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Encyclopedia > Super Bowl IV
Super Bowl IV
Image:SuperBowlIV.png
Quarter 1 2 3 4 Tot
Vikings 0 0 7 0 7
Chiefs 3 13 7 0 23
Date January 11, 1970
Stadium Tulane Stadium
City New Orleans, Louisiana
MVP Len Dawson, Quarterback
Favorite Vikings by 12 1/2
National anthem Al Hirt
Coin toss Game referee
Referee John McDonough
Halftime show "Mardi Gras" with Carol Channing
Attendance 80,562
TV in the United States
Network CBS
Announcers Jack Buck, Frank Gifford and Pat Summerall
Nielsen Ratings 39.4
Market share 69
Cost of 30-sec commercial US$78,000

Super Bowl IV was the fourth AFL-NFL Championship Game in professional American football, and the second one (after Super Bowl III) to officially bear the name "Super Bowl". This was the final AFL-NFL Championship Game before the National Football League (NFL) and the American Football League (AFL) merged into one combined league after the season. Image File history File links Super Bowl IV logo, claiming fair use This work is copyrighted. ... City Minneapolis, Minnesota Other nicknames The Vikes, The Purple People Eaters Team colors Purple, Gold, and White Head Coach Brad Childress Owner Zygi Wilf General manager Rob Brzezinski Fight song Skol, Vikings Mascot Ragnar and Vikadontis Rex Local radio Flagship stations: KFAN (1130 AM) Announcers: Paul Allen, Greg Coleman, and... City Kansas City, Missouri Other nicknames {{{nicknames}}} Team colors Red, Gold, and White Head Coach Herman Edwards Owner Lamar Hunt Fight song {{{song}}} Mascot K.C. Wolf Local radio Flagship stations: 101. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... The Athens Olympic Stadium A modern stadium (plural stadiums, Latin plural stadia) is a place, or venue, for (mostly) outdoor sports, concerts or other events, consisting of a field or stage partly or completely surrounded by a structure designed to allow spectators to stand or sit and view the event. ... Tulane Stadium was an outdoor football stadium located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City That Care Forgot Official website: http://www. ... The Super Bowl MVP, or Super Bowl Most Valuable Player, is an award given at the conclusion of the Super Bowl, the NFLs league championship game, to the player deemed to have made the most significant positive impact on the outcome of the game. ... Len Dawson (born June 20, 1935) was an American football quarterback from Purdue University who played for three professional teams, most notably the Kansas City Chiefs. ... Joe Montana, an American quaterback. ... Spread betting is a form of gambling on the outcome of any event where the more accurate the gamble, the more is won and conversely the less accurate the more is lost. ... City Minneapolis, Minnesota Other nicknames The Vikes, The Purple People Eaters Team colors Purple, Gold, and White Head Coach Brad Childress Owner Zygi Wilf General manager Rob Brzezinski Fight song Skol, Vikings Mascot Ragnar and Vikadontis Rex Local radio Flagship stations: KFAN (1130 AM) Announcers: Paul Allen, Greg Coleman, and... Nicholson took the copy Key gave him to a printer, where it was published as a broadside on September 17 under the title The Defence of Fort McHenry, with an explanatory note explaining the circumstances of its writing. ... Al Hirt (November 7, 1922 – April 27, 1999) was a popular trumpeter and bandleader. ... Coin flipping or coin tossing is the practice of throwing a coin in the air to resolve a dispute between two parties or otherwise choose between two alternatives. ... National Football League referee Ed Hochuli signals a touchdown. ... A halftime show is a performance given between the first and second halves or the 2nd and 3rd quarters of a sporting event. ... Mardi Gras (French for Fat Tuesday) is the day before Ash Wednesday, and is also called Shrove Tuesday or Pancake Day. It is the final day of Carnival (English:IPA: and Romance languages:IPA: ). It is a celebration that is held just before the beginning of the Christian liturgical season... Carol Channing photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1956 Carol Channing (born on January 31, 1921 in Seattle, Washington) is an American actress whose career was built largely on two roles, Lorelei Lee in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Dolly Gallagher Levi in Hello Dolly!. She is easily recognized by her distinctive... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... For other uses, see CBS (disambiguation). ... A sportscaster is an announcer on radio or television who specializes in reporting or commenting on sports events. ... John Francis Buck (August 21, 1924 – June 18, 2002), born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, was an American sportscaster, best known for his work announcing Major League Baseball games of the St. ... Frank Newton Gifford (born August 16, 1930 in Santa Monica, California) was an American football player and one of the better-known American sports commentators in the latter part of the 20th century who made the transition from an athlete to broadcasting. ... George Allen Pat Summerall (born May 10, 1930 in Lake City, Florida) is a former American football player and television sportscaster. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are generally referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by the New York City-based firm Nielsen Media Research to determine which shows television viewers watch at what times. ... This article is about general United States currency. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy The first Super Bowl was played in 1967, as commemorated by this stamp issued in 1999 by the United States Postal Service featuring the ticket for that first game. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Date January 12, 1969 Stadium Miami Orange Bowl City Miami, Florida MVP Joe Namath, Quarterback Favorite Colts by 18 National anthem Anita Bryant Coin toss Game referee Referee Tom Bell Halftime show America Thanks with Florida A&M University Attendance 75,389 TV in the United States Network NBC Announcers... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... AFL logo The American Football League (AFL) was a professional league of American football that operated from 1960 to 1969. ... The AFL-NFL Merger of 1970 involved the merger of the two major professional American football leagues in the United States during the time: the National Football League (NFL) and the American Football League (AFL). ...


The game was played on January 11, 1970, at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana. The AFL champion Kansas City Chiefs defeated the NFL champion Minnesota Vikings, 23–7. Even though the Vikings were 13-point favorites coming into the game, the Chiefs defense dominated the game by limiting the Minneosta offense to only 67 rushing yards, forcing 3 interceptions, and recovering 2 fumbles. The victory by the AFL evened the Super Bowl series with the NFL at two games apiece. January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... Tulane Stadium was an outdoor football stadium located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City That Care Forgot Official website: http://www. ... City Kansas City, Missouri Other nicknames {{{nicknames}}} Team colors Red, Gold, and White Head Coach Herman Edwards Owner Lamar Hunt Fight song {{{song}}} Mascot K.C. Wolf Local radio Flagship stations: 101. ... City Minneapolis, Minnesota Other nicknames The Vikes, The Purple People Eaters Team colors Purple, Gold, and White Head Coach Brad Childress Owner Zygi Wilf General manager Rob Brzezinski Fight song Skol, Vikings Mascot Ragnar and Vikadontis Rex Local radio Flagship stations: KFAN (1130 AM) Announcers: Paul Allen, Greg Coleman, and...


Kansas City's Len Dawson became the fourth consecutive winning quarterback to be named Super Bowl MVP, although he became the first one to win it despite throwing one interception. He completing 12 of 17 passes for 142 yards and one touchdown. Dawson also recorded 3 rushing attempts for 11 yards. Len Dawson (born June 20, 1935) was an American football quarterback from Purdue University who played for three professional teams, most notably the Kansas City Chiefs. ... The Super Bowl MVP, or Super Bowl Most Valuable Player, is an award given at the conclusion of the Super Bowl, the NFLs league championship game, to the player deemed to have made the most significant positive impact on the outcome of the game. ...


The crowd of 80,562 was a Super Bowl record for attendance.

Contents


Background

Minnesota Vikings

The Vikings entered the game with an NFL best 12-2 regular season record, leading the older league in total points scored (379) and total points allowed (133). Their defense was anchored by a defensive line nicknamed the "Purple People Eaters", consisting of defensive tackles Gary Larsen and Alan Page, and defensive tackles Carl Eller and Jim Marshall. The secondary was led by defensive backs Bobby Bryant (8 interceptions, 97 return yards), Earsell Mackbee (6 interceptions, 100 return yards), and future Pro Football Hall of Famer Paul Krause (5 interceptions, 82 return yards, 1 touchdown). The Purple People Eaters was the nickname of the Minnesota Vikings football teams defensive line during the 1970s, when the Vikings played in four Super Bowls. ... A defensive tackle from the famous Purple People Eaters for the Minnesota Vikings. ... Alan Cedric Page (born August 7, 1945 in Canton, Ohio) is a former football player who starred as a defensive lineman in the NFL, primarily with the Minnesota Vikings, and then went on to have a distinguished legal career, serving as a current member of the Minnesota Supreme Court. ... Carl Eller (born January 25, 1942) was a professional American football player in the National Football League from 1964 through 1979. ... Jim Marshall (born December 30, 1937) was born in Danville, Kentucky and played college football at Ohio State. ... Bobby Bryant was a cornerback for the Minnesota Vikings. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is technically the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ... Paul Krause (born February 19, 1942 in Flint, Michigan) is a former professional American football player. ...


On offense, quarterback Joe Kapp was known for his superb leadership and his running ability, both throwing on the run and running for extra yards. And when Kapp did take off and run, instead of sliding when he was about to be tackled like most quarterbacks, he lowered his shoulder and went right at the tackler. This style of play earned him the nickname "Indestructible". In the NFL Championship Game against Cleveland Browns, he collided with linebacker Jim Houston while running for a first down, and Houston had to be helped off the field after the play ended. Also, Kapp was known for being an extremely unselfish leader: when he was voted the Vikings' Most Valuable Player, he turned the award down and said that every player on the team was equally valuable. Joe Kapp is an American football quarterback. ... City Cleveland, Ohio Other nicknames {{{nicknames}}} Team colors Brown, Orange, and White Head Coach Romeo Crennel Owner Randy Lerner General manager Phil Savage Fight song {{{song}}} Mascot CB, Chomps, TD, and Trapper Local radio Flagship stations: WMMS (100. ...


Running back Dave Osborn was the team's top rusher with 643 yards and 7 touchdowns. He also caught 22 passes for 236 yards and another touchdown. In the passing game, Pro Bowl wide receiver Gene Washington averaged 21.1 yards per catch by recording 821 yards and 9 touchdowns of off just 39 receptions. Wide receiver John Henderson caught 34 passes for 553 yards and 5 touchdowns. The Vikings offensive line was anchored by Pro Bowlers Grady Alderman and Mick Tingelhoff. Tackle during 2006 Pro Bowl in Hawaii A top cheerleader from each team takes part in the 2006 Pro Bowl in Hawaii The Pro Bowl is the National Football Leagues all-star game. ... John Nathan Henderson (born January 9, 1979, Nashville, Tennessee) is an American Football player who currently plays Defensive Tackle for the Jacksonville Jaguars of the NFL. Categories: | | | ... Grady Alderman (born December 10, 1938) was offensive lineman in the NFL. He played most of his career with the Minnesota Vikings. ... Mick Tingelhoff (born 1940) was a football player in the 1960s and 1970s. ...


Kansas City Chiefs

Meanwhile, it seemed that the Chiefs, and especially quarterback Len Dawson, were jinxed throughout the year. In the second game of the regular season, Dawson suffered a knee injury that kept him from playing the next six games. The Chiefs managed to finish in second place behind the Oakland Raiders in the AFL's Western Division, but only after suffering a tough 10-6 loss to Oakland in the final game of the regular season. After that game, many sports writers and fans heavily criticized the team and Dawson for the poor play calling. Len Dawson (born June 20, 1935) was an American football quarterback from Purdue University who played for three professional teams, most notably the Kansas City Chiefs. ... A jinx, in popular superstition and folklore, is: A sort of curse placed on a person that makes them prey to large numbers of minor misfortunes and other forms of bad luck; A person afflicted with a similar curse, who, while not directly subject to a series of misfortunes, seems... City Oakland, California Other nicknames None Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Art Shell Owner Al Davis General manager Al Davis Fight song None Mascot None Local radio Flagship stations: KSFO (560 AM)-English and KZSF (1370 AM)-Spanish Announcers: George Atkinson, Tom Flores, Greg Papa, and Jim Plunkett...


The Chiefs still managed to clinch a playoff spot. Wanting to set itself up more like the NFL right before the merger, the AFL expanded the playoffs for the 1969 season, by having the second place teams from each division face the first place teams from the other division (Western Champion vs. Eastern Runner-Up, and vice versa). As a result of the new playoff format, many critics thought the Chiefs entered the playoffs through a "back-door" as the runner up in the Western division. But Dawson silenced the critics and led Kansas City to a strong finish in the playoffs, defeating the Jets in the Divisional Playoffs and eliminating the Raiders in the AFL Championship Game, thus essentially making the Chiefs the first wild card team to play in the Super Bowl. In North American professional sports leagues, the term wild card refers to a team that qualifies for championship playoffs without winning their specific subdivision (usually called a conference or division) outright. ...


Still, many people felt that Dawson's level of play in the AFL was not comparable to the NFL. Dawson himself had spent 4 seasons in the NFL as a backup before going to the AFL and becoming one of its top quarterbacks. In his 8 AFL seasons, he had thrown more touchdown passes (182) then any other professional football quarterback during that time. But because many still viewed the AFL as being inferior to the NFL, his records were not considered significant. Dawson's first chance to prove himself against an NFL team ended in failure, with his Chiefs losing 35-10 in Super Bowl I, reinforcing the notion that his success was only due to playing in the "inferior league". Date January 15, 1967 Stadium Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum City Los Angeles MVP Bart Starr, Quarterback Favorite Packers by 14 National anthem University of Arizona and University of Michigan Bands Coin toss Game referee Referee Norm Schachter Halftime show University of Arizona and University of Michigan Bands Attendance 61,946...


Besides Dawson, the Chiefs main offensive weapon was running back Mike Garrett, who rushed for 732 yards and 6 touchdowns. He also recorded 43 receptions for 432 yards and another 2 touchdowns. Running back Robert Holmes had 612 rushing yards, 266 receiving yards, and 5 touchdowns. In the passing game, wide receiver Otis Taylor caught 41 passes for 696 yards and 7 touchdowns. The offensive line was anchored by AFL All-Stars Ed Budde and Jim Tyrer. Mike Garrett (born April 12, 1944 in Los Angeles, California), a graduate of Los Angeless Roosevelt High School won the 1965 Heisman Trophy (best player in the nation) playing tailback (aka running back) for the University of Southern California Trojans. ... This entry is about the television scriptwriter. ... Otis Taylor (born August 11, 1942, in Houston, Texas) was an American college and professional football player, drafted and signed out of Prairie View A&M University by the American Football Leagues Kansas City Chiefs in 1965. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame and the NFL include American Football League All-Star Games in their statistics for Pro Bowls. From 1961 through 1969, the AFL East All-Stars played the AFL West All-Stars, with the exception of 1965, when an AFL All-Star team played the... Ed Budde (born 1940), a product of Rockhurst High School in Kansas City, Missouri and later Michigan State University, was the No. ... Jim Tyrer was an All-American at Ohio State University under Woody Hayes. ...


The Chiefs defense led the AFL in fewest points allowed (177). Like the Vikings, the Chiefs also had an outstanding defensive line, which was led by defensive tackles Buck Buchanan and Curley Culp, and defensive end Jerry Mays. The Chiefs also had AFL All-Star linebacker and future hall of famer Willie Lanier, who recorded 4 interceptions and 1 fumble recovery during the season. The Kansas City secondary was led by defensive backs Emmitt Thomas (9 interceptions for 146 return yards and a touchdown), and Johnny Robinson (8 interceptions for 158 return yards). Junious Buchanan (Born September 10, 1940, in Gainesville, Alabama, Died July 16, 1992) was a former American Football defensive tackle who played for the Kansas City Chiefs. ... Jerry Mays (born 1939) was an American college and professional football player from Southern Methodist University, where he had been a co-captain and an All-Southwest Conference defensive tackle. ... Willie Edward Lanier (August 21, 1945, Clover, Virginia) is a former American Football linebacker who played for the Kansas City Chiefs. ... Emmitt Thomas is an American football Player born June 3, 1943. ... Johnny Robinson was an American college and professional football player from Louisiana State University. ...


Super Bowl pregame news and notes

Many sports writers and fans fully expected that the Vikings would easily defeat the Chiefs. Although the AFL's New York Jets won Super Bowl III at the end of the previous season, many were convinced that it was a fluke. They continued to believe that all of the NFL teams were far and away superior to all of the AFL teams. City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames None Team colors Green and White Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Robert Wood Johnson IV General manager Mike Tannenbaum Fight song None Mascot None Local radio Flagship stations: WABC (770 AM) and WEPN (1050 AM) Announcers: Marty Lyons and Bob Wischusen League/Conference... Date January 12, 1969 Stadium Miami Orange Bowl City Miami, Florida MVP Joe Namath, Quarterback Favorite Colts by 18 National anthem Anita Bryant Coin toss Game referee Referee Tom Bell Halftime show America Thanks with Florida A&M University Attendance 75,389 TV in the United States Network NBC Announcers...


Super Bowl IV provided another chance to show that Dawson belonged at the same level with all of the great NFL quarterbacks. But five days before the Super Bowl, news leaked that his name had been linked to a Detroit federal gambling investigation. Although Dawson was eventually cleared of any charges, the controversy added to the pressure he was already under while preparing for the game, causing him to lose sleep and concentration. Nickname: Motor City Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (Latin for, We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes) Official website: www. ...


Television and entertainment

Super Bowl IV was broadcast in the United States by CBS with play-by-play announcer Jack Buck and color commentators Frank Gifford and Pat Summerall. While the game was sold out at Tulane Stadium, unconditional blackout rules in both leagues prohibited the live telecast from being shown in the New Orleans area. For other uses, see CBS (disambiguation). ... Play-by-play, in broadcasting, means the reporting of a sporting event with a voiceover describing the details of the action of the game in progress. ... John Francis Buck (August 21, 1924 – June 18, 2002), born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, was an American sportscaster, best known for his work announcing Major League Baseball games of the St. ... A color (or colour) commentator is a black member of the broadcasting team for a sporting event who assists the play-by-play announcer by filling in any time when play is not in progress. ... Frank Newton Gifford (born August 16, 1930 in Santa Monica, California) was an American football player and one of the better-known American sports commentators in the latter part of the 20th century who made the transition from an athlete to broadcasting. ... George Allen Pat Summerall (born May 10, 1930 in Lake City, Florida) is a former American football player and television sportscaster. ...


Trumpeters Al Hirt and Doc Severinsen "faced off" during the pregame show in a "Battle of the Horns". Hirt later performed the national anthem, while actress and singer Carol Channing was featured during the halftime show that paid tribute to Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Trumpeter redirects to here. ... Al Hirt (November 7, 1922 – April 27, 1999) was a popular trumpeter and bandleader. ... Carl Hilding Doc Severinsen (born July 7, 1927 in Arlington, Oregon) is an American pop and jazz trumpeter, most known for leading the Tonight Show Band in the Johnny Carson era. ... Carol Channing photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1956 Carol Channing (born on January 31, 1921 in Seattle, Washington) is an American actress whose career was built largely on two roles, Lorelei Lee in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Dolly Gallagher Levi in Hello Dolly!. She is easily recognized by her distinctive... Mardi Gras (French for Fat Tuesday) is the day before Ash Wednesday, and is also called Shrove Tuesday or Pancake Day. It is the final day of Carnival (English:IPA: and Romance languages:IPA: ). It is a celebration that is held just before the beginning of the Christian liturgical season...


Game summary

The Vikings began the game by taking the opening kickoff and marching from their own 20-yard line to the Kansas City 39-yard line, but were forced to put. The Chiefs then drove 42 yards in 8 plays to score on kicker Jan Stenerud's Super Bowl record 48-yard field goal. Minnesota then managed to reach midfield on their next drive, but were forced to punt again. Jan Stenerud (born November 26, 1942, in Fetsund, Norway) is a former football player for the Kansas City Chiefs (1967-1979), Green Bay Packers (1980-1983), and Minnesota Vikings (1984-1985) of the National Football League. ...


On the first play of their ensuing drive, Chiefs quaterback Len Dawson threw a 20-yard completion to wide receiver Frank Pitts, followed by a 9-yard pass to wide receiver Otis Taylor. Four plays later, on the first play of the second half, a pass interference penalty on Vikings defensive back Ed Sharockman nullified Dawson's third down incompletion and gave Kansas City a first down at the Minnesota 31-yard line. However on third down and 4 at the 25-yard line, Vikings cornerback Earsell Mackbee broke up a deep pass intended for Taylor. Stenerud then kicked another field goal to increase the Chiefs lead to 6-0. Len Dawson (born June 20, 1935) was an American football quarterback from Purdue University who played for three professional teams, most notably the Kansas City Chiefs. ... Otis Taylor (born August 11, 1942, in Houston, Texas) was an American college and professional football player, drafted and signed out of Prairie View A&M University by the American Football Leagues Kansas City Chiefs in 1965. ...


On the second play of their next drive, Vikings wide receiver John Henderson fumbled the ball after catching a 16-yard reception, and Chiefs defensive back Johnny Robinson recovered the ball at the Minnesota 46-yard line. But the Vikings made key defensive plays, first with defensive tackle Alan Page stopping running back Mike Garrett for a 1-yard loss, and then safety Paul Krause intercepting Dawson's pass at the 7-yard line. John Nathan Henderson (born January 9, 1979, Nashville, Tennessee) is an American Football player who currently plays Defensive Tackle for the Jacksonville Jaguars of the NFL. Categories: | | | ... Johnny Robinson was an American college and professional football player from Louisiana State University. ... Alan Cedric Page (born August 7, 1945 in Canton, Ohio) is a former football player who starred as a defensive lineman in the NFL, primarily with the Minnesota Vikings, and then went on to have a distinguished legal career, serving as a current member of the Minnesota Supreme Court. ... Mike Garrett (born April 12, 1944 in Los Angeles, California), a graduate of Los Angeless Roosevelt High School won the 1965 Heisman Trophy (best player in the nation) playing tailback (aka running back) for the University of Southern California Trojans. ... Paul Krause (born February 19, 1942 in Flint, Michigan) is a former professional American football player. ...


However, the Vikings could also not take advantage of this turnover. quaterback Joe Kapp's two incompletions and a delay of game penalty forced Minnesota to punt from their own 5-yard line. The Chiefs then took over at the Viking 44-yard line after punter Bob Lee's kick only went 39 yards. A 19-yard run by Pitts on a reverse play then set up another field goal by Stenerud to increase the Chiefs' lead to 9-0. Joe Kapp is an American football quarterback. ... Bob Lee can refer to a number of different people. ...


On the ensuing kickoff, Vikings returner Charlie West fumbled the ball, and Kansas City's Remi Prudhomme recovered it at Minnesota 19-yard line. Defensive tackle Jim Marshall sacked Dawson for an 8-yard loss by on the first play of the drive, but then a 13-yard run by running back Wendell Hayes and a 10-yard reception by Taylor gave the Chiefs a first down at the 4-yard line. Two plays later, running back Mike Garrett's 5-yard touchdown run gave Kansas City a 16-0 lead. Jim Marshall could be: Jim Marshall, the United States politician Jim Marshall, the United Kingdom politician Jim Marshall, owner and founder of Marshall amplification Jim Marshall, a United States football player ... Mike Garrett (born April 12, 1944 in Los Angeles, California), a graduate of Los Angeless Roosevelt High School won the 1965 Heisman Trophy (best player in the nation) playing tailback (aka running back) for the University of Southern California Trojans. ...


West returned the ensuing kickoff 27 yards to the 32-yard line. Then on the first play of the drive, Kapp completed a 27-yard pass to Henderson to advance the ball to the Kansas City 41-yard line, the first time in the game that the Vikings crossed midfield. However, on the next 3 plays, Kapp threw 2 incompletions and was sacked by defensive tackle Buck Buchanan for an 8-yard loss. Then on fourth down, kicker Fred Cox's 56-yard field goal attempt fell short of the goal posts. Junious Buchanan (Born September 10, 1940, in Gainesville, Alabama, Died July 16, 1992) was a former American Football defensive tackle who played for the Kansas City Chiefs. ... Fred Cox is a former National Football League kicker for the Minnesota Vikings throughout his career (1963-1977). ...


In the third quarter, the Vikings managed to build some momentum. After forcing the Chiefs to punt on the opening possession of the second half, Minnesota drove 69 yards in 10 plays to score on fullback Dave Osborn's 4-yard rushing touchdown to cut the lead, 16-7. However, Kansas City responded on their next possession with a 6-play, 82-yard drive to score on Dawson's 46-yard touchdown completion to Taylor three minutes later.


The Chiefs would then go on to shut out the Vikings in the fourth quarter, forcing three interceptions on three Minnesota possessions, to clinch the 23-7 victory. The defeat was total for the Vikings, as even their "Indestructible" quarterback Joe Kapp had to be helped off the field in the fourth quarter after being sacked by Chiefs defensive lineman Aaron Brown.


Garrett was the top rusher of the game, recording 11 carries for 39 yards and a touchdown. He also caught 2 passes for 25 yards and returned a kickoff for 18 yards. Taylor was the Chiefs' leading receiver with 6 catches for 81 yards and a touchdown. Kapp finished the game with 16 of 25 completions for 183 yards, with 2 interceptions. Henderson was the top receiver of the game with 7 catches for 111 yards.


Scoring Summary

  • KC - FG Stenerud 48
  • KC - FG Stenerud 32
  • KC - FG Stenerud 25
  • KC - Garrett 5 run (Stenerud kick)
  • MIN - Osborn 4 run (Cox kick)
  • KC - Taylor 46 pass from Dawson (Stenerud kick)

Trivia

  • The Chiefs' Hank Stram became the first professional football coach to wear a microphone for NFL Films during the game.

Hank Stram being carried off of the field following his victory in Super Bowl IV with the Kansas City Chiefs Hank Stram (January 3, 1923 – July 4, 2005), was a former American Football coach. ... NFL Films is a Mount Laurel, New Jersey-based company devoted to producing commercials, television programs, feature films, and documentaries on the National Football League. ...

Officials

  • Referee: John McDonough (AFL)
  • Umpire: Lou Palazzi (NFL)
  • Head Linesman: Harry Kessel (AFL)
  • Line Judge: Bill Schleibaum (NFL)
  • Field Judge: Charlie Musser (AFL)
  • Back Judge: Tom Kelleher (NFL)

Note: A seven-official system was not used until 1978 National Football League referee Ed Hochuli signals a touchdown. ...


See also

The 1969 NFL season was the 50th regular season of the National Football League, and the last one before the AFL-NFL Merger. ... The 1969 NFL playoffs determined who would represent the NFL in Super Bowl IV. This was the last NFL playoff tournament before the AFL-NFL Merger. ... From 1960 to 1968, the American Football League determined its champion via a single playoff game between the winners of its two divisions. ...

References

The Super Bowl
I 1967 | II 1968 | III 1969 | IV 1970 | V 1971 | VI 1972 | VII 1973 | VIII 1974 | IX 1975 | X 1976 | XI 1977 | XII 1978 | XIII 1979 | XIV 1980 | XV 1981 | XVI 1982 | XVII 1983 | XVIII 1984 | XIX 1985 | XX 1986 | XXI 1987 | XXII 1988 | XXIII 1989 | XXIV 1990 | XXV 1991 | XXVI 1992 | XXVII 1993 | XXVIII 1994 | XXIX 1995 | XXX 1996 | XXXI 1997 | XXXII 1998 | XXXIII 1999 | XXXIV 2000 | XXXV 2001 | XXXVI 2002 | XXXVII 2003 | XXXVIII 2004 | XXXIX 2005 | XL 2006 | XLI 2007 | XLII 2008 | XLIII 2009 | XLIV 2010 | XLV 2011 | XLVI 2012 | XLVII 2013 | XLVIII 2014 | XLIX 2015
NFL | Super Bowl Champions | Most Valuable Players | Broadcasters | Pre-Super Bowl NFL champions

 
 

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