenure associated chiefly with the county of Kent, but found also in other parts of England. ... Brede is the name for several places, among others: River Brede in East Sussex, England with the Brede village. ...


Population

The area of the ancient county is 933,887 acres (3,800 km²), with a population in 1891 of 550,446 and in 1901 of 605,202. The earliest statement as to the population is made by Bede, who describes the county as containing in the year 681 land of 7000 families; allowing ten to a family (a reasonable estimate at that date), the total population would be 70,000.


In 1693 the county is stated to have contained 21,537 houses. If seven were allowed to a house at that date, the total population would be 150,759. It is curious, therefore, to observe that in 1801 the population was only 159,311. The decline of the Sussex ironworks probably accounts for the small increase of population during several centuries, although after the massacre of St Bartholomew upwards of 1500 Huguenots landed at Rye, and in 1685, after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, many more refugees were added to the county. The St. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


An act of Henry VII (1504) directed that for convenience the county court should be held at Lewes as well as at Chichester, and this apparently gave rise to the division of Sussex into east and west parts. Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ...


History

See main article: History of Sussex Apart from conclusions to be drawn from prehistoric remains, the history of Sussex begins in 477, when the Saxons landed in the west of the county under Aelle and his three sons, and founded the kingdom of the South Saxons (see Kingdom of Sussex). ...


Antiquities

From early times castles guarded three important entries from the coast through the South Downs into the interior provided by the valleys of the Ouse, the Adur and the Arun. These are respectively at Lewes, Bramber and Arundel. The ruins of the first two, though imposing, do not compare in grandeur with the third, which is still the seat of the dukes of Norfolk. For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... Near Beachy Head The South Downs is one of the two areas of chalk downland in southern England. ... The River Ouse is a river in the county of West and East Sussex in England. ... The Adur is a river in Sussex (in England). ... The Arun is a river in Sussex. ... This is about Lewes in England. ... Bramber is a village and civil parish in the Horsham District of West Sussex, England. ... This article is about the town in England. ... Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk holding the baton of the Earl Marshal. ...


More famous than these are the massive remains, in part Norman but mainly of the 13th century, of the stronghold of Pevensey Castle, within the walls of Roman Anderitum. Other ruins are those of the finely situated Hastings Castle; the Norman remains at Knepp near West Grinstead; the picturesque and remarkably perfect moated fortress of Bodiam, of the 14th century; and Herstmonceux Castle, a beautiful 15th century building of brick. Norman conquests in red. ... Remnants of castle Pevensey Castle is a medieval castle and former Roman fort at Pevensey in the English county of East Sussex. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... View from the castle inner bailey showing the outer Roman curtain wall. ... After landing here in 1066, William Of Normandy ordered a fortification to be built, one being Pevensey Castle and the other was Hastings. ... The 11th centuary village of West Grinstead is in West Sussex. ... The moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire, England Moats (also known as a Fosse) were deep and wide water-filled trenches, excavated to provide a barrier against attack upon castle ramparts or other fortifications. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Bodiam is a small village in East Sussex, England in the valley of the River Rother near to the Sussex villages of Sandhurst and Ewhurst Green. ... Herstmonceux Castle Herstmonceux (pronounced: Hers-mon-syu) is a village in the county of East Sussex in the South East of England. ...


The County is also rich in moated sites, and smaller castles, mostly found in the low weald.


Towns and cities

Major towns and cities of Sussex include:

This article is about the town in England. ... Location within the British Isles Battle is a small town in East Sussex, England, about 5 miles (8 km) from Hastings, and the site of the Battle of Hastings, where William, Duke of Normandy, defeated King Harold II to become William I. Battle Abbey takes its name from the town... , Bognor Regis is a seaside resort town and civil parish in the Arun District of West Sussex, England. ... Bexhill-on-Sea is a town and seaside resort in the county of East Sussex, in the south of England. ... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... The University of Sussex (also known colloquially as Sussex Uni) is an English campus university which is situated next to the East Sussex village of Falmer, and is four miles from Brighton. ... // University of Brighton Logo © University of Brighton The University of Brighton (formerly Brighton Polytechnic until its re-designation in 1992) is a multi-site university based in the city of Brighton & Hove (England). ... , Burgess Hill is a town and civil parish within the Mid Sussex district of West Sussex, England, close to the border with East Sussex. ... For the larger local government district, see Chichester (district). ... The University of Chichester is a new university based in West Sussex, England. ... For other uses, see Crawley (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Eastbourne (disambiguation). ... East Grinstead (archaically spelt Grimstead[1]) is a town and civil parish in the northeastern corner of Mid Sussex, West Sussex in England near the East Sussex, Surrey, and Kent borders. ... For other uses, see Hastings (disambiguation). ... Statistics Population: 22,800 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TQ335245 Administration District: Mid Sussex Shire county: West Sussex Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: West Sussex Historic county: Sussex Services Police force: {{{Police}}} Ambulance service: South East Coast Post office and... , Horsham is a market town in West Sussex, England with a population of roughly 50,000. ... This is about Lewes in England. ... , Littlehampton also known as chavhmpton is a seaside resort town in the Arun District of West Sussex, England. ... , Midhurst is a market town in the English county of West Sussex, with a population of approximately 5000. ... Map sources for Petworth at grid reference SU8821 Petworth is a small town in West Sussex, England. ... , Rye is a small hill top town and civil parish in East Sussex, England, on the River Rother, and at the western edge of the Walland Marsh, part of the Romney Marshes. ... Map sources for Worthing at grid reference TQ1303 Worthing is the largest town and a local government district in West Sussex, England. ...

See also

East Sussex is a county in South East England. ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... The Kingdom of Sussex, (Suth Seaxe, i. ... Sussex by the Sea is a song written in 1907 by William Ward-Higgs. ... The following are lists of recreational walks in East Sussex, England // Short walks Abbots Wood near Hailsham has two walks, the Abbots Amble, 2. ... Sussex field against Derbyshire at Hove on 24 April 2005 The Arthur Gilligan stand at Hove The Pavilion at Hove Leaving the County Ground at Hove Sussex County Cricket Club is one of the 18 major county clubs which make up the English domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county... Look up twitten in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1638 U class at Sheffield Park station The Bluebell Railway is a heritage line running for nine miles along the border between East Sussex and West Sussex, England. ... A scene on a heritage railway. ... Peacehaven is a town in the Lewes District of East Sussex, England. ... The Royal Sussex Regiment, a regiment in the British Army , was formed in 1881 from the 35th (Royal Sussex) Regiment of Foot and the 107th Regiment of Foot (Bengal Light Infantry) . // Following its formation the 1st Battalion was sent to the Sudan on the unsuccessful attempt to save General... Stool ball is a historical ball game, originating in southern England, where variants are still played in some schools. ...

Further reading

  • "Angels in the Sussex Air", an anthology of poetry by Sussex authors chosen and edited by Patrick Garland, ISBN 1-85619-725-5
  • "An Historical Atlas of Sussex", An Atlas of the History of the Counties of East and West Sussex, edited by Kim Leslie and Brian Short, with maps by Susan Rowland, published by Phillimore & Co. Ltd, Chichester, 1999, ISBN 1-86077-112-2

Patrick Garland (born April 10, 1935) is an actor and a director of British theatre, television and film, and a writer. ...

Links and References

  • The County of Sussex Website
  • Sussex County Cricket Club
  • Sussex County Football Association
  • Sussex Enterprise
  • Sussex Past (The Sussex Archaeological Society)
  • Sussex Wildlife Trust
  • Sussex Police
  • The Royal Sussex Regimental Association [3]
  • University of Sussex
  • Sussex search and Rescue

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


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