FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Supreme Court of the United States Reporter of Decisions
Seal of the Supreme Court
Seal of the Supreme Court

The Reporter of Decisions of the United States Supreme Court is the official charged with editing and publishing the Court's decisions both when announced and in the bound volumes of the United States Reports. The official title of this officer was changed from "Reporter" to "Reporter of Decisions" in 1953, to clarify the duties of the office at the request of Reporter Walter Wyatt with the authorization of Chief Justice Fred M. Vinson. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Walter Wyatt (July 20, 1893–February 26, 1978) was an American lawyer and the twelfth reporter of decisions of the United States Supreme Court from 1946 to 1963. ... Frederick Moore Vinson (January 22, 1890–September 8, 1953) served the United States in all three branches of government. ...


The first two reporters acted in an unofficial capacity. Only in 1816, after the Supreme Court had existed for a quarter-century, did Congress create an official post of reporter. It then added a $1,000 a year salary in the Judiciary Act of 1817. The reporter also profited from selling the printed volumes of the reports of decisions. In 1874, Congress for the first time appropriated funds to publish the volumes; from that time the report was known as the United States Reports and numbering began as if Dallas's first volume was number one. In 1922 the Government Printing Office took over publication of the United States Reports. 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The logotype of the United States Government Printing Office In the United States, the Government Printing Office (GPO) provides printed (and now electronic) copies of documents produced by and for all federal agencies, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, and all executive branch agencies like the FCC and EPA. Court...


The Reporter of Decisions is responsible only for the contents of the "United States Reports" issued by the Government Printing Office, first in preliminary prints and later in the final bound volumes. The Reporter is not responsible for the editorial content of unofficial reports of the Court's decisions, such as the "Supreme Court Reporter" or "Lawyer's Edition." published by private firms.


List of Reporters

The reporters of decisions are listed here with their tenures and the numbers of the volumes of the United States Reports they edited. Until volume 90, the volumes were also by the name of the reporter and the numbers of those nominative reports are listed after the U.S. Reports numbers. The post was vacant from 1944 to 1946. 1944 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1946 was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...

  1. Alexander J. Dallas (1790-1800); 1-4 (Dallas 1-4)
  2. William Cranch, (1801-1815); 5-13 (Cranch 1-9)
  3. Henry Wheaton, (1816-1827); 14-25 (Wheat. 1-12)
  4. Richard Peters, (1828-1842); 26-41 (Peters 1-24)
  5. Benjamin Chew Howard, (1843-1860); 42-65 (Howard 1-24)
  6. Jeremiah Sullivan Black, (1861-1862); 66-67 (Black 1-2)
  7. John William Wallace, (1863-1874); 68-90 (Wall. 1-23)
  8. William Tod Otto, (1875-1883); 91-107
  9. John Chandler Bancroft Davis, (1883-1902); 108-186
  10. Charles Henry Butler, (1902-1916); 187-241
  11. Ernest Knaebel, (1916-1944); 242-321
  12. Walter Wyatt, (1946-1963); 322-376
  13. Henry Putzel, Jr., (1964-1979); 376-449
  14. Henry Curtis Lind, (1979-1989); 440-479
  15. Frank D. Wagner, (1989-to date); 480-

  Results from FactBites:
 
Category:Supreme Court of the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (250 words)
Unsuccessful nominees to the United States Supreme Court
Demographics of the Supreme Court of the United States
Procedures of the Supreme Court of the United States
Supreme Court of the United States Reporter o... - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (205 words)
Supreme Court of the United States Reporter o...
Start the Supreme Court of the United States Reporter o...
Promotional articles about yourself, your friends, your company or products; or articles written as part of a marketing or promotional campaign, may be deleted in accordance with our deletion policies.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m