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Encyclopedia > Supreme intercostal vein
Vein: Supreme intercostal vein
Intercostal spaces, viewed from the left. (Highest intercostal vein labeled at upper right.)
The venæ cavæ and azygos veins, with their tributaries. (Highest intercostal labeled, very faintly, written vertically, to the right of the aortic arch.)
Latin vena intercostalis suprema
Gray's subject #172 666
Dorlands/Elsevier v_05/12850652

The supreme intercostal vein (highest intercostal vein) is a paired vein that drains the first intercostal space on its corresponding side. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Elseviers logo Elsevier, the worlds largest publisher of medical and scientific literature, forms part of the Reed Elsevier group. ... Intercostal spaces, viewed from the left The intercostal space is the space between two ribs (Lat. ...


It can drain into either the brachiocephalic vein, the superior intercostal vein, or the vertebral vein of its corresponding side. The Brachiocephalic vein is also known as the innominate vein, the left and right brachiocephalic veins in the upper chest are formed by the union of each corresponding jugular vein and subclavian vein. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


This vein does not have valves, this is an important point when it comes to spread of cancerous secondaries.


See also

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The azygos vein is so named because it is unpaired, having no matching vein on the left side of the body. ...

External links


GPnotebook is a British medical database for general practitioners (GPs. ...

Veins edit

superficial - deep - venae comitantes - venous sinuses - pulmonary | (Gray's s164-Gray's s165) In biology, a vein is a blood vessel which carries blood toward the heart. ... Superficial vein is a term used to describe a vein that is close to the surface of the body. ... Deep vein is a term used to describe a vein that is deep in the body. ... The pulmonary veins carry oxygen rich blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


heart: coronary sinus - great cardiac - left marginal - small cardiac - right marginal - middle cardiac - posterior of the left ventricle - oblique of the left atrium - anterior cardiac | (Gray's s166) An aortic sinus is one of the anatomic dilations of the ascending aorta which occurs at the aortic root, i. ... The Great Cardiac Vein (left coronary vein) begins at the apex of the heart and ascends along the anterior longitudinal sulcus to the base of the ventricles. ... The great cardiac vein receives tributaries from the left atrium and from both ventricles: one, the left marginal vein, is of considerable size, and ascends along the left margin of the heart. ... The small cardiac vein (right coronary vein) runs in the coronary sulcus between the right atrium and ventricle, and opens into the right extremity of the coronary sinus. ... The right marginal vein ascends along the right margin of the heart and joins the small cardiac vein in the coronary sulcus, or opens directly into the right atrium. ... The middle cardiac vein commences at the apex of the heart, ascends in the posterior longitudinal sulcus, and ends in the coronary sinus near its right extremity. ... The Posterior Vein of the Left Ventricle runs on the diaphragmatic surface of the left ventricle to the coronary sinus, but may end in the great cardiac vein. ... The Oblique Vein of the Left Atrium (oblique vein of Marshall) is a small vessel which descends obliquely on the back of the left atrium and ends in the coronary sinus near its left extremity; it is continuous above with the ligament of the left vena cava (lig. ... The anterior cardiac veins (or anterior veins of right ventricle), comprising three or four small vessels which collect blood from the front of the right ventricle and open into the right atrium; the right marginal vein frequently opens into the right atrium, and is therefore sometimes regarded as belonging to... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


exterior of the head and face: frontal - supraorbital - angular - anterior facial - common facial - deep facial - superficial temporal - posterior facial - transverse facial - pterygoid - internal maxillary - posterior auricular - occipital | (Gray's s167) The frontal vein begins on the forehead in a venous plexus which communicates with the frontal branches of the superficial temporal vein. ... The supraorbital vein begins on the forehead where it communicates with the frontal branch of the superficial temporal vein. ... The angular vein formed by the junction of the frontal and supraorbital veins, runs obliquely downward, on the side of the root of the nose, to the level of the lower margin of the orbit, where it becomes the anterior facial vein. ... The anterior facial vein (facial vein) commences at the side of the root of the nose, and is a direct continuation of the angular vein. ... The anterior facial vein unites with the posterior facial vein to form the common facial vein, which crosses the external carotid artery and enters the internal jugular vein at a variable point below the hyoid bone. ... The anterior facial vein receives a branch of considerable size, the deep facial vein, from the pterygoid venous plexus. ... The superficial temporal vein begins on the side and vertex of the skull in a plexus which communicates with the frontal and supraorbital veins, with the corresponding vein of the opposite side, and with the posterior auricular and occipital veins. ... The posterior facial vein (temporomaxillary vein, retromandibular vein), formed by the union of the superficial temporal and internal maxillary veins, descends in the substance of the parotid gland, superficial to the external carotid artery but beneath the facial nerve, between the ramus of the mandible and the Sternocleidomastoideus muscle. ... The pterygoid plexus is of considerable size, and is situated between the Temporalis and Pterygoideus externus, and partly between the two Pterygoidei. ... The internal maxillary vein is a short trunk which accompanies the first part of the internal maxillary artery. ... The posterior auricular vein begins upon the side of the head, in a plexus which communicates with the tributaries of the occipital, and superficial temporal veins. ... The occipital vein begins in a plexus at the back part of the vertex of the skull. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


veins of the neck: external jugular - sinus - posterior external jugular - anterior jugular - internal jugular - inferior petrosal sinus - lingual - ranine - pharyngeal - superior thyroid - middle thyroid - vertebral - deep cervical | (Gray's s168) The external and internal jugular veins are veins that bring deoxygenated blood from the head back to the heart via the superior vena cava. ... A sinus is a pouch or cavity in any organ or tissue, or an abnormal cavity or passage caused by the destruction of tissue. ... The posterior external jugular vein begins in the occipital region and returns the blood from the skin and superficial muscles in the upper and back part of the neck, lying between the Splenius and Trapezius. ... The anterior jugular vein begins near the hyoid bone by the confluence of several superficial veins from the submaxillary region. ... The external and internal jugular veins are veins that bring deoxygenated blood from the head back to the heart via the superior vena cava. ... Several large dural sinuses, such as the superior and inferior sagittal sinuses, are visible with a sagittal cut through the brain. ... The Lingual Veins begin on the dorsum, sides, and under surface of the tongue, and, passing backward along the course of the lingual artery, end in the internal jugular vein. ... The Lingual Veins begin on the dorsum, sides, and under surface of the tongue, and, passing backward along the course of the lingual artery, end in the internal jugular vein. ... The Pharyngeal Veins begin in the pharyngeal plexus on the outer surface of the pharynx, and, after receiving some posterior meningeal veins and the vein of the pterygoid canal, end in the internal jugular. ... The Superior Thyroid Vein begins in the substance and on the surface of the thyroid gland, by tributaries corresponding with the branches of the superior thyroid artery, and ends in the upper part of the internal jugular vein. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Deep Cervical Vein (posterior vertebral or posterior deep cervical vein) accompanies its artery between the Semispinales capitis and colli. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


diploic/veins of the brain: cerebral - superior cerebral - middle cerebral - inferior cerebral - basal - internal cerebral - great cerebral - cerebellar | (Gray's s169-Gray's s170) The diploic veins are found in the skull, and drain the diploic space. ... The cerebral veins are divisible into external and internal (internal cerebral veins) groups according as they drain the outer surfaces or the inner parts of the hemispheres. ... The Superior Cerebral Veins, eight to twelve in number, drain the superior, lateral, and medial surfaces of the hemispheres, and are mainly lodged in the sulci between the gyri, but some run across the gyri. ... The middle cerebral vein (superficial Sylvian vein) begins on the lateral surface of the hemisphere, and, running along the lateral cerebral fissure, ends in the cavernous or the sphenoparietal sinus. ... The Inferior Cerebral Veins, of small size, drain the under surfaces of the hemispheres. ... The basal vein is formed at the anterior perforated substance by the union of (a) a small anterior cerebral vein which accompanies the anterior cerebral artery, (b) the deep middle cerebral vein (deep Sylvian vein), which receives tributaries from the insula and neighboring gyri, and runs in the lower part... The internal cerebral veins (veins of Galen; deep cerebral veins) drain the deep parts of the hemisphere and are two in number; each is formed near the interventricular foramen by the union of the terminal and choroid veins. ... The vein of Galen (VG), also known as the great cerebral vein, is one of the large blood vessels in the skull draining the cerebrum (brain). ... The cerebellar veins are placed on the surface of the cerebellum, and are disposed in two sets, superior and inferior. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


sinuses of the dura mater: superior sagittal - inferior sagittal - straight - transverse - sigmoid - petrosquamous - occipital - confluence - cavernous | (Gray's s171) The dural venous sinuses (also called dural sinuses or cerebral sinuses) are venous channels found between layers of dura mater in the brain. ... The superior sagittal sinus lies within the superior border of the falx cerebri, a two-layered dural structure separating the two cerebral hemispheres. ... The inferior sagittal sinus courses along the inferior border of the falx cerebri, superior to the corpus callosum. ... The straight sinus lies in the falx cerebri superior to the tentorium cerebelli, a bilayer of dura mater superior to the cerebellum. ... Each sigmoid sinus begins beneath the temporal bone and follows a tortuous course to the jugular foramen, at which point the sinus becomes continuous with the internal jugular vein. ... The petrosquamous sinus, when present, runs backward along the junction of the squama and petrous portion of the temporal, and opens into the transverse sinus. ... The occipital sinus courses through falx cerebelli, inferior to the straight sinus. ... The superior sagittal sinus, straight sinus, and occipital sinus connect at a series of channels that comprise the confluence of sinuses, which is found beneath the occipital protuberance of the skull. ... The cavernous sinus is a large channel of venous blood creating a sinus cavity bordered by the sphenoid bone and the temporal bone of the skull. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


ophthalmic: superior ophthalmic - nasofrontal - inferior ophthalmic - intercavernous sinuses - superior petrosal sinus - basilar - emissary | (Gray's s171) The ophthalmic veins, two in number, superior and inferior, are devoid of valves. ... Superior ophthalmic vein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Nasofrontal vein is a vein in the eye which drains to the superior ophthalmic vein. ... The Inferior Ophthalmic Vein begins in a venous net-work at the forepart of the floor and medial wall of the orbit; it receives some veins from the Rectus inferior, Obliquus inferior, lacrimal sac and eyelids, runs backward in the lower part of the orbit and divides into two branches. ... The intercavernous sinuses are two in number, an anterior and a posterior, and connect the two cavernous sinuses across the middle line. ... The superior petrosal sinuses (or greater petrosal veins) deliver blood to the transverse sinuses, while the inferior petrosal sinuses deliver blood directly to the internal jugular veins or indirectly via the sigmoid sinuses. ... The basilar plexus (transverse or basilar sinus) consists of several interlacing venous channels between the layers of the dura mater over the basilar part of the occipital bone, and serves to connect the two inferior petrosal sinuses. ... The emissary veins are valveless veins which normally drain the intracranial venous sinuses to veins on the outside of the skull. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


upper extremity: superficial (cephalic - median cubital - accessory cephalic - basilic - median antebrachial) - deep (radial - ulnar - brachial - axillary) | (Gray's s172) This vein is located in the superficial fascia along the anterolateral surface of the biceps brachii muscle and is often visible through the skin. ... Superficial veins of the upper limb. ... The accessory cephalic vein arises either from a small tributory plexus on the back of the forearm or from the ulnar side of the dorsal venous net-work; it joins the cephalic below the elbow. ... In human anatomy, the basilic vein is a superficial vein of the upper limb. ... The median antebrachial vein drains the venous plexus on the volar surface of the hand. ... In anatomy, the radial veins are venae comitantes that accompany the radial artery through the back of the hand and the lateral aspect of the forearm. ... In human anatomy, the brachial veins are venae comitantes of the brachial artery in the arm proper. ... Anterior view of right upper limb and thorax - axillary vein and the distal part of the basilic vein and cephalic vein. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


thorax: subclavian - brachiocephalic - internal thoracic - superior phrenic - inferior thyroid - intercostal (supreme - superior - posterior) - superior vena cava - azygos - hemiazygos - accessory hemiazygos - bronchial | (Gray's s172) The subclavian vein is a continuation of the axillary vein and runs from the outer border of the first rib to the medial border of anterior scalene muscle. ... The Brachiocephalic vein is also known as the innominate vein, the left and right brachiocephalic veins in the upper chest are formed by the union of each corresponding jugular vein and subclavian vein. ... Veins of the thorax and abdomen. ... The superior phrenic vein, i. ... The inferior thyroid veins two, frequently three or four, in number, arise in the venous plexus on the thyroid gland, communicating with the middle and superior thyroid veins. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The posterior intercostal veins are veins that drain the intercostal spaces posteriorly. ... Superior vena cava - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The azygos vein is so named because it is unpaired, having no matching vein on the left side of the body. ... The Hemiazygos Vein (vena azygos minor inferior) begins in the left ascending lumbar or renal vein. ... The accessory hemiazygos vein (vena azygos minor superior) is a vein on the left side of the vertebral column that generally drains the fifth through eighth intercostal spaces on the left side of the body. ... The bronchial veins are small vessels that return blood from the larger bronchi and structures at the roots of the lungs. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


vertebral column: external vertebral venous plexuses - internal vertebral venous plexuses - basivertebral - intervertebral - of the medulla spinalis | (Gray's s172) The external vertebral venous plexuses (extraspinal veins) best marked in the cervical region, consist of anterior and posterior plexuses which anastomose freely with each other. ... The internal vertebral venous plexuses (intraspinal veins) lie within the vertebral canal between the dura mater and the vertebrae, and receive tributaries from the bones and from the medulla spinalis. ... The basivertebral veins emerge from the foramina on the posterior surfaces of the vertebral bodies. ... The intervertebral veins accompany the spinal nerves through the intervertebral foramina; they receive the veins from the medulla spinalis, drain the internal and external vertebral plexuses and end in the vertebral, intercostal, lumbar, and lateral sacral veins, their orifices being provided with valves. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


lower extremity: common digital - great saphenous - small saphenous - plantar digital - posterior tibial - peroneal - anterior tibial - popliteal - femoral - profunda femoris | (Gray's s173) On the dorsum of the foot the dorsal digital veins receive, in the clefts between the toes, the intercapitular veins from the plantar cutaneous venous arch and join to form short common digital veins which unite across the distal ends of the metatarsal bones in a dorsal venous arch. ... Great saphenous vein and its tributaries. ... Small saphenous vein and its tributaries. ... The plantar digital veins arise from plexuses on the plantar surfaces of the digits, and, after sending intercapitular veins to join the dorsal digital veins, unite to form four metatarsal veins; these run backward in the metatarsal spaces, communicate, by means of perforating veins, with the veins on the dorsum... In anatomy, the posterior tibial vein of the lower limb carries blood from the posterior compartment and plantar surface of the foot to the popliteal vein which is forms when it joins with the anterior tibial vein. ... In anatomy, the peroneal vein (also known as the fibular vein) of the lower limb carries blood from the lateral compartment of the leg to the popliteal vein. ... In human anatomy, the anterior tibial vein of the lower limb carries blood from the anterior compartment of the leg to the popliteal vein which is forms when it joins with the posterior tibial vein. ... The politeal vein parrallels the popliteal artery but carries the blood from the knee joint and muscles in the thigh and calf back to the heart. ... In the human body, the femoral vein is a blood vessel that accompanies the femoral artery in the same sheath. ... Profunda femoris vein is a large vein in the thigh. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


abdomen and pelvis: external iliac - inferior epigastric - internal iliac - superior gluteal - inferior gluteal - internal pudendal - hemorrhoidal - pudendal - dorsal of the penis - common iliac - inferior vena cava - spermatic - ovarian - renal - suprarenal - inferior phrenic - hepatic | (Gray's s173) Veins of the abdomen and lower limb - inferior vena cava, common iliac vein, external iliac vein, internal iliac vein, femoral vein and their tributaries. ... Right inferior epigastric vein - view from inside of abdomen. ... The internal iliac vein (hypogastric vein) begins near the upper part of the greater sciatic foramen, passes upward behind and slightly medial to the hypogastric artery and, at the brim of the pelvis, joins with the external iliac to form the common iliac vein. ... The Superior Gluteal Veins (gluteal veins) are venæ comitantes of the superior gluteal artery; they receive tributaries from the buttock corresponding with the branches of the artery, and enter the pelvis through the greater sciatic foramen, above the Piriformis, and frequently unite before ending in the hypogastric vein. ... The Inferior Gluteal Veins (sciatic veins), or venæ comitantes of the inferior gluteal artery, begin on the upper part of the back of the thigh, where they anastomose with the medial femoral circumflex and first perforating veins. ... The Internal Pudendal Veins (internal pudic veins) are the venæ comitantes of the internal pudendal artery. ... The hemorrhoidal plexus (or rectal venous plexus) surrounds the rectum, and communicates in front with the vesical plexus in the male, and the uterovaginal plexus in the female. ... The pudendal plexus is not sharply marked off from the sacral plexus, and as a consequence some of the branches which spring from it may arise in conjunction with those of the sacral plexus. ... This article, image, template or category belongs in one or more categories. ... The common iliac veins are formed by the external iliac veins and internal iliac veins and together, in the abdomen at about the level of the umbilicus, form the inferior vena cava. ... This article may be too technical for most readers to understand. ... The spermatic veins (or testicular veins) emerge from the back of the testis, and receive tributaries from the epididymis; they unite and form a convoluted plexus, called the pampiniform plexus, which constitutes the greater mass of the spermatic cord; the vessels composing this plexus are very numerous, and ascend along... The ovarian veins correspond with the spermatic in the male; they form a plexus in the broad ligament near the ovary and uterine tube, and communicate with the uterine plexus. ... Kidneys viewed from behind with spine removed The kidneys are bean-shaped excretory organs in vertebrates. ... The Suprarenal Veins are two in number: the right ends in the inferior vena cava. ... The Inferior Phrenic Veins follow the course of the inferior phrenic arteries; the right ends in the inferior vena cava; the left is often represented by two branches, one of which ends in the left renal or suprarenal vein, while the other passes in front of the esophageal hiatus in... Superior vena cava, inferior vena cava (IVC), azygos vein and their tributaries. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


portal system: sinusoids - portal - splenic - short gastric - left gastroepiploic - pancreatic - inferior mesenteric - superior rectal - superior mesenteric - right gastroepiploic - pancreaticoduodenal | (Gray's s174) In human anatomy, the portal venous system is the system of veins that drain into the portal vein. ... A sinusoid is a small blood vessel similar to a capillary but with a fenestrated endothelium. ... The portal vein is a major vein in the human body draining blood from the digestive system and its associated glands. ... The portal vein and its tributaries - the largest are the superior mesenteric vein and splenic vein. ... The short gastric veins, four or five in number, drain the fundus and left part of the greater curvature of the stomach, and pass between the two layers of the gastrolienal ligament to end in the lienal vein or in one of its large tributaries. ... The left gastroepiploic vein receives branches from the antero-superior and postero-inferior surfaces of the stomach and from the greater omentum; it runs from right to left along the greater curvature of the stomach and ends in the commencement of the lienal vein. ... The pancreatic veins consist of several small vessels which drain the body and tail of the pancreas, and open into the trunk of the lienal vein. ... The portal vein and its tributaries. ... The inferior mesenteric vein begins in the rectum as the superior rectal vein (superior hemorrhoidal vein), which has its origin in the hemorrhoidal plexus, and through this plexus communicates with the middle and inferior hemorrhoidal veins. ... The portal vein and its tributaries. ... The right gastroepiploic vein (right gastroomental vein) receives branches from the greater omentum and from the lower parts of the antero-superior and posteroinferior surfaces of the stomach; it runs from left to right along the greater curvature of the stomach between the two layers of the greater omentum. ... The pancreaticoduodenal veins accompany their corresponding arteries; the lower of the two frequently joins the right gastroepiploic vein. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


fetal: ductus venosus - umbilical | (Gray's s139) In the fetus, the ductus venosus connects the left umbilical vein with the upper inferior vena cava. ... Fetal circulation; the umbilical vein is the large, red vessel at the far left The umbilical vein is a blood vessel present during fetal development that carries oxygenated blood from the placenta to the growing fetus. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


 
 

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