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Encyclopedia > Superior, Wisconsin
The Fairlawn Mansion, a 42 room mansion built in 1890 by Superior's three-time mayor Martin Pattison, is now a museum
The Fairlawn Mansion, a 42 room mansion built in 1890 by Superior's three-time mayor Martin Pattison, is now a museum
Downtown Superior, Duluth is on the horizon.
Downtown Superior, Duluth is on the horizon.

The city of Superior sits at the junction of U.S. Highway 2 and U.S. Highway 53, and is the county seat of Douglas County, Wisconsin, USA. As of the 2000 census, it had a population of 27,368. The city is located just north of and adjacent to both the Village of Superior and the Town of Superior. Incorporated as a city on September 6, 1854,[1] Superior is located at the western end of Lake Superior in northwestern Wisconsin. Bordered by St. Louis Bay, Superior Bay and Allouez Bay, it is also framed by two rivers: the Nemadji and the St. Louis. Superior, and the neighboring city across the bay, Duluth, Minnesota, form a single metropolitan area called the Twin Ports and share a harbor that is one of the most important ports on the Great Lakes. Both cities have museum ships (SS William A Irvin in Duluth and SS Meteor in Superior) devoted to the local nautical heritage. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 772 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1907 × 1482 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 772 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1907 × 1482 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 386 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1095 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 386 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1095 pixel, file size: 1. ... United States Highway 2 is an east-west United States Highway. ... U.S. Highway 53 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 403 miles (649 km) from northern Minnesota to La Crosse, Wisconsin. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Douglas County is a county located in the state of Wisconsin. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Superior is a village located in Douglas County, Wisconsin. ... Superior is a town located in Douglas County, Wisconsin. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Location in St. ... The Twin Ports of Duluth, Minnesota and Superior, Wisconsin are located at the western part of Lake Superior (the westernmost of North Americas Great Lakes). ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... USS Wisconsin, one of three Iowa class battleships opened to the public as a museum, and was one of two Iowas maintained in the US Mothball fleet. ... The SS William A Irvin is a lake freighter which sailed as a bulk freighter on the Great Lakes as part US Steels lake fleet. ... The SS Meteor, the only remaining whaleback on earth, Superior, Wisconsin. ...

Contents

History

The early history of Superior and Douglas County is a story of the Native American. The first-known inhabitants of what is now Douglas County were Mound Builders. These were an advanced group of people that appeared on the shores of Lake Superior sometime after the last glacier receded. They mined copper in the Minong Range and at Manitou Falls on the Black River. They pounded this metal into weapons, implements, and ornaments, which were later found buried in mounds with their dead. Their civilization was eventually overrun by other tribes, mainly of Muskhogean and Iroquois stock, and disappeared as a distinct culture in late prehistoric American times. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... For other uses, see Mound builder (disambiguation). ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... Muskogean languages Muskogean (also Muskhogean, Muskogee) is a language family of the Northern American Southeast. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ...


The first-known white men to visit the area were the French. In 1618, Stephen Brule, a voyager for Champlain, coasted along the south shore of Lake Superior where he met the Ojibwa. Upon returning to Quebec, he carried back some copper specimens and a glowing account of the region. In 1632, Champlain’s map appeared showing “Lac Superior de Tracy” as Lake Superior and the lower end shore as “Fond du Lac”. Soon after, fur trading companies established settlements, while missionaries came bringing the first touches of civilization. Champlain can refer to a number of things named after explorer Samuel de Champlain Champlain (village), New York Champlain (town), New York Champlain, Ontario Champlain, Quebec Lake Champlain Champlain Valley Champlain Sea Champlain College, Vermont school Champlain Regional College, Quebec CEGEP Samuel de Champlain, the explorer Category: ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... This article is about the native North American people. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Champlain can refer to a number of things named after explorer Samuel de Champlain Champlain (village), New York Champlain (town), New York Champlain, Ontario Champlain, Quebec Lake Champlain Champlain Valley Champlain Sea Champlain College, Vermont school Champlain Regional College, Quebec CEGEP Samuel de Champlain, the explorer Category: ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... Fond du Lac is a neighborhood in Duluth, Minnesota. ...


For more than a century, the Hudson's Bay Company, followed by the Northwestern Fur Company in 1787 and later, the John Jacob Astor Fur Company, maintained trading posts with the Native Americans. With the coming of settlement, however, the voyager and fur trader faded into the misty twilight of a romantic and historic past. Hbc redirects here. ... John Jacob Astor, detail of an oil painting by Gilbert Stuart, 1794 John Jacob (originally either Johann Jakob or Johann Jacob) Astor (July 17, 1763 - March 29, 1848) was the first of the Astor family dynasty and the first millionaire in the United States, the creator of the first Trust... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


Douglas County lies on one of the major water highways used by early travelers and voyagers of inland America. This water trail, the Bois Brule-St. Croix River Portage Trail, was the most convenient connecting link between Lake Superior and the Mississippi River. The Bois Brule and St. Croix River systems were only separated by a short portage over the Continental Divide near Solon Springs, Talahassee. The northward traveler used this water trail to take him to Lake Superior, while the downstream traveler could use it to go southwest to the Gulf of Mexico, unhindered by portages, by using the St. Croix and Mississippi Rivers. This waterway was also an important route in the Wisconsin fur trade, particularly when the French War with the Fox Indians closed the more southern routes. Spurred by the prospect of lucrative shipping and iron ore industry, businessmen from Chicago and St. Paul laid claim to the site which became the city of Superior, and plans began for the plotting of a great city. For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... A continental divide is a line of elevated terrain which forms a border between two watersheds such that water falling on one side of the line eventually travels to one ocean or body of water, and water on the other side travels to another, generally on the opposite side of... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


The first log cabin in Superior was erected in September of 1853 on the banks of the Nemadji River, paralleling the breaking of ground for the locks and ship canal at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. This brought the dawning of a new age for the infant city, Superior. Immediately there was eagerness for a railroad from Lake Superior to the Pacific Coast. This was later realized with construction of the Northern Pacific, and the dream of a rail and water highway from coast to coast was born. In 1889, the booming settlement at the Head of the Lakes would soon be named the county seat for Wisconsin’s 4th largest county. Between 1890 and 1920, the city was heavily settled by new arrivals from the eastern United States as well as Immigrants from over 15 different countries, including England, Scotland, Ireland, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Belgium, Germany, Austria, Hungary, and Croatia. Named for Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois, famed opponent of Abraham Lincoln, Douglas County became the site where its largest city and county seat, Superior, would be located, and money was pumped into the city’s shipping and railway industries.[2] Nickname: Location of Sault Ste. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


Education

Main entrance of the University of Wisconsin-Superior, with Campus Welcome Center in foreground.
Main entrance of the University of Wisconsin-Superior, with Campus Welcome Center in foreground.

The University of Wisconsin-Superior (UW-S) is a public liberal arts college and offers a range of undergraduae and graduate programs that combine a liberal arts education with professional training. Originally opened as a state Normal School (teacher's college), UW-S was formally combined into the University of Wisconsin System in 1971.[3] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 431 pixelsFull resolution (1834 × 988 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 431 pixelsFull resolution (1834 × 988 pixel, file size: 1. ... Main entrance of the UW-Superior, with Campus Welcome Center in foreground. ... The University of Wisconsin System is the state university system in Wisconsin, composed of fifteen institutions with twenty-six campuses. ...


UWS Yellowjacket athletic teams compete in one of the country’s NCAA Division III conferences. Teams travel to games and tournaments throughout Wisconsin and the upper Midwest. Athletic facilities include the new state-of-the-art Health & Wellness Center, with gymnasium, field house with indoor track, fitness center, weight room, swimming pool and training room. The campus also offers Wessman Arena for hockey, an outdoor track, baseball field and soccer field.


The Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College (WITC) offers a combination of skill development and technical education. Over 2,200 students enroll each year at the school and there are 40 full-time faculty employed. WITC has labs with up-to-date technologies for a hands-on-experience technical education. There are more than 50 programs and certificates available. WITC also provides workforce training, technical assistance and customized training. Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College (WITC) is a two-year college with campuses located in Ashland, New Richmond, Rice Lake, and Superior, Wisconsin. ...


The Superior School District has one high school, one middle school, and six elementary schools with a total enrollment of over 5,000 students. Superior Senior High School currently enrolls more than 1,500 students; the mascot is the Spartan. Over 1,400 students are enrolled in the Maple School District’s high school, middle school and two elementary schools. St. Croix has over 360 students one high school and one elementary school. A variety of schools aimed at faith-focused education are available in Superior ~ Douglas County as well, including Catholic education at Cathedral School, the Protestant-based Maranatha Academy and Twin Ports Baptist School.[4] The School District of Superior is the 23rd largest school district in Wisconsin. ...


Religion

Superior is the episcopal see of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Superior. The Cathedral of Christ the King in Superior is the mother church of the diocese. A see (from the Latin word sedem, meaning seat) is the throne (cathedra) of a bishop. ... The Roman Catholic Diocese of Superior covers the city of Superior, Wisconsin, as well as the counties of Ashland, Barron, Bayfield, Burnett, Douglas, Iron, Lincoln, Oneida, Price, Polk, Rusk, Sawyer, St. ... The Cathedral of Christ the King is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Superior in Superior, Wisconsin. ...


Geography

Location of Superior, Wisconsin

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 55.4 square miles (143.6 km²), of which, 36.9 square miles (95.7 km²) of it is land and 18.5 square miles (47.9 km²) of it (33.36%) is water.[5] Image File history File links Adapted from Wikipedias WI county maps by Bumm13. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...


There are several parks in the city, including the second largest municipal forest in the United States. Pattison State Park is a short distance south of the city, and contains Big Manitou Falls, the highest waterfall in the state at 165 feet. Big Manitou Falls is a waterfall situated on the Black River (Nemadji River), a tributary of the Nemadji River. ... For other uses, see Waterfall (disambiguation). ...


Demographics

City of Superior
Population by year
[6][7]
1900 31,106
1910 37,643
1920 40,432
1930 46,209
1940 39,731
1950 36,146
1960 35,185
1970 35,329
1980 33,671
1990 27,144
2000 27,368
2005 25,980

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 27,368 people, 11,609 households, and 6,698 families residing in the city. The population density was 740.9 people per square mile (286.1/km²). There were 12,196 housing units at an average density of 330.2/sq mi (127.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.26% White, 0.68% Black or African American, 2.23% Native American, 0.84% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.26% from other races, and 1.69% from two or more races. 0.83% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 15.8% were of German, 13.6% Norwegian, 10.9% Swedish, 9.3% Irish, 7.2% Polish, 6.9% Finnish and 5.3% American ancestry according to Census 2000. Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ... The term Norwegians may refer to: People with a Norwegian ancestral or ethnic identity, whether living in Norway, emigrants, or the descendents of emigrants. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The United States 2000 Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


There were 11,609 households out of which 27.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.3% were married couples living together, 12.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.3% were non-families. 34.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.91. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 22.7% under the age of 18, 12.9% from 18 to 24, 27.9% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 92.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.8 males.


Economy

Superior has a population of 27,368 and is the largest municipality in Douglas County, which has a total population of 43,708.[9] It is situated in a metropolitan area that includes the 86,918 residents of Duluth, Minnesota, just across the St. Louis Bay. The transportation industry is robust and accounts for more than 1,000 jobs. The Duluth-Superior port is the largest in the Great Lakes and welcomes both domestic and foreign vessels. In 2004, the port’s busiest year since 1979, more than 41.4 million metric tons were shipped out of the port. Shipments are on the increase, railroads are busy, and trucking firms are hiring, exploring new markets and investing in warehousing in Douglas County.[10] Growing area manufacturers include FenTech, Inc., a company dealing with vinyl manipulation and fenestration, Charter Films, a producer of plastic films, Genesis Attachments, manufacturer of shears and grapples, and Amsoil, a producer of synthetic motor oil and lubricants. Location in St. ... Duluth is the name of some places in the United States of America: Duluth, Minnesota - on Lake Superior Duluth, Georgia - a suburb of Atlanta See also the French explorer Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... The word fenestration finds its root in the Latin word for window, fenestra. ... Amsoil, Inc. ...


Employment Facts (2002) in numbers of employees:


Construction/Mining, 1,130; Manufacturing, 1,190; Transportation/Public Utilities, 2,750; Wholesale Trade, 1,210; Retail Trade, 4,020; Finance, Insurance, Real Estate, 500; Service, 5,350; Government, 3,440;[11]


Notable residents

Harry Peter Bud Grant, Jr (born May 20, 1927) is the longtime former American football head coach of the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL) for eighteen seasons. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1961–present) Western Conference (1961-1969) Central Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC Central (1970-2001) NFC North (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Purple, Gold, White Fight song Skol, Vikings Mascot Viktor the Viking, Ragnar Personnel Owner Zygi Wilf General... Kristin James Benson (born November 7, 1974 in Superior, Wisconsin) was a Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher who plays for the Baltimore Orioles in 2006. ...

See also

The Richard I. Bong Memorial Bridge (Bong Bridge) connects Duluth, Minnesota with Superior, Wisconsin via U.S. Highway 2. ... United States Highway 2 is an east-west United States Highway. ... U.S. Highway 53 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 403 miles (649 km) from northern Minnesota to La Crosse, Wisconsin. ... Interstate 535 (I-535) is a 2. ... The John A. Blatnik Bridge is the bridge that carries Interstate 535 and U.S. Highway 53 over the Saint Louis River, which drains into Lake Superior, between Duluth, Minnesota and Superior, Wisconsin. ... State Trunk Highway 35 (often called Highway 35, STH 35 or WIS 35) is a Wisconsin state highway running north-south across western Wisconsin. ... State Trunk Highway 105 (often called Highway 105, STH 105 or WIS 105) is a Wisconsin state highway running east-west in northwest Wisconsin from the Minnesota border at Duluth, Minn. ... The Lakehead Pipeline, also known as the Lakehead System, is one of the largest oil pipeline systems in the world, totaling 3,100 miles (4,990 km) in length including multiple paths. ...

References

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Superior, Wisconsin is at coordinates 46°42′25″N 92°05′07″W / 46.706882, -92.085255 (Superior, Wisconsin)Coordinates: 46°42′25″N 92°05′07″W / 46.706882, -92.085255 (Superior, Wisconsin)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Superior, Wisconsin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (571 words)
Superior is the a city and the county seat of Douglas County, Wisconsin.
Duluth and Superior form a single metropolitan area called the Twin Ports and share a harbor that is one of the most important ports on the Great Lakes.
The Cathedral of Christ the King in Superior is the mother church of the Diocese.
MSN Encarta - Wisconsin (state) (992 words)
Wisconsin (state), in the north central United States, bordered by Lake Superior on the north, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan on the northeast, Lake Michigan on the east, Illinois on the south, and Iowa and Minnesota on the west.
In Wisconsin at the beginning of the 20th century, Robert La Follette and the Progressives evolved their theories of good government in close collaboration with leading scholars at the University of Wisconsin.
Wisconsin is customarily divided into two major natural regions, or physiographic provinces, each of which is a part of one of the broader physiographic divisions of North America.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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