FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Super Bowl IX
Super Bowl IX
Image:SuperBowlIX.png
1 2 3 4 Total
Steelers 0 2 7 7 16
Vikings 0 0 0 6 6
Date January 12, 1975
Stadium Tulane Stadium
City New Orleans, Louisiana
MVP Franco Harris, Running back
Favorite Steelers by 3
National anthem Grambling State University Band
Coin toss Game referee
Referee Bernie Ulman
Halftime show "Tribute to Duke Ellington" with Mercer Ellington and Grambling State University Band
Attendance 80,997
TV in the United States
Network NBC
Announcers Curt Gowdy, Al DeRogatis and Don Meredith
Nielsen Ratings 42.4
Market share 72
Cost of 30-second commercial US$107,000

Super Bowl IX was the ninth Super Bowl, the championship game of the National Football League (NFL). The game was played on January 12, 1975 at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana following the 1974 regular season. The American Football Conference (AFC) champion Pittsburgh Steelers defeated the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Minnesota Vikings, 16–6. Image File history File links SuperBowlIX.png Super Bowl IX logo, claiming fair use File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... City Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Team colors Black and Gold Head Coach Mike Tomlin Owner Dan Rooney General manager Kevin Colbert League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933–1943; 1945–1949) Western Division (1944) American Conference (1950–1952) Eastern Conference (1953–1969) Century Division (1967–1969) American Football... City Minneapolis, Minnesota Other nicknames The Vikes, The Purple People Eaters Team colors Purple, Gold, and White Head Coach Brad Childress Owner Zygi Wilf General manager Rob Brzezinski Mascot Ragnar League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1961–present) Western Conference (1961-1969) Central Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Telstra Stadium in Sydney, Australia is capable of being converted from a rectangular rugby football field to an oval for cricket and Australian rules football games A modern stadium (plural stadiums or stadia in English) is a place, or venue, for (mostly) outdoor sports, concerts or other events, consisting of... Tulane Stadium was an outdoor football stadium located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City That Care Forgot, NOLA (acronym for New Orleans, LA) Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Louisiana Parish Orleans Founded 1718  - Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Area    - City  350. ... The Super Bowl MVP, or Super Bowl Most Valuable Player, is an award given at the conclusion of the Super Bowl, the National Football Leagues championship game, to the player deemed to have made the most significant positive impact on the outcome of the game. ... Franco Harris (born March 7, 1950) was an American football player. ... High school running back A running back, halfback, tailback or wingback is the position of a player on an American and Canadian football team who lines up in the offensive backfield. ... Spread betting is a form of gambling on the outcome of any event where the more accurate the gamble, the more is won and conversely the less accurate the more is lost. ... City Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Team colors Black and Gold Head Coach Mike Tomlin Owner Dan Rooney General manager Kevin Colbert League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933–1943; 1945–1949) Western Division (1944) American Conference (1950–1952) Eastern Conference (1953–1969) Century Division (1967–1969) American Football... Nicholson took the copy Key had given him to a printer, who published it as a broadside on 17 September, 1814 under the title Defence of Fort McHenry, with a note explaining the circumstances of its writing. ... GSU athletics logo, highly reminiscent of the Green Bay Packers logo. ... Coin flipping or coin tossing is the practice of throwing a coin in the air to resolve a dispute between two parties or otherwise choose between two alternatives. ... NFL officials (striped shirts) and guests prepare to toss the coin to start the 40th annual Pro Bowl. ... A halftime show is a performance given between the first and second halves or the 2nd and 3rd quarters of a sporting event. ... Edward Kennedy Duke Ellington (April 29, 1899, Washington, D.C.; d. ... Mercer Ellington (11 March 1919–8 February 1996) was an American jazz trumpeter, composer, and arranger. ... GSU athletics logo, highly reminiscent of the Green Bay Packers logo. ... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... NBC (an abbreviation for National Broadcasting Company, its former corporate name) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... A sportscaster is an announcer on radio or television who specializes in reporting or commenting on sports events. ... Curt Gowdy (born July 31, 1919, in Green River, Wyoming) is a former American sportscaster. ... Al DeRogatis (born May 5, 1927 in Newark, New Jersey; died December 26, 1995 in Spring Lake, New Jersey) was an American football player and television sportscaster. ... Joseph Don Dandy Don Meredith (born April 10, 1938 in Mount Vernon, Texas) was an American football quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys, football commentator, and entertainer. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are generally referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory[1], the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... For other uses of National Football League, see National Football League (disambiguation). ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Tulane Stadium was an outdoor football stadium located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City That Care Forgot, NOLA (acronym for New Orleans, LA) Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Louisiana Parish Orleans Founded 1718  - Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Area    - City  350. ... The 1974 NFL season was the 55th regular season of the National Football League. ... The American Football Conference (AFC) is one of the two conferences of the National Football League (NFL). ... City Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Team colors Black and Gold Head Coach Mike Tomlin Owner Dan Rooney General manager Kevin Colbert League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933–1943; 1945–1949) Western Division (1944) American Conference (1950–1952) Eastern Conference (1953–1969) Century Division (1967–1969) American Football... The National Football Conference is one of the two conferences of the National Football League. ... City Minneapolis, Minnesota Other nicknames The Vikes, The Purple People Eaters Team colors Purple, Gold, and White Head Coach Brad Childress Owner Zygi Wilf General manager Rob Brzezinski Mascot Ragnar League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1961–present) Western Conference (1961-1969) Central Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970...


This game matched two of the NFL's best defenses -- Pittsburgh's Steel Curtain against the Purple People Eaters of Minnesota -- and two legendary quarterbacks: Terry Bradshaw and Fran Tarkenton, respectively. For other uses of National Football League, see National Football League (disambiguation). ... The Steel Curtain was one of the most feared American football defenses, and a big part of the Pittsburgh Steelers 1970s dynasty. ... The Purple People Eaters was the nickname of the Minnesota Vikings football teams defensive line during the late 1960s to the late 1970s, when the Vikings played in four Super Bowls. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... Terry Paxton Bradshaw (born September 2, 1948) is a former American football quarterback with the Pittsburgh Steelers in the National Football League (NFL). ... Francis Asbury Fran Tarkenton (born February 3, 1940), American football player, TV personality, and computer software executive, is best known as a Pro football player (for the Vikings and Giants), as well as a commentator on Monday Night Football and a co-host of Thats Incredible! (TV shows). ...


However, the Steelers dominated the game, recording the first safety in Super Bowl history, and limiting the Vikings to Super Bowl lows of 9 first downs, 119 yards of total offense, and 17 rushing yards. The Steelers also tied Super Bowl records for the least rushing first downs allowed (2) and the least passing first downs allowed (5). Tarkenton was held to only 11 out of 26 completions for 102 passing yards, no touchdown passes, and tied a Super Bowl record with 3 interceptions. Furthermore, Pittsburgh became the second Super Bowl team after the Miami Dolphins in Super Bowl VII to hold their opponents' offense scoreless; Minnesota's only score came on a blocked punt, and they did not even score on the extra point attempt. The Steelers accomplished all of this with 2 backups: linebackers Ed Bradley and Loren Toews replaced injured starters Andy Russell and Jack Lambert for most of the second half. City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins, The Fish Team colors Aqua, Coral and Navy Head Coach Cam Cameron Owner Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T. D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... Date January 14, 1973 Stadium Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum City Los Angeles, California MVP Jake Scott, Safety Favorite Redskins by 1 National anthem Andy Williams Little Angels of Holy Angels Church, Chicago Coin toss Game referee Referee Tom Bell Halftime show Woody Herman and the University of Michigan Band Attendance... Charles Andrew Andy Russell (born October 29, 1941, Detroit, Michigan) wore number 34 as an outside linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1963 and from 1966-1976. ... John Harold Jack Lambert (July 8, 1952, Mantua, Ohio, United States) is a former NFL linebacker in American football. ...


Meanwhile, Pittsburgh had 333 yards of total offense. Steelers running back Franco Harris, who ran for a Super Bowl record 158 yards and a touchdown, was named the Super Bowl's Most Valuable Player. Notably, Franco Harris had more rushing yards than the entire Minnesota offense. High school running back A running back, halfback, tailback or wingback is the position of a player on an American and Canadian football team who lines up in the offensive backfield. ... Franco Harris (born March 7, 1950) was an American football player. ... The Super Bowl MVP, or Super Bowl Most Valuable Player, is an award given at the conclusion of the Super Bowl, the National Football Leagues championship game, to the player deemed to have made the most significant positive impact on the outcome of the game. ...

Contents

Background

Pittsburgh Steelers

Pittsburgh advanced to their first Super Bowl and were playing for a league championship for the first time in team history. Their 73-year old owner Art Rooney founded the Steelers as a 1933 NFL expansion team, but suffered through losing seasons for most of its 42-year history and had never made it to an NFL championship game or a Super Bowl. But in 1969, Rooney hired Chuck Noll to be the team's head coach and its fortunes started to turn. Arthur Joseph Rooney, Sr. ... An expansion team is a term used for a brand new team in a sports league. ... Charles Henry Chuck Noll (born January 5, 1932) is a former American football coach, having served as the coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers in the National Football League from 1969 to 1991. ...


Noll rebuilt the Steelers through the NFL draft, selecting defensive tackle Joe Greene and defensive end L.C. Greenwood in his first season as head coach. In 1970, Noll drafted quarterback Terry Bradshaw and cornerback Mel Blount. In 1971, linebacker Jack Ham, defensive tackle Ernie Holmes, defensive tackle Dwight White, and defensive back Mike Wagner were selected by the team. Running back Franco Harris was drafted in 1972. And in 1974, the Steelers picked linebacker Jack Lambert, center Mike Webster and wide receivers Lynn Swann and John Stallworth. Bradshaw, Webster, Swann, Stallworth and Harris ended up being hall of fame players on offense, while the others formed the core nucleus of their "Steel Curtain" defense. The NFL Draft (officially the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting) is an annual sports draft in which National Football League (NFL) teams take turns selecting amateur college American football players and other first-time eligible players. ... Charles Edward Greene, known as Mean Joe Greene (born September 24, 1946 in Temple, Texas), was an American football Defensive Tackle in the NFL. Before his NFL career, Greene had an outstanding college football career at North Texas State University(1966-1968), assisting the team to a 23-5-1... L.C. Greenwood L.C. Greenwood was an American football player for the 1970s Pittsburgh Steelers. ... Terry Paxton Bradshaw (born September 2, 1948) is a former American football quarterback with the Pittsburgh Steelers in the National Football League (NFL). ... Melvin Carnell Blount (Born April 10, 1948 in Vidalia, Georgia) was a 5-time All Pro-Bowl defensive back with the Pittsburgh Steelers. ... Jack Raphael Ham, Jr. ... Ernie Holmes was an American Football player who was most famous as a player for the Pittsburgh Steelers. ... Dwight White (born July 30, 1949) was a American football player who played defensive end with the Pittsburgh Steelers and was a member of the famed Steel Curtain defense. ... Mike Wagner is a former American football player. ... Franco Harris (born March 7, 1950) was an American football player. ... John Harold Jack Lambert (July 8, 1952, Mantua, Ohio, United States) is a former NFL linebacker in American football. ... Michael Lewis Webster (born March 18, 1952 in Tomahawk, Wisconsin - died September 22, 2002 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) was an American football player who played center in the National Football League from 1974 to 1990. ... Lynn Curtis Swann (b. ... Johnny Lee Stallworth (Born July 15, 1952, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama) played college football at Alabama A&M, becoming the Pittsburgh Steelers fourth-round draft pick in 1974. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ...


But en route to Super Bowl IX, the Steelers had started the regular season slowly, as Bradshaw and Joe Gilliam fought to be the team's starting quarterback. Gilliam had started for the first 4 games of the season, but Noll eventually made Bradshaw the starter. Although Bradshaw ended up completing only 67 out of 148 passes for 785 yards, 7 touchdowns, and 8 interceptions, he helped lead the team to a 10-3-1 regular season record. But the Steelers main offensive weapon was running the ball. Harris rushed for 1,006 yards and 5 touchdowns, while also catching 23 passes for 200 yards and another touchdown. Running backs Rocky Bleier, Preston Pearson, and Steve Davis also made important contributions, gaining a combined total of 936 yards and 8 touchdowns. Joe Gilliam (1950-2000) was an American football player. ... Robert Rocky Bleier (born March 5, 1946 in Appleton, Wisconsin, Wisconsin) is a former National Football League fullback who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1968 and from 1971 to 1980. ... Preston James Pearson (b. ... Steve Davis OBE (born August 22, 1957) is an English professional snooker player who was born in London and lives in Brentwood, Essex with his wife and two sons. ...


But the Steelers main strength during the season was their "Steel Curtain" defense, who led the league with the fewest total yards allowed (3,074) and the fewest passing yards allowed (1,466). Greene won the NFL Defensive Player of the Year Award for the second time in the last 3 seasons, and he and Greenwood were named to the Pro Bowl. Both of the team's outside linebackers, Ham and Andy Russell, had been also selected to play in the Pro Bowl, while Lambert already had 2 interceptions for 19 yards in his rookie year. And in the defensive backfield, Blount, Wagner, and Glen Edwards made an impact against opposing passing plays. The NFL Defensive Player of the Year Award is given by the Associated Press to the leagues most outstanding defensive player at the end of every NFL season since 1971. ... The Pro Bowl is the National Football Leagues all-star game. ... Charles Andrew Andy Russell (born October 29, 1941, Detroit, Michigan) wore number 34 as an outside linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1963 and from 1966-1976. ...


Minnesota Vikings

The Vikings came into the season trying to redeem themselves after Super Bowl VIII during the previous year when they became the first team ever to lose two Super Bowls (the other loss was in Super Bowl IV). Date January 13, 1974 Stadium Rice Stadium City Houston, Texas MVP Larry Csonka, Running back Favorite Dolphins by 7 National Anthem Charley Pride Coin toss Game referee Halftime show University of Texas at Austin Band Attendance 71,882 TV in the United States Network CBS Announcers Ray Scott, Pat Summerall... Date January 11, 1970 Stadium Tulane Stadium City New Orleans, Louisiana MVP Len Dawson, Quarterback Favorite Vikings by 12 1/2 National anthem Al Hirt Coin toss Game referee Referee John McDonough Halftime show Mardi Gras with Carol Channing Attendance 80,562 TV in the United States Network CBS Announcers...


Minnesota's powerful offense was still led by veteran quarterback Fran Tarkenton, who passed for 2,598 yards and 17 touchdowns. The Vikings' primary offensive weapon was running back Chuck Foreman, who lead the team in receptions with 53 for 586 yards and 6 touchdowns. He was also their leading rusher with 777 rushing yards and 9 touchdowns. Wide receiver Jim Lash was a major deep threat, with 32 receptions for 631 yards (a 19.7 yards per catch average). Fullback Dave Osborn contributed with 514 rushing yards, and 29 receptions for 196 yards. And the Vikings offensive line, led by future Hall of Fame left tackle Ron Yary, allowed only 17 sacks. Francis Asbury Fran Tarkenton (born February 3, 1940), American football player, TV personality, and computer software executive, is best known as a Pro football player (for the Vikings and Giants), as well as a commentator on Monday Night Football and a co-host of Thats Incredible! (TV shows). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Dave Osborn (born March 18, 1943 in Everett, Washington is a former professional American football player who played running back for twelve seasons for the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ... Ron Yary (born July 16, 1946) is a former professional American football player. ...


Aided by the "Purple People Eaters" defense, led by future hall of fame defensive linemen Carl Eller and Alan Page, and future hall of fame safety Paul Krause, the Vikings won the NFC Central for the 6th time in the last 7 years. The Purple People Eaters was the nickname of the Minnesota Vikings football teams defensive line during the late 1960s to the late 1970s, when the Vikings played in four Super Bowls. ... Carl Eller (born January 25, 1942) was a professional American football player in the National Football League from 1964 through 1979. ... Alan Cedric Page (born August 7, 1945 in Canton, Ohio) is a former football player who starred as a defensive lineman in the NFL, primarily with the Minnesota Vikings, and then went on to have a distinguished legal career, serving as a current member of the Minnesota Supreme Court. ... Paul Krause (born February 19, 1942 in Flint, Michigan) is a former professional American football player. ... The NFC Central refers to the Central Division of the National Football Conference of the National Football League. ...


Playoffs

For more details on this topic, see NFL playoffs, 1974-75.

Minnesota allowed only a combined 24 points in their playoff wins against the St. Louis Cardinals, 30-14, and their narrow defeat of the Los Angeles Rams, 14-10, after their defense stopped an attempted comeback touchdown drive from the Rams on the Vikings' own 2-yard line. The NFL playoffs for the 1974-75 season led up to Super Bowl IX. // Divisional playoff round December 21, 1974 AFC: Oakland Raiders 28, Miami Dolphins 26 at Oakland Coliseum, Oakland, California With 24 seconds left in the game, the Raiders Clarence Davis somehow catches the winning touchdown pass among... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner William V. Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern... The St. ...


Meanwhile, the Steelers never faced the Miami Dolphins, who advanced to the previous 3 Super Bowls. While the Steelers defeated the Buffalo Bills, 32-14, in the first round, the Dolphins lost to the Oakland Raiders, 28-26, giving up Raiders running back Clarence Davis' 8-yard touchdown reception with 26 seconds left in the game in a play that became known as the Sea of Hands. The Steelers then won the AFC Championship Game over the Raiders, 24-13. City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins, The Fish Team colors Aqua, Coral and Navy Head Coach Cam Cameron Owner Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T. D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... City Orchard Park, New York Team colors Dark Navy, light blue, Red, light Red, Royal, Nickel, and White Head Coach Dick Jauron Owner Ralph C. Wilson Jr. ... City Oakland, California Other nicknames The Silver and Black, Da Raidahs Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Lane Kiffin Owner Al Davis General manager Michael Lombardi League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC... Clarence Davis (born June 28, 1949 in Birmingham, AL) is a former american football Running Back who played with the National Football League Oakland Raiders from 1971 to 1978. ... Since the National Football League was founded in 1920, it has grown from an informal network of teams based mostly in small towns and cities into the most popular and successful sports league in the United States. ...


Super Bowl pregame news and notes

Sports writers and fans predicted that Super Bowl IX would be a low scoring game because of each team's defenses. The Steelers' "Steel Curtain" had lead the AFC in fewest points allowed (189) and the Vikings' "Purple People Eaters" had only given up 195. The American Football Conference (AFC) is one of the two conferences of the National Football League (NFL). ...


Television and entertainment

The game was broadcast in the United States by NBC with play-by-play announcer Curt Gowdy and color commentators Al DeRogatis and Don Meredith. NBC (an abbreviation for National Broadcasting Company, its former corporate name) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Play-by-play, in broadcasting, is a North American term and means the reporting of a sporting event with a voiceover describing the details of the action of the game in progress. ... Curt Gowdy (born July 31, 1919, in Green River, Wyoming) is a former American sportscaster. ... A color commentator (or colour commentator in Canada), sometimes known as a color analyst (or colour analyst), is a member of the broadcasting team for a sporting event who assists the play-by-play announcer by filling in any time when play is not in progress. ... Al DeRogatis (born May 5, 1927 in Newark, New Jersey; died December 26, 1995 in Spring Lake, New Jersey) was an American football player and television sportscaster. ... Joseph Don Dandy Don Meredith (born April 10, 1938 in Mount Vernon, Texas) was an American football quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys, football commentator, and entertainer. ...


The Grambling State University Band performed during both the pregame festivities and the national anthem. During the national anthem, they were backed by a Mardi Gras choir, The halftime show was a tribute to American jazz composer, pianist and bandleader Duke Ellington, also featuring the Grambling State University Band along with Ellington's son Mercer. GSU athletics logo, highly reminiscent of the Green Bay Packers logo. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans at around the start of the 20th century. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Pianist Claudio Arrau, Carnegie Hall, 1954. ... A bandleader is the director of a band of musicians. ... Edward Kennedy Duke Ellington (April 29, 1899, Washington, D.C.; d. ...


The Mary Tyler Moore Show on CBS used this game as a plotline on the Saturday night before the Sunday game. Lou Grant was teaching Ted Baxter how to bet on football games, and used Ted's money, as well as some of his own to bet on the Vikings winning the Super Bowl. The Vikings won the Super Bowl in this episode but Ted's hopes were dashed when it was revealed that Lou actually bet all the money on the Steelers. At the end of the show, Mary's voice apologized over the credits (of course still prior to the known outcome of the actual game) to the Steelers and their fans (in case the Steelers won) for wrongly predicting the outcome of the game and in case the Vikings won (which of course they didn't), said "You heard it here first!" The Mary Tyler Moore Show is an American television sitcom created by James L. Brooks and Allan Burns that aired on CBS from September 19, 1970 to March 19, 1977. ... CBS is one of the largest radio and television networks in the United States. ... Lou Grant is a fictional character played by Ed Asner in two shows on CBS. The first was Mary Tyler Moore in which the character was the producer of the fictional WJM-TV news. ... Ted Baxter was a fictional character on the long running situation comedy, The Mary Tyler Moore Show. ... Mary Tyler Moore, American actress and comedian, perhaps best known for The Mary Tyler Moore Show, in which she starred as Mary Richards, a 30ish single woman who worked as a news producer at WJM-TV in Minneapolis, and for her role as Laura Petrie, wife of television comedy writer...


Game summary

As many predicted, the game was low scoring; both teams failed to score a touchdown or a field goal until the third quarter and ended up with the second lowest total of combined points in Super Bowl history.


The first quarter of the game was completely dominated by both teams defense. The Vikings were limited to 0 rushing yards, 20 passing yards, and only 1 first down. The Steelers did slightly better with 15 passing yards, 64 rushing yards, and 4 first downs. Pittsburgh even managed to get close enough for their kicker Roy Gerela to attempt 2 field goals. But Gerela missed his first attempt, and a bad snap prevented the second one from even being kicked. Roy Gerela (born April 2, 1948, Sarrail, Alberta) is a former American football placekicker best known for his years with the Pittsburgh Steelers, with whom he won three Super Bowl rings. ...


In the second quarter, the Vikings got an opportunity to score when they recovered a fumble from fullback Rocky Bleier at the Steelers 24-yard line. But they could only move the ball 2 yards in their next three plays, and then Vikings kicker Fred Cox missed a 39-yard field goal attempt. The first score of the game occurred later in the period, when fullback Dave Osborn fumbled a pitch from Tarkenton in Minnesota's own end zone. Tarkenton quickly dove on the ball to prevent a Steeler touchdown, but he was downed by Dwight White for a safety, giving Pittsburgh a 2-0 lead. The Vikings later threatened to score when Tarkenton led them on a 55-yard drive to the Steelers 20-yard line. With 1:17 left in the half, Tarkenton threw a pass to receiver John Gilliam at the 5-yard line, but Steelers safety Glen Edwards hit him just as he caught the ball. The ball popped out of his hands and right into the arms of Mel Blount for an interception. Robert Rocky Bleier (born March 5, 1946 in Appleton, Wisconsin, Wisconsin) is a former National Football League fullback who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1968 and from 1971 to 1980. ... Fred Cox is a former National Football League kicker for the Minnesota Vikings throughout his career (1963-1977). ... Dave Osborn (born March 18, 1943 in Everett, Washington is a former professional American football player who played running back for twelve seasons for the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers. ... The end zone is a term in both Canadian football and American football. ... Dwight White (born July 30, 1949) was a American football player who played defensive end with the Pittsburgh Steelers and was a member of the famed Steel Curtain defense. ... John Gilliam (born August 7, 1945 in Greenwood, South Carolina) was an American football wide receiver. ... Melvin Carnell Blount (Born April 10, 1948 in Vidalia, Georgia) was a 5-time All Pro-Bowl defensive back with the Pittsburgh Steelers. ...


The half ended with the Steelers leading 2-0, the lowest halftime score in Super Bowl history.


On the opening kickoff of the second half, Minnesota's Bill Brown lost a fumble, and the Steelers recovered the ball at the Vikings 30-yard line. Then, Franco Harris moved the ball to the 6-yard line with a 24-yard run. Harris was then tackled for a 3-yard loss on the next play, but then made up for it with a 9-yard touchdown run after that, giving the Steelers a 9-0 lead. Franco Harris (born March 7, 1950) was an American football player. ...


After an exchange of punts, Minnesota got the ball back on their own 20-yard line. On the second play of drive, Tarkenton's pass was deflected behind the line of scrimmage by Pittsburgh defensive lineman Joe Greene, and bounced back right into the arms of Tarkenton, who then threw 41-yard completion to Gilliam. However, officials ruled Tarkenton's first pass attempt was a completion to himself, and thus his second attempt was an illegal forward pass. The penalty brought up third down and 11 yards to go, but Minnesota got the first down with running back Chuck Foreman's 12-yard run. Three plays later, Tarkenton completed a 28-yard pass to tight end Stu Voigt at the Steelers 45-yard line. However, White deflected Tarkenton's next pass attempt and Greene intercepted the ball, ending the Vikings' scoring opportunity. The name Joe Greene may refer to the following people: John James Greene, a Canadian politician. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Stu Voigt is a former NFL tight end. ...


Early in the fourth quarter, the Vikings got another scoring opportunity when Minnesota safety Paul Krause recovered a fumble from Harris on the Steelers 47-yard line. On the next play, a 42-yard pass interference penalty on Pittsburgh defensive back Mike Wagner moved the ball up to the 5-yard line. But once again the Steelers stopped them from scoring when Greene forced and recovered a fumble from Foreman. However, Pittsburgh failed to get a first down on their next possession and was forced to punt from deep in their own territory. Minnesota defender Matt Blair burst through the line to block the punt, and Terry Brown recovered the ball in the end zone for touchdown. Cox missed the extra point, but the Vikings had cut their deficit to 9-6 and were just a field goal away from a tie. Paul Krause (born February 19, 1942 in Flint, Michigan) is a former professional American football player. ... Mike Wagner is a former American football player. ... Matt Blair was a linebacker for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League for 12 seasons from 1974-1985. ... Terry Brown may refer to: Terry Brown (record producer), record producer known most notably for his work with the Canadian rock bands Rush, Blue Rodeo, and Klaatu Terry Brown (football chairman), former chairman of West Ham United football club Terry Brown (football manager), manager of Aldershot Town football club Terry...


But on the ensuing drive, the Steelers put the game out of reach with a 66 yard, 11 play scoring drive that took 6:47 off the clock and featured 3 successful third down conversions. The first was a key 30-yard pass completion from Terry Bradshaw to tight end Larry Brown. Brown fumbled the ball as he was being tackled, and two officials initially ruled the ball recovered for the Vikings, but head linesman Ed Marion overuled them, stating that Brown was down by contact before the ball came out of his hands. Another third down pass to Bleier advanced the ball to the Vikings 5-yard line. The Steelers gained just 1 yard with their next 2 plays, but on third down Bradshaw's 4-yard touchdown pass to Brown gave the Steelers a 16-6 lead with only 3:31 left on the clock. Terry Paxton Bradshaw (born September 2, 1948) is a former American football quarterback with the Pittsburgh Steelers in the National Football League (NFL). ... Larry Brown (born July 16, 1949) was a American football player who played tight end and offensive tackle with the Pittsburgh Steelers. ...


Vikings running back Brent McClanahan returned the ensuing kickoff 22 yards to the 39-yard line, but on the first play of the drive, Tarkenton's pass was intercepted by Wagner. The Steelers then executed 7 consecutive running plays, taking the game clock all the way down to 38 seconds before turning the ball over on downs.


Harris finished the game with 34 carries for a Super Bowl record 158 yards and a touchdown. Bleier had 65 rushing yards, and 2 receptions for 11 yards. Bradshaw completed 9 out of 14 passes for 96 yards and a touchdown. Foreman was the Viking's top offensive contributor, finishing the game as the team's leading rusher and receiver with 18 rushing yards and 50 receiving yards.


Scoring summary

  • PIT - Safety, Dwight White tackled Fran Tarkenton in end zone PIT 2-0
  • PIT - Franco Harris 9 run (Roy Gerela kick) PIT 9-0
  • MIN - Terry Brown recovered blocked punt in end zone (kick failed) PIT 9-6
  • PIT - Larry Brown 4 pass from Terry Bradshaw (Roy Gerela kick) PIT 16-6

Starting lineups

Pittsburgh Position Minnesota
OFFENSE
Frank Lewis WR John Gilliam
Gordon Gravelle LT Charlie Goodrum
Jim Clack LG Andy Maurer
Ray Mansfield C Mick Tingelhoff
Gerry Mullins RG Ed White
Jon Kolb RT Ron Yary
Larry Brown TE Stu Voigt
Ronnie Shanklin WR Jim Lash
Terry Bradshaw QB Fran Tarkenton
Rocky Bleier FB Chuck Foreman
Franco Harris RB Dave Osborn
DEFENSE
L. C. Greenwood LE Carl Eller
Joe Greene LDT Alan Page
Ernie Holmes RDT Doug Sutherland
Dwight White RE Jim Marshall
Jack Ham LOLB Roy Winston
Jack Lambert MLB Jeff Siemon
Andy Russell ROLB Wally Hilgenberg
J.T. Thomas LCB Jackie Wallace
Mel Blount RCB Nate Wright
Mike Wagner SS Jeff Wright
Glen Edwards FS Paul Krause

Frank Douglas Lewis (born July 4, 1947 in Houma, Louisiana) was a National Football League wide receiver from 1971 through 1983. ... John Gilliam (born August 7, 1945 in Greenwood, South Carolina) was an American football wide receiver. ... Gordon Gravelle is a former tackle in the National Football League. ... Jim Clack (1948-2006) was a guard in the National Football League. ... James Ray Mansfield (January 21, 1941, Bakersfield, California-November 3, 1996, Grand Canyon, Arizona) was a National Football League center for the Philadelphia Eagles and Pittsburgh Steelers. ... Mick Tingelhoff (born 1940) was a football player in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Gerry Mullins (1949-) is a retired American football player, who started at the offensive guard position for the Pittsburgh Steelers for his entire career (1971-1979). ... Edward White (1910-1994) a British composer of light classical music. ... Jon Kolb is a former offensive lineman with the Pittsburgh Steelers, where he played for 13 seasons. ... Ron Yary (born July 16, 1946) is a former professional American football player. ... Larry Brown For other people of the same name, see Larry Brown (disambiguation). ... Stu Voigt is a former NFL tight end. ... Jim Lash (born 1951, in Pittsburgh) was an American football player who played wide receiver in the NFL in the 1970s and played on three Super Bowl teams. ... Terry Paxton Bradshaw (born September 2, 1948) is a former American football quarterback with the Pittsburgh Steelers in the National Football League (NFL). ... Francis Asbury Fran Tarkenton (born February 3, 1940), American football player, TV personality, and computer software executive, is best known as a Pro football player (for the Vikings and Giants), as well as a commentator on Monday Night Football and a co-host of Thats Incredible! (TV shows). ... Robert Rocky Bleier (born March 5, 1946 in Appleton, Wisconsin, Wisconsin) is a former National Football League fullback who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1968 and from 1971 to 1980. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Franco Harris (born March 7, 1950) was an American football player. ... Dave Osborn (born March 18, 1943 in Everett, Washington is a former professional American football player who played running back for twelve seasons for the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers. ... L.C. Henderson Greenwood (born September 8, 1946 in Canton, Mississippi) is a former american football player for the 1970s Pittsburgh Steelers. ... Carl Eller (born January 25, 1942) was a professional American football player in the National Football League from 1964 through 1979. ... The name Joe Greene may refer to the following people: John James Greene, a Canadian politician. ... Alan Cedric Page (born August 7, 1945 in Canton, Ohio) is a former football player who starred as a defensive lineman in the NFL, primarily with the Minnesota Vikings, and then went on to have a distinguished legal career, serving as a current member of the Minnesota Supreme Court. ... Ernie Holmes was an American Football player who was most famous as a player for the Pittsburgh Steelers. ... Doug Sutherland, an American politician, currently serves as the Commissioner of Public Lands for the state of Washington. ... Dwight White (born July 30, 1949) was a American football player who played defensive end with the Pittsburgh Steelers and was a member of the famed Steel Curtain defense. ... Jim Marshall could be: Jim Marshall, the United States politician Jim Marshall, the United Kingdom politician Jim Marshall, owner and founder of Marshall amplification Jim Marshall, a United States football player ... Jack Raphael Ham, Jr. ... Roy Charles Winston (born September 15, 1940 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is a former professional American football player. ... John Harold Lambert (July 8, 1952, Mantua, Ohio), considered to be one of the greatest NFL linebackers in history, played football with Kent State, winning two-year All-Mid American Conference linebacker honors. ... Jeffrey Glenn Siemon (born September 19, 1950 in Rochester, Minnesota) is a former professional American football player. ... Charles Andrew Andy Russell (born October 29, 1941, Detroit, Michigan) wore number 34 as an outside linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1963 and from 1966-1976. ... Walter Hilgenberg (born September 19, 1942 in Marshalltown, Iowa) is a former professional American football player. ... J.T. Thomas (born May 22, 1951 in Macon, Georgia is a former professional American football player who played cornerback for nine seasons for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Denver Broncos. ... Melvin Carnell Blount (Born April 10, 1948 in Vidalia, Georgia) was a 5-time All Pro-Bowl defensive back with the Pittsburgh Steelers. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Mike Wagner is a former American football player. ... Glen Edwards (March 5, 1918–June 5, 1948) was born in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada where he lived until 1931, when his parents moved the family to Lincoln, California. ... Paul Krause (born February 19, 1942 in Flint, Michigan) is a former professional American football player. ...

Trivia

  • The game was originally scheduled for the Louisiana Superdome. But since construction on the dome was not yet finished, the game had to be moved to Tulane Stadium.
  • This was not only the last of three Super Bowls played at Tulane Stadium, but the last game ever played in the stadium, which was demolished five years later and replaced for the 1975 NFL season by the Louisiana Superdome,which has hosted every Super Bowl held in New Orleans since.
  • Every Super Bowl since has been either in a domed stadium or an outdoor stadium in (California, Florida, or the Phoenix metropolitan area). The temperature was cold and the field was slick from overnight rain.[1] This was the last Super Bowl to be played in inclement weather before Super Bowl XLI.
  • The Steelers are currently the only team to hold their opponent from scoring an extra point,field goal or offensive touchdown in a Super Bowl. While both the Dolphins in Super Bowl VII and the Baltimore Ravens in Super Bowl XXXV also prevented their opponents from scoring an offensive touchdown or a field goal in a Super Bowl,they did score on extra point attempts.

Superdome redirects here. ... The 1975 NFL season was the 56th regular season of the National Football League. ... Superdome redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 162 miles (260 km)  - Length 497 miles (800 km)  - % water 17. ... The Phoenix metropolitan area, locally known as the Valley of the Sun (or just The Valley), is a metropolitan area that includes Phoenix, Arizona, and all of the rest of Maricopa County, Pinal County, and Yavapai County. ... Date February 4, 2007 Stadium Dolphin Stadium City Miami Gardens, Florida MVP Peyton Manning, Quarterback, Colts Favorite Colts by 7[1] National anthem Billy Joel, ASL performed by Marlee Matlin Coin toss Dan Marino and Norma Hunt[2] Referee Tony Corrente[3] Halftime show Prince and the Florida A&M... Date January 14, 1973 Stadium Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum City Los Angeles, California MVP Jake Scott, Safety Favorite Redskins by 1 National anthem Andy Williams Little Angels of Holy Angels Church, Chicago Coin toss Game referee Referee Tom Bell Halftime show Woody Herman and the University of Michigan Band Attendance... City Baltimore, Maryland Team colors Purple, Black, and Gold Head Coach Brian Billick Owner Steve Bisciotti General manager Ozzie Newsome Mascot Edgar, Allan, and Poe League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1996–present) American Football Conference (1996-present) AFC Central (1996-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team history Baltimore Ravens... Date January 28, 2001 Stadium Raymond James Stadium City Tampa, Florida MVP Ray Lewis, Linebacker Favorite Ravens by 3 National anthem Backstreet Boys Coin toss Marcus Allen, Ottis Anderson, Tom Flores, Bill Parcells Referee Gerald Austin Halftime show Aerosmith, Britney Spears, Nelly, Mary J. Blige and *NSYNC Attendance 71,921...

Officials

  • Referee: Bernie Ulman
  • Umpire: Al Conway
  • Head Linesman: Ed Marion
  • Line Judge: Bruce Alford
  • Field Judge: Richard Dolack
  • Back Judge: Raymond Douglas
  • Alternate Referee: Fred Silva

Note: A seven-official system was not used until 1978 NFL officials (striped shirts) and guests prepare to toss the coin to start the 40th annual Pro Bowl. ... Al Conway (born 1930 in North Kansas City, Missouri) was an American football official in the National Football League (NFL) for 28 seasons from 1969 to 1996. ... Fred Silva Fred Silva (October 18, 1927 – December 3, 2004, born in Oakland, California) was an American football official in the National Football League (NFL) for 21 seasons from 1968 to 1988. ...


Weather Conditions

  • 46 degrees, cloudy

See also

The 1974 NFL season was the 55th regular season of the National Football League. ... The NFL playoffs for the 1974-75 season led up to Super Bowl IX. // Divisional playoff round December 21, 1974 AFC: Oakland Raiders 28, Miami Dolphins 26 at Oakland Coliseum, Oakland, California With 24 seconds left in the game, the Raiders Clarence Davis somehow catches the winning touchdown pass among...

References

  • Super Bowl official website
  • 2006 NFL Record and Fact Book. Time Inc. Home Entertainment. ISBN 1-933405-32-5. 
  • Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. Harper Collins. ISBN 1-933405-32-5. 
  • The Official NFL Encyclopedia Pro Football. NAL Books. ISBN 0-453-00431-8. 
  • The Sporting News Complete Super Bowl Book 1995. ISBN 0-89204-523-X. 
  • http://www.pro-football-reference.com - Large online database of NFL data and statistics
  • Super Bowl play-by-plays from USA Today (Last accessed September 28, 2005)
  • All-Time Super Bowl Odds from The Sports Network (Last accessed October 16, 2005)
Super Bowl
I 1967 | II 1968 | III 1969 | IV 1970 | V 1971 | VI 1972 | VII 1973 | VIII 1974 | IX 1975 | X 1976 | XI 1977 | XII 1978 | XIII 1979 | XIV 1980 | XV 1981 | XVI 1982 | XVII 1983 | XVIII 1984 | XIX 1985 | XX 1986 | XXI 1987 | XXII 1988 | XXIII 1989 | XXIV 1990 | XXV 1991 | XXVI 1992 | XXVII 1993 | XXVIII 1994 | XXIX 1995 | XXX 1996 | XXXI 1997 | XXXII 1998 | XXXIII 1999 | XXXIV 2000 | XXXV 2001 | XXXVI 2002 | XXXVII 2003 | XXXVIII 2004 | XXXIX 2005 | XL 2006 | XLI 2007 | XLII 2008 | XLIII 2009 | XLIV 2010 | XLV 2011 
NFL | Super Bowl Champions | Most Valuable Players | Records | Broadcasters | Halftime | Pre-Super Bowl NFL champions

  Results from FactBites:
 
Super Bowl IX - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1934 words)
Super Bowl IX was the 9th Super Bowl, the championship game of the National Football League (NFL).
Pittsburgh advanced to their first Super Bowl and were playing for a league championship for the first time in team history.
The Vikings came into the season trying to redeem themselves after Super Bowl VIII during the previous year when they became the first team ever to lose two Super Bowls (the other loss was in Super Bowl IV).
Super Bowl XXXV - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1967 words)
Super Bowl XXXV was the 35th Super Bowl, the championship game of the National Football League (NFL).
This was also the first Super Bowl broadcast by CBS not to have the Pat Summerall-John Madden broadcast team since Super Bowl XIV when Tom Brookshier broadcast the game with Summerall.
Gumbel was the host during his first stint with CBS for Super Bowl XXVI and he was the pre-game host for Super Bowls XXX and XXXII when he was with NBC.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m