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Encyclopedia > Susquehannock
Susquehannock
Susquehannock

The Susquehannock people were natives of areas adjacent to the Susquehanna River and its tributaries from the southern part of what is now New York, through Pennsylvania, to the mouth of the Susquehanna in Maryland at the north end of the Chesapeake Bay. These people were called Image File history File links Susquehannock_lang. ... Image File history File links Susquehannock_lang. ... This article is the current U.S. Collaboration of the Week. ... The Susquehanna River is a river in the northeastern United States. ... A tributary (or affluent or confluent) is a contributory stream, a river that does not reach the sea, but joins another major river (a parent river), to which it contributes its waters, swelling its discharge. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 160 miles (255 km)  - Length 280 miles (455 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,417 sq. ... Chesapeake Bay - Landsat photo Chesapeake Bay where the Susquehanna River empties into it. ...

It is unknown what the Susquehannocks called themselves. The Susquehannocks were Iroquoian-speaking people who rejected invitations to join the Five Nations Iroquois League to the north. This made them a typical enemy of the Five Nations. The true nature of their society, whether comprised of a single tribe in a single village, or a confederacy of smaller tribes occupying scattered villages, will probably never be known, since Europeans seldom visited this inland region during the early colonial period. It's likely that the Susquehannocks had occupied the same land for several hundred years. They had a formidable village in the lower river valley near present-day Lancaster, Pennsylvania, when Captain John Smith of Jamestown met them in 1608. He estimated the population of their village to be two thousand, although he never visited it. Modern estimates of their population, including the whole territory in 1600, range as high as seven thousand. The Susquehannock people were natives of areas adjacent to the Susquehanna River and its tributaries from the southern part of what is now New York, through Pennsylvania, to the mouth of the Susquehanna in Maryland at the north end of the Chesapeake Bay. ... This article is about the First Nations people, the Wyandot, also known as the Huron. ... The Susquehannock people were natives of areas adjacent to the Susquehanna River and its tributaries from the southern part of what is now New York, through Pennsylvania, to the mouth of the Susquehanna in Maryland at the north end of the Chesapeake Bay. ... The Lenape or Lenni-Lenape (later named Delaware Indians by Europeans) were, in the 1600s, loosely organized bands of Native American people practicing small-scale agriculture to augment a largely mobile hunter-gatherer society in the region around the Delaware River, the lower Hudson River, and western Long Island Sound. ... The English are an ethnic group originating in the lowlands of Great Britain and are descendent primarily from the Anglo-Saxons, the Celts with minor influences from the Scandanavians and other groups. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,417 sq. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq. ... The Algonquins or Algonkins are an aboriginal North American people speaking Algonquin, an Algonquian language. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 160 miles (255 km)  - Length 280 miles (455 km)  - % water 2. ... The Iroquoian languages are a Native American language family. ... Five Nations can refer to: The original five nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, a union of Native American tribes The Five Nations Championship in rugby union, now the Six Nations Championship The Five Nations of the Eberron Campaign Setting. ... The Iroquois Confederacy (Haudenosaunee, also known as the League of Peace and Power, Five Nations, or Six Nations) is a group of First Nations/Native Americans. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Captain John Smith John Smith (1580–1631) was an English soldier, sailor, and author. ...


Over the next hundred years, the Susquehannock population was devasted by the ravages of disease and warfare. Some groups left the area and joined other tribes to the north, south, and west. The remaining Susquehannock, numbering only a few hundred, eventually settled in a new village in Lancaster County called Conestoga Town, where they lived under the protection of the provincial government of the Pennsylvania Commonwealth. Nevertheless, their population declined steadily, so that only twenty-two people remained in Conestoga Town in 1763. That year the Paxton Boys, in response to Indian hostilities on the western frontier, attacked the village and brutally murdered all twenty people that they could find. The Paxton Boys were a group of backcountry frontiersmen from western Pennsylvania who banded together to defend themselves against Indian attack during Pontiacs Rebellion. ... Combatants British Empire American Indians Commanders Jeffrey Amherst Henry Bouquet Pontiac Guyasuta Pontiacs Rebellion was a war launched in 1763 by North American Indians who were dissatisfied with British rule in the Great Lakes region and the Ohio Country after the British victory in the French and Indian War...


References

  • Illick, Joseph E. Colonial Pennsylvania: a History. New York. Scribner. 1976.
  • Kent, Barry C. Susquehanna's Indians. Harrisburg, The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. 1984.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Susquehannock (3814 words)
Susquehannock alliances and trade also extended to the Erie and Neutrals, with the result that the Iroquois were surrounded by hostile tribes.
For the Susquehannock, the worst blow was a smallpox epidemic in 1661 that devastated their population to a point from which it never recovered.
Under the terms of the peace agreed to, the Susquehannock were settled among the Mohawk and Oneida, became members of the Iroquois "covenant chain," and their dominion over the Delaware and other former allies was also surrendered to the League.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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