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Encyclopedia > Susan B. Anthony
Susan B. Anthony
Born February 15, 1820(1820-02-15)
Adams, Massachusetts
Died March 13, 1906 (aged 86)
Rochester, New York
Occupation Suffragist, women's rights advocate

Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820March 13, 1906) was a prominent American civil rights leader who played a pivotal role in the 19th century women's rights movement to secure women's suffrage in the United States. She traveled the United States and Europe, and gave 75 to 100 speeches per year on women's rights for some 45 years. Susan B. Anthony died in Rochester, New York in her house at 17 Madison Street on March 13, 1906, and is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery. Susan B. Anthony can refer to: Susan B. Anthony Susan B. Anthony dollar USS Susan B. Anthony (AP-72) Susan B. Anthony (Prison Break character) Category: ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 432 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (574 × 796 pixels, file size: 314 KB, MIME type: image/png)Susan B. Anthony in her older years. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Adams is a town located in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ... This article is about the state. ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... The term women’s rights typically refers to freedoms inherently possessed by women and girls of all ages, which may be institutionalized or ignored and/or illegitimately suppressed by law or custom in a particular society. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term women’s rights typically refers to freedoms inherently possessed by women and girls of all ages, which may be institutionalized or ignored and/or illegitimately suppressed by law or custom in a particular society. ... American women were granted the right to vote with the passage of the 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920 Suffrage parade, New York City, 1912 The effort to obtain womens suffrage in the United States was a primary effort of those involved in the greater women... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester, New York, founded in 1838, is the United States first municipal Victorian cemetery. ...

Contents

Early life

Anthony was born and raised in West Grove, near Adams, Massachusetts. She was one of seven children, Susan Brownell (1820), Daniel Read (1822), Jacob Merritt (1824), Guelma Penn (1826), Hannah E (1828), Mary Stafford (1830), and Eliza Tefft (1832) born to Daniel Anthony and Lucy Read. Her brother, publisher Daniel Read Anthony, would become active in the anti-slavery movement in Kansas, while her sister Mary Stafford Anthony became a teacher and a woman's rights activist. Anthony remained close to her sisters throughout her life. Adams is a town located in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. ... Daniel Anthony Daniel Read Anthony (August 22, 1824-November 12, 1904 ) was an American publisher and abolitionist. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Anthony was a precocious child, having learned to read and write at age three. Her father, a cotton manufacturer and abolitionist, was a stern but open-minded man who was born into the Quaker religion. Her mother was a student in Daniel's school when she and Daniel fell in love. Although Lucy readily agreed to marry Daniel in 1817, she was less sure about marrying into the Society of Friends (Quakers). She was not a convinced Quaker and claimed that she was “not good enough” for the religion. In 1826, when the Quakers split into liberal and conservative camps, the Anthonys quickly followed the liberals, known as the "Hicksite Friends"—a group named after Elias Hicks. For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Social conservatism generally refers to a political ideology or personal belief system that advocates the conservation or resurrection of what one, or ones community, considers to be traditional morality and social structure. ... Elias Hicks Elias Hicks (March 19, 1748 - February 27, 1830) was an itinerant Quaker preacher from Long Island, New York. ...

Susan Brownell Anthony, age 28
Susan Brownell Anthony, age 28

Daniel wished to raise his children in a moderately strict household and did not allow Susan to experience what he perceived as the childish amusements of toys and games, which were seen as distractions from the “Inner Light”. However, Daniel was shunned by other Quakers for permitting dancing and citing a firm belief in "complete personal, mental and spiritual freedom" in his home. Download high resolution version (570x732, 74 KB)Susan B. Anthony - Age 28 - Project Gutenberg eText 15220 From http://www. ... Download high resolution version (570x732, 74 KB)Susan B. Anthony - Age 28 - Project Gutenberg eText 15220 From http://www. ... The concept of the Inner Light is central to many versions of Quaker (or Religious Society of Friends) theology. ...


Anthony's mother Lucy was a progressive-minded woman. She attended the Rochester women’s rights convention held in August of 1848, two weeks after the historic Seneca Falls Convention, and signed the Rochester convention’s Declaration of Sentiments. Together the Anthonys enforced self-discipline, principled convictions, and belief in one's own self-worth. For other uses, see Progressivism (disambiguation). ... The Seneca Falls Convention, held in Seneca Falls, New York on July 19 to July 20, 1848, was the first womens rights convention held in the United States, and as a result is often called the birthplace of feminism. ... The Declaration of Sentiments is a document signed in 1848 by 68 women and 32 men, delegates to the first womens rights convention, in Seneca Falls, New York, now known to historians as the 1848 Womens Rights Convention. ... Methods of child discipline vary widely between cultures and have in recent times changed considerably in many of them. ... In psychology, self-esteem or self-worth is a persons self-image at an emotional level; circumventing reason and logic. ...


In 1826, when Susan was six years old, the Anthony family moved from Massachusetts to Battenville, New York. Susan was sent to attend a local district school, where a teacher refused to teach her long division because of her gender. Upon learning of the weak education she was receiving, her father promptly had her placed in a group home school, where he taught Susan himself. Mary Perkins, another teacher there, conveyed a progressive image of womanhood to Anthony, further fostering her growing belief in women's equality. This article is about the U.S. state. ... In arithmetic, long division is a procedure for calculating the division of one integer, called the dividend, by another integer called the divisor, to produce a result called the quotient. ... Homeschooling (also called home education) is the education of children at home and in the community, in contrast to education in an institution such as a public or parochial school. ... Image of a woman on the Pioneer plaque sent to outer space. ...


In 1837, Anthony was sent to Deborah Moulson's Female Seminary, a Quaker boarding school in Philadelphia. She was not happy at Moulson's, but she did not have to stay there long. She was forced to end her formal studies because her family, like many others, was financially ruined during the Panic of 1837. Their losses were so great that they were forced to attempt to sell everything in an auction, even their most personal belongings, which were saved at the last minute when Susan's uncle, Joshua Read, stepped up and bid for them in order to restore them to the family. Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Whig campaign poster blames Van Buren for hard times (1840). ...


In 1839, the family moved to Hardscrabble (later called Center Falls) New York, in the wake of the panic and economic depression that followed. That same year, Anthony left home to teach and to help pay off her father's debts. She taught first at Eunice Kenyon's Friends' Seminary in New Rochelle, and then at the Canajoharie Academy in 1846, where she rose to become headmistress of the Female Department. Anthony's first occupation inspired her to fight for wages equivalent to those of male teachers, since men earned roughly four times more than women for the same duties. Lucy was a progressive-minded woman. She attended the Rochester women’s rights convention held in August 1848, two weeks after the historic Seneca Falls Convention, and signed the Rochester convention’s Declaration of Sentiments. Greenwich is a town in Washington County, New York, United States. ... New Rochelle City Hall New Roc City New Rochelle (French: Nouvelle-Rochelle) is a city in the southeast portion of the U.S. state of New York in Westchester County, 16 miles (26 km) from Grand Central Terminal in New York City and 2 miles north of the border with... For other uses, see Progressivism (disambiguation). ... The Seneca Falls Convention, held in Seneca Falls, New York on July 19 to July 20, 1848, was the first womens rights convention held in the United States, and as a result is often called the birthplace of feminism. ... The Declaration of Sentiments is a document signed in 1848 by 68 women and 32 men, delegates to the first womens rights convention, in Seneca Falls, New York, now known to historians as the 1848 Womens Rights Convention. ...


In 1849, at age 29, Anthony quit teaching and moved to the family farm in Rochester, New York. Anthony began to take part in conventions and gatherings related to the temperance movement. In Rochester, she attended the local Unitarian Church and began to distance herself from the Quakers, in part because she had frequently witnessed instances of hypocritical behavior such as alcohol abuse amongst Quaker preachers. As she got older, Anthony continued to move further away from organized religion in general, and she was later chastised by various Christian religious groups for displaying irreligious tendencies. A cartoon from Australia ca. ... Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA), in full the Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations in North America, is a liberal religious denomination formed by the merger in 1961 of the American Unitarian Association and the Universalist Church in America. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Preacher is a term the for someone who preaches sermons or gives homilies. ... Churchianity is a negative description of organized religion that characterizes it as emphasizing the institutional forms of Christianity (traditions, rituals, committees, and programs) and omitting the actual gospel teachings of Jesus Christ that forms the basis of Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Irreligion is the absence of religious following. ...


In her youth, Anthony was very self-conscious of her looks and speaking abilities. She long resisted public speaking for fear she would not be sufficiently eloquent. Despite these insecurities, she became a renowned public presence, eventually helping to lead the women's movement. Self-consciousness is the knowledge of ones own presence. ...


Early social activism

In the decade before the American Civil War, Anthony took a prominent role in the New York anti-slavery and temperance movements. In 1849, at age 29, Anthony became secretary for the Daughters of Temperance, allowing her a forum to speak out against alcohol abuse, and the beginning of a movement towards the public limelight. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Anthony (standing) with Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Anthony (standing) with Elizabeth Cady Stanton

In 1851, on a street in Seneca Falls, Anthony was introduced to Elizabeth Cady Stanton by mutual acquaintance, as well as fellow feminist Amelia Bloomer. Anthony joined with Stanton in organizing the first women's state temperance society in America after being refused admission to a previous convention on account of her sex in 1851. Stanton remained a close friend and colleague of Anthony's for the remainder of their lives, but Stanton longed for a broader, more radical women's rights platform. Together, the two women traversed the United States giving speeches and attempting to persuade the government that society should treat men and women equally. Image File history File links Elizabeth_Cady_Stanton_and_Susan_B._Anthony. ... Image File history File links Elizabeth_Cady_Stanton_and_Susan_B._Anthony. ... Elizabeth Cady Stanton, (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902), was an American social activist and leading figure of the early womans movement . ... Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... Amelia Jenks Bloomer (May 27, 1818—December 30, 1894) was an American womens rights and temperance advocate. ...


After the first American women's rights convention took place on July 19 and July 20, 1848, in Seneca Falls, New York, Anthony took the opportunity to attend and support the women's rights convention held in Syracuse, New York, in 1852. It was around this time that Anthony began to gain widespread notoriety as a powerful public advocate of women's rights and as a new and stirring voice for change. The Seneca Falls Convention, held in Seneca Falls, New York on July 19 to July 20, 1848, was the first womens rights convention held in the United States, and as a result is often called the birthplace of feminism. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Seneca Falls refers to a town and a village in Seneca County, New York: Seneca Falls (town) Seneca Falls (village) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Nickname: Location of Syracuse within the state of New York Coordinates: , City Government  - Mayor Matthew Driscoll (D) Area  - City 66. ...


In 1856, Anthony further attempted to unify the African-American and women's rights movements when, recruited by abolitionist Abby Kelley[citation needed], she became agent for William Lloyd Garrison's American Anti-Slavery Society of New York State. Speaking at the Ninth National Women’s Rights Convention on May 12, 1859, Anthony asked "Where, under our Declaration of Independence, does the Saxon man get his power to deprive all women and Negroes of their inalienable rights?" Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Abby Kelley (Abby Kelley Foster) (January 15, 1811 - January 14, 1887) - Radical Reformer Abby Kelley was born in Pelham, Massachusetts on January 15th, 1811. ... William Lloyd Garrison William Lloyd Garrison (December 12, 1805–May 24, 1879) was a prominent United States abolitionist, journalist, and social reformer. ... The American Anti-Slavery Society (1833-1870) was founded by William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur Tappan. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to...


In 1869, long time friends Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony found themselves, for the first time, on opposing sides of a debate. The Equal Rights Association, which had originally fought for both blacks’ and women’s right to suffrage, voted to support the 15th Amendment to the Constitution granting suffrage to black men, but not women. Anthony questioned why women should support this amendment when black men were not continuing to show support for women’s voting rights. Partially as a result of the decision by the Equal Rights Association, Anthony soon thereafter devoted herself almost exclusively to the agitation for women's rights. Frederick Douglass, ca. ... Amendment XV in the National Archives 1870 celebration of the 15th amendment as a guarantee of African American rights 1867 drawing depicting the first vote by African Americans Amendment XV (the Fifteenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution provides that governments in the United States may not prevent a citizen... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme...


On January 1, 1868, Anthony first published a weekly journal entitled The Revolution. Published in New York City, its motto was: "The true republic — men, their rights and nothing more; women, their rights and nothing less." Anthony worked as the publisher and business manager, while Elizabeth Cady Stanton acted as editor. The main thrust of The Revolution was to promote women’s and African Americans’ right to suffrage, but it also discussed issues of equal pay for equal work, more liberal divorce laws, and the church’s position on women’s issues. The journal was backed by independently wealthy George Francis Train, who provided $600 in starting funds. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Revolution was a weekly womens rights newspaper published between January 8, 1868 and 1972. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... George Francis Train (1829 - 1904) was a businessman and an eccentric figure in American history. ...


On November 18, 1872, Anthony was arrested by a U.S. Deputy Marshal for alleged illegal voting in the presidential election two weeks earlier. She had written to Stanton on the night of the election that she had "positively voted the Republican ticket -- straight...". She was tried and convicted seven months later, despite the stirring and eloquent presentation of her arguments that the recently adopted Fourteenth Amendment, which guaranteed to "all persons born or naturalized in the United States" the privileges of citizenship, and which contained no sex qualification, gave women the constitutional right to vote in federal elections. The sentence was a fine, but not imprisonment; and true to her word in court, she never paid the penalty for the rest of her life. The trial gave Anthony the opportunity to spread her arguments to a wider audience than ever before.[1] is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Republican Party of the United States was established in 1854 and is one of the two dominant parties today. ... The Fourteenth Amendment may refer to the: Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution - contains the due process and equal protection clauses. ...


In 1893, she joined with Helen Barrett Montgomery in forming a chapter of the Woman’s Educational and Industrial Union (WEIU) in Rochester. In 1898, she also worked with her to raise funds to open opportunities for women students to study at University of Rochester, a goal which was reached in 1900.[citations needed] Helen Barrett Montgomery (July 31, 1861 - October 19, 1934) She was a social reformer, church leader, women’s activist, missions activist. ... The University of Rochester (UR) is a private, coeducational and nonsectarian research university located in Rochester, New York. ...


Anthony used The Revolution as a vehicle in her crusade for equality, writing passionately about a variety of subjects relating to women's rights.


National suffrage organizations

Political cartoon showing Anthony and Grover Cleveland
Political cartoon showing Anthony and Grover Cleveland

In 1869, Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Women's Suffrage Association (NWSA), an organization dedicated to gaining women's suffrage. Anthony was vice-president-at-large of the NWSA from the date of its organization until 1892, when she became president . Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Elizabeth Cady Stanton, (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902), was an American social activist and leading figure of the early womans movement . ... The National Womens Suffrage Association was a 19th-century womens suffrage organization. ...


In the early years of the NWSA, Anthony made attempts to unite women in the labor movement with the suffragist cause, but with little success. She and Stanton were delegates at the 1868 convention of the National Labor Union. However, Anthony inadvertently alienated the labor movement not only because suffrage was seen as a concern for middle-class rather than working-class women, but because she openly encouraged women to achieve economic independence by entering the printing trades, where male workers were on strike at the time. Anthony was later expelled from the National Labor Union over this controversy. The labor movement (or labour movement) is a broad term for the development of a collective organization of working people, to campaign in their own interest for better treatment from their employers and political governments. ... The National Labor Union was the first national labor federation in the United States. ... This article is about the socio-economic class from a global vantage point. ... Statue of a coal miner in Charleston, WV, USA. Working class is a term used in academic sociology and in ordinary conversation. ...


In 1890, Anthony orchestrated the merger of the NWSA with the more conservative American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA), creating the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Prior to the controversial merge, Anthony had created a special NWSA executive committee to vote on whether they should merge with the AWSA, despite the fact that using a committee instead of an all-member vote went against the NWSA constitution. Motions to make it possible for members to vote by mail were strenuously opposed by Anthony and her adherents, and the committee was stacked with members who favored the merger. (Two members who voted against the merger were asked to resign). The National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) was created in 1890, when two competing American womens suffrage advocacy groups united. ... The National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), an American womens rights organization, was formed as an amalgamation of the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) and the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA) in May of 1890. ...


Anthony's pursuit of alliances with moderate and conservative suffragists created long lasting tension between herself and more radical suffragists like Stanton. Anthony felt strongly that a moderate rather than radical approach to women's rights was more realistic, and would consequently serve to gain more for women in the long-run. Anthony's strategy was to unite the suffrage movement wherever possible and to then concentrate strictly on gaining the vote, temporarily postponing other efforts related to women's rights in order to focus attention on a singular cause. Stanton openly criticized Anthony's stance, writing that Anthony and AWSA leader Lucy Stone, "see suffrage only. They do not see woman's religious and social bondage." Anthony responded to Stanton: "We number over 10,000 women and each one has opinions...we can only hold them together to work for the ballot by letting alone their whims and prejudices on other subjects." “Moderates” redirects here. ... Lucy Stone (August 13, 1818 – October 19, 1893) was a prominent American suffragist. ...


The creation of the NAWSA effectively marginalized the more radical elements within the women's movement, including Stanton. Anthony pushed for Stanton to be voted in as the first NAWSA president, and stood by her as Stanton was belittled by the large conservative factions within the new organization.


In collaboration with Stanton, Matilda Joslyn Gage, and Ida Husted Harper, Anthony published The History of Woman Suffrage (4 vols., New York, 1884–1887). Anthony also befriended Josephine Brawley Hughes, an advocate of women's rights and of alcohol abolition in Arizona, and Carrie Chapman Catt, who Anthony endorsed for the presidency of the NAWSA when Anthony formally retired in 1900. Matilda Electa Joslyn Gage (1826-1898) was a suffragist, a Native American activist, an abolitionist, a freethinker, and a prolific author, who was born with a hatred of oppression. Though born in Cicero, New York, Gage maintained residence in Fayetteville, New York for the majority of her life. ... Ida Husted Harper (born Ida Husted in Indiana on February 18th 1851 and died March 14th 1931 in Washington, D.C.) was a prominant figure in the American womens suffrage movement. ... Elizabeth Josephine Brawley Hughes (December 22, 1839-March, 1926) was an advocate of womens rights in the United States West region. ... Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of alcohol includes many other compounds. ... Abolition is the act of formally destroying something through legal means, either by making it illegal, or simply no longer allowing it to exist in any form. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947) was a womans suffrage leader. ...


Legacy

A Susan B. Anthony dollar coin

Susan B. Anthony, who died 14 years, 5 months and 5 days before passage of the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote, was honored as the first real (non-allegorical) American woman on circulating U.S. coinage with her appearance on the Susan B. Anthony dollar. The coin, approximately the size of a U.S. quarter, was minted for only four years, 1979, 1980, 1981, and 1999. Anthony dollars were produced at the Philadelphia and Denver mints for all four years, and at the San Francisco mint for all production years except 1999. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Amendment XIX (the Nineteenth Amendment) to the United States Constitution grants voting rights regardless of the voters sex: The amendment prohibits both the federal government and the states from using a persons sex as a qualification to vote; it was specifically intended to extend suffrage to women. ... Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... Top row: Sacagawea Dollar, Lincoln Cent, and Roosevelt Dime. ... The Susan B. Anthony dollar is a United States coin minted between 1979 and 1981, and again in 1999. ... Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in gold, silver, and base metal versions. ... A quarter is a coin worth one-quarter of a United States dollar, or 25 cents. ... The Philadelphia Mint was created from the need to establish a national identity and the needs of commerce. ... The Denver Mint The Denver Mint is a branch of the United States Mint established in 1862 that is today operational and produces coins for circulation, as well as mint sets and commemorative coins. ... The San Francisco Mint is a branch of the United States Mint, and was opened in 1854 to serve the gold mines of the California Gold Rush. ...

Susan B. Anthony Birthplace

Anthony's birthplace in Adams was purchased in August 2006 by Carol Crossed, who founded the New York chapter of Democrats for Life of America and who is affiliated with Feminists for Life.[2] This article is about the state. ... This article is about the political organization. ... Feminists for Life of America (FFL) is a non-sectarian, non-partisan, nonprofit pro-life feminist organization established in 1972. ...


Anthony's childhood home in Battenville, NY was placed on the National Historic Register in 2007 and NY State Historic Register 2006 made possible by, Helise Flickstein. Freddie Mac Bank donated their foreclosed house because Helise Flickstein convinced them to do so. It was Assemblyman Steven Englebright, because Hedi Flickstein, Helise's mother, had contacted him & Assemblyman Roy Mc Donald who finalized the acquisition to the New York State Parks Department in 2006]].[3]

A 1967 photograph of the Susan B Anthony House
A 1967 photograph of the Susan B Anthony House

The Susan B. Anthony House in Rochester was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965 and is operated now as a museum.[4] Susan B. Anthony House was the home of Susan B. Anthony while she was a national figure in the Womens Rights movement. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


100th Anniversary of Susan B. Anthony's death was on March 13, 2006.


The American composer Virgil Thomson and poet Gertrude Stein wrote an opera, The Mother of Us All, that abstractly explores Anthony's life and mission. Virgil Thomson, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1947 Virgil Thomson (November 25, 1896 - September 30, 1989) was an American composer from Missouri, whose rural background gave a sense of place in his compositions. ... Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946) was an American writer who became a catalyst in the development of modern art and literature. ... The Mother of Us All (1947) is an opera by Virgil Thomson to a libretto by Gertrude Stein. ...


She is commemorated in a sculpture by Adelaide Johnson at the US Capitol, unveiled in 1921. United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ...


 
 

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