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Encyclopedia > Super Mario 64
Super Mario 64
Developer Nintendo EAD
Publisher Nintendo
Designer Shigeru Miyamoto
Series Mario
Released Nintendo 64

JP June 23, 1996
NA September 29, 1996
EU March 1, 1997
AUS March 1, 1997
iQue
CHN November 2003
Virtual Console
NA November 19, 2006
JP December 2, 2006[1]
AUS December 7, 2006
Super Mario 64 DS is an enhanced remake of the 1996 video game Super Mario 64, produced by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS. It was released in the United States on November 21, 2004, in Japan on December 2, 2004, and in Europe on March 11, 2005 as one of... Super Mario 64 box cover. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development (or EAD; formerly Research & Development Team 4) is the largest division inside Nintendo of Japan, under the management of Shigeru Miyamoto. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Shigeru Miyamoto , born November 16, 1952) is a Japanese video game designer. ... Over the years, Mario has appeared in at least 140 popular video games to date, both with starring and less significant roles. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For other uses, see Australia (disambiguation). ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Peoples Republic of China (PRC) and Republic of China (Taiwan) For other meanings, see China (disambiguation). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Australia (disambiguation). ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

EU December 8, 2006
Genre Platform
Mode(s) Single player
Ratings ESRB: K-A (Kids to Adults)
Newer SM64 games contain rating E (Everyone)
Platform(s) Nintendo 64, iQue, Virtual Console
Media 64 Mb (8 MB) Cartridge
90 blocks of memory (Virtual Console)

Super Mario 64 (スーパーマリオ64 Sūpā Mario Rokujūyon?) is a top-selling platform game developed by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. It debuted in Japan on June 23, 1996, in North America on September 29, 1996, and in Europe on March 1, 1997.[2] Along with Pilotwings 64, it was one of the launch titles for the new console.[3] is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay. ... A simple platform sequence from the game Wonder Boy Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms or over obstacles. ... In computer games and video games, single-player refers to the variant of a particular game where input from only one player is expected throughout the course of the gaming session. ... The ESRBs logo. ... In computing, a platform describes some sort of framework, either in hardware or software, which allows software to run. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... The iQue Player (pronounced IQ) is a video game console that is being manufactured by iQue, a joint venture between Nintendo and Chinese-American scientist Dr Wei Yen. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ... The Megabit is a unit of information storage, abbreviated Mbit or sometimes Mb. ... ReBoot character, see Megabyte (ReBoot). ... Cartridge for the VIC 20 homecomputer In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ... A simple platform sequence from the game Wonder Boy Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms or over obstacles. ... Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development (or EAD; formerly Research & Development Team 4) is the largest division inside Nintendo of Japan, under the management of Shigeru Miyamoto. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Pilotwings 64 is a video game for the Nintendo 64, released in 1996, along with the launch of the console. ... Super Mario Brothers was a launch title for the NES. A launch title is a video game that has been made available to consumers synchronously with its respective video game console, meaning they are the only available games at the time of the consoles launch. ...


Super Mario 64, was the first 3D platform game in the Mario series, established a new archetype for the genre, much as Super Mario Bros. did for 2D sidescrolling platformers. Hailed as "revolutionary", the game left a lasting impression on the 3D game design, particularly notable for its use of a dynamic camera system and the implementation of its analog control.[4][5][6] This article is about process of creating 3D computer graphics. ... Mario ) is a video game character created by Japanese game designer Shigeru Miyamoto and the official mascot of Nintendo. ... This article is about the Super Mario Brothers video game for the NES. For other uses, see Super Mario Bros. ... 2D computer graphics is the computer-based generation of digital images—mostly from two-dimensional models (such as 2D geometric models, text, and digital images) and by techniques specific to them. ...


In going from two to three dimensions, Super Mario 64 replaced the linear obstacle courses of traditional platform games with vast worlds in which the player must complete multiple and diverse missions, with an emphasis on exploration. While doing so, it managed to preserve many gameplay elements and characters of earlier Mario games.[6] It is acclaimed by many critics and fans as one of the greatest and most revolutionary video games of all time.[7]


As of May 21, 2003, Super Mario 64 has sold 11 million units,[8] with 6 million of those units being sold in the United States.[9] As of September 25, 2007, Super Mario 64 is the seventh best-selling video game in the US.[9] is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This is a list of video games that have sold one million copies or more. ...

Contents

Gameplay

Whomp's Fortress requires the player to navigate chasms, a classic Mario element.
Whomp's Fortress requires the player to navigate chasms, a classic Mario element.

Super Mario 64 is a 3D platformer where the player controls Mario through several courses. Each course is an enclosed world in which the player is free to wander in all directions and discover the environment without time limits. The worlds are filled with enemies that attack Mario as well as friendly creatures that provide assistance, offer information, or ask a favor. Mario gathers stars in each course; some stars only appear after Mario has completed certain tasks, often hinted at by the name of the course. These challenges include defeating a boss, solving puzzles, racing an opponent, and gathering coins. As Mario collects stars, more areas of the castle are opened. Mario unlocks doors in the castle with keys obtained by defeating Bowser in special courses.[10] screenshot N64 Super_Mario_64 in Whomps Fortress, made by me This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... screenshot N64 Super_Mario_64 in Whomps Fortress, made by me This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... A simple platform sequence from the game Wonder Boy Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms or over obstacles. ... Flag Ship from the video game Gorf A boss is an enemy-based challenge in video games that, once encountered, stops the games progression until the player is able either to surmount the enemy or is thwarted by it. ...


Mario is assisted in some courses by three cap power-ups. The Wing Cap allows Mario to fly, the Metal Cap makes him immune to most damage and allows him to withstand wind and walk underwater, and the Vanish Cap renders him partially immaterial and allows him to walk through some obstacles such as wire mesh (as well as granting invulnerability to some forms of damage).[10] Some courses contain cannons that Mario can unlock by speaking to a pink Bob-omb Buddy. After Mario enters a cannon, he can be shot out to reach distant places. When Mario has the Wing Cap, cannons can be used to reach high altitudes or fly across most levels quickly. There are many hidden secrets to the game, most containing extra stars needed to complete the game entirely. For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of Mario series enemies. ...


Controls

As illustrated in the instruction manual, Mario can perform a wide range of jumps among other moves.
As illustrated in the instruction manual, Mario can perform a wide range of jumps among other moves.

Mario's abilities in Super Mario 64 are far more diverse than those of previous Mario games. He can walk, run, crouch, crawl, swim, climb, and jump at great heights or distances using the game controller's analog stick and buttons. As jumping was Mario's signature move in earlier games, particular attention was paid to this move. Special jumps can be executed by combining a regular jump with other actions, including the extra high double and triple jumps (jumping two and three times in a row, respectively), the long jump, and backflip. There are also special maneuvers, such as wall jumping (jumping from one wall to another in rapid succession to reach areas that would otherwise be too high).[10][11] Mario can pick up and carry certain items, an ability which is used to solve various puzzles. Mario can also swim underwater at various speeds. His life slowly diminishes while underwater (representing how long he can hold his breath); he must find coins or air bubbles to replenish it, or return to the surface before drowning.[10] If Mario surfaces from underwater, he heals all of his damage regardless of the source, with the exception of icy water in some snow levels. Image File history File links Excerpt from instruction manual for Super Mario 64, showing Marios various jump moves. ... Image File history File links Excerpt from instruction manual for Super Mario 64, showing Marios various jump moves. ... A game controller is an input device used to control a video game. ... An analog stick from the Nintendo GameCube game controller An analog stick, sometimes called thumbstick, often mistakenly referred to as a joystick, is an input device for a controller (often a game controller) that is used for two-dimensional input. ... Somersaults. ... A wall jump is a technique players can execute in many video games. ...


Plot and setting

Super Mario 64 is set in Princess Peach's Castle, which consists of three floors, a basement, a moat, and a courtyard. The area outside the castle is an introductory area in which the player can experiment. Scattered throughout the castle are entrances to courses and other areas, usually accessed by jumping into a painting. Each course is an enclosed world in which the player is free to wander in all directions and discover the environment without time limits. Princess Peachs Castle is one of the Mushroom Kingdoms most famous landmarks and the home of Princess Peach. ...


Story

Super Mario 64 begins with a letter from Princess Peach inviting Mario to come to her castle for a cake she has baked for him. When he arrives, Mario discovers that Bowser has invaded the castle and imprisoned the Princess and her servants within it using the power of 105 of the castle's 120 power stars. Many of the castle's paintings are portals to other realms, in which Bowser's minions keep watch over the stars. Princess Peach (formerly known as Princess Toadstool outside Japan), is a video game character in Nintendos Mario video games series, often playing the damsel in distress character of the adventure series. ... Bowser may mean: Bowser, British Columbia, an unincorporated community on Vancouver Island Bowser and Blue Bowser and Blitz from King Bowser, a Nintendo character The above characters enhanced form, Giga Bowser The above characters youngest apparent son, Bowser, Jr. ...


Mario searches the castle for these portals to enter the worlds and recover the stars. He gains access to more rooms as he recovers more stars, and will have to tackle three obstacle courses leading to a battle with Bowser. Defeating Bowser the first two times earns Mario a key for opening another level of the castle, while the final battle releases Peach and rolls the credits. Peach rewards Mario by baking the cake that she had promised him.[10][11]


Development

According to programmer Giles Goddard, the linear levels where Mario encounters Bowser are a reflection of what the entire game might have been if the original fixed path concept had stood.
According to programmer Giles Goddard, the linear levels where Mario encounters Bowser are a reflection of what the entire game might have been if the original fixed path concept had stood.[12]

The development of Super Mario 64 took less than two years, but producer/director Shigeru Miyamoto had conceived of a 3D Mario game over five years before, while working on Star Fox.[13] Miyamoto developed most of the concepts during the era of the SNES and considered making it a SNES game (making use of the Super FX chip), but decided to develop it for the Nintendo 64 due to the earlier system's technical limitations.[14] Image File history File linksMetadata Mario64_bowser_level. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mario64_bowser_level. ... Shigeru Miyamoto , born November 16, 1952) is a Japanese video game designer. ... Star Fox ) (also known as Star Wing in Europe due to trademark issues) is the first game in the Star Fox series of video games. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... Super FX-rendered 3D polygon graphics in the SNES game Star Fox The Super FX is probably the most widely recognized coprocessor chip used in select Super Nintendo (SNES) video game cartridges. ...


The development of the game started with the creation of the characters and camera system. Shigeru Miyamoto and the other designers were initially unsure of which direction the game should take, and months were spent selecting a camera view and layout that would be appropriate.[12] The original concept involved the game having fixed path much like an isometric type game, before the choice was made to settle on a free-roaming 3D design.[12] Although the majority of Super Mario 64 would end up featuring the free-roaming design, elements of the original fixed path concept would remain in certain parts of the game, particularly in the three Bowser encounters. One of the programmers for Super Mario 64, Giles Goddard, explained that these few linear elements survived as a means to force players into Bowser's lair rather than to encourage exploration.[12] The development team placed high priority on getting Mario's movements right, and before levels were created, the team was testing and refining Mario's animations on a simple grid. The first test scenario used to try out controls and physics involved Mario and the golden rabbit, MIPS. The term isometric adventure game refers to exploratory, 2D video games with an isomorphic perspective and action-adventure gameplay. ...

Princess Peach's castle in a pre-release version of Super Mario 64. The textures, layout, and icons are different from what appeared in the final release, though Mario himself is basically identical.
Princess Peach's castle in a pre-release version of Super Mario 64. The textures, layout, and icons are different from what appeared in the final release, though Mario himself is basically identical.

Shigeru Miyamoto's guiding design philosophy behind Super Mario 64 was to include more details.[13] Many were inspired from real life; for example, one character is based on assistant director Takashi Tezuka's wife who "is very quiet normally, but one day she exploded, maddened by all the time [Tezuka] spent at work. In the game, there is now a character (Big Boo) which shrinks (or looks semi-transparent) when Mario looks at it, but when Mario turns away, it will grow large and menacing."[15] Super Mario 64 is also characterized by featuring more puzzles than earlier Mario games. It was developed simultaneously with The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, but as Zelda was released years later, some puzzles were taken from that game for Super Mario 64.[16] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... An assistant director (AD) is a person who helps the film director in the making of a movie. ... Takashi Tezuka ) (born November 17, 1960) is a video game designer for Nintendo. ... The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time was a video game released in 1998, and the first Zelda game for the Nintendo 64. ...

Mario inside the final version of Princess Peach's Castle.

Reliable information about Nintendo's new 3D Mario first leaked out in November 1995, and a playable version of Super Mario 64 was presented days later as part of the world premiere for the Nintendo 64 (then known as Ultra 64) at Nintendo SpaceWorld. The basic controls had at this point been implemented, and the game was reportedly 50% finished, although most course design remained. At least 32 courses were planned, but the number turned out lower in the final game, as only 15 could fit (or 25 courses, if the game's 10 extra mini-levels are included).[13] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... SpaceWorld is a video game trade show hosted by Nintendo. ...


Audio

The music was composed by veteran Koji Kondo, who used new interpretations of the familiar melodies from earlier games as well as entirely new material. Super Mario 64 was one of the first games in the series to feature the voice acting of Charles Martinet. It also features Leslie Swan as Princess Peach and Isaac Marshall as Bowser. The characters speak more in the English version than in the Japanese version.[16] In addition, dialog and some sounds differ between the Japanese and English versions. Some of these vocal changes for the English release were brought to the Japanese Rumble Pak edition. When Super Mario 64 DS was released, all the voices were kept consistent in both the English and Japanese versions. Koji Kondo , b. ... Charles Martinet, voice of Mario Charles Martinet (born September 17, 1955, in San Jose, California) is a voice actor, best known for providing the voice of Mario, the star of Nintendos flagship video game franchise. ... Isaac Marshall is a voice actor, who recognizably provided the voices of Yoshi, Bowser, and Donkey Kong in Nintendos flagship-franchise. ... Super Mario 64 DS is an enhanced remake of the 1996 video game Super Mario 64, produced by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS. It was released in the United States on November 21, 2004, in Japan on December 2, 2004, and in Europe on March 11, 2005 as one of...


Reception

Super Mario 64 is counted by 1up.com as one of the first games to have brought a series of 2D games into full 3D and is regarded as one of the best games ever made.[6] In the transition to 3D, many of the series conventions were rethought drastically, placing an emphasis on exploration over traditional platform jumping, or "hop and bop" action. While its quality was disputed by some, it has been argued that it established an entirely new genre, different from that of previous games in the series.[17] Super Mario 64 was praised in the gaming press, and is still highly acclaimed. It has collected numerous awards, including various "Game of the Year" honors by members of the gaming media, as well as Nintendo's own bestseller Player's Choice selection. It has placed high on many "greatest games of all time" lists, ranked #1 by Next Generation Magazine, #5 and #1 in Nintendo Power issues 200 and 100 respectively, #1 by Super PLAY, #5 by IGN,[18] #2 by Electronic Gaming Monthly, #5 by GameInformer.[19]and #13 by GameFAQs users.[20] 1UP.com is a video-game site owned and operated by Ziff Davis Media, publisher of popular videogame magazines Computer Gaming World (CGW) (now known as Games for Windows: The Official Magazine (or GFW) Magazine), Electronic Gaming Monthly (EGM), and the now-defunct Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine (OPM), GMR... The NTSC Players Choice release of the GameCube title, Star Fox Adventures. ... The cover of the January 95 issue of Next Generation. ... Nintendo Power magazine is a monthly news and strategy magazine formerly published in-house by Nintendo. ... Super PLAY (often abbreviated SP) is a Swedish video game magazine. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Electronic Gaming Monthly (often abbreviated to EGM) is an American video game magazine. ... Game Informer (often abbreviated to GI) is a United States-based monthly magazine featuring articles, news, strategy and reviews of popular video games and associated consoles. ... GameFAQs is a website that hosts FAQs and walkthroughs for video games. ...


EGM awarded Super Mario 64 a Gold award in its initial review, and in Edge, the game was the first of only seven games to ever score a perfect 10/10.[citation needed] Michael Grayford of Liquid Entertainment stated that he was initially "very turned off" by the openness of the game the first time he played it. Upon playing it later, he was "highly pleased" and stated that "each level brought some new unique cool gameplay element and I was never bored."[21]GameSpot called Super Mario 64 one of the 15 most influential games of all time.[4] They rated the Nintendo 64 version a 9.4[22] and the Wii Virtual Console version an 8.[23] The Japanese gaming magazine Famitsu rated Super Mario 64 a 39/40.[4] The Japanese magazine "Nintendo Dream" gave Super Mario 64 a full 10/10, making the first game ever to receive a perfect score.[citation needed] Warren Spector, former lead designer at Ion Storm Inc., stated that it was "not possible to squeeze this much gameplay into a single game" and "no game has done a better job of showing goals before they can be attained, allowing players to make a plan and execute on it." He also commented on that the exploration aspect of the game, allowed players to "explore the same spaces several times while revealing something new each time is a revelation."[21] As of June 2007, it is the second most popular title in the Wii's Virtual Console.[24] Edge is a multi-format computer and video game magazine published by Future Publishing in the United Kingdom. ... Liquid Entertainment logo Liquid Entertainment is a computer game development company co-founded in March, 1999 by Ed Del Castillo and Michael Grayford. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Cover art for Issue 1 of Famitsū magazine, June 1986, then known as Famicom Tsūshin Famitsū abbreviated ファミ Fami) is a Japanese video game magazine published by Enterbrain, Inc. ... Warren Spector, 1999 Warren Spector is a respected game designer, having worked to merge elements of RPGs and first-person shooters. ... Ion Storm Inc. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ...


Impact and legacy

Super Mario 64 set many precedents for 3D platformers to follow.[6] Most 3D games at the time used a first person perspective, or a camera that was fixed in position relative to the player's character, or to the level. In order to create freedom of exploration, and more fluid control in a 3D world, the designers created a dynamic system in which the video camera was operated by the in-game character Lakitu.[11] The camera system was the first of its kind in the platform genre, and would become the standard for 3D platformers in the future.[25] This article is about video games. ... Sony camera head with Betacam SP dock recorder. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of Mario series enemies. ...


The Nintendo 64's analog control stick allowed for more precise and wide-ranging character movements than the digital D-pads of other consoles, and Super Mario 64 used this in a way that was unique for its time. At the time, 3D games generally allowed for either character-relative controls in which the player could rotate the character, or screen-relative controls in conjunction with a fixed camera, which were a logical extension of 2D control. Mario 64's controls were fully analog, and interpreted a 360 degree range of motion into navigation through a 3D space relative to the camera. The analog control also allowed for subtleties of movement like controlling the speed at which Mario runs.[26] For other uses, see Digital (disambiguation). ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ...


Super Mario 64 was also notable for its sense of freedom and non-linearity. A central hub, where controls can be learned before entering levels themselves, has been used in many 3D platformers since. In addition, the game's mission-based level design was an inspiration for other game designers. For example, Martin Hollis, who produced and directed GoldenEye 007, says that "the idea for the huge variety of missions within a level came from Super Mario 64."[27] In computer and video games, linearity denotes that the objectives of the game must be completed in a fixed sequence whereas non-linearity means that the player always has multiple choices. ... Martin Hollis, founder and CEO of Zoonami, is a renowned game industry veteran of over 19 years and director/producer of the critically acclaimed first-person shooter GoldenEye 007 which has sold more than 8 million copies worldwide. ... For the film, see GoldenEye. ...


Sequels and remakes

Super Mario 64 was first re-released in Japan on July 18, 1997 as Shindou Super Mario 64. This version added support for the Rumble Pak and included voice acting from the American version as well.[28][29] In 1998, Super Mario 64 was re-released in Europe and North America as part of the Player's Choice line, a selection of games with high sales sold for a reduced price. Super Mario 64 2 was planned for the Nintendo 64DD, but was canceled due to the failure of that peripheral, as well as a lack of progress in development.[30] Super Mario Sunshine for the Nintendo GameCube built on Super Mario 64's core gameplay by adding a water pump device and add-on nozzles, similar to the Caps.[31] The next 3D Mario platformer, Super Mario Galaxy, was released for Wii in November 2007. is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... A Nintendo 64 gamepad with the Rumble Pak attached. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The NTSC Players Choice release of the GameCube title, Star Fox Adventures. ... Super Mario 64 2 was a rumored expansion and sequel to Super Mario 64. ... The Nintendo 64DD is an expansion system for the Nintendo 64. ... Super Mario Sunshine ) is a 3-D platform game developed by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo GameCube. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... Super Mario Galaxy ) is a 3D action-platformer game developed by Nintendo EAD Tokyo and published by Nintendo for the Wii. ...


An enhanced remake for the Nintendo DS called Super Mario 64 DS was available for the launch of the DS in 2004. Yoshi, Luigi, and Wario were added as additional playable characters, and the game featured slightly altered graphics, additional stars and courses, touch screen mini-games, and a few minor multiplayer modes.[32] Super Mario 64 is downloadable for the Wii's Virtual Console service, with a price of 1,000 Wii Points.[33] This release adds compatibility with the GameCube and Classic controllers, and enhances the display.[34] This version is able to run in 480p via the component video cables. Otherwise it will still run at 480i at 60Hz, an improvement over its original resolution of 240p. The PAL Virtual Console release can also run at 576i at 50Hz. In the video game subculture, an enhanced remake (also called updated classics) is an updated version of a video or computer game that was originally developed for a less advanced system. ... NDS redirects here. ... Super Mario 64 DS is an enhanced remake of the 1996 video game Super Mario 64, produced by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS. It was released in the United States on November 21, 2004, in Japan on December 2, 2004, and in Europe on March 11, 2005 as one of... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Nintendo character Yoshi. ... This article is about the Nintendo character. ... Wario ) is a video game character created by Nintendo. ... Touchscreens are display overlays which have the ability to display and receive information on the same screen. ... Online gaming redirects here. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ... The Nintendo GameCube (Japanese: ゲームキューブ; originally code-named Dolphin during development; abbreviated as GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the 128-bit era; the same generation as Segas Dreamcast, Sonys PlayStation 2, and Microsofts Xbox. ... 480p is the shorthand name for a video mode. ...


Rumors

Mario swims in the castle's fountain with the mysterious writing on it.
Mario swims in the castle's fountain with the mysterious writing on it.

Because of the game's popularity, rumors about glitches and secrets spread rapidly after its release.[35] The most common rumor is that Mario's brother Luigi is an unlockable character in the game. This rumor was fueled by some blurry text in the castle courtyard that supposedly read "L is real 2401". This caused rampant fan speculation that L(uigi) was real. IGN received so many questions and supposed methods to unlock Luigi that the staff offered a $100 bounty to anyone who could prove that Luigi was in the game.[36] The number of false codes submitted to IGN dropped dramatically; no successful method emerged.[37] A screenshot from Super Mario 64, made with the 1964 Nintendo 64 emulator. ... A screenshot from Super Mario 64, made with the 1964 Nintendo 64 emulator. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ...


Nintendo has consistently denied Luigi's playability, and never commented on the meaning of "L is real 2401" except for the April Fool's Day 1998 issue of Nintendo Power. In this issue, the "April News Briefs" section said that the cryptic phrase would be discussed on page 128, but the magazine had only 106 pages. The section also featured a facetious article entitled "Luigi 64", commenting humorously on the rumor.[38] The then-infamous texture made a cameo appearance in Dodongo's Cavern, a dungeon in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. Another reference to the Luigi rumour occured in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, where a player could purchase a book containing Luigi's many stories, titled "Super Luigi". The first volume of this book cost 64 coins, a reference to the rumour (Super Luigi 64). The next volume, and all volumes after, cost 128 coins, a reference to the page number Nintendo Power claimed the "L is real 2401" rumour would be discussed.
To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Nintendo Power magazine is a monthly news and strategy magazine formerly published in-house by Nintendo. ... The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time was a video game released in 1998, and the first Zelda game for the Nintendo 64. ... Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door is the sequel to the Nintendo 64 video game Paper Mario, and is the fourth in the series of Mario role-playing game titles that includes Super Mario RPG, Paper Mario, and Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga. ... Nintendo Power magazine is a monthly news and strategy magazine formerly published in-house by Nintendo. ...


References

  1. ^ Super Mario 64. IGN (2006-01-01). Retrieved on 2006-10-29.
  2. ^ Perry, Doug. Super Mario 64. IGN. Retrieved on 2006-10-22.
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For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Game Informer (often abbreviated to GI) is an American-based monthly magazine featuring articles, news, strategy and reviews of popular video games and associated consoles. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1UP.com is a video-game site owned and operated by Ziff Davis Media, publisher of popular videogame magazines Computer Gaming World (CGW) (now known as Games for Windows: The Official Magazine (or GFW) Magazine), Electronic Gaming Monthly (EGM), and the now-defunct Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine (OPM), GMR... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The San Diego Union-Tribune is a daily newspaper published in San Diego, California by the Copley Press. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... N-Sider is a website that provides news, history, and opinion articles relating to Nintendo Co. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Game Informer (often abbreviated to GI) is a United States-based monthly magazine featuring articles, news, strategy and reviews of popular video games and associated consoles. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Matt Casamassina (born December 1975) is a video game journalist working for IGN. He is the author of many reviews and previews of Nintendo games,[1] and the editor-in-chief of the IGN Nintendo Team. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nintendo Power magazine is a monthly news and strategy magazine formerly published in-house by Nintendo. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ...

See also

This is a complete list of all 387 games for the Nintendo 64 video game system, organized alphabetically by their English titles or their alphabet conversions. ...

External links

Interviews

  Results from FactBites:
 
Super Mario 64 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3961 words)
Super Mario 64 is often counted as the first among games such as The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, Metroid Prime, Sonic Adventure, and Final Fantasy VII to have brought a series of 2D games into full 3D while maintaining their signature feel.
Super Mario 64 was re-released in Japan in 1997.
Super Mario 64 DS for the Nintendo DS is a remake of Super Mario 64 that features Yoshi, Luigi, and Wario as additional playable characters, additional stars and courses, touch screen mini-games, and a few minor multiplayer modes.
Super Mario 64 DS - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1836 words)
Super Mario 64 DS is an enhanced remake of the 1996 video game Super Mario 64.
Super Mario 64 DS begins when Mario receives an invitation to eat a cake at Princess Peach's castle, with Luigi and Wario tagging along.
Mario and friends must defeat King Bowser and release Princess Peach from captivity by obtaining Power Stars scattered throughout the different levels, along with secret stars that Bowser himself was unaware of.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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