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Encyclopedia > Supermarine Walrus
Supermarine Walrus
Type amphibious reconnaissance aircraft
Manufacturer Supermarine
Designed by R. J. Mitchell
Introduced 1935
Primary users Fleet Air Arm
Royal Air Force
Royal Australian Navy
Royal Canadian Navy
Produced 1936 - 1944
Number built 740
Developed from Supermarine Seagull

The Supermarine Walrus was a single-engine amphibious biplane reconnaissance aircraft designed by R. J. Mitchell and operated by the Fleet Air Arm. It also served with the Royal Air Force, RAAF, RNZN, RCAF, and RNZAF. Supermarine Walrus Fleet reconnaissance amphibian. ... An amphibious or amphibian aircraft is an aircraft that can land on either land or water. ... Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ... An aerospace manufacturer is a company or individual involved in the various aspects of designing, building, testing, selling, and maintaining aircraft, aircraft parts, missiles, rockets, and/or spacecraft. ... Supermarine was a British aircraft manufacturer that become famous for producing a range of sea planes and the legendary Supermarine Spitfire fighter. ... Reginald Joseph Mitchell CBE (20 May 1895-11 June 1937) was an aeronautical engineer, most notable for his design of the Supermarine Spitfire. ... The Fleet Air Arm is the branch of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ... RAF redirects here. ... The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) is the naval branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... For history after 1968, see Canadian Forces Maritime Command The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was the navy of Canada from 1911 until 1968 when the three Canadian armed services were unified to form the Canadian Forces. ... For the air/sea rescue aircraft, see Supermarine Seagull ASR-1 The Supermarine Seagull was a development of the Supermarine Seal by the Supermarine company. ... Supermarine was a British aircraft manufacturer that become famous for producing a range of sea planes and the legendary Supermarine Spitfire fighter. ... An amphibious or amphibian aircraft is an aircraft that can land on either land or water. ... Reproduction of a Sopwith Camel biplane flown by Lt. ... Reginald Joseph Mitchell CBE (20 May 1895-11 June 1937) was an aeronautical engineer, most notable for his design of the Supermarine Spitfire. ... The Fleet Air Arm is the branch of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ... RAF redirects here. ... The RAAF Roundel is based on that of the British Royal Air Force, with the central circle replaced by a Kangaroo, a symbol of Australia. ... The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) is the navy of New Zealand. ... The RCAF Roundel is based on that of the British Royal Air Force with a maple leaf, a symbol of Canada in the centre. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force or RNZAF is the air operations arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ...

Contents

Development

The Walrus was initially developed for service from cruisers at the request of Australia, and was called the Seagull V; although there was little resemblance to the earlier Supermarine Seagull III. It was designed to be launched from ship-borne catapults, and was the first amphibious aircraft in the world to be launched by catapult with a full military load. USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser (really an uprated guided missile destroyer), launched in 1992. ... For the air/sea rescue aircraft, see Supermarine Seagull ASR-1 The Supermarine Seagull was a development of the Supermarine Seal by the Supermarine company. ... u suk usuk u suk u suk u suk u suk u suk u suk u suk u suk usuk suk suk suk suk suk suk suk suk suk suk suk suk suk suk suk suk{| class=wikitable |- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3 |- | row 1, cell 1 | row 1...


The lower wings of this biplane were set in the shoulder position with a stabilising float mounted under each one, and its horizontal tail-surfaces were positioned high on the tail-fin; while its single Bristol Pegasus VI radial engine was housed in a nacelle slung from the upper wing and powered a four-blade propeller in "pusher" configuration. The wings could be folded on ship, giving a storage width of 17 ft 11 in (5.5 m). One of the more unusual characteristics of the aircraft was that the control column was not a fixed fitting in the usual way, but could be unplugged from either of two sockets at floor level. It became a habit for only one column to be in use, and when control was passed from the pilot to co-pilot or vice-versa, for the control column to be unplugged and handed over. Bristol Pegasus piston engine The Pegasus was a 9 cylinder one_row radial aircraft engine designed as the follow-on to the Bristol Aeroplane Companys very successful Bristol Jupiter, following lessons learned in the Mercury effort. ... The radial engine is an internal combustion engine configuration in which the cylinders point outward from a central crankshaft like the spokes on a wheel. ... Look up nacelle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


As the Walrus was stressed to a level suitable for catapult-launching, rather surprisingly for such an ungainly-looking machine, it could be looped and bunted, whereupon any water in the bilges would make its presence felt. This usually discouraged the pilot from any future aerobatics on this type. The UK Utterly Butterly display team perform an aerobatic manoeuver with their Boeing Stearmans, at an air display in England. ... The bilge is the compartment at the bottom of the hull of a ship or boat where water collects so that it may be pumped out of the vessel at a later time. ... The Frecce Tricolori aerobatic team of the Italian Air Force, flying at the Royal International Air Tattoo, Fairford, England, in 2005 The UK Utterly Butterly display team perform an aerobatic maneuvre with their Boeing Stearmans Red Arrows Hawks in Concorde formation Indian Air Forces Surya Kiran during an aerobatic...


Armament usually consisted of two Vickers K machine guns, with the capability of carrying 760 lb (345 kg) of bombs or depth charges mounted beneath the lower wings. The Vickers K gun known as the Vickers Gas Operated (VGO) in British service, was a rapid firing machine gun developed for use by observers in aircraft. ... Depth Charge used by U.S. Navy later in World War II The depth charge is the oldest anti-submarine weapon. ...


The Royal Australian Air Force ordered 24 examples directly off the drawing boards, under the Seagull V 'A2' designation, which were delivered for service from cruisers from 1935; followed by orders from the Royal Air Force with the first production Walrus, K5772, first flying on 16 March, 1936. It was also hoped to capitalise on the aircraft's successful exports to Japan, Spain, etc. This is a list of aviation-related events from 1935: Events January January 11-12 – Amelia Earhart makes the first solo flight across the Pacific from Honolulu, Hawaii to Oakland, California. ...


A total of 740 Walrus were built in three major variants: the metal-hulled Seagull V and Walrus I, and the wooden-hulled Walrus II. The Walrus was affectionately known as the "Shagbat" or sometimes "Steam-pigeon"; the latter name coming from the steam produced by water striking the hot Pegasus engine.


Operational history

The first Seagull V, A2-1, was handed over to the Royal Australian Air Force in 1935, with the last, A2-24 delivered in 1937 and served aboard the HMA Ships Australia (MTO [Mediterranian Theatre of Operations]), Canberra (MTO, SWPA, lost at Guadalcanal in 1942), Sydney (MTO, SWPA, lost off the coast of Western Australia 1942), Perth and Hobart. For other ships of this name, see HMAS Australia. ... HMAS Canberra (D33) was a Royal Australian Navy heavy cruiser of the Kent sub-class of County class cruisers between 1928 and 1942. ... A map of the Pacific Theater. ... Combatants Allied forces including: United States Australia New Zealand British Solomon Is. ... HMAS Sydney in 1940. ... HMAS Perth, the first to be named after the city of Perth, was a modified Leander class cruiser, laid down by HM Dockyard at Portsmouth on 26 June 1933, launched on 26 July 1934 by the Marchioness of Titchfield, completed in July 1936 and commissioned at Portsmouth on 15 June... The HMAS Hobart was a Leander class light cruiser which served in the Royal Australian Navy during World War II. Description The Hobart was the second of its class to be modified for Australian service, and the first to be named after the city of Hobart in Tasmania. ...


Walrus deliveries started in 1936 when the first to be deployed was with the New Zealand division of the Royal Navy, on HMS Achilles (later a victor of the Battle of the River Plate). By the start of World War II the Walrus was in widespread use, and saw service in home waters, the Mediterranean and the Far East. Walrus are credited with sinking or damaging at least five enemy submarines, while RAF use in home waters was mainly in the air-sea rescue role. One Walrus, HD874, (Restored and exhibited at the RAAF Museum, Point Cook, Victoria) was still in service in 1947 with the Australian Antarctic Expedition. This is a list of aviation-related events from 1936: Events February February 13 - Imperial Airways commences airmail services to West Africa March March 23 - Impreial Airways begins scheduled flights between Hong Kong and Malaysia. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... HMS Achilles (from 1941 HMNZS Achilles) was a Leander class cruiser of 7,200 tons built in Birkenhead, England and launched on 1 September 1932. ... Combatants Germany United Kingdom New Zealand Commanders Hans Langsdorff Henry Harwood Strength 1 heavy cruiser 1 heavy cruiser 2 light cruisers Casualties 1 heavy cruiser damaged 36 dead 60 wounded 1 heavy cruiser heavily damaged 2 light cruisers damaged 72 dead 28 wounded For other uses, see The Battle of... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... This is a list of aviation-related events from 1947: Events March March 14 - Saudi Arabian Airlines begins regular services. ...


The Irish Air Corps used the Walrus as a maritime patrol aircraft during World War II (see: The Emergency). One of the Walrus aircraft formerly flown by the Air Corps is preserved, albeit in Royal Navy colours. The aircraft was bought back by the Fleet Air Arm after the war as a training aircraft, and now resides in the RNAS museum in Yeovilton. The Irish Air Corps (in Irish: Aer Chór na hÉireann) provides the air defence function of Oglaigh na hÉireann (the Irish Defence Forces), in support of the Army and Naval Service, together with such other roles as may be assigned by the Government (e. ... The Emergency was an official euphemism used by the Irish Government (of the State now known as the Republic of Ireland) during the 1940s to refer to its position during World War II. The State was officially neutral during World War II and in government media, direct references to the... The Fleet Air Arm is the branch of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ... Personnel of No 1 Squadron RNAS in late 1914 The Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) was the air arm of the Royal Navy until near the end of World War I, when it merged with the British Armys Royal Flying Corps (RFC) to form the Royal Air Force. ... RNAS Yeovilton is an air station of the Royal Navy, sited a few miles north of Yeovil in Somerset. ...


Variants

Seagull V
Original Metal-hull version.
Walrus I
Metal-hull version.
Walrus II
Wooden-hull version.

Operators

Supermarine Walrus, seaplane training flight of RNZAF

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 543 pixelsFull resolution (1260 × 856 pixel, file size: 106 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 543 pixelsFull resolution (1260 × 856 pixel, file size: 106 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force or RNZAF is the air operations arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ...

Military operators

Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... A Boomerang aircraft operated by No. ... A No. ... Two Supermarine Seagull III seaplanes of No. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The French Navy, officially called the National Navy (French: Marine Nationale) is the maritime arm of the French military. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Map of Éire Éire (pronounced AIR uh, in the Irish language, translated as Ireland) is the name given in Article 4 of the 1937 Irish constitution to the 26-county Irish state, created under the 1921 Anglo-Irish Treaty, which was known between 1922 and 1937 as the Irish Free... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) is the air force arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ... At the outbreak of hostilities in the Pacific, operated Short Singapores from Fiji against Japan on maratime patrol and antisubmarine duties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Soviet_Union. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The Fleet Air Arm is the branch of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ... RAF redirects here. ...

Civilian operators

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ...

Specifications (Supermarine Walrus)

A Walrus aircraft embarked on an Australian light cruiser
A Supermarine Walrus on display at the RAF Museum in London.
A Supermarine Walrus on display at the RAF Museum in London.

General characteristics

  • Crew: 3-4
  • Length: 33 ft 7 in (10.2 m)
  • Wingspan: 45 ft 10 in (14.0 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 3 in (4.6 m)
  • Wing area: 610 ft² (56.7 m²)
  • Empty weight: 4,900 lb (2,220 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 7,200 lb (3,265 kg)
  • Powerplant:Bristol Pegasus VI radial engine, 680 hp (510 kW)

Performance

Armament

Image File history File linksMetadata 9_Sqn_(AWM_044443). ... Image File history File linksMetadata 9_Sqn_(AWM_044443). ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... An Avro Lancaster in the main hangar of the RAF Museum London The Royal Air Force Museum (RAF Museum) is a museum dedicated to the history of aviation, and the British Royal Air Force in particular. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The distance AB is the wing span of this Aer Lingus Airbus A320. ... Bristol Pegasus piston engine The Pegasus was a 9 cylinder one_row radial aircraft engine designed as the follow-on to the Bristol Aeroplane Companys very successful Bristol Jupiter, following lessons learned in the Mercury effort. ... The radial engine is an internal combustion engine configuration in which the cylinders point outward from a central crankshaft like the spokes on a wheel. ... V speeds are speeds that define certain performance and limiting characteristics of an aircraft. ... The maximal total range is the distance an aircraft can fly between takeoff and landing, as limited by fuel capacity in powered aircraft, or cross-country speed and environmental conditions in unpowered aircraft. ... In aeronautics, the service ceiling is the maximum density altitude where the best rate of climb airspeed will produce a 100 feet per minute climb(twin engine) and 50 feet(single engine) at maximum weight while in a clean configuration with maximum continuous power. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... In aerodynamics, wing loading is the loaded weight of the aircraft divided by the area of the wing. ... Power-to-weight ratio is a measure commonly used when comparing various vehicles (or engines), including automobiles, motorcycles and aircraft. ... The Vickers K gun known as the Vickers Gas Operated (VGO) in British service, was a rapid firing machine gun developed for use by observers in aircraft. ...

References

Notes
Bibliography
  • Andrews, C.F. and Morgan, E.B. Supermarine Aircraft Since 1914. London: Putnam Books Ltd.,2nd revised edition 2003. ISBN 0-851-77800-3.
  • Brown, David. "Supermarine Walrus I & Seagull V Variants". Aircraft in Profile, Volume 11. Windsor, Berkshire, UK: Profile Publications Ltd., 1972.
  • Green, William. War Planes of the Second World War, Volume Five: Flying Boats. London: Macdonald & Co.(Publishers) Ltd., 1962 (5th Impression 1972). ISBN 0-356-01449-5.
  • Hall, Alan W. "Aircraft in Detail-The Supermarine Walrus". Scale Aircraft Modelling Magazine, Vol.8 No.7, April 1986.
  • Kightly, James and Wallsgrove, Roger. Supermarine Walrus & Stranraer. Sandomierz, Poland/Redbourn, UK: Mushroom Model Publications, 2004. ISBN 83-917178-9-5.

External links

  • Fleet Air Arm Archive

Related content

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Category:Supermarine Walrus

Related development

Supermarine Seagull Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... For the air/sea rescue aircraft, see Supermarine Seagull ASR-1 The Supermarine Seagull was a development of the Supermarine Seal by the Supermarine company. ...

Designation sequence

Scapa - Stranraer - Seamew - Walrus - S6.B - Spitfire - Sea Otter The Supermarine Scapa was the flying boat that was the inter-design between the Southampton and the Stranraer. ... The Supermarine Stranraer marked the end of biplane flying-boat devlopment for the Royal Air Force. ... Supermarine Seamew was a twin engined amphibian, built by the Supermarine company, intended as a small, shipborne aircraft. ... The Supermarine S.6B was a racing seaplane developed by Reginald Mitchell for the Supermarine company in order to win the Schneider Trophy in 1931. ... The Supermarine Spitfire was a British single-seat fighter, which was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries during the Second World War, and into the 1950s. ... The Supermarine Sea Otter, the developement of the Walrus, was intended to have a longer range. ...

Related lists

List of aircraft of the Fleet Air Arm This is a list of aircraft of the Fleet Air Arm. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Supermarine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (246 words)
The first Supermarine landplane to go into production was the famous Spitfire, which proved to be a successful design and, along with the Hawker Hurricane, entered into legend after its role in the Battle of Britain.
Supermarine also developed the Spiteful/Seafang (successor of the Spitfire/Seafire).
The Supermarine main works was in Woolston, Southampton which led to the city being heavily bombed in 1940.
Supermarine Walrus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (446 words)
The Walrus was initially developed for service from cruisers at the request of Australia, and at first was called the Seagull V - although there was little resemblance to the earlier Seagull, it was hoped to capitalise on that amphibian's successful exports to Japan, Spain, etc. It was delivered for service from cruisers from 1935.
The first Walrus to be deployed was with the New Zealand division of the Royal Navy, on HMNZS Achilles, (victor of the Battle of the River Plate).
The Walrus was affectionately known as the 'Shagbat' or sometimes 'Steam-pigeon', the latter name coming from the steam produced by water falling on the hot Pegasus engine.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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