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Encyclopedia > Superhero
Batman and Superman, two of the most recognizable and iconic superheroes. Art by Alex Ross and Jim Lee.
Batman and Superman, two of the most recognizable and iconic superheroes. Art by Alex Ross and Jim Lee.

A superhero (also known as a super hero) is a fictional character "of unprecedented physical prowess dedicated to acts of derring-do in the public interest." [1] Since the debut of the prototypal superhero Superman in 1938, stories of superheroes — ranging from brief episodic adventures to continuing years-long sagas — have dominated American comic books and crossed over into other media. A female superhero is sometimes called a superheroine or super heroine. Superhero may refer to Superhero, a fictional archetype Superhero!, a comedy film Marvel Super Heroes, the title of various Marvel Comics series and a television show The Worlds Greatest Superheroes, a DC Comics newspaper comic strip Category: ... Image File history File links Batman_superman. ... Image File history File links Batman_superman. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity whose existence originates from a work of fiction. ... For other uses, see Prototype (disambiguation). ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... An American comic book is a small magazine originating in the United States containing a narrative in the comics form. ... For other uses, see Female (disambiguation). ...


By most definitions, characters need not have actual superhuman powers to be deemed superheroes, although sometimes terms such as costumed crimefighters[2] are used to refer to those without such powers who have many other common traits of superheroes.


The two-word version of the term is a trademark co-owned by DC Comics and Marvel Comics. “(TM)” redirects here. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ...

Contents

Common traits

Promotional art for The Amazing Spider-Man vol. 2, #50 (April 2003), by J. Scott Campbell and Tim Townsend.
  • Extraordinary powers and abilities, relevant skills, and/or advanced equipment. Although superhero powers vary widely, superhuman strength, the ability to fly, enhanced senses, and the projection of energy bolts are all common. Some superheroes, such as Batman and the Question possess no superhuman powers but have mastered skills such as martial arts and forensic sciences. Others have special weapons or technology, such as Iron Man's powered armor suits and Green Lantern’s power ring. Many characters supplement their natural powers with a special weapon or device (e.g., Wonder Woman's lasso and bracelets, Spider-Man's webbing, Wolverine's adamantium, Daredevil's billy club, Thor's hammer, Gambit's staff, etc.)
  • A strong moral code, including a willingness to risk one’s own safety in the service of good without expectation of reward. Such a code often includes a refusal or strong reluctance to kill or wield weapons.
  • A motivation, such as a sense of responsibility (e.g. Spider-Man), a formal calling (e.g., Wonder Woman), a personal vendetta against criminals (e.g. Batman), or a strong belief in justice and humanitarian service (e.g. Superman).
  • A secret identity that protects the superhero’s friends and family from becoming targets of his or her enemies (exceptions such as the Fantastic Four notwithstanding), such as Clark Kent (Superman), although many superheroes have a confidant (usually a friend or relative who has been sworn to secrecy). Most superheroes use a descriptive or metaphoric code name for their public deeds.
  • A distinctive costume, often used to conceal the secret identity (see Common costume features).
  • An underlying motif or theme that affects the hero's name, costume, personal effects, and other aspects of his or her character (e.g., Batman resembles a large bat, calls his specialized automobile, which also looks bat-like, the "Batmobile" and uses several devices given a "bat" prefix).
  • A supporting cast of recurring characters, including the hero's friends, co-workers and/or love interests, who may or may not know of the superhero's secret identity. Often the hero's personal relationships are complicated by this dual life, a common theme in Spider-Man and Batman stories in particular.
  • A number of enemies that he/she fights repeatedly. In some cases super heros begin by fighting run of the mill criminals before super villains surface in their respective story lines. In many cases the hero is in part responsible for the appearance of these super heros (The Scorpion was created as the perfect enemy to defeat Spider-Man, and characters in Batman's comics often accuse him of creating the villains he fights). Often superheros have an archenemy who is more troubling than the others. Often a nemesis is a superhero's doppelganger or foil (e.g., Sabretooth embraces his savage instincts while Wolverine tries to control his. Batman is serious and grim, while the Joker is flamboyant and views the world as one big sick joke).
  • Independent wealth (e.g., Batman or the X-Men's benefactor Professor X) or an occupation that allows for minimal supervision (e.g., Superman's civilian job as a reporter).
  • A headquarters or base of operations, usually kept hidden from the general public (e.g., Superman's Fortress of Solitude, Batman's Batcave).
  • An backstory that explains the circumstances by which the character acquired his or her abilities as well as his or her motivation for becoming a superhero. Many origin stories involve tragic elements and/or freak accidents that result in the development of the hero's abilities.
Promotional art for Fantastic Four #509, by Mike Wieringo and Karl Kesel.
Promotional art for Fantastic Four #509, by Mike Wieringo and Karl Kesel.

Many superheroes work independently. However, there are also many superhero teams. Some, such as the Fantastic Four and X-Men, have common origins and usually operate as a group. Others, such as DC Comics’s Justice League and Marvel’s Avengers, are "all-star" groups consisting of heroes with separate origins who also operate individually. The shared setting or "universes" of Marvel, DC and other publishers also allow for regular superhero team-ups. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (515x780, 165 KB) Cover of Amazing Spider-Man #50, Vol. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (515x780, 165 KB) Cover of Amazing Spider-Man #50, Vol. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is an American comic book series published by Marvel Comics, and additionally a spin-off television program and a daily newspaper comic strip, all featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ... Cover of Danger Girl: Back in Black, by J. Scott Campbell. ... Superhero fiction invariably features characters with superhuman, supernatural and/or paranormal abilities, often referred to as superpowers, also spelled super-powers. Below is a list of many of those that have been known to be used. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The Question is an American comic book superhero. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... U.S. Army conceptual mockup of an exoskeleton-equipped soldier. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... This article is about the Green Lantern Corps weapon. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... A gambit is a chess opening in which something, usually a pawn, but sometimes even a piece, is sacrificed in order to achieve an advantage. ... Homicide (Latin homicidium, homo human being + caedere to cut, kill) refers to the act of killing another human being. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... For other uses of this term, please see Secret identity (disambiguation). ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... For other uses, see Clark Kent (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... The Batmobile as seen in the 2005 movie Batman Begins. The Batmobile is the fictional personal automobile of comic book superhero Batman. ... A character of a book, play, movie, TV show or other form of storytelling usually used only to give dimension to a main character, by adding a relationship with this character, although sometimes supporting characters may develop a complexity of their own. ... Rogues gallery is a police collection of pictures of criminals and suspects kept for identification purposes. ... The Green Goblin, a supervillain and enemy of Spider-Man. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sabretooth is a Marvel Comics character, an arch-enemy of the X-Men’s Wolverine. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Charles Francis Xavier, also known as Professor X, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, known as the leader and founder of the X-Men. ... The Fortress of Solitude is the occasional headquarters of Superman in DC Comics. ... The Batcave. ... Cover to Fantastic Four #509. ... Cover to Fantastic Four #509. ... Michael Lance Mike Wieringo (June 24, 1963–August 12, 2007)[1] was an American comic book artist best known for his work on DC Comics The Flash and Marvel Comics Fantastic Four. ... This article is about the superheroes. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... The Avengers are a superhero team that appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ...


Some superheroes, especially those introduced in the 1940s, work with a young sidekick (e.g., Batman and Robin, Captain America and Bucky). This has become less common since more sophisticated writing and older audiences have lessened the need for characters who specifically appeal to child readers. Sidekicks are seen as a separate classification of superheroes. For other uses, see Sidekick (disambiguation). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Robin (also referred to as The Boy Wonder) is the name of several fictional characters appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, originally created by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, as a junior counterpart to DC Comics superhero Batman. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Captain America. ... For other uses, see Bucky (disambiguation). ...


Superheroes most often appear in comic books, and superhero stories are the dominant form of American comic books, to the point that the terms "superhero" and "comic book character" have been used synonymously in North America. With the rise in relative popularity of non-superhero comics, as well as the popularity of Japanese comics (manga), this trend is slowly declining[citation needed]. Superheroes have also been featured in radio serials, novel, TV series, movies, and other media. Most of the superheroes who appear in other media are adapted from comics, but there are exceptions.


Marvel Characters, Inc. and DC Comics share ownership of the United States trademark for the phrases "Super Hero" and "Super Heroes" and these two companies own a majority of the world’s most famous and influential superheroes. Of the "Significant Seven" chosen by The Comic Book in America: An Illustrated History (1989), Marvel owns Spider-Man and Captain America and DC owns Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Captain Marvel and Plastic Man. Although, like many non-Marvel characters popular during the 1940s, the latter two were acquired by DC from defunct publishers.[3] However, there have been significant heroes owned by others, especially since the 1990s when Image Comics and other companies that allowed creators to maintain trademark and editorial control over their characters developed. Hellboy, Spawn and Invincible are some of the most successful creator-owned heroes. This article is about the comic book company. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Captain America. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Captain Marvel may refer to: Captain Marvel (DC Comics), a young boy who transforms into a superhero by saying the word Shazam!; originally published by Fawcett Comics and currently published by DC Comics. ... Plastic Man (Patrick Eel OBrian) is a fictional comic-book superhero originally published by Quality Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ... Hellboy is a fictional Dark Horse Comics character created by Mike Mignola. ... Spawn is a fictional comic book character created by Todd McFarlane. ... Invincible (Mark Grayson) is a fictional character, an Image Comics superhero. ...

Reflective of his time, Charlton Comics' Captain Atom was an astronaut in his civilian identity. Strange Suspense Stories #75 (June 1965). Cover art by Steve Ditko.
Reflective of his time, Charlton Comics' Captain Atom was an astronaut in his civilian identity. Strange Suspense Stories #75 (June 1965). Cover art by Steve Ditko.

Although superhero fiction is considered a form of fantasy/adventure, it crosses into many genres. Many superhero franchises resemble crime fiction (Batman, Punisher), others horror fiction (Spawn, Spectre) and others more standard science fiction (Green Lantern, X-Men). Many of the earliest superheroes, such as The Sandman and The Clock, were rooted in the pulp fiction of their predecessors. Image File history File linksMetadata StrangeSuspenseStories75. ... Image File history File linksMetadata StrangeSuspenseStories75. ... Big C logo, used from Sept. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character. ... Look up spawn in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... The Sandman, alias Wesley Dodds, is a comic book superhero in the DC Comics universe, best known for his stories set during the 1940s and his costume consisting of a green business suit, fedora, and gas mask. ... Funny Picture Stories #1 (Nov, 1936). ...


Within their own fictional universes, public perception of superheroes varies greatly. Some, like Superman and the Fantastic Four, are adored and seen as important civic leaders. Others, like Batman and Spider-Man, meet with public skepticism or outright hostility. A few, such as the X-Men and the characters of Watchmen, defend a populace that misunderstands and despises them. For other uses, see Watchman. ...


Common costume features

A superhero's costume helps make him or her recognizable to the general public. Costumes are often colorful to enhance the character's visual appeal and frequently incorporate the superhero's name and theme. For example, Daredevil resembles a red devil, Captain America's costume echoes the American flag, Batman resembles a large bat, and Spider-Man's costume features a spider web pattern. The convention of superheroes wearing masks and skintight unitards originated with Lee Falk's comic strip crimefighter The Phantom. Several superheroes such as the Phantom, Superman, Batman and Robin wear breeches over this unitard. This is often satirized as the idea that superheroes wear their underpants on the outside.[citation needed] For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... This article is about the comic book superhero Captain America. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Leon Harrison Gross, more known by the alias of Lee Falk, (April 28, 1911 - March 13, 1999) was an American writer, best known as the creator of the popular comic strip superheroes The Phantom and Mandrake the Magician, who at the height of their popularity secured him over a hundred... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... For other uses, see Phantom. ...


Many features of superhero costumes recur frequently, including the following:

  • Superheroes who maintain a secret identity often wear a mask, ranging from the domino masks of Green Lantern and Ms. Marvel to the full-face masks of Spider-Man and Black Panther. Most common are masks covering the upper face, leaving the mouth and jaw exposed. This allows for both a believable disguise and recognizable facial expressions. A notable exception is Clark Kent, who wears nothing on his face while fighting crime as Superman, but uses large glasses in his civilian life. Helmets are also worn, like the titanium helmet of the Galvanizer
  • A symbol, such as a stylized letter or visual icon, usually on the chest. Examples include the uppercase "S" of Superman, the bat emblem of Batman, and the spider emblem of Spider-Man. Often, they also wear a common symbol referring to their group or league, such as the "4" on the Fantastic Four's suits, or the "X" on the X-Men's costumes.
  • Form-fitting clothing, often referred to as tights or Spandex, although the exact material is usually unidentified. Such material displays a character’s athletic build and heroic sex appeal and allows a simple design for illustrators to reproduce.
  • While a vast majority of superheroes do not wear capes, the garment is still closely associated with them, likely due to the fact that two of the most widely-recognized, Batman and Superman, wear capes. In fact, police officers in Batman’s home of Gotham City have used the word "cape" as a shorthand for all superheroes and costumed crimefighters. Other shorthands for superheroes are used in the computer game City of Heroes, when a player's hero fights with some of the game's supervillain groups such as the Hellions, Skulls, and Clockwork, the villains will often say, "The capes are trying to stop us," "I smell spandex" (referring to the spandex costumes some heroes wear), or "Attack the mask" (an allusion to the masks used by some superheroes). The comic book series Watchmen and the animated movie The Incredibles humorously commented on the potentially-lethal impracticality of capes. In Marvel Comics the term "cape-killer" has been used to describe Superhuman Restraint Unit.
Captain America's costume display many features common to superheroes. Art by Gabriele Dell'Otto
Captain America's costume display many features common to superheroes. Art by Gabriele Dell'Otto
  • While most superhero costumes merely hide the hero’s identity and present a recognizable image, parts of some costumes have functional uses. Batman's utility belt and Spawn’s "necroplasmic armor" have both been of great assistance to the heroes. Iron Man's armor, in particular, protects him and provides technological advantages.
  • When thematically appropriate, some superheroes dress like people from various professions or subcultures. Zatanna, who possesses wizard-like powers, dresses like a magician, and Ghost Rider, who rides a superpowered motorcycle, dresses in the leather garb of a biker.
  • Several heroes of the 1990s, including Cable and many Image Comics characters, rejected the traditional superhero outfit for costumes that appeared more practical and militaristic. Shoulder pads, kevlar-like vests, metal-plated armor, knee and elbow pads, heavy-duty belts, and ammunition pouches were common features. Other characters, such as The Punisher or The Question, opt for a "civilian" costume (mostly a trench coat).

For other uses, see Mask (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... For the Marvel Comics character with the same codename, see Sharon Ventura. ... The Black Panther (TChalla) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe who is the first modern Black superhero. ... For other uses, see Clark Kent (disambiguation). ... Galvanization or galvanisation refers to any of several electrochemical processes named after the Italian scientist Luigi Galvani. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... This article is about the superheroes. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... There have been several groups of fictional characters in the Marvel Comics universe who have been known as the Hellions. ... For symbolic or mythic uses of the human skull, see Skull (symbolism). ... Gear with escapment mechanism For other uses, see Clockwork (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... The Incredibles is a 2004 American Academy Award-winning computer-animated feature film produced by Pixar Animation Studios for Walt Disney Pictures, centering around a family of superheroes. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (550x827, 42 KB)Cover to Secret War #3, featuring Captain America. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (550x827, 42 KB)Cover to Secret War #3, featuring Captain America. ... Gabriele Dell’Otto is an italian illustrator author of works published in several countries of the world. ... Batmans utility belt is the most characteristic portion of Batmans costume, much like Wonder Womans Lasso of Truth, or Green Lanterns power ring. ... Spawn is a fictional comic book character created by Todd McFarlane. ... Necroplasm is a will-controlled substance featured in the fictional Spawn universe. ... The various armors of Iron Man. ... Zatanna Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Ghost Rider is the name of several fictional supernatural anti-heroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Motorcycle (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character Nathan Summers. ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character. ... The Question is an American comic book superhero. ...

Secret headquarters

Many superheroes (and supervillains) have headquarters or a base of operations. These locations are often equipped with state-of-the-art, highly-advanced or alien technologies, and they are usually disguised and/or in secret locations to as to avoid being detected by enemies, or by the general public. Some bases, such as the Baxter Building, are known of by the public (even though their precise location may remain secret). Many heroes and villains who do not have a permanent headquarters are said to have a mobile base of operations. The Baxter Building is a fictitious Manhattan 35-story office building whose five upper floors house the Fantastic Fours headquarters in the Marvel Universe. ...


To the heroes and villains who have a secret base, the base can serve a variety of functions.

  • a safehouse, where the heroes can conceal themselves from their enemies.
  • a laboratory, for experiments and scientific study.
  • a research library, covering a variety of topics from science, to history, to criminal profiling.
  • an armory, for weapons design, construction and storage.
  • a garage/hangar/dock.
  • a communications center.
  • a weapons platform, for defense of the facility (these are more common to supervillains).
  • a trophy room, where mementos of significant battles and adventures are displayed.
  • a common area, for social activity (typically for larger teams, such as the Justice League or the Avengers).

For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... The Avengers are a superhero team that appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ...

Superheroes outside the United States

Kamen Rider 1 was the hero of the original Kamen Rider series in 1971. This statue stands outside of Bandai's Tokyo headquarters.
Kamen Rider 1 was the hero of the original Kamen Rider series in 1971. This statue stands outside of Bandai's Tokyo headquarters.

There have been successful superheroes in other countries most of whom share the conventions of the American model. Examples include Cybersix from Argentina, Captain Canuck from Canada and the heroes of AK Comics from Egypt. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (512 × 768 pixel, file size: 562 KB, MIME type: image/png) Kamen Rider 1 statue taken outside the Bandai HQ in Tokyo. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (512 × 768 pixel, file size: 562 KB, MIME type: image/png) Kamen Rider 1 statue taken outside the Bandai HQ in Tokyo. ... Kamen Rider No. ... Kamen Rider ), translated as Masked Rider, was a popular and seminal sci-fi story conceived by renowned Japanese comic book creator Shōtarō Ishinomori ). It debuted as a tokusatsu television series on April 3, 1971 and ran until February 10, 1973. ... This article is about the Japanese toy manufacturer. ... Cybersix as she appears in TMS 1999 animated series. ... The Original Captain Canuck. ... AK Comics is an Egyptian-based superhero comic publishing venture, and the first example of the genre produced in the Middle East. ...


Japan is the only country that nears the US in output of superheroes. The earlier of these wore scarves either in addition to or as a substitute for capes and many wear helmets instead of masks.Moonlight Mask Ultraman, Kamen Rider, Super Sentai (the basis for Power Rangers), Metal Heroes and Kikaider have become popular in Japanese tokusatsu live-action shows, and Science Ninja Team Gatchaman, Casshan, The Guyver, and Sailor Moon are staples of Japanese anime and manga. However, most Japanese superheroes are shorter-lived. While American entertainment companies update and reinvent superheroes, hoping to keep them popular for decades, Japanese companies retire and introduce superheroes more quickly, usually on an annual basis, in order to shorten merchandise lines.[citation needed] In addition, Japanese manga often targets female readers, unlike U.S. comics, and has created such varieties as "magical girl" (e.g. Cardcaptor Sakura) for this audience. . This article is about the article of clothing. ... A person wearing a helmet. ... For other uses, see Mask (disambiguation). ... Gekkō Kamen (月光仮面), known in English as Moonlight Mask, is a fictional superhero that has appeared in Japanese tokusatsu and anime TV shows and movies since his TV debut in 1958. ... The Ultra Series is the collective name for all the shows featuring Ultraman and his many brethren (although few of these shows, like the first Ultra Series, Ultra Q, do not have any Ultramen in them). ... A statue of Kamen Rider 1 outside of Bandai Corporate Headquarters, Tokyo, Japan The Kamen Rider Series , translated as Masked Rider Series) is the overall name of a franchise of Japanese tokusatsu. ... The official logo of the Super Sentai Series introduced in 2000 during the run of Mirai Sentai Timeranger The Super Sentai Series ) is the name given to the long running Japanese superhero team genre of shows produced by Toei Company Ltd. ... Power Rangers is a long-running American childrens television series adapted from the Japanese tokusatsu Super Sentai Series, though it is not simply an English dub of the original. ... The Metal Heroes, Space Sherrif Gavan to Ironbark Detective Robotack The Metal Heroes Series ) is a genre of tokusatsu superhero TV series produced by Toei for Japanese television. ... Kikaida or Kikaider ) is a Japanese superhero created by Shotaro Ishinomori. ... Icons of tokusatsu in the late 1970s: Spider-Man, Kamen Rider Stronger, Kamen Rider V3, Battle Fever J, Ultraman Jonias, as well as the manga and anime icon Doraemon Tokusatsu ) is a Japanese word that literally means special effects. ... Science Ninja Team Gatchaman , literally Scientific Ninja Troop Gatchaman), often shortened to Gatchaman, is a 5-member superhero team which comprises the main characters in several anime originally produced in Japan by Tatsunoko Productions and later adapted into several English-language versions. ... Casshan, known in Japan as Shinzō Ningen Casshern ), is an anime series created by animation studio Tatsunoko Productions in 1973, which was based on a serialization in Kodansha’s “Terebi Magazine” and Akita Shoten’s “Boken Oh” (Adventure King). ... Bio-Booster Armor Guyver or Guyver: The Bio-Boosted Armor ) is a long-running (over 140 chapters) manga series written by Yoshiki Takaya. ... For the title character, see Sailor Moon (character) and for the first story arc, see Sailor Moon (arc). ... Animé redirects here. ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1947, Filipino writer/cartoonist Mars Ravelo introduced the first Asian superheroine, Darna, a young Filipina country girl who found a mystic talisman-pebble from another planet that allows her to transform into an adult warrior-woman. She was the first solo superheroine in the world to get her own feature-length motion picture in 1951 and has become a cultural institution in the Philippines. Mars Ravelo (October 9, 1916 - 1988) was one of the most successful Filipino graphic novelists. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... Darna is a fictional character and superheroine created by Filipino komiks (Philippine colloquial term for comics) legend Mars Ravelo. ...


British superheroes began appearing in the Golden Age shortly after the first American heroes became popular in the UK.[4] Most original British heroes were confined to anthology comics magazines such as Lion, Valiant, Warrior, and 2000AD. Marvelman, known as Miracleman in North America, is probably the most well known original British superhero (although he was based heavily on Captain Marvel). Popular in the 1960s, British readers grew fond of him and contemporary UK comics writers Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman revived Marvelman in series that reinvented the characters in a more serious vein, an attitude prevalent in newer British heroes, such as Zenith. Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... ANThology is the first major label album by Alien Ant Farm released on March 6, 2001 in the USA and March 19, 2001 in the UK. // Their first single, Smooth Criminal, was a cover of Michael Jacksons song Smooth Criminal, which started to bring popularity to the band. ... Robot Archie featured on the cover of Lion. ... The cover of the Valiant annual of 1975. ... Warrior #1 (March 1982), featuring an image of Axel Pressbutton by Steve Dillon. ... Cover of the first issue of 2000 AD, 26 February 1977. ... Miracleman (originally Marvelman) was a British-authored superhero comic, first published on February 3, 1954. ... North American redirects here. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Zenith, a comic book title, was created by Grant Morrison and Steve Yeowell first appearing in 2000 AD in 1988. ...


In France, where comics are known as Bande Dessinée, literally drawn strip, and regarded as a proper art form, Editions Lug began translating and publishing Marvel comic books in anthology magazines in 1969. Soon Lug started presenting its own heroes alongside Marvel stories. Some closely modeled their U.S. counterparts, while others indulged in weirder attributes, such as the shape-changing alien Wampus. Many were short-lived, while others rivaled their inspirations in longevity and have been the subject of reprints and revivals, such as Photonik. Tintin, one of the most famous Belgian comics Franco-Belgian comics are comics or comic books written in Belgium and France. ... Editions Lug was a French comic book publisher created in 1950 by writer/editor Marcel Navarro and businessman Auguste Vistel. ... For other uses, see Shapeshifting (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wampus is a French comic book character written by Franco Frescura and illustrated by Luciano Bernasconi for French publisher Editions Lug in 1969. ...


In India, Raj Comics, founded in 1984, owns a number of superheroes, such as Nagraj, Doga and Super Commando Dhruva, that, while somewhat akin to Western superheroes, carry Hindu ideas of morality and incorporate Indian myths. Raj Comics is an Indian comic book line published by a division of Raja Pocket Books. ... Nagaraj or Nagraj is a common Indian surname, literally meaning King (-raj) of Snakes (nag-). It commonly refers to a Multi-Headed Snake, seen protecting Hindu God idols in temples. ... Doga is a Superhero character appearing in Raj Comics, published and distributed in the entire India. ... Super Commando Dhruva is fictional Indian comic book superhero created by writer and artist Anupam Sinha. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ...

See also: Manga, Komiks, Canadian comics, and History of the British comic

This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... Komiks is the general term used for comics created or produced in the Philippines. ... In spite of U.S. dominance of Comic Book sales in Canada and the overwhelming number of U.S. comic strips printed in Canadian newspapers there is such a thing as Canadian Comics. ... A British comic is a periodical published in the United Kingdom that contains comic strips. ...

Types of superheroes

In superhero role-playing games, such as Hero Games' Champions, Green Ronin Publishing's Mutants and Masterminds or Cryptic Studios' MMORPG City Of Heroes, superheroes are informally organized into categories or archetypes based on their skills and abilities. Since comic book and role-playing fandom overlap, these labels have carried over into discussions of superheroes outside the context of games:[citation needed] This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... Hero Games (DOJ, Inc dba Hero Games) is the publisher of the Hero System, a generic roleplaying rules set that can be used to simulate many different genres, and was the co-developer of the Fuzion system. ... Champions is a role-playing game originally by George MacDonald, Steve Peterson, Bruce Harlick, and Ray Greer, published by Hero Games, designed to simulate and function in a four-color superhero comic book world. ... Green Ronin Publishing is a company based in Seattle, WA, USA. They have published several role-playing game related products. ... Mutants & Masterminds (abbreviated M&M or MnM) is a superhero role-playing game written by Steve Kenson and published by Green Ronin Publishing based on a variant of the d20 System by Wizards of the Coast. ... Cryptic Studios develops massively multiplayer online role-playing games. ... An image from World of Warcraft, one of the largest commercial MMORPGs as of 2004, based on active subscriptions. ... City of Heroes (CoH) is a massively multiplayer online role-playing computer game based on the superhero comic book genre, developed by Cryptic Studios and published by NCsoft. ... Fandom (from the noun fan and the affix -dom, as in kingdom, dukedom, etc. ...

Plastic Man's shapeshifting abilities have often been used for humorous effect. Plastic Man #17 (May 1949). Cover art by Jack Cole.
Plastic Man's shapeshifting abilities have often been used for humorous effect. Plastic Man #17 (May 1949). Cover art by Jack Cole.

These categories often overlap. For instance, Batman is both a skilled martial artist and gadgeteer and Hellboy has the strength and durability of a brick and the mystic arts abilities of a mage. Wolverine also fits into a healing category. Very powerful characters, such as Superman, Wonder Woman, Captain Marvel, Dr. Manhattan and the Silver Surfer can be listed in many categories, and are sometimes in a category all their own, known as "original," as they were some of the earliest heroes in comics. Image File history File links Plastic Man #17 (May, 1949), Quality Comics. ... Image File history File links Plastic Man #17 (May, 1949), Quality Comics. ... Plastic Man (Patrick Eel OBrian) is a fictional comic-book superhero originally published by Quality Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ... The following persons are known under this name. ... It has been suggested that the section Exoskeletons in modern and near-future technology from the article Exoskeleton be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... John Henry Irons is the third hero known as Steel, a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... The Rocket Red Brigade is a DC Comics superhero team. ... An energy blast is a collection of energy in the form of a projectile that has destructive effects when it strikes an object. ... For other uses, see Cyclops (disambiguation). ... Starfire is a name shared by three fictional comic book superheroes from the DC Comics universe. ... Static is a teenage African-American superhero with electromagnetic powers. ... Robotman is the name of two DC Comics Superheroes. ... Hercules (Heracles) is a fictional character, an Olympian demigod and superhero in the Marvel Comics Universe, based on the mythological demigod and hero called Heracles by the Greeks and Hercules by the Romans. ... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... Colossus (Piotr Nikolaievitch Rasputin) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero in the X-Men. ... Robert Bob Parr (superhero name Mr. ... The Savage Dragon is an ongoing American comic book series created by Erik Larsen and published by Image Comics. ... X-Factor is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Strong Guy (real name Guido Carosella) is a fictional mutant superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article is about the term used in science fiction, anime, and manga. ... Megas XLR (XLR = eXtra Large Robot) is an American Anime-influenced animated television series that aired on the Toonami block on Cartoon Network and is produced by Cartoon Network Studios. ... Cover art by Geof Darrow The Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot is a comic book by Frank Miller and Geof Darrow and an eponymous animated television series. ... Power Rangers is a series of television series, based on the Super Sentai series of shows. ... Stripesy is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E was the title of a comic book published by DC Comics, featuring the second Star-Spangled Kid and her stepfather, the original versions sidekick Stripesy. ... This article is about the X-Men character. ... Polaris (Lorna Dane) is a Marvel Comics superhero, a member of the X-Men. ... This article is about the Silver/Modern Age Human Torch, Johnny Storm. ... Nite Owl is the name of a pair of fictional characters in the comic book series, Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons and published by DC Comics. ... Amazo is a fictional android from DC Comics. ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... Doctor Fate is a DC Comics superhero and wizard, best known as a member of the Justice Society of America. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... Zatanna Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... This article is about the video game. ... Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character. ... Rose Tattoo is the name of a comic book character from DC Comics/Wildstorm. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... Speedy is the name of two DC Comics superheroes, both of whom have served as teenaged sidekicks for the Green Arrow (a. ... Hawkeye (Clint Barton) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a longtime member of the Avengers. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Iron Fist (Daniel Rand) is a fictional character, a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe, and a practitioner of martial arts. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... Cover to Batman Allies: Secret Files & Origins 2005. ... Elektra Natchios, usually known only by her first name Elektra, is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Shang-Chi (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; literally rising of the spirit) is a Marvel Comics character, often called the Master of Kung Fu. He was created by writer Steve Englehart and artist Jim Starlin. ... For the Agatha Christie character Harley Quin, see The Mysterious Mr. ... Mercy Graves from Superman: the Animated Series. ... Early parapsychological research employed the use of Zener cards in experiments designed to test for possible telepathic communication. ... Psychokinesis (literally mind-movement) or PK is the more commonly used term today for what in the past was known as telekinesis (literally distant-movement). It refers to the psi ability to influence the behavior of matter by mental intention (or possibly some other aspect of mental activity) alone. ... Telepathy, from the Greek τῆλε, tele, remote; and πάθεια, patheia, to be effected by, describes the hypothetical transfer of information on thoughts or feelings between individuals by means other than the five classical senses. ... Extra-Sensory Perception (ESP) is defined as ability to acquire information by paranormal means independent of any known physical senses or deduction from previous experience. ... Charles Francis Xavier, also known as Professor X, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, known as the leader and founder of the X-Men. ... Jean Grey-Summers (born Jean Grey) is a fictional superheroine who lives in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Saturn Girl is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero, a telepath and a member of the Legion of Super-Heroes, an organization of teenage heroes that exists one thousand years in the future. ... For other uses, see Shapeshifting (disambiguation). ... Mr. ... Plastic Man (Patrick Eel OBrian) is a fictional comic-book superhero originally published by Quality Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ... The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... The Changeling (Kevin Sydney) is a Marvel Comics character, and a member of the X-Men. ... Mystique (Raven Darkholme) is a Marvel Comics character associated with the X-Men franchise. ... Beast Boy (real name Garfield Mark Gar Logan) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a shapeshifting superhero who is a former member of the Doom Patrol and member of the Teen Titans. ... For other uses, see The Mask (disambiguation). ... Resizing (including size-changing, miniaturization, magnification, shrinking, and enlargement, is a theme in fiction, especially science fiction. ... The Atom is a fictional comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Colossal Boy is a fictional character in the 30th century of the DC Comics universe. ... -1... Yellowjacket. ... Elasti-Girl is a superhero of the DC Comics universe and a member of the Doom Patrol. ... For other uses, see Zorro (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... A speedster is a fictional character, often found as a staple of superhero comic books, who has the superhuman ability to run and perform other normal physical acts at speeds unachievable by normal human beings. ... The Flash. ... For Quicksilver (DC Comics), see Max Mercury. ... For other uses, see Dead pool (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Xombi was a Milestone Comics superhero. ... Mr. ... Hellboy is a fictional Dark Horse Comics character created by Mike Mignola. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Doctor Manhattan is a fictional superhero who is a central character in the classic comic book series, Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons and published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the comic book character. ...

See also: List of comic book superpowers

Comic book fiction traditionally features characters with superhuman, supernatural, or paranormal abilities, often referred to as superpowers (also spelled super-powers). ...

Character examples

While the typical superhero is described above, a vast array of superhero characters have been created and many break the usual pattern:

Wolverine: Origins #1 (June 2006). Cover art by Michael Turner.
Wolverine: Origins #1 (June 2006). Cover art by Michael Turner.
  • Wolverine has shown a willingness to kill and anti-social behavior. He belongs to an underclass of morally ambivalent anti-heroes who are coarser and more violent rather than classic superheroes. Others include Green Arrow, Black Canary, Blade and, in some incarnations, Batman. Namor the Sub-Mariner is the earliest example of this archetype, originally appearing in 1939. Some, such as Wolverine, Deadpool, and Daredevil, are often repentant about their actions, while others, such as The Punisher and Rorschach, are unapologetic.
  • Some superheroes have been created and employed by national governments to serve their interests and defend the nation. Captain America was outfitted by and worked for the United States Army during World War II and Alpha Flight is a superhero team formed and usually managed by an arm of the Canadian Department of National Defence. The Ultimates, in particular, work directly under the U.S. government and are used as a metaphor for U.S. military and political power. The Savage Dragon is virtually unique in that he began his superhero career as police officer, rather than a costumed vigilante. Wonder Woman's day job also works for the government as an agent.
  • Many superheroes have never had a secret identity, such as Luke Cage or the members of The Fantastic Four. Others who once had secret identities, such as Captain America and Steel, later made their identities public. The third Flash and Iron Man are rare examples of "public" superheroes who regain their secret identities (though Iron Man once more gave his up in Civil War).
  • The Hulk is usually defined as a superhero, but he has a Jekyll/Hyde relationship with his alter ego. When enraged, scientist Bruce Banner becomes the super-strong Hulk, a creature of little intelligence and self-control. His actions have often either inadvertently or deliberately caused great destruction. As a result, he has been hunted by the military and other superheroes.
  • While most superheroes traditionally gained their abilities through accidents of science, magical means or rigorous training, the X-Men and related characters are genetic mutants whose abilities naturally manifest at puberty. Mutants more often have difficulty controlling their powers than other superheroes and are persecuted as a group.
  • Some superhero identities have been used by more than one person. A character (often a close associate or family member) takes on another's name and mission after the original dies, retires or takes on a new identity. The Flash, Blue Beetle and Robin are notable mantles that have passed from one character to another. Green Lantern and Nova are standard titles for the thousands of members of their respective intergalactic "police corps". The Phantom and the Black Panther both adopted personae and missions that have lasted several generations.
  • The Living Death Star, (alias Lord Pedro), is classed as a superhero, purely for his sheer size and ability to still be able to walk. It has been known that The Living Death Star (TLDS for short), has attracted people through use of his own Gravity.
  • Thor and Hercules are mythological gods reinterpreted as superheroes. Wonder Woman, while not a goddess in her current incarnation, is a member of the Amazon tribe of Greek mythology given many "god like" powers, enough to challenge the gods themselves.
  • Spawn, Etrigan, Ghost Rider and Hellboy are actual demons who have been manipulated by circumstance into being forces of good.
  • Superman, the Silver Surfer, Martian Manhunter, and Captain Marvel (the Marvel Comics character) are extraterrestrials who have, either permanently or provisionally, taken it upon themselves to protect the planet Earth.
  • Adam Strange, on the other hand, is a human being who protects the planet Rann.
  • Some characters tread the line between superhero and villain because of a permanent or temporary change in character or because of a complex, individualistic moral code. These include Juggernaut, Emma Frost, Catwoman, Elektra, Black Adam and Venom. This change often coincides with a spin-off series in which the character must be a likable protagonist. The Thunderbolts are a team made up mostly of former villains acting as super heroes.
  • Because the superhero is such an outlandish and recognizable character type, several comedic heroes have been introduced, including Ambush Bug, The Tick, The Flaming Carrot, The Great Lakes Avengers, Herbie Popnecker, The Powerpuff Girls and The SimpsonsRadioactive Man. Early, Harvey Kurtzman-edited issues of Mad Magazine featured several parodies of superheroes and count as some of the first satiric treatments of this subject matter.
  • The title characters of the franchise Gargoyles are powerful warrior creatures who have an instinctual need to protect their territory and the beings living in it, although that need can be broadly interpreted by individuals.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 395 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (550 × 835 pixel, file size: 186 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) alternate cover to Origin #01 by Michael Turner more covers : http://abcovers. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 395 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (550 × 835 pixel, file size: 186 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) alternate cover to Origin #01 by Michael Turner more covers : http://abcovers. ... Michael Turner is: Michael Turner (artist), a comic book publisher and artist known for his work on Witchblade and Fathom. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... In literature and film, an anti-hero is a central or supporting character that has some of the personality flaws and ultimate fortune traditionally assigned to villains but nonetheless also have enough heroic qualities or intentions to gain the sympathy of readers or viewers. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... Blade (Eric Brooks) is a fictional vampire-hunter in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional character featured in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the oldest superhero characters. ... For other uses, see Dead pool (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character. ... Rorschach is a fictional character, a superhero featured in the acclaimed 1986 DC Comics series Watchmen. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Captain America. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Alpha Flight is a Marvel Comics superhero team, noteworthy for being one of the few Canadian superhero teams. ... The Department of National Defence, frequently referred to by its acronym DND, is the department within the government of Canada with responsibility for Canadas military, known as the Canadian Forces. ... Members of the Ultimates, on the cover of The Ultimates is a comic book published by Marvel Comics, part of the Ultimate Marvel line featuring classic Marvel Universe characters re-imagined for a modern audience. ... The Savage Dragon is an ongoing American comic book series created by Erik Larsen and published by Image Comics. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... For other uses of this term, please see Secret identity (disambiguation). ... Luke Cage, born Carl Lucas and also called Power Man, is a fictional superhero appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... Steel is a name used by several fictional characters owned and published by DC Comics. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... Civil War is a 2006-2007 Marvel Comics crossover event built around a seven-issue limited series of the same name written by Mark Millar, and penciled by Steve McNiven. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... For other uses, see Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... In Marvel comic books, particularly those of the X-Men mythos, a mutant is a member of the species Homo sapiens superior, an offshoot of regular humanity, Homo sapiens sapiens. ... Puberty refers to the process of physical changes by which a childs body becomes an adult body capable of reproduction. ... The Flash. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... Robin (also referred to as The Boy Wonder) is the name of several fictional characters appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, originally created by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, as a junior counterpart to DC Comics superhero Batman. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... Nova, (Richard Rider), is a fictional superhero from Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Phantom. ... The Black Panther (TChalla) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe who is the first modern Black superhero. ... For other uses, see Death Star (disambiguation). ... Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ... Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a superhero appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Hercules, or Heracles, being in one sense a superhero from classical antiquity, and a recognisable character freely available in the public domain, has been featured in a number of comic book series. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Spawn is a fictional comic book character created by Todd McFarlane. ... The Demon is a DC Comics superhero series created by comic book master, Jack Kirby. ... Ghost Rider is the name of several fictional supernatural anti-heroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Hellboy is a fictional Dark Horse Comics character created by Mike Mignola. ... “Fiend” redirects here. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... Martian Manhunter is the superhero alias of Jonn Jonzz, alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, a fictional comic book superhero who was created by DC Comics. ... Captain Marvel is the name of several fictional Marvel Comics superheroes. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Adam Strange is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Rann is a fictional planet in the Polaris star system (formerly the Alpha Centauri system) of the DC Comics universe. ... The Juggernaut (Cain Marko) is a fictional comic book supervillain from the Marvel Comics universe. ... Emma Grace[1] Frost, formerly known as the White Queen, is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... Elektra Natchios is a fictional character from Marvel Comics. ... Black Adam is a fictional comic book character whose morally ambiguous nature has his character fall between the lines of heroism and villainy; as a result, he has associated himself with both superheroes and supervillains at different times. ... Venom (Edward Eddie Charles Brock), is a fictional character, a comic book supervillain and anti-hero from the Marvel Comics Universe. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... For other uses, see Thunderbolt (comics). ... Ambush Bug is a fictional comic book character who has appeared in several DC Comics. ... The Tick is the name of a series of comic books and an animated TV series created in 1986 by Ben Edlund, following the exploits of a blue-skinned muscular man named The Tick who fights crime in a place simply called The City. He is an absurdist spoof of... Flaming Carrot Comics is a surrealist comic book by Bob Burden between 1979 and 1993. ... The Great Lakes Avengers are a comedic superhero group, fashioned after Marvel Comics’ Avengers. ... Herbie Popnecker from cover of Herbie #1 (April-May 1964) and the Fat Fury from cover of Herbie #8 (March 1965). ... The Powerpuff Girls is an Emmy-winning American animated television series about three little girls in kindergarten who have superpowers. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Radioactive Man, within the world of the animated television series The Simpsons, is a comic book superhero who acquired his powers after surviving an atomic bomb explosion. ... Harvey Kurtzman (October 3, 1924 - February 21, 1993) was a U.S. cartoonist and magazine editor. ... Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ... Gargoyles is an American fantasy superhero animated series created by Greg Weisman. ...

Trademark status

Most dictionary definitions[5] and common usages of the term are generic and not limited to the characters of any particular company or companies. For other uses, see Dictionary (disambiguation). ... A genericized trademark, generic trade mark, generic descriptor, or proprietary eponym, is a trademark or brand name which has become the colloquial or generic description for a particular class of product or service. ...


Nevertheless, variations on the term "Super Hero" are jointly claimed by DC Comics and Marvel Comics as trademarks. Registrations of "Super Hero" marks have been maintained by DC and Marvel since the 1960s.[6] (U.S. Trademark Serial Nos. 72243225 and 73222079, among others). DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... “(TM)” redirects here. ...


Joint trademarks shared by competitors are rare in the United States.[7] They are supported by a non-precedential 2003 Trademark Trial and Appeal Board decision upholding the "Swiss Army" knife trademark. Like the "Super Hero" marks, the "Swiss Army" mark was jointly registered by competitors. It was upheld on the basis that the registrants jointly "represent a single source" of the knives, due to their long-standing cooperation for quality control.[8] The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (or TTAB) is a body within the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) responsible for hearing and deciding oppositions filed against trademark applications. ... A Swiss army knife with its implements in various stages of extension A Swiss Army knife (SAK), (German: , French: ) is a multi-function pocket knife or multitool. ...


Critics in the legal community dispute whether the "Super Hero" marks meet the legal standard for trademark protection in the United States—distinctive designation of a single source of a product or service. Controversy exists over each element of that standard: whether "Super Hero" is distinctive rather than generic, whether "Super Hero" designates a source of products or services, and whether DC and Marvel jointly represent a single source.[9] Some critics further characterize the marks as a misuse of trademark law to chill competition.[10]


America's Best Comics, originally an imprint of Wildstorm, used the term science hero, coined by Alan Moore. Alex Ross cover to Americas Best Comics 64 Page Giant, featuring all of the characters created by Alan Moore for the imprint. ... WildStorm Productions, or simply WildStorm or Wildstorm, is a publishing imprint and studio of American comic book publisher DC Comics. ... An alternative term conceived and used by Alan Moore in his work to describe a superhero, usually one that has a science fiction explanation for his/her powers. ...


History of superheroes in comic books

Image File history File links Emblem-important. ...

Antecedents

The Phantom. Art by Jerry DeCaire.
The Phantom. Art by Jerry DeCaire.

Early mythologies feature pantheons of gods with superhuman powers, as well as heroes such as Gilgamesh and Perseus. Later, folkloric heroes such as Robin Hood and the 19th century protagonists of Victorian literature, such as the masked adventurer The Scarlet Pimpernel, featured what became such superhero conventions as secret identities. Penny dreadfuls, dime novels, radio programs and other popular fiction of the late 19th and early 20th centuries featured mysterious, swashbuckling heroes with distinct costumes, secret identities, unusual abilities and altruistic missions. These include Zorro, the Green Hornet, the Scarecrow of Romney Marsh and Spring Heeled Jack, the last of whom first emerged as an urban legend. Likewise, the science-fiction hero John Carter of Mars, with his futuristic weapons and gadgets; Tarzan, with his high degree of athleticism and strength, and his ability to communicate with animals; and the biologically modified Hugo Danner of the novel Gladiator were heroes with unusual abilities who fought sometimes larger-than-life foes. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (597x798, 84 KB) Summary Jerry DeCaire http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (597x798, 84 KB) Summary Jerry DeCaire http://www. ... DeCaires Punisher Jerry DeCaire [1] is a comic book illustrator. ... For other uses, see Gilgamesh (disambiguation). ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... For the eponymous flower, see Scarlet pimpernel. ... In the United States in the late 19th century and very early 20th century, a dime novel was a low-priced novel, typically priced at 10 cents (a dime). ... An example of the original dime novel series, circa 1860. ... Radio broadcasts have been a popular entertainment since the 1910s, though popularity has declined a little in some countries since television became widespread. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... For other uses, see Zorro (disambiguation). ... Green Hornet has several meanings: The Green Hornet character, created by George W. Trendle. ... The Scarecrow of Romney Marsh is a fictional character, he is the leader of the Dymchurch smugglers in the Doctor Syn novels of Russell Thorndike. ... For other uses, see Spring Heeled Jack (disambiguation). ... An urban legend or urban myth is similar to a modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ... In 1911, Edgar Rice Burroughs, now best known as the creator of the character Tarzan, began his writing career with A Princess of Mars, a rousing tale of pulp adventure on the planet Barsoom or Mars. ... For other uses, see Tarzan (disambiguation). ... Hugo Danner is the protagonist of the 1930 novel Gladiator, by Philip Gordon Wylie. ...


The most direct antecedents are pulp magazine crime fighters — such as the "peak human" Doc Savage, the preternaturally mesmeric The Shadow, and The Spider — and comic strip characters such as Hugo Hercules, Popeye and The Phantom.[citation needed] The first masked crime-fighter created for comic books was writer-artist George Brenner's The Clock,[11] [12] who debuted in Centaur Publications' Funny Pages vol. 1, #6 (Nov. 1936). In terms of superpowered characters, many historians consider[citation needed] the first appearance of Superman in Action Comics #1 (June 1938) the point at which the comic-book archetype began. This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... Doc Savage is a fictional character, one of the pulp heroes of the 1930s and 1940s. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... The Spider was the violent, relentless hero of a pulp magazine series produced by Popular Publications from 1933 to 1943. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Popeye (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Phantom. ... George Brenner was a cartoonist in the mid 1900s. ... Funny Picture Stories #1 (Nov, 1936). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ...


Golden Age

Action Comics #1 (June 1938), Superman's debut. Cover art by Joe Shuster.
Action Comics #1 (June 1938), Superman's debut. Cover art by Joe Shuster.

In 1938, writer Jerry Siegel and illustrator Joe Shuster, who had previously worked in pulp science fiction magazines, introduced Superman. The character possessed many of the traits that have come to define the superhero: a secret identity, superhuman powers and a colorful costume including a symbol and cape. His name is also the source of the term "superhero," although early comic book heroes were sometimes also called "mystery men" or "masked heroes". Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... Cover of Action Comics #1. ... Cover of Action Comics #1. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ... Jerome Jerry Siegel a. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ... This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... For other uses of this term, please see Secret identity (disambiguation). ...


DC Comics, which published under the names National and All-American at the time, received an overwhelming response to Superman and, in the years that followed, introduced Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, The Flash, Hawkman, Aquaman and Green Arrow. The first team of superheroes was DC's Justice Society of America, featuring most of the aforementioned characters. Although DC dominated the superhero market at this time, companies large and small created hundreds of superheroes. The Human Torch and Sub-Mariner from Marvel Comics (then called Timely Comics) and Plastic Man and Phantom Lady from Quality Comics were also hits. Will Eisner's The Spirit, featured in a comic strip, would become a considerable artistic inspiration to later comic book creators. The era's most popular superhero, however, was Fawcett Comics' Captain Marvel, whose exploits regularly outsold those of Superman during the 1940s. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... The Flash. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... The Human Torch is a Marvel Comics-owned superhero. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional character, featured in Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Timely Comics is the 1940s comic-book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... Plastic Man (Patrick Eel OBrian) is a fictional comic-book superhero originally published by Quality Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Phantom Lady (disambiguation). ... Crack Comics #1 (May, 1940), featuring the Clock, previously introduced as the first masked comic book superhero. ... William Erwin Eisner (March 6, 1917 – January 3, 2005) was an acclaimed American comics writer, artist and entrepreneur. ... For the religious or spiritual meaning of The Spirit, see Spirit. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... Whiz Comics #2, the first appearance of Captain Marvel, the companys most popular character. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ...

Whiz Comics #2 (Feb. 1940), the debut of Captain Marvel. Cover art by C. C. Beck
Whiz Comics #2 (Feb. 1940), the debut of Captain Marvel. Cover art by C. C. Beck

During World War II, superheroes grew in popularity, surviving paper rationing and the loss of many writers and illustrators to service in the armed forces. The need for simple tales of good triumphing over evil may explain the wartime popularity of superheroes. Publishers responded with stories in which superheroes battled the Axis Powers and the patriotically themed superheroes, most notably Marvel's Captain America as well as DC's Wonder Woman. Whiz Comics #2 This image is a book cover. ... Whiz Comics #2 This image is a book cover. ... Whiz Comics was a monthly ongoing comic book anthology series, which was published by Fawcett Comics from February 1940 to June 1952. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Clarence Charles Beck, (July 9, 1910_November 22, 1989), was an American cartoonist. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Black: Zenith of the Axis Powers Capital Not applicable Political structure Military alliance Historical era World War II  - Tripartite Pact September 27, 1940  - Anti-Comintern Pact November 25, 1936  - Pact of Steel May 22, 1939  - Dissolved 1945 This article is about the independent countries (states) that comprised the Axis powers. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Captain America. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ...


After the war, superheroes lost popularity. This led to the rise of genre fiction, particularly horror and crime. The lurid nature of these genres sparked a moral crusade in which comics were blamed for juvenile delinquency. The movement was spearheaded by psychiatrist Fredric Wertham, who famously argued that "deviant" sexual undertones ran rampant in superhero comics.[13] Genre fiction is a term for fictional works (novels, short stories) written with the intent of fitting into a specific literary genre in order to appeal to the fans of that genre. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... Juvenile delinquency refers to criminal acts performed by juveniles. ... Dr. Fredric Wertham (March 20, 1895 – November 18, 1981) was a German-American psychiatrist and crusading author who protested the purportedly harmful effects of mass media—comic books in particular—on the development of children. ...


In response, the comic book industry adopted the stringent Comics Code. By the mid-1950s, only Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman retained a sliver of their prior popularity, although effort towards complete inoffensiveness led to stories that many consider silly, especially by modern standards. This ended what historians have called the Golden Age of comic books. The Comics Code Authority (CCA) is an organization founded in 1954 to act as a de facto censor for American comic books. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ...


Silver Age

Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956) introduced the second Flash and the Silver Age. Cover art by Carmine Infantino & Joe Kubert.
Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956) introduced the second Flash and the Silver Age. Cover art by Carmine Infantino & Joe Kubert.

In the 1950s, DC Comics, under the editorship of Julius Schwartz, recreated many popular 1940s heroes, launching an era later deemed the Silver Age of comic books. The Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman and several others were recreated with new origin stories. While past superheroes resembled mythological heroes in their origins and abilities, these heroes were inspired by contemporary science fiction. In 1960, DC banded its most popular heroes together in the Justice League of America, which became a sales phenomenon. Showcase #4 (Oct. ... Showcase 4 This image is a book cover. ... Showcase 4 This image is a book cover. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... Joe Kubert (born September 18, 1926, Poland) is an American comic book artist who went on to found the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 – February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ... The Flash. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ...


Empowered by the return of the superhero at DC, Marvel Comics editor/writer Stan Lee and the artists/co-writers Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko and Bill Everett launched a new line of superhero comic books, beginning with The Fantastic Four in 1961 and continuing with the Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man, Iron Man, Thor, the X-Men, and Daredevil. These comics continued DC’s use of science fiction concepts (radiation was a common source of superpowers) but placed greater emphasis on personal conflict and character development. This led to many superheroes that differed from predecessors with more dramatic potential. For example, the Fantastic Four were a superhero family of sorts, who squabbled and even held some unresolved acrimony towards one another, and Spider-Man was a teenager who struggled to earn money and maintain his social life in addition to his costumed exploits. This article is about the comic book company. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ... Bill Everett (May 18, 1917 – February 27, 1973) was a comic book writer/illustrator most famous for the creation of Namor the Sub-Mariner and co-creating Daredevil for Marvel Comics. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... // [edit] Marvel Comics Main article: Thor (Marvel Comics) Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a Marvel Comics superhero, based on the thunder god of Norse mythology. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... For other uses, see Radiation (disambiguation). ...


While the superhero form underwent a revival, the rise of television as the top medium for light entertainment and the effects of Comics Code Authority obliterated genres such as westerns, romance, horror, war and crime . In the coming decades, non-superhero comics series would occasionally rise to popularity, but superheroes and comic books would be forever intertwined in the eyes of the American public. The seal of the Comics Code Authority, which appears on the covers of approved comic books. ... Cover of a book by Louis LAmour, one of Western fictions most prolific authors. ... A romance novel is a literary genre developed in Western culture, mainly in English-speaking countries. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ...


Deconstruction

In the 1970s, DC Comics paired Green Arrow with Green Lantern in a ground-breaking, socially conscious series. Writer Dennis O'Neil portrayed Green Arrow as an angry, street-smart populist and Green Lantern as good-natured but short-sighted authority figure. This is the first instance in which superheroes were classified into two distinct groups, the "classic" superhero and the more brazen anti-hero. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ... Look up Populism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

The cast of DC Comics' Watchmen. Promotional art by Dave Gibbons.
The cast of DC Comics' Watchmen. Promotional art by Dave Gibbons.

In the 1970s, DC returned Batman to his roots as a dubious vigilante, and Marvel introduced several popular anti-heroes, including The Punisher, Wolverine, and writer/artist Frank Miller's dark version of the longtime hero Daredevil. Batman, The Punisher, and Daredevil were driven by the crime-related deaths of family members and continual exposure to slum life, while X-Men's Wolverine was tormented by barely controllable savage instincts and Iron Man struggled with debilitating alcoholism. The trend was taken to a higher level in the 1986 miniseries Watchmen by writer Alan Moore and artist Dave Gibbons, which was published by DC but took place outside the "DC Universe" with new characters. The superheroes of Watchmen were emotionally unsatisfied, psychologically withdrawn, sexually confused, and even sociopathic. This image is a book cover. ... This image is a book cover. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... Dave Gibbons (born April 14, 1949) is a British writer and artist of comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... This article is about Frank Miller, the comic book writer and artist. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... Dave Gibbons (born April 14, 1949) is a British writer and artist of comics. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Antisocial personality disorder (APD) is a personality disorder which is often characterised by antisocial and impulsive behaviour. ...


Another story, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns (1985-1986), continued Batman’s renovation/reinterpretation. This miniseries, written and illustrated by Frank Miller, featured a Batman from an alternate/non-continuity future returning from retirement. The series portrayed the hero as an obsessed vigilante, necessarily at odds with official social authority figures, illustrated both by the relationship between Batman and retiring police commissioner James Gordon, and by the symbolic slugfest between the Dark Knight and Superman, now an agent/secret weapon of the U.S government. Both Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns were acclaimed for their artistic ambitiousness and psychological depth, and became watershed series. The premiere issue of the series Spoiler warning: The Dark Knight Returns (known as DKR by fans) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ...


Miller continued his seminal treatment of the Batman character with 1987's Batman: Year One (Batman issues #404-407) and 2001's The Dark Knight Strikes Again (also known as DK2). DK2, the long-awaited follow-up to Dark Knight Returns, contrasts the traditional superhero-crimefighter character with the more politically conscious characters that evolved during the 1990s (perhaps epitomized by The Authority and Planetary, both written by British author Warren Ellis). In DK2, Superman's nemesis Lex Luthor is the power behind the throne, controlling a tyrannical American government, as well as Superman himself. Superman's submission to Luthor's twisted power structure, in the name of saving lives is contrasted with Batman's determined attack against the corrupted institutions of government; the message is that crime can occur at all levels of society, and the heroes are responsible for fighting both symptoms and causes of societal dysfunction and corruption. Batman: Year One was the title of a comic book written by Frank Miller, illustrated by David Mazzuchelli and colored/painted by Richmond Lewis, released in 1988 by DC Comics. ... The Dark Knight Strikes Again (also refered to as DK2) is a Batman graphic novel by Frank Miller with Lynn Varley. ... The Authority is a superhero comic book published by DC Comics under the Wildstorm imprint. ... Planetary is an adjective meaning relating to a planet or planets. ...


Struggles of the 1990s

McFarlane's occult hero Spawn.
McFarlane's occult hero Spawn.

By the early 1990s, anti-heroes had become the rule rather than the exception, as The Punisher, Wolverine and the grimmer Batman became popular and marketable characters. Anti-heroes such as the X-Men’s Gambit and Bishop, X-Force's Cable and the Spider-Man adversary Venom became some of the most popular new characters of the early 1990s. This was a financial boom time for the industry when a new character could become well known quickly and, according to many fans, stylistic flair eclipsed character development. In 1992, Marvel illustrators Todd McFarlane, Jim Lee and Rob Liefeld — all of whom helped popularize anti-heroes in the Spider-Man and X-Men franchises — left Marvel to form Image Comics. Image changed the comic book industry as a haven for creator-owned characters and the first significant challenger to Marvel and DC in thirty years. Image superhero teams, such as Lee’s WildC.A.Ts and Gen¹³, and Liefeld’s Youngblood, were instant hits but were criticized[citation needed] as over-muscled, over-sexualized, excessively violent, and lacking in unique personality. McFarlane's occult hero Spawn fared somewhat better in critical respect[citation needed] and long-term sales. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (600x900, 139 KB) Summary Spawn #95 cover by Greg Capullo. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (600x900, 139 KB) Summary Spawn #95 cover by Greg Capullo. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Gambit (Remy LeBeau) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero that has been a member of the X-Men. ... Bishop (Lucas Bishop), is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero who is a member of the X-Men. ... X-Force was a Marvel Comics superhero team, one of many spin-offs of the popular X-Men franchise. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character Nathan Summers. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Venom, or the Venom Symbiote, is the name given to the first symbiote life form to appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... Comic book collecting is the collecting of comic books in the interest of appreciation, nostalgia, financial profit, and completion of the collection. ... Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian comic book artist, writer, toy manufacturer/designer, and media entrepreneur who is best known as the creator of the epic religious fantasy series Spawn. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rob Liefeld (born October 3, 1967 in Anaheim, California) is an American comic book writer, illustrator, and publisher. ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ... Wildcats is the name of multiple incarnations of the Wildstorm comics superhero comic book. ... Gen¹³ is a fictional superhero team and comic book series originally written by Jim Lee and Brandon Choi and illustrated by J. Scott Campbell. ... Youngblood is a superhero team, and eponymous comic book, created by Rob(The shitty Artist) Liefeld. ... For other uses, see Occult (disambiguation). ... Spawn is a fictional comic book character created by Todd McFarlane. ...


In this decade, Marvel and DC made drastic temporary changes to iconic characters. DC's "Death of Superman" story arc across numerous Superman titles found the hero killed and resurrected, while Batman was physically crippled in the "KnightFall" storyline. At Marvel, a clone of Spider-Man vied with the original for over a year of stories across several series. All eventually returned to the status quo. ... Cover to Batman #497: The breaking of the Bat. ... The Clone Saga or Spider-Clone Saga was a major story arc in Marvel Comics which ran from 1994 to 1996 involving many clones of Spider-Man. ...


Throughout the 1990s, several creators deviated from the trends of violent anti-heroes and sensational, large-scale storylines. Painter Alex Ross, writer Kurt Busiek and Alan Moore himself tried to "reconstruct" the superhero form. Acclaimed titles such as Busiek's, Ross' and Brent Anderson's Astro City and Moore's Tom Strong combined artistic sophistication and idealism into a super heroic version of retro-futurism. Ross also painted two widely acclaimed mini-series, Marvels (written by Busiek) for Marvel Comics and Kingdom Come for DC, which examined the classic superhero in a more literary context, as well as satirizing antiheroes. Magog, Superman’s rival in Kingdom Come, was partially modeled after Cable. Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ... Kurt Busiek (born September 16, 1960) is a comic book writer. ... Brent Eric Anderson (born 1955) is an American comic book artist. ... Astro City, vol. ... Tom Strong was a bi-monthly comic book created by writer Alan Moore and artist Chris Sprouse published by Americas Best Comics, an imprint of DC Comics Wildstorm division. ... The jet pack, an icon of the future, appearing on an August 1928 issue of Amazing Stories science-fiction magazine. ... A miniseries, in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Marvels #1. ... The cover to Absolute Kingdom Come by Alex Ross (2006) Kingdom Come is a comic book limited series published in 1996 by DC Comics, written by Mark Waid and painted by Alex Ross. ... Magog action figure from DC Direct. ...


Superhero philosophy

The "philosophy" informing the ethos of vigilante superheroes (especially as seen in the Punisher and Batman characters) was essentially formulated centuries ago by the famous Greek sage Aristotle: Men possessing superior virtue and self-mastery necessarily transcend the external human bureaucratic-administrative framework: For other uses, see Vigilante (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ...

There are men, wrote Aristotle, so godlike, so exceptional, that they naturally, by right of their extraordinary gifts, transcend all moral judgment or constitutional control: 'There is no law which embraces men of that caliber: they are themselves law.'"[14]

Note that not all superheroes are vigilantes. During the Silver Age, for example, Batman was a deputized officer of the Gotham City police force. Other superheroes have worked, either openly or covertly, with or for government or international organizations. In 1986, John Byrne's Superman was officially deputized by the Metropolis mayor to allow him to arrest criminals legally. Showcase #4 (Oct. ...


Reception

Almost since the inception of the superhero in comic books, the concept has come under fire from critics. Most famously, the psychiatrist Fredric Wertham’s Seduction of the Innocent (1954) alleged that sexual subtext existed in superhero comics, and included the infamous accusations that Batman and Robin were gay and Wonder Woman encouraged female dominance fetishes and lesbianism. Dr. Fredric Wertham (March 20, 1895 – November 18, 1981) was a German-American psychiatrist and crusading author who protested the purportedly harmful effects of mass media—comic books in particular—on the development of children. ... First U.S. printing, 1954 First U.K. printing, 1954 Seduction of the Innocent was a book by Dr. Fredric Wertham, published in 1954, that warned that comic books were a bad form of popular literature and a serious cause of juvenile delinquency. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Robin (also referred to as The Boy Wonder) is the name of several fictional characters appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, originally created by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, as a junior counterpart to DC Comics superhero Batman. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Wikinews has related news: BDSM as business: Interviews with Dominatrixes Femdom, or female dominance, refers to BDSM activities where the dominant partner is female; the submissive partner may be of either sex. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ...


Writer Ariel Dorfman has criticized alleged class biases in many superhero narratives in several of his books, including The Emperor's Old Clothes: What the Lone Ranger, Babar, and Other Innocent Heroes Do to Our Mind (1980). Contemporary critics seem to be more focused on the history and evolving nature of the superhero concept, as in Peter Coogan's Superhero: The Secret Origin of a Genre (2006). Ariel Dorfman (born May 6, 1942 Buenos Aires) is an Argentine-Chilean novelist, playwright, essayist, academic, and human rights activist. ... Coogan is a surname, of Irish origin, and may refer to: Amanda Coogan Gwynneth (Hardesty) Coogan Jackie Coogan James J. Coogan Keith Coogan Kevin Coogan Richard Coogan Scot Coogan Steve Coogan Tim Pat Coogan Categories: | ...


The idea of the superhero has also been explored in several well-received contemporary graphic novels. Daniel Clowes' "The Death Ray" (2004) examines the idea of the superhero as a non-costumed delusional misanthrope and serial killer and Chris Ware's Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth (2000) reimagines the Superman archetype as a mercurial god-like figure. Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... Daniel Gillespie Clowes (born April 14, 1961 in Chicago, Illinois) is an Academy Award-nominated American author, screenwriter and cartoonist of alternative comic books, most notably Eightball (1989-present), an anthology of self-contained narratives and serialized graphic novels (one of which, Ghost World, was published separately in 1997. ... Misanthropy is a general dislike of the human race. ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... The cover to the collected edition of Jimmy Corrigan by Chris Ware Franklin Christenson Ware (born December 28, 1967) is an American comic book artist and cartoonist, best-known for a series of comics called the Acme Novelty Library, and a graphic novel, Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


Growth in diversity

For the first two decades of their existence in comic books, superheroes largely conformed to the model of lead characters in American popular fiction of the time, with the typical superhero a white, middle- to upper- class, heterosexual, professional, 20-to-30-year-old male. A majority of superheroes still fit this description as of 2007, but beginning in the 1960s many characters have broken the mold.


Superheroines

See also: Portrayal of women in comics and List of superheroines
Promotional art for Wonder Woman vol. 3, #5 (May 2007) by Terry Dodson & Rachel Dodson.
Promotional art for Wonder Woman vol. 3, #5 (May 2007) by Terry Dodson & Rachel Dodson.

The first known female superhero is writer-artist Fletcher Hanks's minor character Fantomah,[15] an ageless, ancient Egyptian woman in the modern day who could transform into a skull-faced creature with superpowers to fight evil; she debuted in Fiction House's Jungle Comics #2 (Feb. 1940), credited to the pseudonymous "Barclay Flagg". Women have been portrayed in in comic books since the mediums beginning, with their portrayals often the subject of controversy. ... The following is a list of superheroines (female superheroes) in comics, television, films, and action figures. ... Image File history File links WonderWomanV5. ... Image File history File links WonderWomanV5. ... Terrence Terry Dodson is an American comic book artist and penciller. ... Rachel Dodson(nee Pinnock) is an American comic book inker and colorist, who often works with her husband, Terry Dodson. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Fantomah is a fictional comic book superhero, best known as the first comic book superheroine. ... The pyramids are the most recognizable symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt. ... Jumbo Comics #1 (Sept. ...


Another seminal superheroine is Invisible Scarlet O'Neil, a non-costumed character who fought crime and wartime saboteurs using the superpower of invisibility; she debuted in the eponymous syndicated newspaper comic strip by Russell Stamm on June 3, 1940. A superpowered female antihero, the Black Widow — a costumed emissary of Satan who killed evildoers in order to send them to Hell — debuted in Mystic Comics #4 (Aug. 1940), from Timely Comics, the 1940s predecessor of Marvel Comics. Invisible Scarlet ONeil is a fictional character, a comic strip plainclothes superhero (and one of the first superheroines). ... Print Syndication is a form of syndication in which news articles, columns, or comic strips are made available to newspapers and magazines. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... In literature and film, an anti-hero is a central or supporting character that has some of the personality flaws and ultimate fortune traditionally assigned to villains but nonetheless also have enough heroic qualities or intentions to gain the sympathy of readers or viewers. ... Black Widow (Claire Voyant) is the name of a supernaturally powered fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, known as one of the first costumed, superpowered female protagonists. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... This article is about the theological or philosophical afterlife. ... Mystic has been used as the title of four comic-book series. ... Timely Comics is the 1940s comic-book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the comic book company. ...


Though non-superpowered, like the Phantom and Batman, the earliest female costumed crimefighters are The Woman in Red,[16] introduced in Standard Comics' Thrilling Comics #2 (March 1940); Lady Luck, debuting in the Sunday-newspaper comic-book insert The Spirit Section June 2, 1940; Miss Fury,[17] debuting in the eponymous comic strip by female cartoonist Tarpé Mills on April 6, 1941; the Phantom Lady, introduced in Quality Comics Police Comics #1 (Aug. 1941); and the Black Cat,[18] introduced in Harvey Comics' Pocket Comics #1 (also Aug. 1941). The superpowered Nelvana of the Northern Lights debuted in Canadian publisher Hillborough Studio's Triumph-Adventure Comics #1 (Aug. 1941). Nedor Comics was the comic book line of publisher Ned Pines, who also published pulp magazines under a variety of company names (primarily Standard, Better and Thrilling) that he also used for the comics. ... Lady Luck in close-up, by Klaus Nordling. ... For the religious or spiritual meaning of The Spirit, see Spirit. ... Black Fury is the name of several fictional comic book characters. ... Tarpe Mills (1915-1988) was the pen name of comic book writer June Mills. ... For other uses, see Phantom Lady (disambiguation). ... Crack Comics #1 (May, 1940), featuring the Clock, previously introduced as the first masked comic book superhero. ... The Black Cat is a comic book adventure heroine published by Harvey Comics from 1941 to 1951. ... Casper the Friendly Ghost in Theres Good Boos To-Night (1948). ... Nelvana of the Northern Lights was a Canadian comic book character, the first Canadian national superhero, debuting six months before Johnny Canuck in the August 1941 issue of Triumph comics. ...


The first widely recognizable female superhero is Wonder Woman, from All-American Publications, one of three companies that would merge to form DC Comics. She was created by psychologist William Moulton Marston with help and inspiration from his wife Elizabeth and their companion Olive Byrne.[19] [20]. Wonder Woman debuted in All Star Comics #8 (Jan. 1942). For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Dr. William Moulton Marston (May 9, 1893 – May 2, 1947) was a psychologist, feminist theorist, and comic book writer who created the Wonder Woman character with his wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... Elizabeth (Sadie) Holloway Marston (1893-1993), who lived to be 100 years old, was trained as a lawyer (a rare feat at the time) and was the co-creator of the comic book character, Wonder Woman. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ...


Starting in the late 1950s, DC introduced Hawkgirl, Supergirl, Batwoman and later Batgirl, all female versions of prominent male superheroes. Batgirl would eventually shed her "bat" persona and become Oracle, the premiere information broker of the DC superhero community and leader of the superheroine team Birds of Prey In addition, the company introduced Zatanna and a second Black Canary and had several female supporting characters that were successful professionals, such as the Atom's love-interest, attorney Jean Loring. Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ... For other uses, see Supergirl (disambiguation). ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ... Barbara Babs Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media, created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino. ... Information Broker An Information Broker is someone who buys and sells information based on the needs of a client. ... Birds of Prey is a comic book published by DC Comics that features the adventures of a group of female superheroes who are based in Gotham City (and later Metropolis). ... Zatanna Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... A character of a book, play, movie, TV show or other form of storytelling usually used only to give dimension to a main character, by adding a relationship with this character, although sometimes supporting characters may develop a complexity of their own. ... // History The Atom introduced during the Silver Age of comic books in Showcase # 34 (Sep-Oct 1961) is physicist and university professor Ray Palmer (named for real-life science-fiction writer Raymond A. Palmer, who was himself quite short). ... Jean Loring is a fictional character from DC Comics associated with The Atom. ...


As with DC's superhero team the Justice League of America, with included Wonder Woman, the Marvel Comics teams of the early 1960s usually included at least one female, such as the Fantastic Four's Invisible Girl, the X-Men's Marvel Girl and the Avengers' Wasp and later Scarlet Witch. In the wake of second-wave feminism, the Invisible Girl became the more confident and assertive Invisible Woman, and Marvel Girl became the hugely powerful destructive force called Phoenix. The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the superheroes. ... Invisible Girl redirects here. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Jean Grey-Summers (born Jean Grey) is a fictional superheroine who lives in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... The Wasp (Janet van Dyne) is a comic book superheroine in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who was introduced as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine early in her history. ... Second-wave feminism refers to a period of feminist activity which began during the early 1960s and lasted through the late 1980s. ...


In subsequent decades, Elektra, Catwoman, Witchblade, and Spider-Girl became stars of popular series. The series Uncanny X-Men and its related superhero-team titles included many females in vital roles.[21] Elektra Natchios, usually known only by her first name Elektra, is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Marvel Comics character who is the daughter of Spider-Man, see Spider-Girl. ... For the second comic book series starring the X-Men, see X-Men (vol. ...


The idealized physiques and frequently sexual costumes (such as those of Power Girl, Emma Frost and Starfire) of female superheroes have led to accusations of sexism.[22][23] Power Girl (real name Kara Zor-L, also known as Karen Starr) is a DC Comics superhero, making her first appearance in All Star Comics #58 (January/February 1976). ... Emma Grace[1] Frost, formerly known as the White Queen, is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Starfire is a name shared by three fictional comic book superheroes from the DC Comics universe. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial...


Characters of color

Green Lantern/Green Arrow #87, the first appearance of John Stewart. Art by Neal Adams.
Green Lantern/Green Arrow #87, the first appearance of John Stewart. Art by Neal Adams.

In the late 1960s, superheroes of other racial groups began to appear. In 1966, Marvel Comics introduced the Black Panther, an African king who became the first non-caricatured black superhero[24]. The first African-American superhero, the Falcon, followed in 1969, and three years later, Luke Cage, a self-styled "hero-for-hire", became the first black superhero to star in his own series. In 1971, Red Wolf became the first Native American in the superheroic tradition to headline a series.[25] In 1974, Shang Chi, a martial artist, became the first prominent Asian hero to star in an American comic book. (Asian-American FBI agent Jimmy Woo had starred in a short-lived 1950s series named after "yellow peril" antagonist, Yellow Claw.) Image File history File links GL087. ... Image File history File links GL087. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... The Black Panther (TChalla) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe who is the first modern Black superhero. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... For the book of comics by Daniel Clowes, see Caricature (Daniel Clowes collection). ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Luke Cage, born Carl Lucas and also called Power Man, is a fictional superhero appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Red Wolf is the name of a number of fictional charcters in the Marvel Universe. ... Chief Quanah Parker of the Quahadi Comanche Native Americans in the United States (also Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are those indigenous peoples within the territory which is now encompassed by the continental United States, and their descendants in... Shang-Chi (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; literally rising of the spirit) is a Marvel Comics character, often called the Master of Kung Fu. He was created by writer Steve Englehart and artist Jim Starlin. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... An Asian American is generally defined as a person of Asian ancestry and American citizenship,[2][3][4] although may also be extended to include non-citizen resident Asians as well. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Jimmy Woo is a fictional, Chinese-American secret agent in the Marvel Comics comic-book universe. ... The Yellow Terror In All His Glory, 1899 editorial cartoon Yellow Peril (sometimes Yellow Terror) was a color metaphor for race that originated in the late nineteenth century with immigration of Chinese laborers to various Western countries, notably the United States, and later to the Japanese during the mid 20th... For other uses, see Antagonist (disambiguation). ... The Yellow Claw is a fictional comic book supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe, created by EC Comics great Al Feldstein and artist Joe Maneely in Yellow Claw #1 (Oct. ...


Comic-book companies were in the early stages of cultural expansion and many of these characters played to specific stereotypes; Cage often employed lingo similar to that of blaxploitation films, Native Americans were often associated with wild animals and Asians were often portrayed as martial artists. For other uses, see Stereotype (disambiguation). ... Shaft (1971) Blaxploitation is a film genre that emerged in the United States in the early 1970s when many exploitation films were made that targeted the urban black audience; the word itself is a portmanteau of the words “black” and “exploitation. ...


Subsequent minority heroes, such as the X-Men's Storm (the first black superheroine) and The Teen Titans' Cyborg avoided the patronizing nature of the earlier characters. Storm and Cyborg were both part of superhero teams, which became increasingly diverse in subsequent years. The X-Men, in the particular, were revived in 1975 with a line-up of characters culled from several different nations, including the Kenyan Storm, German Nightcrawler, Russian Colossus and Canadian Wolverine. Diversity in both ethnicity and national origin would be an important part of subsequent X-Men-related groups, as well as series that attempted to mimic the X-Men’s success. In the modern age, minority headliners are still rare but almost all teams feature at least a few minority characters. The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the X-Men character. ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... This article is about the Teen Titans member. ... This article is about the comic character. ... Colossus (Piotr Nikolaievitch Rasputin) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero in the X-Men. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... The Modern Age of Comic Books is an informal name for the period in the history of mainstream American comic books generally considered to last from the mid-1980s until present day. ...


In 1993, Milestone Comics, an African-American-owned imprint of DC, introduced a line of series that included characters of many ethnic minorities, including several black headliners. The imprint lasted four years, during which it introduced Static, a character adapted into the WB Network animated series Static Shock. Milestone Media is a company best known for creating the Milestone comics imprint (that was published through DC Comics) and the Static Shock cartoon series. ... This article is about imprints in publishing. ... Static is a teenage African-American superhero with electromagnetic powers. ... The WB Television Network, casually referred to as The WB, or sometimes as The Frog (referring to the networks former mascot, the animated character Michigan J. Frog), is a television network in the United States, founded as a joint venture between the Warner Bros. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Static Shock is an American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ...


In addition to the creation of new minority heroes, publishers have filled the roles of once-Caucasian heroes with minorities. The best known example is perhaps John Stewart who debuted in 1971 in the socially conscious series Green Lantern/Green Arrow. Stewart was a black and somewhat belligerent architect who Green Lantern’s alien benefactors chose as Hal Jordan's standby, an idea that initially discomforted Jordan and was meant to discomfort some readers. In the 1980s, Stewart became the Green Lantern permanently, making him the first black character to take the mantle of a classic superhero. The creators of the 2000s-era Justice League animated series selected Stewart as the show's Green Lantern, boosting his profile. John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ...


DC has recently passed some other long-established superhero mantles to ethnic minorities. These include the new Firestorm (African-American), Atom (Asian) and Blue Beetle (Latino). Alternatively, Marvel Comics revealed in an acclaimed 2003 limited series that the "Supersoldier serum" that empowered Captain America was subsequently tested on Isaiah Bradley, an African American man. This article is about the Ronnie Raymond/Martin Stein version of Firestorm. ... The Atom is a fictional comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... For the Amalgam Comics character, see Super-Soldier. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Captain America. ... Isaiah Bradley is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ...

See also: List of black superheroes

This is a list of black superheroes from the continent of Africa, the United States, Europe, Canada, Micronesia, New Zealand, Australia, the West Indies and elsewhere. ...

LGBT characters

See also: LGBT comic book characters

In 1992, Marvel revealed that Northstar, a member of Alpha Flight, was homosexual, after years of implication.[26] This ended a long-standing editorial mandate that there would be no LGBT characters in Marvel comics.[27] Although some secondary characters in DC Comics' mature-audience miniseries Watchmen were gay, Northstar was the first openly gay superhero. Other gay and bisexual superheroes have since emerged, such as Pied Piper, Gen¹³'s Rainmaker, and The Authority's gay couple Apollo and Midnighter. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about sexual orientation. ... The fictional character Northstar (born Jean-Paul Beaubier, formerly Jean-Paul Martin) is a Marvel Comics superhero, a member of Alpha Flight and the X-Men. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... Pied Piper (real name: Hartley Rathaway) is a fictional former supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Gen¹³ is a fictional superhero team and comic book series originally written by Jim Lee and Brandon Choi and illustrated by J. Scott Campbell. ... Sarah Rainmaker is a fictional superhero from the comic book series Gen¹³ created by Jim Lee and Brandon Choi and illustrated by J. Scott Campbell. ... The Authority is a superhero comic book published by DC Comics under the Wildstorm imprint. ... Apollo is a comic book superhero who first appeared in the Stormwatch series, but is best known for his role in The Authority. ... Midnighter is a comic book superhero who first appeared in the Stormwatch series, but is best known for his role in The Authority. ...


In the mid-2000s, some characters were revealed gay in two Marvel titles: The Ultimate Marvel incarnation of the X-Men’s Colossus and Wiccan and Hulkling of the superhero group Young Avengers. In 2006, DC revealed in its Manhunter title that longtime character Obsidian was gay, and a new incarnation of Batwoman was introduced as a "lipstick lesbian" to some media attention.[28][29] The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover of Ultimates (v2) #12. ... Ultimate X-Men is a superhero comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Colossus (Piotr Nikolaievitch Rasputin) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero in the X-Men. ... Asgardian (real name Billy Kaplan) is a fictional character, a member of the Young Avengers, a team of superheroes in the Marvel Universe. ... Hulkling (Teddy Altman) is a fictional comic book superhero and a member of the Young Avengers, a team of superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Young Avengers is a comic book published by Marvel Comics. ... Manhunter is a fictional character, a superhero in publications from DC Comics. ... Obsidian is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In other media

Film

Main article: Superhero film
Promotional image of Halle Berry as film version of X-Men character Storm.

Superhero films began as Saturday movie serials aimed at children during the 1940s. The decline of these serials meant the death of superhero films until the release of 1978‘s Superman which was a tremendous success. Several sequels followed in the 1980s. A popular Batman series lasted from 1989 until 1997. These franchises were initially successful but later sequels in both series fared poorly, stunting the growth of superhero films for a time. In the early 2000s, blockbusters such as 2000’s X-Men, 2002’s Spider-Man, and 2005's Batman Begins have led to dozens of superhero films. The improvements in special effects technology and more sophisticated writing that both respects and emulates the spirit of the comic books has drawn in mainstream audiences and caused critics to take superhero films more seriously. DVD front cover for The Adventures of Captain Marvel film serial. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Halle Maria Berry (IPA: ; born August 14, 1966[1]) is an American actress. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the X-Men character. ... DVD front cover for The Adventures of Captain Marvel, one of the most celebrated serials for both Republic Pictures and of the sound era in general. ... For the series of films, see Superman (film series). ... For other uses, see Sequel (disambiguation). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... A sequel is a work of fiction (e. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... Spider-Man is a 2002 American superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Begins (video game). ... Special effects (abbreviated SPFX or SFX) are used in the film, television, and entertainment industry to create effects that cannot be achieved by normal means, such as depicting travel to other star systems. ...


Live-action television series

Main article: Superhero live-action television series

Several popular but, by modern standards, campy live action superhero programs aired from the early 1950s until the late 1970s. These included Adventures of Superman starring George Reeves, the psychedelic-colored Batman series of the 1960s starring Adam West and Burt Ward and CBS’s Wonder Woman series of the 1970s starring Lynda Carter. The popular Incredible Hulk of the late 1970s and early 1980s, however, had a more somber tone. George Reeves as Superman Live action series featuring superheroes have been featured on television almost since the beginning of the medium and continue until present day. ... The term camp—normally used as an adjective, even though earliest recorded uses employed it mainly as a verb—refers to the deliberate and sophisticated use of kitsch, mawkish or corny themes and styles in art, clothing or conversation. ... This article is about the television series. ... George Reeves (January 5,[1] 1914 – June 16, 1959) was an American actor, best known for his role as Superman in the 1950s television program Adventures of Superman and his controversial death at the age of 45. ... This article is about the 1960s television series. ... Adam West (born William West Anderson on September 19, 1928) is an American actor who is best known for playing the role of Batman/Bruce Wayne on the 1960s TV series Batman (which also had a film adaptation). ... Burt Ward (born Bert John Gervis, Jr. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... For the two Marvel Comics nurse characters, see Night Nurse (comics). ... This article is about the live action series. ...

Lou Ferrigno in the 1978 episode "Married"
Lou Ferrigno in the 1978 episode "Married"

In the 1990s, the syndicated Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, adapted from the Japanese Super Sentai, became popular.[citation needed] Other shows targeting teenage and young adult audiences that decade included Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. In 2001, Smallville retooled Superman's origin as a teen drama. The 2006 NBC series Heroes tells the story of several people who "thought they were like everyone else, until they woke with incredible abilities". From fan site, I believe is covered under fair use This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... From fan site, I believe is covered under fair use This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast television programs to multiple television stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (MMPR) is an American live-action television series, created for the American market, based on the sixteenth installment of the Japanese Super Sentai franchise, Kyōryū Sentai Zyuranger. ... The official logo of the Super Sentai Series introduced in 2000 during the run of Mirai Sentai Timeranger The Super Sentai Series ) is the name given to the long running Japanese superhero team genre of shows produced by Toei Company Ltd. ... Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman was a live-action television series based on the Superman comic books. ... For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ... Smallville is an American television series created by writer/producers Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and was initially broadcast by The WB. After its fifth season, the WB and UPN merged to form The CW, which is the current broadcaster for the show in the United States. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the television network. ... Heroes is an American science fiction serial drama television series created by Tim Kring, which premiered on NBC on September 25, 2006. ...


In Japan, tokusatsu (Japanese term for special effects) superhero TV series are very common.[citation needed] Icons of tokusatsu in the late 1970s: Spider-Man, Kamen Rider Stronger, Kamen Rider V3, Battle Fever J, Ultraman Jonias, as well as the manga and anime icon Doraemon Tokusatsu ) is a Japanese word that literally means special effects. ...


Animation

The New Batman Adventures promotional image. Art by Bruce Timm.
The New Batman Adventures promotional image. Art by Bruce Timm.

In the 1940s, Fleischer/Famous Studios produced a number of groundbreaking Superman cartoons, which became the first examples of superheroes in animation. This image of Superman appeared at the beginning of each of the Fleischer cartoons. ... Fleischer Studios, Inc. ... Famous Studios logo, as seen during the opening credits of a 1950s Popeye the Sailor cartoon. ... This image of Superman appeared at the beginning of each of the cartoons. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ...


Since the 1960s, superhero cartoons have been a staple of children’s television, particularly in the U.S.. However, by the early 1980s, US broadcasting restrictions on violence in children’s entertainment led to series that were extremely tame, a trend exemplified by the series Super Friends. Meanwhile, Japan's anime industry successfully contributed to the genre with their own style of superhero series, most notably Science Ninja Team Gatchaman. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about the Hanna-Barbera television series. ...


In the 1990s, Batman: The Animated Series and X-Men led the way for series that displayed advanced animation, mature writing and respect for the comic books on which they were based. This trend continues with Cartoon Network’s successful adaptation of DC's Justice League and Teen Titans. The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... The X-Men Animated Series debuted in the 1992-1993 season on the Fox Network. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... Teen Titans was an American animated television series created by Sam Register and Glen Murakami, developed by David Slack, and produced by Warner Bros. ...


The comics superheroes mythos itself received a nostalgic treatment in the acclaimed 2004 Disney/Pixar release The Incredibles, which utilized computer animation. Original superheroes with basis in older trends have also been made for television, such as Cartoon Network's Ben 10 and Nickelodeon's Danny Phantom. Old logo from 1985-2006 Walt Disney Pictures refers to several different entities associated with The Walt Disney Company: Walt Disney Pictures, the film banner, was established as a designation in 1983, prior to which Disney films since the death of Walt Disney were released under the name of the... Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California, United States, and is notable for its eight Academy Awards. ... The Incredibles is a 2004 American Academy Award-winning computer-animated feature film produced by Pixar Animation Studios for Walt Disney Pictures, centering around a family of superheroes. ... See also: Computer-generated imagery Computer animation is the art of creating moving images via the use of computers. ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... Ben 10 is an American animated television series created by Man of Action (a group consisting of Duncan Rouleau, Joe Casey, Joe Kelly, and Steven T. Seagle), and produced by Cartoon Network Studios. ... This article is about the TV channel. ... Danny Phantom is an animated television series created by Butch Hartman for Nickelodeon, produced by Billionfold Studios. ...


Radio

In the late 1930s and throughout the 1940s, Superman was one of the most popular radio serials in the United States. Other superhero radio programs starred characters including the costumed but not superpowered Blue Beetle, and the non-costumed, superpowered Popeye. Also appearing on radio were such characters as The Green Hornet, The Green Lama, Doc Savage, and The Lone Ranger, a western hero who relied on many conventions of the superhero genre (faithful sidekick, secret identity, prodigious skill in combat, code of conduct). Announcer Jackson Beck (left) with Bud Collyer and Joan Alexander The Adventures of Superman, adapted from the DC Comics character created in 1938 (see Superman), came to radio as a syndicated show on New York Citys WOR on February 12, 1940. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... For other uses, see Popeye (disambiguation). ... The Green Hornet is a fictional character, a masked crime fighter. ... Doc Savage is a fictional character, one of the pulp heroes of the 1930s and 1940s. ... The Lone Ranger. ...


In the 1990s, the BBC broadcast radio plays adapting comic-book stories from at least three publishers.[citation needed] For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


Prose

Adaptations

Superheroes occasionally have been adapted into prose fiction, starting with Random House's 1942 novel The Adventures of Superman by George Lowther. In the 1970s, Elliot S! Maggin wrote the Superman novels, Last Son of Krypton (1978) and Miracle Monday, coinciding with but not adapting the movie Superman.[30] Other early adaptations include novels starring the comic-strip hero The Phantom, starting with 1943's Son of the Phantom. The character likewise returned in 1970s books, with a 15-installment series from Avon Books beginning in 1972, written by Phantom creator Lee Falk, Ron Goulart, and others. // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Elliot S! Maggin is an American writer. ... Last Son of Krypton is a novel written by Elliot S! Maggin and based on the DC Comics character Superman. ... Miracle Monday is a novel written by Elliot S! Maggin and based on the DC Comics character Superman. ... For the franchise, see Superman film series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Phantom. ... Avon is a paperback imprint of HarperCollins. ... Leon Harrison Gross, more known by the alias of Lee Falk, (April 28, 1911 - March 13, 1999) was an American writer, best known as the creator of the popular comic strip superheroes The Phantom and Mandrake the Magician, who at the height of their popularity secured him over a hundred... Ron Goulart (born 1933) is an American pop-culture historian and mystery, fantasy, and science fiction author. ...


Also during the 1970s, Pocket Books published 11 novels based on Marvel Comics characters.[30] Juvenile novels featuring Marvel Comics and DC Comics characters including Batman, Spider-Man, the X-Men, and the Justice League, have been published, often marketed in association with TV series, as have Big Little Books starring the Fantastic Four and others. Pocket Books is the name of a subdivision of Simon & Schuster publishers. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Big Little Books began in 1932, published by the Whitman Publishing Company in Racine, Wisconsin. ... This article is about the superheroes. ...


In the 1990s and 2000s, Marvel and DC released novels adapting such story arcs as "The Death of Superman" and Batman's "No Man’s Land". The Death of Superman is a comic book storyline (culminating in Superman #75 in 1993) that served as the catalyst for DC Comics crossover event of 1993. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ...


Original characters

The 1930 novel Gladiator by Philip Gordon Wylie featured a man granted super-strength and durability through prenatal chemical experimentation. He tries to use his abilities for good but soon becomes disillusioned, making him an early example of both the superhero and its latter day deconstruction. For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Gladiator is an American science fiction novel first published in 1930 and written by Philip Wylie. ... Philip Gordon Wylie (May 12, 1902 – October 25, 1971) was a U.S. author. ...


Robert Mayer's 1977 Superfolks tells of a retired hero who has married and moved to the suburbs being drawn back into action. Sir Robert Mayer KCVO (June 5, 1879 - January 9, 1985) was a philanthropist, businessman, and a major supporter of music and young musicians. ... Super-Folks is a 1977 novel by Robert Mayer that satirizes the superhero genre for a more adult audience than for whom the genre had been previously been intended. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ...


The Wild Cards books, created and edited by George R. R. Martin in 1987, were a non-comic book-based science fiction series that dealt with superpowered heroes. The characters in the series follow many of the superhero archetypes. The cover of the first Wild Cards book, Wild Cards. ... George Raymond Richard Martin, sometimes called GRRM, born September 20, 1948 in Bayonne, New Jersey is an American author and screenwriter of science fiction, horror, and fantasy. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


Science-fiction author Michael Bishop parodied superheroes in his 1992 novel Count Geiger's Blues in which a pop culture-hating art critic plunges into a pool of toxic waste and transforms into a costumed superhero and gains an allergy to high art. For the song from The Rocky Horror Show, see Science Fiction/Double Feature. ... Brittle Innings by Michael Bishop (First Edition) / Bantam Books, 1994 (Cover art by Michael Dudash) Michael Lawson Bishop (born November 12, 1945 in Lincoln, Nebraska) is an award-winning American writer. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ...


Novels

Existing comic-book superheroes have appeared in original novels, as well as in novelizations of comic-book story arcs. A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ...


Computer games

While many popular superheroes have been featured in licensed computer games, up until recently there have been few that have revolved around heroes created specifically for the game. This has changed due to two popular franchises: The Silver Age-inspired Freedom Force (2002) and City of Heroes (2004), a Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game (or MMORPG), boths of which allow players to create their own superheroes. Showcase #4 (Oct. ... Freedom Force is a computer game developed by Irrational Games and published by Electronic Arts in 2002. ... City of Heroes (CoH) is a massively multiplayer online role-playing computer game based on the superhero comic book genre, developed by Cryptic Studios and published by NCsoft. ... An image from World of Warcraft, one of the largest commercial MMORPGs as of 2004, based on active subscriptions. ...


Internet

In the 80s and 90s, the Internet allowed a worldwide community of fans and amateur writers to bring their own superhero creations to a global audience. The first original major shared superhero universe to develop on the Internet was Superguy, which first appeared on a UMNEWS mailing list in 1989. In 1992, a cascade on the USENET newsgroup rec.arts.comics would give birth to the The Legion of Net.Heroes shared universe. In 1994, LNH writers contributed to the creation of the newsgroup rec.arts.comics.creative, which spawned a number of original superhero shared universes. The Internet has also helped in distributing superhero fan fiction to a large audience. Fans of Janet Jackson, at Much Music in Toronto The word fan refers to someone who has an intense, occasionally overwhelming liking of a person, group of persons, work of art, idea, or trend. ... A shared universe is a literary technique in which several different authors create works of fiction that share aspects such as settings or characters and that are intended to be read as taking place in a single universe. ... Superguy was originally a creative fiction writing group on the now-defunct UMNEWS mailing list service, which began in 1988. ... Usenet (USEr NETwork) is a global, decentralized, distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP architecture of the same name. ... A newsgroup is a repository usually within the Usenet system, for messages posted from many users at different locations. ... LNH logo designed by Wil Alambre. ... Fan fiction (also spelled fanfiction and commonly abbreviated to fanfic) is fiction written by people who enjoy a film, novel, television show or other media work, using the characters and situations developed in it and developing new plots in which to use these characters. ...


The World Wide Web has also given writers and artists the ability to display webcomics and webanimation of their superhero creations. Original works of superhero prose, comics, or animation can be posted cheaply on the Internet, giving creators a new canvas in which to tell superhero stories. WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ... Web comics are comics that are available on the web. ... The infinite canvas is the idea that the size of an digital comics page is theoretically infinite, and that online comics are therefore not limited by conventional page sizes. ...


However, with people adding their own definitions of superhero to the mix, Superhero may mean a specific type of superpowered hero, such as in the webcomic Dasien.


With the freedom of community-based sites such as YouTube and Google Video, it has been possible to create new superheroes with modest followings and cult status, with some popular characters being viewed thousands of times a week.[citation needed]


Beginning in the year 2000, Decoder Ring Theatre began a podcast called The Red Panda, featuring a tongue-in-cheek homage to the heroic adventure programs of the 1930s and 40s. After six satirical episodes, they started a new series called The Red Panda Adventures, rebooting the story and taking a slightly more serious approach to the genre. Decoder Ring Theatre is a Toronto based Theatre and Audio Production company that runs an award-nominated weekly podcast of the same name. ... A podcast is a series of digital-media files which are distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and computers. ...


Music video

In the music video "Without Me" by Eminem, he portrays himself as Robin.


The music video of the song "Kryptonite" by Three Doors down shows an old guy reminiscing about his past as a Superhero. He puts the costume back on and tries to help people, but no one takes him seriously.


See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... What If? Vol. ... There have been several movies and live-action television shows based on comic books since comic books first debuted in the late 1930s. ... Comic book fiction traditionally features characters with superhuman, supernatural, or paranormal abilities, often referred to as superpowers (also spelled super-powers). ... This is an incomplete list of hideouts, bases, and heaquarters in comics and animation. ... . ... This is a list of role-playing games, subdivided by genre (although many games do not fit clearly into one genre or another). ... The term real-life superhero is variously applied to real-world people who dress and/or attempt to act like comic book superheroes. ... An alternative term conceived and used by Alan Moore in his work to describe a superhero, usually one that has a science fiction explanation for his/her powers. ... DVD front cover for The Adventures of Captain Marvel film serial. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ...

Notes

  1. ^ National Periodical Publications v. Empire Comics, New York Court of Appeals, April 21, 1954.
  2. ^ Per Lawrence Journal-World (March 17, 2006): "'V for Vendetta' is S for Subversive", by Jon Niccum, "The Dark Knight: Batman — A NonSuper Superhero", Gamespot: PS2 Games: Batman Begins, http://members.fortunecity.com/srca1943/SpotlightComicsAnnual2.html Spotlight Comics Annual #2 (May 2002)]; "The Religious Affiliation of Comic Book Characters: Rev. Dr. Christopher Syn, the Scarecrow of Romney Marsh (one of the world's first masked crime-fighters)" (no date), and other sources.
  3. ^ Benton, Mike. The Comic Book in America: An Illustrated History (Taylor Publishing: Dallas, Texas, 1989), pp. 178-181, reprinted at website Religious Affiliation of Comics Book Characters: "The Significant Seven: History's Most Influential Super-heroes" [sic]
  4. ^ British Superheroes: The Forites
  5. ^ Dictionary.com: Superhero
  6. ^ Ulaby, Neda. All Things Considered, "Comics Creators Search for 'Super Hero' Alternative". March 27, 2006
  7. ^ Schwimmer, Martin. The Trademark Blog, "Do DC and Marvel Own Exclusive Rights in 'SUPER HERO'?" 2004.
  8. ^ Trademark Trial and Appeal Board. Arrow Trading Co., Inc. v. Victorinox A.G. and Wenger S.A.. 2003
  9. ^ Coleman, Ron. Likelihood of Confusion, "SUPER HERO® my foot". 2006.
  10. ^ Doctorow, Cory. Boing Boing, "Marvel Comics: stealing our language". 2006.
  11. ^ Don Markstein's Toonopedia: The Clock
  12. ^ International Heroes: The Clock
  13. ^ Amazing Heroes (issue # unknown; 1987): "Fredric Wertham: Anti-Comics Crusader Who Turned Advocate", by Dwight Decker. Revised version reprinted at website The Art Bin: Articles and Essays
  14. ^ Politics, Book Three, XIII[1](Hughes-Hallett, Lucy. Heroes. Alfred A. Knopf, 2004
  15. ^ Don Markstein's Toonopedia: Fantomah
  16. ^ Don Markstein's Tonnopedia: The Woman in Red and Grand Comics Database: Thrilling Comics #2
  17. ^ Don Markstein's Toonopedia: Miss Fury
  18. ^ Markstein's Toonopedia: Black Cat and Grand Comics Database: Pocket Comics #1
  19. ^ Bostonia (Fall 2001): "Who Was Wonder Woman? Long-ago LAW alumna Elizabeth Marston was the muse who gave us a superheroine", by Marguerite Lamb
  20. ^ The New York Times (February 18, 1992): "Our Towns: She's Behind the Match For That Man of Steel", by Andrew H. Malcolm
  21. ^ Comic Zone (May 1, 1996): "An Interview with Chris Claremont"
  22. ^ Gadfly (no date): "No Girls Allowed", by Casey Franklin
  23. ^ Sequart.com (March 15, 2001): "The State of American Comics Address", by Julian Darius
  24. ^ Brown, Jeffrey A. (2001). Black Superheroes, Milestone Comics and their Fans. University Press of Mississippi. ISBN 1-57806-281-0. 
  25. ^ Appendix to the Handbook of the Marvel Universe: Red Wolf
  26. ^ Gay League - North Star
  27. ^ The Comics Journal: Online Features
  28. ^ BBC NEWS | Entertainment | Batwoman hero returns as lesbian
  29. ^ TIME.com: Caped Crusaders -- Jun. 12, 2006 -- Page 1
  30. ^ a b ComicsResearch.com (n.d.): Superhero Novels

The Court of Appeals is New Yorks highest appellate court, created in 1847, replacing the Court for the Trial of Impeachments and the Correction of Errors. ... For other uses, see SIC. Sic is a Latin word, originally sicut [1] meaning thus, so, or just as that. In writing, it is placed within square brackets and usually italicized — [sic] — to indicate that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation, and/or other preceding quoted material has been...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
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