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Encyclopedia > Superman Returns
Superman Returns

Original movie poster
Directed by Bryan Singer
Produced by Gil Adler
Jon Peters
Bryan Singer
Chris Lee
Written by Screenplay:
Michael Dougherty(Story/Script)
Dan Harris(Story/Script)
Bryan Singer (Story)Comic Book:
Jerry Siegel
Joe Shuster
Starring Brandon Routh
Kate Bosworth
Kevin Spacey
James Marsden
with
Eva Marie Saint
and
Marlon Brando
Music by John Ottman
Themes:
John Williams
Cinematography Newton Thomas Sigel
Editing by John Ottman
Elliot Graham
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release date(s) June 28, 2006
Running time 154 min.
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Budget $200 million (estimated) [1]
Gross revenue $391,081,192
Followed by Superman: The Man of Steel
Official website
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Superman Returns is a 2006 superhero film based on the fictional DC Comics character Superman. It was directed by Bryan Singer and stars Brandon Routh, Kate Bosworth and Kevin Spacey. The screenplay was written by Michael Dougherty and Dan Harris. It was based on a story by Bryan Singer, Dan Harris and Michael Dougherty. For the Game Boy Advance version, see Superman Returns: Fortress of Solitude. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (550x815, 219 KB) Summary http://filmforce. ... Bryan Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American film director. ... Jon Pagano Peters (born on 2 June 1945 in Van Nuys, California to Jack Peters and Helen Pagano) is a former hairdresser turned movie producer. ... Bryan Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American film director. ... Michael Dougherty is a promising young screenwriter who has so far collaborated with director Bryan Singer (of X-Men and The Usual Suspects fame) on two of his movies- X2: X-Men United and Superman Returns. Hes also one of the guest stars in some of the bunny shorts... This article, image, template or category should belong in one or more categories. ... Bryan Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American film director. ... Jerome Jerry Siegel a. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ... Brandon Routh (born October 9, 1979) is an American actor and former fashion model. ... Kate Bosworth (born January 2, 1983) is an American actress. ... Kevin Spacey (born July 26, 1959) is an Academy Award-winning American actor (film and stage) and director. ... James Paul Marsden (born September 18, 1973) is an American actor and former Versace model, perhaps best known for playing Cyclops in the X-Men films. ... Eva Marie Saint (born July 4, 1924) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... John Ottman (born July 6, 1964 in San Diego, California) is an American film editor, composer and director. ... For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... Warner Bros. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The year 2006 in film involved some significant events. ... DVD front cover for The Adventures of Captain Marvel film serial. ... A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity whose existence originates from a work of fiction. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Bryan Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American film director. ... Brandon Routh (born October 9, 1979) is an American actor and former fashion model. ... Kate Bosworth (born January 2, 1983) is an American actress. ... Kevin Spacey (born July 26, 1959) is an Academy Award-winning American actor (film and stage) and director. ... Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... Michael Dougherty is a promising young screenwriter who has so far collaborated with director Bryan Singer (of X-Men and The Usual Suspects fame) on two of his movies- X2: X-Men United and Superman Returns. Hes also one of the guest stars in some of the bunny shorts... This article, image, template or category should belong in one or more categories. ... Bryan Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American film director. ...


The film is a relaunch of the Superman franchise that took more than a decade to get off the ground, and is the first Superman film since Superman IV: The Quest for Peace, made nineteen years earlier. Superman Returns revolves around Superman's return to Earth after a five-year absence. Director Bryan Singer has said that the continuity is "branching off from" elements of "the first two Superman films with Christopher Reeve,"[2] which serve as, as he puts it, a "vague history."[3] The film received fairly positive reviews and earned $391 million worldwide. Superman IV: The Quest For Peace is a 1987 film, the last of the Superman theatrical movies. ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... Christopher DOlier Reeve[1] (September 25, 1952 – October 10, 2004) was an American actor, director, producer, and writer. ...

Contents

Plot

As the film begins, we learn that Superman has been missing for five years. He has traveled to where astronomers believed they had discovered the remains of Krypton. Superman returns to Earth, crashing back into his adoptive mother's corn field in a craft like the one that delivered him to Earth when he was a baby. He returns to the The Daily Planet and his life as Clark Kent in Metropolis. He learns that Lois Lane has won the Pulitzer Prize for her article "Why the World Doesn't Need Superman." Krypton is a fictional planet in the DC Comics universe. ... Martha Kent, née Martha Clark, also known as Ma Kent, is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ... The Daily Planet is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Clark Kent (disambiguation). ... Metropolis Skyline, as seen in Smallville. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


During Superman's absence, Lex Luthor has been released from prison. While away, Superman missed the appeals trial to testify against Lex. Upon his release, Lex marries a rich widow and obtains her fortune, immediately upon her death. Lex travels to the Fortress of Solitude, steals Kryptonian crystals, and returns to Metropolis to experiment with a tiny fragment. The growing crystal causes a blackout due to an electromagnetic pulse, interfering with the test flight of a new space shuttle tethered to a Boeing 777—a plane which Lois Lane is aboard while covering the story. Clark flies into action as Superman and stops the plane from crashing onto a baseball field. Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the superhero Superman. ... The Fortress of Solitude is the occasional headquarters of Superman in DC Comics. ... The term electromagnetic pulse (EMP) has the following meanings: electromagnetic radiation from an explosion (especially a nuclear explosion) or an intensely fluctuating magnetic field caused by Compton-recoil electrons and photoelectrons from photons scattered in the materials of the electronic or explosive device or in a surrounding medium. ... This article is about the space vehicle. ... The Boeing 777 is an American long-range wide-body twin-engine airliner built by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. ... This article is about the sport. ...

Superman (Brandon Routh) makes a rooftop visit to Lois Lane (Kate Bosworth) after returning to earth.

The world rejoices in Superman's return, but Lois is more concerned with the blackout. Clark meets her fiancé Richard White, nephew of Daily Planet editor-in-chief Perry White, and their son, Jason. Clark is emotionally hurt when he overhears a conversation between Lois and Richard in which she says she never loved Superman. He buries himself in his work, including halting a bank heist and saving Kitty, Luthor's co-conspirator. While Kitty distracts Superman, Luthor steals Kryptonite from the Metropolis Museum of Natural History. Perry assigns Lois to interview Superman while Clark investigates the blackout. That night, Superman arrives at The Daily Planet and takes Lois for a flight, during which he apologizes for leaving her. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Perry White is a fictional character who appears in the Superman comics, and is the editor-in-chief of the Metropolis newspaper the Daily Planet. ... Look up heist, hoist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the fictional substance. ... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ...


After her latest Superman interview, Lois focuses her attention on the blackout again and ascertains its origin. She and Jason steal onto Luthor's ship, not realizing who owns it, and are captured. Luthor reveals his grand scheme: using one of the stolen Kryptonian crystals to grow a new continental landmass in the Northern Atlantic Ocean that will destroy much of Earth's existing continents, and in the process killing billions of people and leaving him as the world's sole landowner. Seeing the effects that a stick of Kryptonite apparently has on Jason, Luthor inquires as to who Jason's father really is, but after Lois asserts that the father is Richard, he leaves to launch the crystal (now encased in green Kryptonite) into the sea. Under water, the crystal begins to create Luthor's new landmass. Lois faxes their co-ordinates to The Daily Planet and is attacked by a henchman. The henchman is hit by a piano, appearing as though Jason pushed it at him; afterward, Lois and Jason are imprisoned in a galley. Luthor hears of the incident and flees in a helicopter. The landmass's growth causes destruction in Metropolis, to which Superman attends, and Richard arrives in a sea plane to rescue Lois and Jason. Superman arrives to help, and then he flies off to find Luthor, who has returned to the still-forming continent. Continental may refer to: The adjective of continent, such as in continental Europe, continental breakfast, or continental climate, or Continental Glacier; The culture of the continental nation states of Europe, inasmuch as it contrasts with the culture of Anglo-Saxon England; The Lincoln Continental, a car made by Lincoln division... The galley is the compartment of a ship, submarine, train or aircraft where food is cooked and prepared. ... For other uses, see Metropolis (disambiguation). ... A DeHavilland Single Otter floatplane in Harbour Air livery H-4 Hercules flying boat A seaplane is an aircraft designed to take off and land (correctly, though less commonly, alight) upon water. ...


Meeting Luthor, Superman discovers the landmass is filled with Kryptonite, which weakens him to the point that Luthor and his henchmen are able to beat and torture him. Superman falls into the ocean, after being stabbed with a shard of Kryptonite by Luthor. Lois makes Richard turn back to rescue Superman, and she removes the Kryptonite from his back. Superman, after regaining his strength from the sun, lifts the landmass by putting layers of earth between him and the Kryptonite. Luthor and Kitty escape in their helicopter, but not before Kitty, unwilling to let billions of people die, tosses away the crystals; she and Luthor are stranded on a desert island some time later. Superman throws the landmass into space, but is weakened by the Kryptonite and crashes back to Earth. Doctors remove more Kryptonite from Superman's wound, but after it is removed they cannot penetrate his skin with their surgical tools. While Superman remains in a coma, Lois and Jason visit him at the hospital, where, careful not to let Jason overhear, Lois whispers a secret into Superman's ear. Superman later awakens and flies to see Jason, reciting Jor-El's last speech to Jason as he slumbers. Lois starts writing another article, titled “Why the World Needs Superman". She goes outside, only to be greeted by the Man of Steel after he has just finished visiting Jason. Despite another attempt to tell him that she loves him, she doesn't finish, but the look on Superman's face tells her that she doesn't need to. After reassuring her that he is now back to stay, he flies off on another patrol around Metropolis and then into space, having finally accepted Earth as his new true home.” Sol redirects here. ...


Cast and characters

  • Brandon Routh as Clark Kent / Superman / Kal-El
  • Kate Bosworth as Lois Lane
  • Kevin Spacey as Lex Luthor
  • James Marsden as Richard White:
  • Parker Posey as Kitty Kowalski: Luthor's companion. While loyal to Luthor, she becomes highly distrustful of him during a plot to distract Superman from his main schemes that almost costs her her life. After being saved by him Kitty develops a crush on the Man of Steel and even weeps when Luthors thugs torture him on the new Krypton Island.
  • Frank Langella as Perry White
  • Sam Huntington as Jimmy Olsen: Clark's young friend and photographer at The Daily Planet, who is in desperate need of a good photo of Superman.
  • Marlon Brando as Jor-El: Clark's deceased father, who appears as a hologram to Luthor and whose voice is heard several times in the film (footage from the filming of Superman and Superman II were used to create his character for this film; see visual effects below).
  • Tristan Lake Leabu as Jason White
  • Kal Penn, David Fabrizio and Vincent Stone as Stanford, Brutus and Grant: Lex Luthor's henchmen.
  • Ian Roberts as Riley
  • Eva Marie Saint as Martha Kent
  • Noel Neill as Gertrude Vanderworth: An elderly woman who signs away her fortune to Luthor, while on her death bed.
  • Jack Larson as Bo the Bartender

Brandon Routh (born October 9, 1979) is an American actor and former fashion model. ... For other uses, see Clark Kent (disambiguation). ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Superman, looking over Metropolis, his home, with the Daily Planet building in the background. ... Kate Bosworth (born January 2, 1983) is an American actress. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... Kevin Spacey (born July 26, 1959) is an Academy Award-winning American actor (film and stage) and director. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the superhero Superman. ... James Paul Marsden (born September 18, 1973) is an American actor and former Versace model, perhaps best known for playing Cyclops in the X-Men films. ... For the African-American television actress, see Parker McKenna Posey. ... Frank A. Langella, Jr. ... Perry White is a fictional character who appears in the Superman comics, and is the editor-in-chief of the Metropolis newspaper the Daily Planet. ... Sam Huntington (born April 1, 1982) is an American actor. ... James Bartholomew Jimmy Olsen is a fictional character, a photojournalist that appears in DC Comics’ Superman stories. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Jor-El is a fictional character. ... Tristan Lake Leabu (born 2000) is an American child actor who made his debut playing the part of Jason White, Lois Lanes son, in the 2006 film Superman Returns. ... Kalpen Suresh Modi (born April 23, 1977) known by his stage name Kal Penn, is an American actor and producer. ... [[1]] This article is about the rugby league player. ... Eva Marie Saint (born July 4, 1924) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Martha Kent, née Martha Clark, also known as Ma Kent, is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ... Noel Neill as Lois Lane on the serial version of Superman. ... Jack Edward Larson (born February 8, 1928 in Los Angeles) is an American actor, librettist, screenwriter and producer. ...

Production

X-Men director Bryan Singer turned down directing X-Men 3 to direct Superman Returns. Because of his Academy Award-winning performance in Singer's film The Usual Suspects and friendship with the director, Kevin Spacey was immediately cast as Luthor.[4] He in turn suggested Kate Bosworth, who played his wife, Sandra Dee, in the film Beyond the Sea, for Lois Lane, and she was hired after Singer saw her screen-test.[5] Singer, unlike previous directors, stated his Superman, like Christopher Reeve, should be an unknown. After viewing hundreds of auditions and casting calls from directors previously attached to the project, he found a twenty-four year-old bartender from Iowa named Brandon Routh, whose frame and charisma suited the role of Superman; this actor's Midwestern roots and meekness seemed to fit Clark Kent's mild-mannered and bumbling persona, as well. Routh got the part after a meeting with Singer, spilling a drink on the director in the process, which a panicked Routh believed to have cost him the part. Nevertheless, Singer admitted the misfortune is what helped him choose Routh, because he visualized Clark's clumsiness in the young actor. In 2005, Brandon Routh was introduced for the first time to the media as the new Man of Steel.[6] Hugh Laurie was cast as Perry White, but had to quit due to his role in the series House, being replaced by Frank Langella. [7] The Superman film series currently consists of five superhero films based on the fictional DC comics character of the same name. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Usual Suspects is a 1995 American neo-noir film written by Christopher McQuarrie and directed by Bryan Singer. ... Kate Bosworth (born January 2, 1983) is an American actress. ... Sandra Dee (April 23, 1942 - February 20, 2005) was an American film actress best known for her role as Gidget. // Alexandra Zuck was born to John and Mary Zuck, of Rusyn ancestry, in Bayonne, New Jersey, Dee was a professional model by the age of four. ... Beyond the Sea (2004) is an English language German-based production from Lions Gate Films about singer Bobby Darin (1936-1973). ... Christopher DOlier Reeve[1] (September 25, 1952 – October 10, 2004) was an American actor, director, producer, and writer. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Brandon Routh (born October 9, 1979) is an American actor and former fashion model. ... James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born 11 June 1959) is an English actor, comedian, writer, and musician. ... Perry White is a fictional character who appears in the Superman comics, and is the editor-in-chief of the Metropolis newspaper the Daily Planet. ... House, also known as House, M.D., is an American medical drama television series created by David Shore and executive produced by Shore and film director Bryan Singer. ... Frank A. Langella, Jr. ...

Bryan Singer (right) directs Kevin Spacey (center) and Brandon Routh (left) in front of a green screen set.

Rather than adapting an existing storyline, Singer chose to write a draft of an original story. Singer didn't want to do an origin movie, as he considers Superman to be a classic (as he had seen the film many times while filming X-Men), so he decided to do a return storyline. With his previous writers from X2, Dan Harris and Michael Dougherty, Singer created a script that was a semi-sequel to the original film with very little ties to Superman II and completely disregarding the events of Superman III and Superman IV: The Quest for Peace. His first draft included the character of General Zod, whom he wanted to be played by Jude Law, his first and only choice for the role. When Law turned down the part three times, Singer eliminated the character from the script. The most difficult challenge, he admits, was finding the obstacle that would be impossible for Superman to overcome: the passage of time and change. According to Singer, Lois' son Jason is a permanent reminder of this. While Superman's costume has undergone a variety of changes over the decades, the costume in this movie has been updated for the 21st century and clearly has modern and retro influences. The color scheme is darkened several shades so that bright primary colors are less visible and the material has a deep, webbed texture that is visible on close-up shots. The Superman chest emblem is now a smaller raised 3D-piece. At San Diego Comic Con 2005, Bryan Singer stated that the original silk-screened emblem looks like a billboard, while the new shield has an advanced alien look. The emblem itself is embossed with hundreds of smaller emblems. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The bluescreen setup. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... X2 is a 2003 superhero film based on the fictional characters the X-Men. ... Michael Dougherty is a promising young screenwriter who has so far collaborated with director Bryan Singer (of X-Men and The Usual Suspects fame) on two of his movies- X2: X-Men United and Superman Returns. Hes also one of the guest stars in some of the bunny shorts... For other uses, see Sequel (disambiguation). ... Superman III (originally titled Superman vs. ... Superman IV: The Quest For Peace is a 1987 film, the last of the Superman theatrical movies. ... General Zod is a fictional comic book supervillain who is an enemy of Superman. ... David Jude Law (born 29 December 1972) is an BAFTA Award-winning and Academy Award-nominated British actor. ...


The cape does not sport the large yellow and black emblem, and it now has a visible liner of a different material. The neckline of Superman's top has been changed from a wide scoop-neck to a crew-neck cut. The boots have also been changed, they are now a shorter, mid-calf length with a slightly rubbery appearance for the sole as well as the Superman emblem in varying sizes on the bottom. Finally, the belt and buckle are changed to include the addition of the Superman emblem. Several of these changes were inspired by the Superman costume from Superman cartoons produced by Fleischer Studios in the 1940s, that was inspired by the original Golden Age comics Superman created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. Fleischer Studios, Inc. ... Jerome Jerry Siegel a. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ...


Budget

The film initially was speculated as having a budget as high as US$260,000,000,[8] which would have made it the most expensive film ever (as of August 2006). According to various articles, the development process had utilized "pay or play" contracts, meaning that those involved were paid even if production did not commence as planned. According to Variety, these development costs exceeded $40 million before Bryan Singer came aboard.[9] On the site The-Numbers.com, Bryan Singer was quoted as saying the budget for Superman Returns was $250 million in late 2004.[10] He later denied that figure.[11] In February 2006, Warner Bros. had unofficially put the budget at $184 million, "factoring in tax breaks offered in Australia."[12] In a July 2006 interview with Newsweek, Bryan Singer quoted the final production budget number as $204 million.[1] On October 30, Variety reported that studio placed the cost at $209 million after factoring in tax rebates and incentives.[13] This figure also consists of the $50 million that was spent in the 1990s trying to get a fifth Superman film into production. USD redirects here. ... . ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


Filming

Shooting of Superman Returns began during February 2005 in Australia, on locations that included a farm outside of the regional town of Gunnedah in North West NSW and Sydney. Much of the filming took place in the city centre of Sydney, mostly in the York St area and near Wynyard Station as well as many other areas in Sydney.The part where Lois picks her son up from school was shot in Sydney Boys High School Other scenes were shot in various parts of the United States. The film was shot entirely on high-definition video using Panavision Genesis cameras. Singer said the first cut of the movie was 2 hours and 45 minutes.[14] Gunnedah is a town and Local government area (see Gunnedah Shire Council) in north-western New South Wales, Australia. ... NSW redirects here. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Sydney Boys High School is a secondary school in City of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... This article is about high-definition video technology. ... The Panavision Genesis HD camera. ...


Visual effects

A digital recreation of Marlon Brando in the film, as Jor-El.
A digital recreation of Marlon Brando in the film, as Jor-El.

Using footage from the original Superman film as a reference point, Marlon Brando was re-created using computer technology. In addition to the footage, photography was also scanned using a cyberscan and a lumispheric scan to re-create Brando's appearance.[15] In June 2006, Rhythm and Hues, the studio that created the special effect, released a video detailing the process.[citation needed] The video is available on the 2-Disc special edition DVD release of the film, but different music plays and the video ends with credits. Image File history File links JorELsupermanreturns. ... Image File history File links JorELsupermanreturns. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Jor-El is a fictional character. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Rhythm & Hues Studios is an Academy Award winning visual effects studio, founded in 1987 by six former employees of Robert Abel and Associates. ...


The opening credits for Superman Returns are presented in a deliberate recreation of the style used for Superman, again to the accompaniment of John Williams' theme music. However, the new graphics differ in several respects. They are of a duller shade of blue (changing to red for Brandon Routh's and Kate Bosworth's credits) and lack the 'soaring' sound effect that accompanies their predecessors. They are also of a taller font, with some letters visibly conjoined. In addition, whereas the originals change direction (zooming away from the viewer after the appearance of the 'S' symbol), the new ones consistently travel towards the audience. Because of the number of co-production credits that precede it, the 'S' symbol arrives slightly later on screen. The camera flies through space at breakneck speed throughout the entire sequence, following the path of Superman's return to Earth from Krypton. (In the 1978 film the opposite journey was depicted.) The sequence for Superman Returns was designed by Kyle Cooper. For the series of films, see Superman (film series). ... Williams conducting the London Symphony Orchestra during the recording of the score for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. ... Kyle Cooper is a designer of motion picture title sequences. ...


At least a couple of scenes suggest past media interpretations of the Superman character. In one scene in downtown Metropolis, Superman holds a car over his head with the hood pointed downward at about 45 degrees, similar to the cover of the first Action Comics issue in 1938. The scene where Superman saves an out-of-control airplane and gently sets it down in a setting impossible to fly out of (a baseball stadium) echoes a scene from one of the Fleischer Superman cartoons, in which Superman sets a large, 8-engine airplane down in the middle of a city street, with the wings extending down side streets. Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ...


Brandon Routh, who actually has brown eyes, had to wear blue contact lenses to re-create Superman's blue eyes.


Promotion

Warner Brothers promoted Superman Returns very heavily prior to its cinematic release. During production, Singer released a series of 'video diaries' on the internet at BlueTights.net, giving almost unprecedented up-to-date insight into the behind-the-scenes work being done on what would normally be a very secretive production. However, after 27 installments, the video diaries stopped for a while shortly before the teaser trailer debuted. On November 17, 2005, Warner Bros. released the teaser trailer,[16] containing John Williams' music and Marlon Brando's dialogue from Superman. The main theatrical trailer premiered online on May 2, 2006.[17] It appeared in theatres on May 5, 2006, along with prints of Mission: Impossible 3. On May 19, 2006 with UK prints of The Da Vinci Code, the studio released the film's international trailer. A second full version was issued with some prints of X-Men: The Last Stand on May 26, 2006. A third trailer appeared on the film's new official website in June, 2006.[18] It also appeared online before the new site came on in the end of May. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Trailer (film). ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the film. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Warner Bros rolled out an immense list of tie in products and companies which included General Mills, Burger King, Duracell, Pepsi, Doritos, Papa John's, 7-Eleven, and Colgate.[19] and Warner Bros advertised the movie on the Red Bull Racing Formula One cars for the 2006 Monaco Grand Prix; David Coulthard managed to get the team's first podium that day as well. On the podium, Coulthard also wore a Superman cape in celebration of his achievement.[20] NASCAR champion Jeff Gordon also sported the "Man of Steel" look by promoting the movie on his #24 Chevrolet Monte Carlo in the 2006 Pepsi 400 at Daytona International Speedway. Along similar lines, Troy Bayliss appeared in promotional 'Superman' leathers and sported a cape on the podium following a win and a 2nd place at the 2006 Brands Hatch Superbike World Championship round on his way to winning that year's championship.[21] On May 11, 2006 Warner Bros began a campaign of nine different television commercials, and released eleven clips of Superman Returns through various websites midway through June. The iTunes Music Store also released an exclusive premiere scene, and was first made available on June 20, 2006.[22] General Mills (NYSE: GIS) is a Fortune 500 corporation, mainly concerned with food products, which is headquartered in Golden Valley, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... A pair of Duracell AAA batteries. ... Pepsi Cola is a non-alcoholic carbonated beverage produced and manufactured by PepsiCo. ... Nacho Cheese Doritos Mexican Nacho Flavored Doritos, Israel (old style) Cool American Flavored Doritos found in Amsterdam. ... Papa Johns Pizza (NASDAQ: PZZA) is the third largest carryout and delivery pizza restaurant in the United States behind Pizza Hut and Dominos Pizza; it is based in Louisville, Kentucky. ... For other uses, see 7-Eleven (disambiguation). ... Colgate redirects here. ... Red Bull Racing is one of two Formula One teams owned by Austrian beverage company Red Bull. ... F1 redirects here. ... The Grand Prix de Monaco 2006 was the seventh race of the 2006 Formula One World Championship. ... David Marshall Coulthard, often called DC, (born March 27, 1971 in Twynholm, Kirkcudbrightshire) is a British Formula One racing driver from Scotland. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Jeffery Michael Gordon (born August 4, 1971) is a professional American race car driver. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Monte Carlo is a very wealthy section of the city-state of Monaco known for its casino, gambling, beaches, glamour, and sightings of famous people. ... For the race known as the Pepsi 400 held at Michigan International Speedway from 1998-2002, see GFS Marketplace 400 The Pepsi 400 is a 160 lap/400 mile (approx. ... Daytona International Speedway is a superspeedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ... Troy Bayliss is a motorcycle racer, born in March 30, 1969 at Taree, New South Wales, Australia. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into ITunes. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Look, Up in the Sky: The Amazing Story of Superman, a documentary covering the history of the Superman franchise, was released just prior to the film. Along with input from Bryan Singer, the documentary contains commentary from other past and present actors, directors, writers, artists, and fans, and was narrated by Kevin Spacey.


Release

Superman Returns: An IMAX 3D Experience was released simultaneously in 111 IMAX format theatres world-wide, which (in some theaters) included approximately 26 minutes of specially converted 3D material. It is the first Hollywood live-action film to be released in this combined format.[23][24] IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night LHemisferic (Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències) Valencia, Spain IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display images of far greater... In film, the term 3-D (or 3D) is used to describe any visual presentation system that attempts to maintain or recreate moving images of the third dimension, the illusion of depth as seen by the viewer. ...


The DVD release of Superman Returns was released on November 28, 2006. There are three versions available: a single-disc version, a 2-disc Special Edition, and an exclusive 3-Disc version available only through Circuit City. The third disc features the documentary "The Science of Superman." is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Circuit City (NYSE: CC) is a dealer and retailer in brand-name consumer electronics, personal computers, and entertainment software. ...


The single-disc edition has no extra features, while the 2-disc edition has over 3 hours of bonus material, including deleted scenes and a behind-the-scenes documentary titled Requiem for Krypton: Making Superman Returns, created by Ludovico Technique.[25][26] Requiem for Krypton, which accounts for nearly all of the three hours of bonus features (thereby making it actually longer than the film being profiled), ends with a blooper reel from the film, including outtakes from scenes not in the theatrical release of the film, culminating in a rare outtake featuring Marlon Brando. Ludovico Technique LLC is an art and entertainment production company which produces a variety of media, from feature films, to comic books. ... A blooper usually describes a short sequence of a film or video production which contains a mistake made by a member of the cast or crew. ...


Also released on that day was the 13-disc Ultimate Superman Collection. Alongside the four original Christopher Reeve films, it features Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut as well as Look, Up in the Sky: The Amazing Story of Superman and other documentaries. The Region 1 release of the Ultimate Collection set contains a 14th disc consisting of Singer's Internet video blog entries. All of those features were released individually the same day, as was Supergirl. The Ultimate Superman Collection (also known as The Superman Ultimate Collectors Edition and Superman: The Ultimate Collection) is a 14-disc DVD box set of Superman films (13 Disc box set outside of the US), released on November 28, 2006 by Warner Home Video. ... Supergirl is a 1984 superhero film. ...


Superman Returns was also released on HD DVD (which features standard-def on the disc's opposite side) and Blu-ray Disc. These DVDs also have the bonus features found on the 2-disc edition. The film became the best-selling DVD of 2006 on Amazon.com in both the HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc formats.[27] HD-DVD disc HD DVD (for High Density Digital Versatile Disc) is a digital optical media format which is being developed as one standard for high-definition DVD. HD DVD is similar to the competing Blu-ray Disc, which also uses the same CD sized (120 mm diameter) optical data... Blu-ray Disc (also known as Blu-ray or BD) is an optical disc storage media format. ... Amazon. ...


Reception

Superman Returns grossed $200,081,192 in the United States and an estimated $191 million internationally, taking in over $391 million worldwide by the time its theatrical run officially closed on November 2, 2006. It made $21,037,277 from its June 27, 2006 and June 28, 2006 screenings and $52 million in its first weekend, a rather fair amount, but it was quickly overtaken in its second weekend by Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest in the U.S, but kept a fairly steady gross in the UK.. is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ...


The movie was well reviewed by many critics, receiving a "Certified Fresh" film ranking on Rotten Tomatoes, with 77% overall approval from critics, and a 73% from the "Cream of the Crop."[28] The film also received a 72% on Metacritic.[29]


Many critics gave the film particularly high praise. Empire gave the film five stars (out of five), and described it as "the finest popular entertainment since the Rings trilogy closed."[30] David Ansen of Newsweek said, "Next to Singer's champagne, most recent superhero adventure movies are barely-sparkling cider."[31] Other reviews said that Singer had done the Superman character proud, and that the whole cast had succeeded.[32][33] Leonard Maltin commented on his website, "Bryan Singer has brought us a brand-new movie that celebrates the traditions of Superman in a movie that somehow still seems fresh. Superman Returns is completely absorbing and highly entertaining."[34] Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... This article is about the Peter Jackson film trilogy. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Leonard Maltin (born December 18, 1950 in New York City) is a widely known and respected American film critic. ...


In contrast, Roger Ebert's reaction to the movie was very negative, saying, "This is a glum, lackluster movie in which even the big effects sequences seem dutiful instead of exhilarating."[35] The New York Times labelled the movie "leaden,"[36] while the San Francisco Chronicle observed that "Superman Returns finds no reason for being, other than that it's summer, and computer graphics have improved since the superhero days of Christopher Reeve." Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ...


Superman Returns was nominated for Best Visual Effects at the Academy Awards and BAFTA, losing both to Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest. Awards won by the film include Best Fantasy Film, Best Actor, Best Director, Best Writing and Best Music at the Saturn Awards,[37] Best Superhero on Spike TV's Scream Awards, [38] and Best Male Newcomer at the 2007 Empire Awards for Brandon Routh.[39] Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor the top works in science fiction, fantasy and horror in film, television and home video. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Scream Awards is the first Award Ceremony dedicated to horror, sci-fi and the fantasy genres. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ...


Soundtrack

Main article: Superman Returns (soundtrack)

A soundtrack album assembled by composer John Ottman (also one of the film's editors) was released June 27 2006 by Warner Sunset Records / Rhino Entertainment. It contained over 55 minutes of the original score as well as some Enhanced CD multimedia content, including two trailers and a "Behind the Scenes" piece on the recording of the score, which includes the film take on the main titles which is edited on this album with the end credits to create the "Superman March," which does not appear in its entirety in the film. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Ottman (born July 6, 1964 in San Diego, California) is an American film editor, composer and director. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rhino Entertainment is a specialty record label originally known for releasing retrospectives of famous comedy performers, including Stan Freberg, Tom Lehrer, and Spike Jones. ... Enhanced Music Compact Disc logo/trademark Compact Disc Interactive logo/trademark Enhanced CD, also known as CD Extra and CD Plus, is a certification mark of the Recording Industry Association of America for various technologies that combine audio and computer data for use in both compact disc and CD-ROM...


Legacy

Adaptations

DC Comics, Superman's publisher, released four prequel titles throughout June 2006 to tie in with the movie. The four 40-page editions served to explain the backstory to Superman Returns and are entitled Krypton to Earth (which reintroduces the origin from the 1978 Film, with Jor-El as the main protagonist), Ma Kent (in which Martha Kent recalls finding her son, his life growing up, and contemplates if she'll ever see him again), Lex Luthor (discussing Lex Luthor's time in jail, how he met Kitty and Gertrude Vanderworth (the old rich woman)) and Lois Lane (going over Lois' heartbreaking loss of the Man of Steel, her first meeting with Richard, and the birth of Jason).[40] For the series of films, see Superman (film series). ... Jor-El is a fictional character. ... Martha Kent, née Martha Clark, also known as Ma Kent, is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the superhero Superman. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ...


DC Comics also released a comic adaptation of the movie written by Martin Pasko and illustrated by Matt Haley. The story in the adaptation only focuses on the core story, and does not have any mention of the possibility that Jason is the son of Superman. Nevertheless, the comic does include scenes from Superman's journey in Krypton, unrealized scenes shot for the movie. The novelization by Marv Wolfman was published by Warner Books on 1 June, 2006.[41] The novelization does not link Jason to Superman. Brutus is killed by Lois by pulling a bookcase down onto his head, snapping his neck; however, just like in the movie, Jason finds Superman near-drowning. Superman Returns, the Novelization is a novel written by Marv Wolfman (author) based on the movie Superman Returns. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Sequel

Main article: Superman (film series)#Superman: Man of Steel

See also

  • Superman (film series)

References

  1. ^ a b Sean Smith. A Flying Leap. Newsweek. Retrieved on 2006-07-10.
  2. ^ Superman Returns - Comments from Bryan Singer and Staff:. Retrieved on 2006-07-28.
  3. ^ Capone interviews Bryan Singer. Ain't It Cool News. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  4. ^ Kevin Spacey cast as Lex Luthor in 'Superman'. CBC.ca (2005-01-07). Retrieved on 2007-08-17.
  5. ^ Kate Bosworth is the New Lois Lane in "Superman Returns. clickthecity.com (2006-06-09). Retrieved on 2007-08-17.
  6. ^ Word of Routh. Entertainment Weekly (2004-10-22). Retrieved on 2007-08-17.
  7. ^ Former Dracula to Play Superman's Boss. Rotten Tomatoes (2005-04-06). Retrieved on 2007-08-17.
  8. ^ Superman Returns : Business. IMDB. Amazon. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  9. ^ Singer's zinger: another 'Superman'. Variety (2006-10-30). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  10. ^ Superman Returns. The Numbers. Retrieved on 2006-06-28.
  11. ^ Superman Returns. Entertainment Weekly (January 20 2006). Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  12. ^ Pamela McClintock. Warner's men in tights. Variety.
  13. ^ Pamela McClintock. "Singer's zinger: another 'Superman'", Variety, 2006-10-30. Retrieved on 2007-02-02. 
  14. ^ Heather Newgen. "Superman Returns Director Bryan Singer", SuperHeroHype, 2006-06-16. Retrieved on 2007-02-19. 
  15. ^ Anthony Layser. Bryan Singer on The Triangle, X-Men and Superman. tvguide.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  16. ^ Superman Returns : Trailer 1. Apple Quicktime Trailers. Apple. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  17. ^ Superman Returns. Apple Quicktime Trailers. Apple. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  18. ^ Superman Returns. Warner Bros.. Retrieved on 2006-06-20.
  19. ^ Superman Soars With Over $280 MM in Tie-Ins. Promo Magazine (2006-06-01). Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  20. ^ Coulthard is Red Bull's superman. Formula One Official Website. Retrieved on 2006-10-04.
  21. ^ SUPERMAN BAYLISS TAKES DUCATI'S 25OTH WORLD SUPERBIKE WIN AT BRANDS HATCH. Ducati.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  22. ^ Superman Returns. Apple. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  23. ^ 20 Minutes of Superman Returns Converted to 3D for IMAX. Movieweb.com (2006-05-26). Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  24. ^ Ankeney, Jay (2006-06-14). Superman Returns in 3D. TV Technology. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  25. ^ "Superman Returns" DVDs Announced. Superman Homepage. Retrieved on 2006-09-22.
  26. ^ "Superman Returns" DVD News. Superman Homepage. Retrieved on 2006-09-22.
  27. ^ “Superman Returns” Best Selling HD-DVD in 2006. SupermanHomepage (2006-12-26). Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  28. ^ Rotten Tomatoes certified. RottenTomatoes.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-30.
  29. ^ Metacritic review. Metacritic.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-30.
  30. ^ Nathan, Ian (08 2006). "Superman Returns". Empire: 28. 
  31. ^ David Ansen (June 26 2006). 'Superman Returns' Soars. Newsweek.
  32. ^ BostonHerald.com: "Superman": A Magisterial Return
  33. ^ Comicbookresources.com: Spoiler-free mini-review
  34. ^ Leonard Maltin. Superman Returns. leonardmaltin.com.
  35. ^ Roger Ebert reviews Superman Returns
  36. ^ 'Superman Returns' to Save Mankind From Its Sins. New York Times. Retrieved on 2006-06-30.
  37. ^ David S. Cohen. "'Superman' tops Saturns", Variety, 2007-05-10. Retrieved on 2007-05-11. 
  38. ^ Spike TV Announces SCREAM AWARDS 2006 Winners!!!. PRNewswire (2007-10-08). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  39. ^ "Empire Readers Awards 2007", Empire, 2007-03-29, pp. 129. 
  40. ^ Murray, Rebecca (2006-05-17). "Superman Returns" Creative Team Unites for a Series of Comic Book Prequels. about.com. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  41. ^ Marv Wolfman (2006-06-01). Superman Returns. Warner. ISBN 0-446-60652-9. 

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Additional Reading

Michael Dougherty and Dan Harris. Superman Returns: The Complete Shooting Script. (London: Titan Books, 2006) ISBN: 1845763327 Michael Dougherty is a promising young screenwriter who has so far collaborated with director Bryan Singer (of X-Men and The Usual Suspects fame) on two of his movies- X2: X-Men United and Superman Returns. Hes also one of the guest stars in some of the bunny shorts... This article, image, template or category should belong in one or more categories. ... Titan Books is a UK publisher of graphic novels. ... The International Standard Book Number, or ISBN (sometimes pronounced is-ben), is a unique[1] identifier for books, intended to be used commercially. ...


External links

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Superman returns to theatres
Preceded by
Click
Box office number-one films of 2006 (USA)
July 2, 2006
Succeeded by
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest

  Results from FactBites:
 
CNS Movie Review: Superman Returns (681 words)
In his absence, she wrote a Pulitzer-winning editorial, "Why the World Doesn't Need Superman," to show just how over him she is. But her thesis proves shortsighted as Superman's return rekindles old feelings; not to mention arch-nemesis Lex Luthor (Kevin Spacey) is once again plotting mass destruction.
Superman's body may be indestructible to everything but kryptonite, but his heart is just as breakable as the next guy's.
At its heart, "Superman Returns" explores the relevance of virtue in a contemporary culture that is at once both cynical about idealism and hungry for heroism.
Superman Returns - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5678 words)
Superman Returns is a 2006 superhero film based on the fictional DC Comics character Superman.
Superman's return to Earth generates much of the character development in the film, particularly for Lois Lane.
Superman is rescued by Lois and Richard, flies into the stratosphere to renew his strength by direct exposure to the rays of the sun, and is ultimately able to prevent large-scale catastrophe by lifting the newly-formed landmass directly out of the ocean and throwing it into space, at significant cost to his health.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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