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Encyclopedia > Supreme Court of California
Justices of the Supreme Court of California (circa May 2005). Standing, from left to right: Brown, Werdegar, Chin, Moreno. Seated: Kennard, George, Baxter. Corrigan, appointed in Dec. 2005 and confirmed in Jan. 2006, is not pictured.[1]
Justices of the Supreme Court of California (circa May 2005). Standing, from left to right: Brown, Werdegar, Chin, Moreno. Seated: Kennard, George, Baxter. Corrigan, appointed in Dec. 2005 and confirmed in Jan. 2006, is not pictured.[1]
The Court's headquarters in San Francisco
The Court's headquarters in San Francisco

The Supreme Court of California is the state supreme court in California. It is headquartered in San Francisco, and regularly holds sessions at its branch offices in Los Angeles, and Sacramento. Its decisions are binding on all other California state courts. Photo of the current justices of the Supreme Court of California (circa. ... Image File history File links Supremecourtofcaliforniamaincourthouse. ... Image File history File links Supremecourtofcaliforniamaincourthouse. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... In the United States, the state supreme court (known by various names in various states) is the highest state court in the state court system. ... Official language(s) English Capital Largest city Sacramento Los Angeles Area  - Total   - Width   - Length    - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 158,302 sq mi  410,000 km² 250 miles  400 km 770 miles  1,240 km 4. ... For details about the famous earthquake, refer to the article 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. ... Nickname: City of Angels Official website: http://www. ... Nickname: City of Trees Official website: http://www. ... A court is an official, public forum which a sovereign establishes by lawful authority to adjudicate disputes, and to dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under the law. ...

Contents


Organization

The court consists of one Chief Justice and six Associate Justices who are appointed by the Governor of California for 12-year terms. The appointments are confirmed by the public at the next general election. The electorate has occasionally exercised this power to eject unpopular justices like Rose Bird. Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis with President George W. Bush (2003) Seal of the Governor of California (without the Roman numerals designating the governors sequence) See also: List of pre-statehood governors of California, List of Governors of California The Governor of California is the highest executive authority... Rose Elizabeth Bird (November 2, 1936–December 4, 1999) served for 10 years as the 25th Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court until removed from that office by the voters. ...


According to the California Constitution, to be considered for an appointment, a person must be an attorney admitted to practice in California or have served as a judge of a California court for 10 years immediately preceding the appointment. The California Constitution is the document that establishes and describes the duties, powers, structure and function of the government of the U.S. state of California. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ...


The court currently sits as a whole (all seven together) when hearing appeals. When there is an open seat on the court, or if a justice recused himself or herself on a given case, justices from the California Court of Appeal are assigned to join the court for individual cases, on a rotational basis. Prior to the 1960s, the court reviewed the vast majority of appeals in three-judge panels (like the federal Courts of Appeals). Court of Appeals is the title of certain appellate courts in various jurisdictions. ...


The court has direct mandatory appellate jurisdiction in all California state death penalty cases. It has discretionary appellate jurisdiction over all cases reviewed by the California Court of Appeal. Discretionary jurisdiction is a legal term used to describe a circumstance where a court has the power to decide whether to hear a particular case brought before it. ...


The Chief Justice

Current Chief Justice Ronald M. George was appointed as the 27th Chief Justice of California on March 28, 1991 by Governor Pete Wilson. He was confirmed by the Commission on Judicial Appointments on May 1, 1991, and took his oath the same day. Ronald Marc George (born March 11, 1940) is the current and 27th Chief Justice of California, where he heads the Supreme Court of California. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in Leap years). ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Barton Wilson (born August 23, 1933) is an American Republican politician from California. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ancillary responsibilities

The Supreme Court supervises the lower courts through the Judicial Council of California, and also supervises California's legal profession through the State Bar of California. All lawyer admissions and disbarments are done through recommendations of the State Bar, which are then routinely ratified by the Supreme Court. California's bar is the largest in the U.S. with 200,000 members, of whom 150,000 are actively practicing. The State Bars main office in San Francisco is housed on several floors of this office building The State Bar of California is Californias official bar association. ...


Political, gender, and ethnic diversity

Despite the state that it serves, the Court lacks ethnic and political diversity. There are two Asian-American justices (Chin and Kennard), one Hispanic justice (Moreno), and no African-American justices.


The Court currently has six Republicans (George, Kennard, Baxter, Werdegar, Chin, and Corrigan) and one Democrat (Moreno), although most of the Republicans tend to be moderate. The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


Three justices are female (Kennard, Werdegar, and Corrigan). One justice has a physical disability (Kennard).


Reputation and idiosyncrasies

Just as California has become famous worldwide for its innovations in agriculture, technology, and entertainment, its highest court has become famous for its innovations in jurisprudence. As the Wall Street Journal explained in 1972: The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ...

This state's high court over the past 20 years has won a reputation as perhaps the most innovative of the state judiciaries, setting precedents in areas of criminal justice, civil liberties, racial integration, and consumer protection that heavily influence other states and the federal bench.[2]

Also like the state it serves, the Court has a reputation for being unique in various odd ways. Both the California Supreme Court and all lower California state courts use a different writing style and citation system from the federal courts and many other state courts. The most obvious difference is that California citations always have the year between the names of the parties and the reference to the case reporter, as opposed to the national standard (the Bluebook) of putting the year at the end. For example, the famous case Marvin v. Marvin, which established the standard for non-marital partners' ability to sue for their contributions to the partnership, is rendered Marvin v. Marvin (1976) 18 Cal.3d 660 in California style, while it would be Marvin v. Marvin, 18 Cal. 3d 660 (1976), in Bluebook style. // Case citation is the system used in common law countries such as the United States, England and Wales, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and India to uniquely identify the location of past court cases in special series of books called reporters. ... The Bluebook: a Uniform System of Citation is a book and a widely used legal citation system in the United States. ... Lee Marvin, (February 19, 1924 – August 29, 1987) was an American film actor. ...


While the U.S. Supreme Court justices indicate the author of an opinion and who has "joined" the opinion at the start of the opinion, California justices always sign a majority opinion at the end, followed by "WE CONCUR," and then the names of the joining justices. California judges are traditionally not supposed to use certain ungrammatical terms in their opinions, which has led to embarrassing fights between judges and the editor of the state's official reporters. California has abolished the use of certain French and Latin phrases like en banc, certiorari, and mandamus, so California judges and attorneys write "in bank," "review," and "mandate" instead. The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest judicial body in the U.S. and leads the judicial branch of the U.S. federal government. ... It has been suggested that History of the Latin language be merged into this article or section. ... En banc or in bank is a term used to refer to the hearing of a case by all the judges of a court. ... This law-related article does not cite its references or sources. ... A writ of mandamus or simply mandamus, which means we order in Latin, is the name of one of the prerogative writs and is a court order directing someone, most frequently a government official, to perform a specified act. ...


Finally, the California Supreme Court has the power to "depublish" opinions by the California Courts of Appeal (as opposed to the federal practice of not publishing certain "unpublished" opinions at all in the federal case reporters). This means that even though the opinion has already been published in the official state reporters, it will be binding only upon the parties. Stare decisis does not apply, and any new rules articulated will not be applied in future cases. Similarly, the California Supreme Court has the power to "publish" opinions by the California Courts of Appeal which were initially not published. Court of Appeals is the title of certain appellate courts in various jurisdictions. ... Stare decisis (Latin: , Anglicisation: , to stand by things decided) (more fully, stare decisis et non quieta movere) is a Latin legal term, used in common law to express the notion that prior court decisions must be recognized as precedents, according to case law. ...


Current justices

  • Ronald M. George, (since 1991), Chief Justice (elevated in 1996)
  • Marvin R. Baxter, (since 1991), Associate Justice
  • Ming W. Chin, (since 1996), Associate Justice
  • Carol A. Corrigan, (since 2006), Associate Justice
  • Joyce L. Kennard, (since 1989), Associate Justice
  • Carlos R. Moreno, (since 2001), Associate Justice
  • Kathryn Mickle Werdegar, (since 1994), Associate Justice

Ronald Marc George (born March 11, 1940) is the current and 27th Chief Justice of California, where he heads the Supreme Court of California. ... Carol A. Corrigan (b. ... Joyce Luther Kennard (b. ...

Notable past justices

Serranus Clinton Hastings (1813 – 1893) was the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California and founded the Hastings College of the Law in 1887. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The University of California, Hastings College of the Law is a law school located in downtown San Francisco, California. ... David Smith Terry (March 8, 1823 - August 14, 1889) was a California politician, perhaps best known for his having killed United States Senator David C. Broderick in a duel. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... Stephen Johnson Field (November 4, 1816 – April 9, 1899) was an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from May 20, 1863, to December 1, 1897. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest judicial body in the U.S. and leads the judicial branch of the U.S. federal government. ... The 43rd Secretary of the Navy, Curtis Dwight Wilbur, (10 May 1867–8 September 1954) was born in Boonesboro, Iowa. ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Mathew O. Tobriner was an associate justice on the California Supreme Court from 1962 – 1982. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rose Elizabeth Bird (November 2, 1936–December 4, 1999) served for 10 years as the 25th Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court until removed from that office by the voters. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Janice Rogers Brown Janice Rogers Brown (born in Greenville, Alabama, May 11, 1949) is a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and former governor of Texas. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, known informally as the D.C. Circuit, is the federal appellate court for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. ... Stanley Mosk (September 12, 1912–June 19, 2001) was an associate justice of the California Supreme Court for 37 years (1964-2001), and holds the record for the longest-serving justice on that court. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Roger John Traynor (February 12, 1900 – May 14, 1983) served as the 23rd Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California from 1964 to 1970, and as an Associate Justice from 1940 to 1964. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... Wiley W. Manuel (1927 - 1981) was an associate justice on the Supreme Court of California from 1977-1981 and the first African American to serve on the high court. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Pro bono is a phrase derived from Latin meaning for the good. The complete phrase is pro bono publico, for the public good. It is used to designate legal or other professional work undertaken voluntarily and without payment, as a public service. ...

List of Chief Justices

# Name Term
1 Serranus Clinton Hastings (1850-1852)
2 Henry A. Lyons (1852)
3 Hugh C. Murray (1852-1857)
4 David S. Terry (1857-1859)
5 Stephen J. Field (1859-1863)
6 W.W. Cope (1863-1864)
7 Silas W. Sanderson (1864-1866)
8 John Currey (1866-1868)
9 Lorenzo Sawyer (1868-1870)
10 Augustus L. Rhodes (1870-1872)
11 Royal T. Sprague (1872)
12 William T. Wallace (1872-1879)
13 Robert F. Morrison (1879-1887)
14 Niles Searls (1887-1889)
15 William H. Beatty (1889-1914)
16 Matt I. Sullivan (1914-1915)
17 Frank M. Angellotti (1915-1921)
18 Lucien Shaw (1921-1923)
19 Curtis D. Wilbur (1923-1924)
20 Louis W. Myers (1924-1926)
21 William H. Waste (1926-1940)
22 Phil S. Gibson (1940-1964)
23 Roger J. Traynor (1964-1970)
24 Donald R. Wright (1970-1977)
25 Rose Elizabeth Bird (1977-1987)
26 Malcolm M. Lucas (1987-1996)
27 Ronald M. George (1996-present)

Serranus Clinton Hastings (1813 – 1893) was the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California and founded the Hastings College of the Law in 1887. ... Henry A. Lyons (1809? – July 27, 1872) was the 2nd Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Hugh C. Murray (1825? – 1857) was the 3rd Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... David Smith Terry (March 8, 1823 - August 14, 1889) was a California politician, perhaps best known for his having killed United States Senator David C. Broderick in a duel. ... Stephen Johnson Field (November 4, 1816 – April 9, 1899) was an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from May 20, 1863, to December 1, 1897. ... Warner Cope (c. ... Silas W. Sanderson (1823 - 1886) was the 7th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... John Currey was the 8th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Lorenzo Sawyer was the 9th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Augustus L. Rhodes was the 10th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Royal T. Sprague was the 11th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... William T. Wallace was the 12th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Robert F. Morrison was a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Niles Searls (c. ... William H. Beatty (1838 - 1914) was the 12th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Matt I. Sullivan was a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Frank M. Angellotti was a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Lucien Shaw (1845 - 1933) was the 18th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California and a prominent Republican politician in California during the early 20th Century. ... The 43rd Secretary of the Navy, Curtis Dwight Wilbur, (10 May 1867–8 September 1954) was born in Boonesboro, Iowa. ... Louis Westcott Myers was a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... William H. Waste was a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Phil S. Gibson was a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Roger John Traynor (February 12, 1900 - May 14, 1983) served as Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court from 1964 to 1970. ... Donald R. Wright was a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Rose Elizabeth Bird (November 2, 1936–December 4, 1999) served for 10 years as the 25th Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court until removed from that office by the voters. ... Malcolm M. Lucas was a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. ... Ronald Marc George (born March 11, 1940) is the current and 27th Chief Justice of California, where he heads the Supreme Court of California. ...

References

  Joann Lublin, "Trailblazing Bench: California High Court Often Points the Way for Judges Elsewhere," Wall Street Journal, 20 July 1972, 1. The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1972 calendar). ...


External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
News: California Supreme Court allows arrests of hundreds paroled sex offenders | offenders, court, law, sex, last - ... (785 words)
Court is deciding whether Jessica's Law is constitutional as it applies to four parolees.
The court previously blocked the state from arresting four parolees who claimed the law is too vague and unfairly punishes offenders after they are released from prison.
The Supreme Court is considering whether Jessica's Law is constitutional as it applies to the four parolees, meaning attorneys representing additional sex offenders could simply wait for a decision.
Supreme Court of California - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1024 words)
According to the California Constitution, to be considered for an appointment, a person must be an attorney admitted to practice in California or have served as a judge of a California court for 10 years immediately preceding the appointment.
The most obvious difference is that California citations always have the year between the names of the parties and the reference to the case reporter, as opposed to the national standard (the Bluebook) of putting the year at the end.
California judges are traditionally not supposed to use certain ungrammatical terms in their opinions, which has led to embarrassing fights between judges and the editor of the state's official reporters.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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