FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Sushi" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Sushi
Food Portal

In Japanese cuisine, sushi (寿司, 鮨, 鮓?) is vinegared rice, usually topped with other ingredients including fish (cooked or uncooked) and vegetables. Outside of Japan, sushi is sometimes misunderstood to mean the raw fish by itself, or even any fresh raw-seafood dishes.[1] In Japan, sliced raw fish alone is called sashimi and is distinct from sushi, as sashimi is the raw fish component, not the rice component. The word sushi itself comes from an outdated grammatical form of a word that is no longer used in other contexts; literally, sushi means "it's sour." Image File history File links Portal. ... Sushi is primarily used to refer to a Japanese food made out of vinegared rice (see Sushi). ... There are many views as to what defines Japanese cuisine, as the everyday food of the Japanese people has diversified immensely over the past century or so. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Assorted sashimi Sashimi (Japanese: ) is a Japanese delicacy primarily consisting of very fresh raw seafoods, thinly sliced into pieces about 2. ...


There are various types of sushi: sushi served rolled inside nori (dried and pressed layer sheets of seaweed or alga) called makizushi (巻き) or rolls; sushi made with toppings laid with hand-formed clumps of rice called nigirizushi (にぎり); toppings stuffed into a small pouch of fried tofu called inarizushi; and toppings served scattered over a bowl of sushi rice called chirashi-zushi (ちらし). For other uses, see Nori (disambiguation). ... Ascophyllum nodosum exposed to the sun in Nova Scotia, Canada Dead Mans Fingers (Codium fragile) off Massachusetts coast For the band, see; Seaweed (band) For the rock musician, see; Seaweed (musician) Seaweeds are any of a large number of marine benthic algae. ... Osborne (talk) 20:17, 5 December 2007 (UTC):For the programming language, see algae (programming language) Laurencia, a marine red alga from Hawaii. ... For other uses, see Tofu (disambiguation). ...

Different types of sushi ready to be eaten.
Different types of sushi ready to be eaten.

Contents

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ...

History

Main article: History of sushi

The main idea in the preparation of sushi is the preservation and fermentation of fish with salt and rice, a process that has been traced back to China and Southeast Asia where fish and rice fermentation dishes still exist today. The science behind the fermentation of fish in rice is that the vinegar produced from the fermenting rice breaks the fish down into amino acids. This results into one of the five basic tastes, called umami in Japanese.[2] The oldest form of sushi in Japan, Narezushi still very closely resembles this process. In Japan, Narezushi evolved into Oshizushi and ultimately Edomae nigirizushi, which is what the world today knows as "sushi". The basic idea behind the preparation of sushi, a well-known Japanese dish, is the practice of preserving fish with salt and fermenting with rice, a process that can probably be traced back to seafood-preserving methods used in China and South-East Asia, where countries have a long history... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... This article is about the class of chemicals. ... Human taste sensory organs, called taste buds or gustatory calyculi, and concentrated on the upper surface of the tongue, appear to be receptive to relatively few chemical species as tastes. ...


Modern Japanese sushi has little resemblance to the traditional lacto-fermented rice dish. Originally, when the fermented fish was taken out of the rice, only the fish was consumed and the fermented rice was discarded. The strong-tasting and -smelling funazushi, a kind of narezushi made near Lake Biwa in Japan, resembles the traditional fermented dish. Lacto-fermentation is the method of pickling which is traditionally used to preserve vegetables. ... Prepared Fermented Fish Fermented Fish is an Eskimo food that is eaten raw and frozen. ... Lake Biwa ), formerly known as ÅŒmi Lake, is the largest fresh water lake in Japan, located in Shiga Prefecture (west-central Honshu), northeast of the former capital city of Kyoto. ...


Beginning in the Muromachi period (1336–1573) of Japan, vinegar was added to the mixture for better taste and for preservation. The vinegar accentuated the rice's sourness, and was known to increase its life span, allowing the fermentation process to be shortened and eventually abandoned. In the following centuries, sushi in Osaka evolved into oshi-zushi, the seafood and the rice were pressed using wooden (usually bamboo) molds. By the mid 18th century, this form of sushi had reached Edo (contemporary Tokyo).[3] The Muromachi period (Japanese: 室町時代, Muromachi-jidai, also known as the Muromachi era, the Muromachi bakufu, the Ashikaga era, the Ashikaga period, or the Ashikaga bakufu) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1336 to 1573. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... For other uses, see Fermentation. ... For other uses, see Osaka (disambiguation). ... Edo (Japanese: , literally: bay-door, estuary, pronounced //), once also spelled Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of the Japanese capital Tokyo. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ...

Sushi by Hiroshige in Edo period
Sushi by Hiroshige in Edo period

The contemporary version, internationally known as "sushi," was invented by Hanaya Yohei (華屋与兵衛; 1799–1858) at the end of Edo period in Edo. The sushi invented by Hanaya was an early form of fast food that was not fermented, (therefore prepared quickly) and could be eaten with one's hands roadside or in a theatre.[3] Originally, this sushi was known as Edomae zushi, because it used freshly-caught fish in the Edo-mae (Edo Bay or Tokyo Bay). Though the fish used in modern sushi no longer usually come from Tokyo Bay, it is still formally known as Edomae nigirizushi. Memorial portrait of Hiroshige by Kunisada. ... The Edo period ), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1868. ... Hanaya Yohei (華屋与兵衛 or 花屋與兵衛; 1799-1858) is generally credited as the inventor of todays Tokyo-style (Edo-mae; 江戸前) nigiri sushi (hand-formed sushi) at the end of Japans Edo period. ... The Edo period ), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1868. ... Edo (Japanese: , literally: bay-door, estuary, pronounced //), once also spelled Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of the Japanese capital Tokyo. ... Tokyo Bay from space Tokyo Bay ) is a bay in the southern Kantō region of Japan. ...


Types of sushi

Types of sushi
Types of sushi

The common ingredient across all the different kinds of sushi is sushi rice (known as shari in Japanese). The variety in sushi arises from the different fillings and toppings, condiments, and the way these ingredients are put together. The same ingredients may be assembled in a traditional or a contemporary way, creating a very different final result.[4] Made with gimp By french wikipédiste Rinaldum Licences GFDL GPL and CC http://fr. ... Made with gimp By french wikipédiste Rinaldum Licences GFDL GPL and CC http://fr. ... Sushi comes in many varieties. ...


Nigiri-zushi

  • Nigiri-zushi (握り寿司, lit. hand-formed sushi). This is the most typical form of sushi in restaurants[citation needed]. It consists of an oblong mound of sushi rice that is pressed between the palms of the hands, with a speck of wasabi and a slice of topping called neta draped over it. This is possibly bound with a thin band of nori, and is often served in pairs.
  • Gunkan-maki (軍艦巻, lit. warship roll). A special type of nigiri-zushi: an oval, hand-formed clump of sushi rice that has a strip of "nori" wrapped around its perimeter to form a vessel that is filled in with topping(s). The topping is typically some soft, loose or fine-chopped ingredient that requires the confinement of nori such as roe, natto, oysters, and quail eggs. Gunkan-maki was invented at the Ginza Kyubey (Kubei) restaurant in 1931;[5][6] its invention significantly expanded the repertoire of soft toppings used in sushi.

Binomial name Matsum. ... This article is about fish eggs. ... Natto eaten on top of rice is commonly stirred before consumption Nattō ) is a traditional Japanese food made from fermented soybeans, popular especially at breakfast. ... The Ginza area of Tokyo, Japan The Wako department store occupies a busy corner in Ginza Ginza (銀座) is a place in Chūō Ward, Tokyo named after the silver coin foundry or Ginza established here in 1612 (Edo period). ...

Maki-zushi (roll)

Rolling maki
Rolling maki
Maki rolls
Maki rolls
  • Makizushi (巻き寿司, lit. rolled sushi). A cylindrical piece, formed with the help of a bamboo mat, called a makisu (巻き簾). Makizushi is generally wrapped in nori, but can occasionally be found wrapped in a thin omelette, sesame seeds, cucumber, or parsley.[1] Makizushi is usually cut into six or eight pieces, which constitutes a single roll order. Below are some common types of makizushi, but many other kinds exist.
    • Futomaki (太巻き, lit. large or fat rolls). A large cylindrical piece, with nori on the outside. A typical futomaki is three or four centimeters (1.5 in) in diameter. They are often made with two or three fillings that are chosen for their complementary tastes and colors. During the Setsubun festival, it is traditional in Kansai to eat uncut futomaki in its cylindrical form. Futomaki is generally vegetarian, but may include toppings such as tiny fish eggs.
    • Hosomaki (細巻き, lit. thin rolls). A small cylindrical piece, with the nori on the outside. A typical hosomaki has a diameter of about two centimeters (0.75 in). They generally contain only one filling, often tuna, cucumber, kanpyō, thinly sliced carrots, or, more recently, avocado.
      • Kappamaki, (河童巻き) a kind of Hosomaki filled with cucumber, is named after the Japanese legendary water imp fond of cucumbers called the kappa. Traditionally, Kappamaki is consumed to clear the palate between eating raw fish and other kinds of food, so that the flavors of the fish are distinct from the tastes of other foods.
      • Tekkamaki (鉄火巻き) is a kind of Hosomaki filled with raw tuna. Although some believe that the name "Tekka", meaning 'red hot iron', alludes to the color of the tuna flesh, it actually originated as a quick snack to eat in gambling dens called "Tekkaba (鉄火場)", much like the sandwich.[7][8]
      • Negitoromaki (ねぎとろ巻) is a kind of Hosomaki filled with scallion and chopped tuna. Fatty tuna is often used in this style.
      • Tsunamayomaki (ツナマヨ巻) is a kind of Hosomaki filled with canned tuna tossed with mayonnaise.
    • Uramaki (裏巻き, lit. inside-out rolls). A medium-sized cylindrical piece, with two or more fillings. Uramaki differs from other maki because the rice is on the outside and the nori inside. The filling is in the center surrounded by nori, then a layer of rice, and an outer coating of some other ingredients such as roe or toasted sesame seeds. It can be made with different fillings such as tuna, crab meat, avocado, mayonnaise, cucumber, carrots. This is typically thought of as an invention to suit the American palate [2], and is not commonly seen in Japan. The increasing popularity of sushi in North America, as well as around the world, has resulted in numerous kinds of uramaki and regional off-shoots being created, such as the California roll, the B.C. roll (grilled salmon skin), and the Philadelphia roll (cream cheese).
      • The caterpillar roll includes avocado, unagi, and carrot greens.
      • The dynamite roll includes yellowtail (hamachi), and fillings such as bean sprouts, carrots, chili and spicy mayo.
      • The rainbow roll features like a sashimi, layered outside with rice.
      • The spider roll includes fried soft shell crab and other fillings such as cucumber, avocado, daikon sprouts or lettuce, roe, and spicy mayonnaise.
      • A Philadelphia roll contains smoked salmon, cream cheese, cucumber, and/or onion.
      • A BC roll has grilled salmon with sweet sauce and cucumber. It is named after British Columbia for its famous wild Pacific salmon.
      • A crunchy roll is typically a California roll with shrimp tempura wrapped inside with the other ingredients, with the outside of the roll coated with fried tempura batter crumbs. It is often served with chili sauce on the side.
      • The Godzilla Roll includes yellowtail, deep-fried in tempura, topped with teriyaki and a stripe of hot sauce, and then sprinkled with green onions.
      • Other rolls may include scallops, spicy tuna, beef or chicken or teriyaki roll, okra, vegetables, and cheese. Sushi rolls can also be made with Brown rice and black rice. These have also appeared in Japanese cuisine.
  • Temaki (手巻き, lit. hand rolls). A large cone-shaped piece of nori on the outside and the ingredients spilling out the wide end. A typical temaki is about ten centimeters (4 in) long, and is eaten with fingers because it is too awkward to pick it up with chopsticks. For optimal taste and texture, Temaki must be eaten quickly after being made because the nori cone soon absorbs moisture from the filling and loses its crispness and becomes somewhat difficult to bite.
Makizushi selection (Futomaki and Inarizushi at right) from a Kansai Super store.
Makizushi selection (Futomaki and Inarizushi at right) from a Kansai Super store.
  • Inari-zushi (稲荷寿司, stuffed sushi). A pouch of fried tofu filled with usually just sushi rice. It is named after the Shinto god Inari, who is believed to have a fondness for fried tofu. The pouch is normally fashioned as deep-fried tofu (油揚げ, abura age). Regional variations include pouches are made of a thin omelet (帛紗寿司, fukusa-zushi or 茶巾寿司, chakin-zushi) or dried gourd shavings (干瓢, kanpyō).

A selection of makisu mats with bamboo sticks of different thicknesses The Makisu (Japanese: 巻す) is a mat made of long bamboo strips woven together with a cotton string used in the preparation and presentation of Japanese food. ... An omelette Ham, cheese, and vegetable omelette served with fresh fruit. ... Setsubun, Tokuan shrine In Japan, Setsubun (節分) is the day before the beginning of each season. ... The Kansai (Japanese: 関西) region of Japan, also known as the Kinki region (近畿地方, Kinki-chihō), lies in the Southern-Central region of Japans main island, Honshu. ... Kanpyō ) is dried gourd shavings, an ingredient in traditional Edo style Japanese cuisine. ... A drawing of a kappa which was reported to have been caught in a net on Mito East beach in 1801. ... This article is about the food item. ... Chopped spring onion The common name scallion(Or Don Patch sword as on Bobobo) is associated with various members of the genus Allium that lack a fully-developed bulb. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ... Binomial name Sesamum indicum L. Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is a flowering plant in the genus Sesamum. ... California roll served in Shanghai, China. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Country of origin United States Region, town Chester, New York Source of milk Cow Pasteurised Texture Soft Aging time none Certification Cream cheese is a sweet, soft, mild-tasting, white cheese that contains at least 33% milkfat (as marketed) with a moisture content of not more than 55%, and a... A kabayaki-don (una-don), Japanese unagi cuisine Unagi (うなぎ) is the Japanese word for freshwater eels, especially the Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. ... Assorted sashimi Sashimi (Japanese: ) is a Japanese delicacy primarily consisting of very fresh raw seafoods, thinly sliced into pieces about 2. ... Blue crab on fish market in Piraeus, Greece Soft shell crab is a seafood delicacy with the entire crustacean capable of being eaten, a result of catching and cooking crabs shortly after they molt their hard shell. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... Tempura Tempura Ice Cream Tempura (Japanese: てんぷら or 天麩羅, tenpura) refers to classic Japanese deep fried batter-dipped seafood and vegetables. ... Chicken teriyaki. ... Genera Pecten Pedum Amusium Chlamys Decatopecten Argopecten Flexopecten Lissopecten Hyalopecten Nodipecten Patinopecten Semipallium Mimachlamys Equichlamys Mesopeplum Veprichlamys Notochlamys Delectopecten Cryptopecten Anguipecten Haumea Mirapecten Volachlamys Juxtamusium Annachlamys Gloripallium Excellichlamys Bractechlamys Minnivola Coralichlamys Serratovola Somalipecten Pseudohinnites Glorichlamys Scallops are the family Pectinidae of bivalve molluscs. ... For other uses, see Tuna (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Chicken teriyaki. ... Binomial name (L.) Moench Okra (American English: , British English ), also known as ladys finger[1], bhindi and gumbo, is a flowering plant valued for its edible green fruits. ... Vegetables on a market Vegetable is a nutritional and culinary term denoting any part of a plant that is commonly consumed by humans as food, but is not regarded as a culinary fruit, nut, herb, spice, or grain. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Black rice is one of several black-colored heirloom plants producing rice variants such as Indonesian Black Rice, forbidden rice, or wild rice. ... For other uses, see Chopsticks (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 565 KB) Summary Photo I took in of a sushi case in a Kansai Super in Kōbe, Japan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 565 KB) Summary Photo I took in of a sushi case in a Kansai Super in Kōbe, Japan. ... A Kansai Super store located in Kōbe, Japan. ... Inari and her fox spirits help the blacksmith Munechika forge the blade ko-kitsune-maru (Little Fox) in the late 10th century. ... Kanpyō ) is dried gourd shavings, an ingredient in traditional Edo style Japanese cuisine. ...

Oshizushi

  • Oshizushi (押し寿司, lit. pressed sushi). A block-shaped piece formed using a wooden mold, called an oshibako. The chef lines the bottom of the oshibako with the toppings, covers them with sushi rice, and then presses the lid of the mold down to create a compact, rectilinear block. The block is removed from the mold and then cut into bite-sized pieces. This variety originates from the Kansai Region and is a favourite and specialty of Osaka.

Kansai region, Japan The Kansai region ) of Japan, also known as the Kinki region ), lies in the Southern-Central region of Japans main island, Honshū. The region includes the prefectures of Nara, Wakayama, Mie, Kyoto, Osaka, Hyōgo, and Shiga. ... For other uses, see Osaka (disambiguation). ...

Chirashizushi

Chirashizushi
Chirashizushi
  • Chirashizushi (ちらし寿司, lit. scattered sushi). A bowl of sushi rice with other ingredients mixed in (also refers to barazushi). It is commonly eaten in Japan because it is filling, fast and easy to make. Chirashizushi most often varies regionally because it is eaten annually as a part of the Doll Festival, celebrated only during March in Japan.
    • Edomae chirashizushi (Edo-style scattered sushi) is an uncooked ingredient that is arranged artfully on top of the sushi rice in a bowl.
    • Gomokuzushi (Kansai-style sushi). Cooked or uncooked ingredients mixed in the body of rice in a bowl.

Edo (Japanese: , literally: bay-door, estuary, pronounced //), once also spelled Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of the Japanese capital Tokyo. ...

Narezushi (old style fermented sushi)

  • Narezushi (熟れ寿司, lit. matured sushi) is an older form of sushi. Skinned and gutted fish are stuffed with salt, placed in a wooden barrel, doused with salt again, and then weighed down with a heavy tsukemonoishi (pickling stone). They are supposedly salted for ten days to a month, then placed in water for 15 minutes to an hour. They are then placed in another barrel, sandwiched, and layered with cooled steamed rice and fish. Then the mixture is again partially sealed with otoshibuta and a pickling stone. As days pass, water seeps out, which must be removed. Six months later, this funazushi can be eaten, and remains edible for another six months or more.
  • Funazushi (鮒寿司) is a dish in Japanese cooking, which involves with anaerobic lacto-fermentation of fresh water fish, funa (, crucian carp). The dish is famous as a regional dish from the "Shiga Prefecture", It is considered to be a chinmi, a delicacy in Japanese cooking.[9]

Tsukemono (漬物) are Japanese pickles. ... Lacto-fermentation is the method of pickling which is traditionally used to preserve vegetables. ... Binomial name Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) The Crucian Carp (Carassius carassius) is a member of the family Cyprinidae, which includes many other fish such as the common carp, or the smaller minnows. ... Shiga Prefecture from outer space. ... Chinmi (珍味), lit. ...

Temarizushi

  • Temarizushi are ball-shaped sushi made by pressing rice and fish into a ball-shaped form by hand using a plastic wrap. They are quite easy to make and thus a good starting point for beginners.[citation needed]

Ingredients

Various nigiri sushi in an ice sculpture.
Various nigiri sushi in an ice sculpture.

All sushi has a base of specially prepared rice, and complemented with other ingredients. Sushi on display in an ice sculpture. ... Sushi on display in an ice sculpture. ...


Sushi rice

Sushi is made with white, short-grained, Japanese rice mixed with a dressing made of rice vinegar, sugar, salt, and occasionally kombu&sake. It is usually cooled to room temperature before being used for a filling in a sushi. In some fusion cuisine restaurants, short grain brown rice and wild rice are also used. Japanese rice is a variety called Japonica which is characterized by stickiness. ... Rice vinegar is a vinegar made from fermented rice or rice wine in China and Japan. ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely-traded commodity. ... This article is about common table salt. ... Kombu or konbu (Japanese: 昆布), also called dashima (Korean), or haidai (Chinese: 海带; pinyin: ), are edible kelp widely eaten in Northeast Asia. ... Sake barrels at Itsukushima Shrine. ... Fusion cuisine combines elements of various culinary traditions whilst not fitting specifically into any. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Species Zizania aquatica Zizania latifolia Zizania palustris Zizania texana Zizania aquatica L. Hitchc. ...


Sushi rice (sushi-meshi) is prepared with short-grain Japanese rice, which has a consistency that differs from long-grain strains such as India. The essential quality is its stickiness. Rice that is too sticky has a mushy texture; if not sticky enough, it feels dry. Freshly harvested rice (shinmai) typically has too much water, and requires extra time to drain the rice cooker after washing.


There are regional variations in sushi rice and, of course, individual chefs have their individual methods. Most of the variations are in the rice vinegar dressing: "the Tokyo version of the dressing commonly uses more salt; in Osaka, the dressing has more sugar."


Nori

The seaweed wrappers used in maki and temaki are called nori. Nori is an algae, traditionally cultivated into the harbors of Japan. Originally, algae was scraped from dock pilings, rolled out into thin, edible sheets, and dried in the sun, in a process similar to making rice paper. Whereas in Japan Nori may never be toasted before being used in food, many brands found in the U.S. reach drying temperatures above 108 degrees Fahrenheit [which according to raw foodists, would affect the nutrition]. For other uses, see Nori (disambiguation). ... Osborne (talk) 20:17, 5 December 2007 (UTC):For the programming language, see algae (programming language) Laurencia, a marine red alga from Hawaii. ...


Today, the commercial product is farmed, produced, toasted, packaged, and sold in standard-size sheets in about 18 cm by 21 cm (7 in by 8 in). Higher quality nori is thick, smooth, shiny, green,[citation needed] and has no holes. When stored for several months, nori sheets change color to dark green-brownish color.[citation needed]


Nori by itself is an edible snack and is available with salt or flavored with teriyaki sauce. The flavored variety, however, tends to be of lesser quality and is not suitable for sushi. This article is about common table salt. ... Chicken teriyaki. ...


Omelette

Wikibooks
Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on

When making fukusazushi, a paper-thin omelet may replace a sheet of nori as the wrapping. The omelet is traditionally made on a rectangular omelet pan (makiyakinabe), and used to form the pouch for the rice and fillings. Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... An Omelette or omelet is a preparation of beaten egg cooked with butter or oil in a frying pan, often folded around a filling. ... An Omelette or omelet is a preparation of beaten egg cooked with butter or oil in a frying pan, often folded around a filling. ... Different makiyakinabe for sale Makiyakinabe (Japanese: 巻き焼き鍋, literally: roll-bake-pan) is a square pan used to make japanese style rolled omelettes. ...


Toppings and fillings

Yaki Anago-Ippon-Nigiri (焼きアナゴ一本握り). A roasted and sweet sauced whole conger.
Yaki Anago-Ippon-Nigiri (焼きアナゴ一本握り). A roasted and sweet sauced whole conger.
  • Fish
For culinary, sanitary, and aesthetic reasons, fish eaten raw must be fresher and of higher quality than fish which is cooked.
Professional sushi chefs are trained to recognize good fish. Important attributes include smells, colour, and being free of obvious parasites that normal commercial inspection do not detect (many go undetected).
Only ocean fish are used raw in sushi; freshwater fish are more likely to harbour parasites that are harmful to humans if uncooked.
Commonly-used fish are tuna (akami, chutoro, shiro-maguro, toro), Japanese amberjack, also known as yellowtail (hamachi), snapper (kurodai), conger (hamo), mackerel (saba), salmon (sake), and eel (anago and unagi). The most valued sushi ingredient is toro, the fatty cut of tuna. This comes in a variety of ōtoro (often from the bluefin species of tuna) and chutoro, meaning middle toro, implying that it is halfway into the fattiness between toro and regular red tuna (akami).
Aburi style refers to nigiri sushi where the fish is partially grilled (topside) and partially raw.
  • Seafood
Other seafoods such as squid (ika), octopus (tako), shrimp (ebi and amaebi), clam (mirugai, aoyagi and akagi), fish roe (ikura, masago, kazunoko and tobiko), sea urchin (uni), crab (kani), and various kinds of shellfish (abalone, prawn, scallop) are the most popular seafoods in sushi. Oysters, however, are not typically put in sushi because the taste is not thought to go well with the rice. However, some sushi restaurants in New Orleans are known to have Fried Oyster Rolls and Crawfish rolls.
Ebifurai-Maki(エビフライ巻き). Fried-Shrimp Roll.
Ebifurai-Maki(エビフライ巻き). Fried-Shrimp Roll.
  • Vegetables
Pickled daikon radish (takuan) in shinko maki, pickled vegetables (tsukemono), fermented soybeans (nattō) in nattō maki, avocado in California rolls, cucumber in kappa maki, asparagus, yam, pickled ume (umeboshi), gourd (kampyō), burdock (gobo), and sweet corn may be mixed with mayonnaise.
  • Red meat
Beef, ham, spam, sausage, and horse meat are often lightly cooked.
Note: It is a common misconception that in Hawaii, fried Spam is a popular local variation for sushi. In reality, Spam musubi differs from sushi in that its rice lacks the vinegar required to classify it. Spam musubi is correctly classified as onigiri.
  • Other fillings
Tofu, Eggs (in the form of slightly sweet, layered omelet called tamagoyaki), and raw quail eggs ride as a gunkan-maki topping.
Date-Maki (伊達巻). Futomaki wrapped with sweet-tamagoyaki.
Date-Maki (伊達巻). Futomaki wrapped with sweet-tamagoyaki.

Image File history File links Whole-eel. ... Image File history File links Whole-eel. ... There are many sushi and sashimi ingredients, some traditional and some contemporary. ... For other uses, see Tuna (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Seriola quinqueradiata Temminck & Schlegel, 1845 The Japanese amberjack or yellowtail, Seriola quinqueradiata, is a fish in the family Carangidae. ... Genera Aphareus Aprion Apsilus Etelis Hemilutjanus Hoplopagrus Lipocheilus Lutjanus Macolor Ocyurus Paracaesio Pinjalo Pristipomoides Randallichthys Rhomboplites Symphorus Snapper can also refer to the Snapping turtle. ... Species Conger cinereus Conger conger Conger erebennus Conger esculentus Conger japonicus Conger macrocephalus Conger myriaster Conger oceanicus Conger oligoporus Conger orbignianus Conger philippinus Conger triporiceps Conger verreauxi Conger wilsoni Conger is a genus of marine congrid eels. ... Mackerel is a common name applied to a number of different species of fish, mostly, but not exclusively, from the family Scombridae. ... For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Eel (disambiguation). ... A kabayaki-don (una-don), Japanese unagi cuisine Unagi (うなぎ) is the Japanese word for freshwater eels, especially the Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. ... For other uses, see Squid (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Octopus (disambiguation). ... Superfamilies Alpheoidea Atyoidea Bresilioidea Campylonotoidea Crangonoidea Galatheacaridoidea Nematocarcinoidea Oplophoroidea Palaemonoidea Pandaloidea Pasiphaeoidea Procaridoidea Processoidea Psalidopodoidea Stylodactyloidea True shrimp are swimming, decapod crustaceans classified in the infraorder Caridea, found widely around the world in both fresh and salt water. ... For other uses, see Clam (disambiguation). ... This article is about fish eggs. ... Subclasses Subclass Perischoechinoidea Order Cidaroida (pencil urchins) Subclass Euechinoidea Superorder Atelostomata Order Cassiduloida Order Spatangoida (heart urchins) Superorder Diadematacea Order Diadematoida Order Echinothurioida Order Pedinoida Superorder Echinacea Order Arbacioida Order Echinoida Order Phymosomatoida Order Salenioida Order Temnopleuroida Superorder Gnathostomata Order Clypeasteroida (sand dollars) Order Holectypoida Wikispecies has information related to... For other uses, see Crab (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Oyster (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Fried-shrimp. ... Image File history File links Fried-shrimp. ... Binomial name Raphanus sativus L. Daikon (Japanese: , literally large root; Traditional Chinese: , literally white carrot; Korean: mu, literally radish), is a mild-flavored East Asian giant white radish. ... Tsukemono (漬物) are Japanese pickles. ... Natto eaten on top of rice is commonly stirred before consumption Nattō ) is a traditional Japanese food made from fermented soybeans, popular especially at breakfast. ... Binomial name Mill. ... California roll served in Shanghai, China. ... This article is about the fruit. ... A drawing of a kappa which was reported to have been caught in a net on Mito East beach in 1801. ... For the botanical genus, see Asparagus (genus). ... Yams at Brixton market Yam is the common name for some species in the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae). ... Binomial name Prunus mume Siebold & Zucc. ... Umeboshi Umeboshi (Japanese: 梅干; literally dried ume) are pickled umes. ... Binomial name (Molina) Standl. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... This article is about the cut of meat. ... This article is about the canned meat product. ... This article is about the prepared meat. ... Musculature of horse Horse meat is the culinary name for meat cut from a horse. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the canned meat product. ... Spam musubi made from SPAM. Spam musubi is made by taking a piece of SPAM and placing it onto of a block of rice. ... Onigiri Onigiri (お握り) also known as Omusubi (おむすび) is a Japanese (short grain) rice ball snack most commonly formed into triangle or oval shapes and wrapped in seaweed (nori). ... For other uses, see Tofu (disambiguation). ... An Omelette or omelet is a preparation of beaten egg cooked with butter or oil in a frying pan, often folded around a filling. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links Datemaki. ... Image File history File links Datemaki. ...

Condiments

The common name for soy sauce. In sushi restaurants, it may also be referred to as murasaki (lit. "purple").
A piquant paste made from the grated root of the wasabi plant. Real wasabi (hon-wasabi) is Wasabi japonica. Hon-wasabi has anti-microbial properties and may reduce the risk of food poisoning.[10] The traditional grating tool for wasabi is a sharkskin grater or samegawa oroshi.
An imitation wasabi (seiyo-wasabi), made from horseradish and mustard powder and dyed green is common. It is found at lower-end kaiten zushi restaurants, in bento box sushi and at most restaurants outside of Japan. If it is manufactured in Japan, it may be labelled "Japanese Horseradish".[11]
In sushi restaurants, wasabi may be referred to as namida ("tears").
Sweet, pickled ginger. Eaten to both cleanse the palate as well as to aid in the digestive process.
In Japan, green tea (ocha) is invariably served together with sushi. Better sushi restaurants often use a distinctive premium tea known as mecha. In sushi vocabulary, green tea is known as agari.

Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Soy sauce (US) or soya sauce is a fermented sauce made from soybeans (soya beans), roasted grain, water and salt. ... Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Soy sauce (US) or soya sauce is a fermented sauce made from soybeans (soya beans), roasted grain, water and salt. ... Binomial name Matsum. ... An antimicrobial is a substance that kills or inhibits the growth of microbes such as bacteria. ... Binomial name P.G. Gaertn. ... Bento served at a restaurant Bentō ) is a single-portion takeout or home-packed meal common in Japanese cuisine. ... Gari Gari is a type of tsukemono (pickled vegetables). ... For other uses, see Ginger (disambiguation). ... Green tea (绿茶) is tea that has undergone minimal oxidation during processing. ... The name of Mecha tea derives from the early leaf buds needed to make this special green tea. ...

Nutritional information

The main ingredients of sushi, raw fish and rice are naturally low in fat (with the exception of some rolls, especially Western style rolls), high in protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals. Specifically:

  • Fats: Most seafood are naturally low in fat; and what fat is found in them is generally rich in unsaturated fat Omega-3. Since sushi is often served raw, no fat is introduced in its preparation.
  • Proteins: Fish, tofu, seafood, egg, and many other sushi fillings contain high levels of protein.
  • Vitamins and Minerals: These are found in many of the vegetables used for sushi. For example, the gari and nori used to make sushi are both rich in nutrients. Other vegetables wrapped within the sushi also offer various degrees of nutritional value.
  • Carbohydrates: These are found in the rice and the vegetables.

For an explanation of n and numerical nomenclature (such as n−3 or 18:3), see Nomenclature of fatty acids. ...

Health risks

Some fish such as tuna, especially bluefin, can carry high levels of mercury and can be hazardous when consumed in large quantities. As of January 2008, quite a few New York City restaurants offer tuna sushi with high enough concentration of mercury that a weekly reference dose is contained in 2−6 pieces, depending on the amount of tuna in sushi and the person's weight.[12] Consuming raw or undercooked seafood presents the risk of anisakiasis.[13][14] For other uses, see Tuna (disambiguation). ... Bluefin tuna may mean any of several species of tuna: Northern Bluefin Tuna Thunnus thynnus Southern Bluefin Tuna Thunnus maccoyii Pacific Bluefin Tuna Thunnus orientalis This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Methylmercury (sometimes methyl mercury), an organometallic cation with the formula [CH3Hg]+. It is a bioaccumulative environmental toxin. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with human weight. ... Species Anisakis pegreffii Anisakis physeteris Anisakis schupakovi Anisakis simplex Anisakis simplex Anisakis typica Anisakis ziphidarum Anisakis is a genus of parasitic nematodes, which have a life cycle involving fish and marine mammals. ...


Presentation

Sushi chef preparing Nigirizushi, Kyoto, Japan.
Sushi chef preparing Nigirizushi, Kyoto, Japan.

In Japan, and increasingly abroad, conveyor belt sushi/sushi train (kaiten zushi) restaurants are a popular, cost effective way of eating sushi. At these restaurants, the sushi is served on color-coded plates, with each color denoting the cost of the sushi serving. The plates are placed on a conveyor belt or boats floating in a moat. As the belt or boat passes, the customers choose their desired plates. After finishing, the bill is tallied by counting how many plates of each color have been taken. Some kaiten sushi restaurants in Japan operate on a fixed price system, with each plate, consisting usually of two pieces of sushi, generally costing between ¥100 and ¥200. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 2927 KB) Summary Sushi chef working in a restaurant in Kyoto Station, Kyoto, Japan. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 2927 KB) Summary Sushi chef working in a restaurant in Kyoto Station, Kyoto, Japan. ... For other uses, see Kyoto (disambiguation). ... A conveyor belt sushi restaurant. ...


More traditionally, sushi is served on minimalist Japanese-style, geometric, wood or lacquer plates which are mono- or duo-tone in color, in keeping with the aesthetic qualities of this cuisine. Many small sushi restaurants actually use no plates — the sushi is eaten directly off of the wooden counter, usually with one's hands.


Modern fusion presentation has given sushi a European sensibility, taking Japanese minimalism and garnishing it with Western gestures such as the colorful arrangement of edible ingredients, the use of differently flavored sauces, and the mixing of foreign flavors. Highly suggestive of French cuisine, this deviates somewhat from the more traditional, austere style of Japanese sushi. For other uses, see Minimalism (disambiguation). ... French cuisine is a style of cooking derived from the nation of France. ...


Etiquette

Sushi can be eaten either by hand or using chopsticks, although traditionally nigiri is eaten with the fingers because the rice is packed loosely so as to fall apart in ones mouth, and would disintegrate on chopsticks.[15] Traditionally, one should start with white-fleshed or milder-tasting items and proceed into darker, stronger-flavored varieties later. Condiments (soy sauce, wasabi, and pickled ginger) may be used as desired. However, consider the following recommendations: For other uses, see Chopsticks (disambiguation). ...

  • The soy sauce is to flavor the fish, not the rice, and should be used sparingly so as to not overwhelm the flavor of the fish.
  • As one connoisseur counsels, "adding wasabi to soy sauce is a disaster. It reduces the spiciness dramatically and masks the taste of the fish."[16] (Likewise, the pickled ginger should be eaten by itself as a palate cleanser between types of sushi, not dipped in soy sauce.) This, however, may be a matter of personal taste as the two are sometimes mixed to form a single dipping sauce known as Wasabi-joyu. In top-end sushi restaurants, it is also considered bad form to request or add extra wasabi when the chef has (or should have) already placed a suitable amount in each morsel.
  • Also contrary to popular belief in the west, sake is not considered a natural pairing of sushi, since the flavor is too similar to rice to enrich the meal. Beer is usually preferred choice of drink for accompanying sushi.

Many sushi restaurants offer fixed-price sets, selected by the chef from the catch of the day. These are often graded as shō-chiku-bai (松竹梅), shō/matsu (松, pine), chiku/take (竹, bamboo) and bai/ume (梅, ume), with matsu the most expensive and ume the cheapest. The house soy sauce is often diluted with dashi, a broth made from fish flakes and kelp. Sake barrels at Itsukushima Shrine. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Prunus mume Siebold & Zucc. ...


In Japan, staff in sushi restaurants often employ a complex code-like vocabulary, where alternate words are substituted for common items. For example, egg is called gyoku ("jewel"), rice is called shari (Buddha's bones), soy sauce is called murasaki ("purple") and the bill is known as o-aiso ("courtesy", "compliment"). The code words vary from place to place and often evolve locally to incorporate puns: for example, shako (giant clam) might be called garēji (garage), because the Japanese word shako can also refer to a vehicle depot. These terms would not be used, or even understood, in other contexts, but regular patrons may pick up and use this specialized terminology themselves while dining in the restaurant. For other uses, see Pun (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The giant clam (Tridacna gigas) or traditionally, pa’ua, is the largest living bivalve mollusc. ... A Depot is usually a centralised store or operating base for logistical use by commercial or governmental bodies. ...


Utensils for preparing sushi

Cheese-topped sushi is seared using a blow torch.
Cheese-topped sushi is seared using a blow torch.

Also see the comprehensive list of Japanese cooking utensils. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1125 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1125 pixel, file size: 1. ... A blowtorch is a tool used in gas welding and metal cutting and brazing and sometimes in soldering. ... In Japanese cuisine, a hangiri is a round, flat-bottom wooden tub or barrel used in the final steps of preparing rice for sushi. ... There are a number of different types of Japanese kitchen knives. ... A selection of makisu mats with bamboo sticks of different thicknesses The Makisu (Japanese: 巻す) is a mat made of long bamboo strips woven together with a cotton string used in the preparation and presentation of Japanese food. ... Chopsticks, a pair of small even-length tapered sticks, are the traditional eating utensils of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, the four chopstick countries) as well as Thailand, where they are now restricted to just soup and noodles since the introduction of Western utensils by King Rama V... Shamoji and a table spoon for size comparisom A shamoji (しゃもじ) is a flat rice paddle used in the Japanese kitchen. ... Different makiyakinabe for sale Makiyakinabe (Japanese: 巻き焼き鍋, literally: roll-bake-pan) is a square pan used to make japanese style rolled omelettes. ... The following items are common Japanese cooking tools used in preparing Japanese cuisine. ...


Guinness World Records

  1. January 1992: A 325 kg (715 lb) Bluefin tuna sold for $83,500 (almost $257 / kg or $117 / lb) in Tokyo, Japan. The tuna was reduced to 2,400 servings of sushi for wealthy diners at $75 per serving. The estimated takings from this one fish were approximately $180,000. At the time, the fish held the record for Most Expensive Fish.
  2. October 12, 1997: The longest sushi roll. Six hundred members of the Nikopaka Festa Committee made a kappamaki (cucumber roll) that was 1 km (3,281 ft.) long at Yoshii, Japan.

Bluefin tuna may mean any of several species of tuna: Northern Bluefin Tuna Thunnus thynnus Southern Bluefin Tuna Thunnus maccoyii Pacific Bluefin Tuna Thunnus orientalis This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Kappamaki (Japanese:きぱまき) is a type of Japanese sushi roll that is made from cucumber, rolled with vinegared rice (shari) and nori to make a maki, or sushi roll. ...

Gallery

See also

Sushi comes in many varieties. ... Assorted sashimi Sashimi (Japanese: ) is a Japanese delicacy primarily consisting of very fresh raw seafoods, thinly sliced into pieces about 2. ... Japan has a code of etiquette, the code that governs the expectations of social behavior, and it is considered very important. ...

References

  1. ^ "If You Knew Sushi," Urban Legend Reference Pages, February 20, 2007
  2. ^ Kouji ITOU, Shinsuke KOBAYASHI, Tooru OOIZUMI, Yoshiaki AKAHANE (2006) "Changes of proximate composition and extractive components in narezushi, a fermented mackerel product, during processing", Fisheries Science, 72 (6), 1269–1276.
  3. ^ a b Zschock, Day. The Little Black Book of Sushi: The Essential Guide to the World of Sushi. Page 14-15. 2005. ISBN 1593599617.
  4. ^ Kawasumi, Ken (2001). The Encyclopedia of Sushi Rolls. Graph-Sha. ISBN 4-88996-076-7. 
  5. ^ Chad Hershler, "Sushi Then and Now", The Walrus, May 2005.
  6. ^ (ja) 軍カン巻の由来, お寿し大辞典 > お寿し用語集, 小僧寿しチェーン.
  7. ^ Andy Bellin, "Poker Night in Napa", Food & Wine Magazine, March, 2005.
  8. ^ Ryuichi Yoshii, "Tuna rolls (Tekkamaki)", Sushi, p. 48 (1999), Tuttle Publishing, ISBN 962593460X.
  9. ^ Aiko Kitagawa, "AN ACQUIRED TASTE", KANSAI TIME OUT, SEPTEMBER 2001.
  10. ^ Shin, I.S.; Masuda H., Naohide K. (Aug 2004). "Bactericidal activity of wasabi (Wasabia japonica) against Helicobacter pylori.". Int J Food Microbiol. 94 (3): 255-61. 
  11. ^ Shimbo, Hiroko (2000). The Japanese Kitchen. The Harvard Commons Press. ISBN 1-55832-176-4. 
  12. ^ Burros, Marian (2008-01-23), "High Mercury Levels Are Found in Tuna Sushi", The New York Times, <http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/23/dining/23sushi.html>
  13. ^ nytimes.com, Tuna Fish Stories: The Candidates Spin the Sushi
  14. ^ ap.google.com, Japanese Sushi Lovers Shrug at Mercury
  15. ^ Issenberg, Sasha. The Sushi Economy. Gotham Books: 2007
  16. ^ Corson, Trevor. The Zen of Fish. HarperCollins: 2007

is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Cover of the April 2005 issue of The Walrus. ... Food & Wine is a monthly magazine published by American Express Publishing. ... Tuttle Publishing which includes Tuttle, Periplus Editions, and, Journey Editions, was founded by Charles E. Tuttle (1915-1993) in Tokyo in 1948. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikibooks
Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sushi

Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sushi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2108 words)
Sushi made with toppings laid onto hand-formed clumps of rice is called nigiri; sushi made with toppings stuffed into a small pouch of fried tofu is called inari; and sushi made with toppings served scattered over a bowl of sushi rice are called chirashi-zushi, or scattered sushi.
Arguably the most typical form of sushi at restaurants, it consists of an oblong mound of sushi rice which is pressed between the palms of the hands, with a speck of wasabi and a thin slice of a topping (neta) draped over it, possibly tied up with a thin band of nori.
Sushi is made with white, short-grained, Japanese rice mixed with a dressing made of rice vinegar, sugar, salt, kombu, and sake.
Sushi - Free Encyclopedia (722 words)
Sushi (鮨 or &#39827; or 寿司) is a Japanese dish consisting of vinegared rice combined with other ingredients such as raw fish, raw or cooked shellfish, or vegetables.
Sushi is sometimes confused with sashimi, which is the seafood sometimes served with sushi.
Sushi rice: The rice used in making sushi is a short-grained, sweeter variety rather different in consistency from the long-grain and Indian rice strains Westerners may be more used to.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m