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Encyclopedia > Superficial peroneal nerve
Nerve: Superficial fibular nerve
Nerves of the right lower extremity Posterior view.
Latin n. peronæus superficialis or n. fibularis superficialis
Gray's subject #213 966
From Common peroneal nerve

The Superficial Fibular/Peroneal Nerve (musculocutaneous nerve of the leg) innervates the Peronei longus and brevis and the skin over the greater part of the dorsum of the foot. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (344x1000, 115 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Sciatic nerve Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy images with missing articles 17 Tibial nerve Common peroneal nerve Femoral nerve List of images in Grays Anatomy: IX. Neurology... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The Common peroneal nerve is a branch of the Sciatic nerve. ... The muscle peroneus longus (also known as fibularis longus) is a superficial muscle in the human leg, and acts to evert and plantar flex the ankle. ... The Fibularis brevis (or Peronæus brevis) lies under cover of the Peronæus longus, and is a shorter and smaller muscle. ...


It passes forward between the Peronæi and the Extensor digitorum longus, pierces the deep fascia at the lower third of the leg, and divides into a medial and an intermediate dorsal cutaneous nerve. The Extensor digitorum longus muscle is a muscle of the human body. ...


In its course between the muscles, the nerve gives off muscular branches to the Peronæi longus and brevis, and cutaneous filaments to the integument of the lower part of the leg.


Medial dorsal cutaneous nerve

The medial dorsal cutaneous nerve (n. cutaneus dorsalis medialis; internal dorsal cutaneous branch) passes in front of the ankle-joint, and divides into two dorsal digital branches, one of which supplies the medial side of the great toe, the other, the adjacent side of the second and third toes.


It also supplies the integument of the medial side of the foot and ankle, and communicates with the saphenous nerve, and with the deep peroneal nerve. A human foot - Enlarge to view legend The foot is a biological structure found in many animals that is used for locomotion. ... Grays Fig. ... The Saphenous Nerve (long or internal saphenous nerve) is the largest cutaneous branch of the femoral nerve. ... The Deep fibular nerve (deep peroneal nerve) begins at the bifurcation of the common peroneal nerve, between the fibula and upper part of the Fibularis (Peronæus) longus, passes infero-medially, deep to Extensor digitorum longus, to the anterior surface of the interosseous membrane, and comes into relation with the...


Intermediate dorsal cutaneous nerve

The intermediate dorsal cutaneous nerve (n. cutaneus dorsalis intermedius; external dorsal cutaneous branch), the smaller, passes along the lateral part of the dorsum of the foot, and divides into dorsal digital branches, which supply the contiguous sides of the third and fourth, and of the fourth and fifth toes.


It also supplies the skin of the lateral side of the foot and ankle, and communicates with the sural nerve. The sural nerve (short saphenous nerve), formed by the junction of the medial sural cutaneous with the peroneal anastomotic branch, passes downward near the lateral margin of the tendo calcaneus, lying close to the small saphenous vein, to the interval between the lateral malleolus and the calcaneus. ...


The branches of the superficial peroneal nerve supply the skin of the dorsal surfaces of all the toes excepting the lateral side of the little toe, and the adjoining sides of the great and second toes, the former being supplied by the lateral dorsal cutaneous nerve from the sural nerve, and the latter by the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve.


Frequently some of the lateral branches of the superficial peroneal are absent, and their places are then taken by branches of the sural nerve.


External links

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. The State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, better known as SUNY Downstate Medical Center, is an academic medical center and is the only one of its kind in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... eMedicine is an online clinical medical knowledge base that was founded in 1996. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...

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Lumbosacral plexus

lumbar plexus: iliohypogastric - ilioinguinal - genitofemoral (femoral branch/lumboinguinal, genital branch) - lateral cutaneous of thigh (patellar) - obturator (accessory obturator) - femoral (saphenous) - lumbosacral trunk The anterior divisions of the lumbar nerve, sacral nerve, and coccygeal nerves form the lumbosacral plexus, the first lumbar nerve being frequently joined by a branch from the twelfth thoracic. ... Grays Fig. ... The Iliohypogastric Nerve arises from the first lumbar nerve. ... The Ilioinguinal Nerve, smaller than the Iliohypogastric nerve, arises with it from the first lumbar nerve. ... In human anatomy, the genitofemoral nerve originates from the upper part of the lumbar plexus of spinal nerves. ... The lumboinguinal nerve (femoral or crural branch of genitofemoral) descends on the external iliac artery, sending a few filaments around it, and, passing beneath the inguinal ligament, enters the sheath of the femoral vessels, lying superficial and lateral to the femoral artery. ... The genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve (external spermatic nerve) passes outward on the Psoas major, and pierces the fascia transversalis, or passes through the abdominal inguinal ring; it then descends behind the spermatic cord to the scrotum, supplies the Cremaster, and gives a few filaments to the skin of... The lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh (also called the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve) is a cutaneous nerve that innervates the skin on the lateral part of the thigh. ... The terminal filaments of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve frequently communicate with the anterior cutaneous branches of the femoral nerve, and with the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve, forming with them the patellar plexus. ... The Obturator Nerve arises from the ventral divisions of the second, third, and fourth lumbar nerves; the branch from the third is the largest, while that from the second is often very small. ... The Accessory Obturator Nerve is present in about 29 per cent. ... The Femoral Nerve supplies innervation the anterior portion of the leg. ... The Saphenous Nerve (long or internal saphenous nerve) is the largest cutaneous branch of the femoral nerve. ... The lumbosacral trunk is nervous tissue that connects the lumbar plexus with the sacral plexus. ...


sacral/coccygeal plexus: to quadratus femoris - to obturator internus - to the piriformis - superior gluteal - inferior gluteal - posterior cutaneous of thigh
sciatic: tibial (sural - medial plantar - lateral plantar) - common fibular (deep fibular - superficial fibular) In human anatomy, the Sacral plexus refers to the nerve plexus emerging from the sacral vertebrae (S1-S4), and which provides nerves for the pelvis and lower limbs. ... The nerve to quadratus femoris is a nerve that provides innervation to the quadratus femoris and gemellus inferior muscles. ... The nerve to obturator internus is a nerve that innervates the obturator internus and gemellus superior muscles. ... The nerve to piriformis is a nerve that innervates the piriformis muscle. ... The superior gluteal nerve is a nerve that originates in the pelvis which supplies the gluteus medius, the gluteus minimus, and the tensor fasciae latae muscles. ... The Superior Gluteal Nerve () arises from the dorsal divisions of the fourth and fifth lumbar and first sacral nerves: it leaves the pelvis through the greater sciatic foramen above the Piriformis, accompanied by the superior gluteal vessels, and divides into a superior and an inferior branch. ... The posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh (also called the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve) provides innervation to the skin of the posterior surface of the thigh and leg, as well as to the skin of the perineum. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... The Tibial Nerve The tibial nerve passes through the popliteal fossa to pass below the arch of soleus. ... The sural nerve (short saphenous nerve), formed by the junction of the medial sural cutaneous with the peroneal anastomotic branch, passes downward near the lateral margin of the tendo calcaneus, lying close to the small saphenous vein, to the interval between the lateral malleolus and the calcaneus. ... The medial plantar nerve (internal plantar nerve), the larger of the two terminal divisions of the tibial nerve, accompanies the medial plantar artery. ... The Lateral Plantar Nerve (external plantar nerve) supplies the skin of the fifth toe and lateral half of the fourth, as well as most of the deep muscles, its distribution being similar to that of the ulnar nerve in the hand. ... The common peroneal nerve (common fibular nerve; external popliteal nerve; peroneal nerve), about one-half the size of the tibial nerve, is derived from the dorsal branches of the fourth and fifth lumbar and the first and second sacral nerves. ... The Deep fibular nerve (deep peroneal nerve) begins at the bifurcation of the common peroneal nerve, between the fibula and upper part of the Fibularis (Peronæus) longus, passes infero-medially, deep to Extensor digitorum longus, to the anterior surface of the interosseous membrane, and comes into relation with the...


pudendal plexus: perforating cutaneous - pudendal (dorsal of the penis/clitoris, inferior anal, perineal and posterior scrotal/labial) - anococcygeal The pudendal plexus is not sharply marked off from the sacral plexus, and as a consequence some of the branches which spring from it may arise in conjunction with those of the sacral plexus. ... The Perforating Cutaneous Nerve usually arises from the posterior surface of the second and third sacral nerves. ... The pudendal nerve is responsible for orgasm, urination, and defecation in both sexes. ... The dorsal nerve of the penis is the deepest division of the pudendal nerve; it accompanies the internal pudendal artery along the ramus of the ischium; it then runs forward along the margin of the inferior ramus of the pubis, between the superior and inferior layers of the fascia of... The dorsal nerve of the clitoris is a nerve in females that branches off the pudendal nerve to innervate the clitoris. ... The Inferior rectal nerves (inferior anal nerves, inferior hemorrhoidal nerve) occasionally arises directly from the sacral plexus; it crosses the ischiorectal fossa, with the inferior hemorrhoidal vessels, toward the anal canal and the lower end of the rectum, and is distributed to the Sphincter ani externus and to the integument... The perineal nerve is a nerve arising from the pudendal nerve that supplies the perineum. ... The posterior scrotal (or labial) branches; superficial peroneal nerves) are two in number, medial and lateral. ... Anococcygeal Nerves: The fifth sacral nerve receives a communicating filament from the fourth, and unites with the coccygeal nerve to form the coccygeal plexus. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
New York School Of Regional Anesthesia - Ankle Block (2749 words)
An ankle block is essentially a block of four branches of the sciatic nerve (deep and superficial peroneal, tibial and sural nerves) and one cutaneous branch of the femoral nerve (saphe-nous nerve).
The sural nerve is a sensory nerve formed by the union of the medial sural nerve - a branch of the tibial nerve - and lateral sural nerve, a branch of the common peroneal nerve.
The superficial peroneal, sural, and saphenous nerves are located in the subcutaneous tissue alongside a circular line that stretches from the lateral aspect of the Achilles tendon across the lateral malleolus, anterior aspect of the foot, and medial malleolus to the medial aspect of the Achilles tendon.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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