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Encyclopedia > Super Bowl III
Super Bowl III
Image:SuperBowlIII.png
1 2 3 4 Total
Jets 0 7 6 3 16
Colts 0 0 0 7 7
Date January 12, 1969
Stadium Miami Orange Bowl
City Miami, Florida
MVP Joe Namath, Quarterback
Favorite Colts by 18
National anthem Anita Bryant
Coin toss Tom Bell
Referee Tom Bell
Halftime show "America Thanks" with Florida A&M University
Attendance 75,389
TV in the United States
Network NBC
Announcers Curt Gowdy, Al DeRogatis and Kyle Rote
Nielsen Ratings 36.0
Market share 71
Cost of 30-second commercial US$55,000

Super Bowl III was the third AFL-NFL Championship Game in professional American football, but the first to officially bear the name "Super Bowl" (The two previous AFL-NFL Championship Games would retroactively be called "Super Bowls" as well). This game is regarded as one of the biggest upsets in American sports history. The heavy underdog American Football League (AFL) champion New York Jets defeated the National Football League (NFL) champion Baltimore Colts, 16–7, in the first Super Bowl victory for the AFL. Image File history File links SuperBowlIII.png Super Bowl III logo, claiming fair use File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White Team colors Green and White Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970... There have been two unrelated American football teams called the Baltimore Colts based in Baltimore, Maryland. ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Telstra Stadium in Sydney, Australia is capable of being converted from a rectangular rugby football field to an oval for cricket and Australian rules football games This article is about the building type. ... The Miami Orange Bowl is a stadium in the City of Miami, Florida, near downtown. ... Nickname: The Magic City Location in Miami-Dade County and the state of Florida. ... The Super Bowl MVP, or Super Bowl Most Valuable Player, is an award given at the conclusion of the Super Bowl, the National Football Leagues championship game, to the player deemed to have made the most significant positive impact on the outcome of the game. ... Joseph William Joe Willie Namath (born May 31, 1943), also known as Broadway Joe, was an American football Hall of Fame quarterback in the American Football League and National Football League during the 1960s and 1970s. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... Spread betting is a form of gambling on the outcome of any event where the more accurate the gamble, the more is won and conversely the less accurate the more is lost. ... There have been two unrelated American football teams called the Baltimore Colts based in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Nicholson took the copy Key had given him to a printer, who published it as a broadside on 17 September, 1814 under the title Defence of Fort McHenry, with a note explaining the circumstances of its writing. ... Anita Jane Bryant (born March 25, 1940, in Barnsdall, Oklahoma) is an American singer who made a series of television commercials for Florida orange juice. ... Coin flipping or coin tossing is the practice of throwing a coin in the air to resolve a dispute between two parties or otherwise choose between two alternatives. ... NFL officials (striped shirts) and guests prepare to toss the coin to start the 40th annual Pro Bowl. ... A halftime show is a performance given between the first and second halves or the 2nd and 3rd quarters of a sporting event. ... Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, commonly known as Florida A&M or FAMU (pronounced fam-you), is a historically black university located in Tallahassee, Florida, the state capital, and is one of eleven institutions in Floridas State University System. ... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... NBC (an acronym for National Broadcasting Company) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... A sportscaster is an announcer on radio or television who specializes in reporting or commenting on sports events. ... Curtis Edward Gowdy (July 31, 1919 – February 20, 2006) was an American sportscaster, well-known as the longtime voice of the Boston Red Sox and for his coverage of many nationally-televised sporting events, primarily for NBC Sports in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Al DeRogatis (born May 5, 1927 in Newark, New Jersey; died December 26, 1995 in Spring Lake, New Jersey) was an American football player and television sportscaster. ... Kyle Rote Born October 27, 1928 Died August 15, 2002 Kyle Rote, an All-American running back at Southern Methodist University, Class of 1951, played for 11 years for the New York Giants, 1951-1961. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy The first Super Bowl was played in 1967, as commemorated by this stamp issued in 1999 by the United States Postal Service featuring the ticket for that first game. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... An underdog is a person or group in a competition, frequently in electoral politics, sports, and creative works, who is popularly expected to lose. ... AFL logo The American Football League (AFL) was a professional league of American football that operated from 1960 to 1969. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White Team colors Green and White Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... City Indianapolis, Indiana Team colors Dark Blue and White Head Coach Tony Dungy Owner Jim Irsay General manager Bill Polian Mascot Blue League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002...


The game was played on January 12, 1969 at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida. Entering Super Bowl III, the NFL champion Colts were heavily favored (in some books, by over 20 points) to defeat the AFL champion Jets. Although the upstart AFL had successfully forced the long-established NFL into a merger agreement three years earlier, the AFL was not generally respected as having the same calibre of talent as the NFL. Plus, the AFL representatives were heavily defeated in the first two Super Bowls. January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... The Miami Orange Bowl is a stadium in the City of Miami, Florida, near downtown. ... Nickname: The Magic City Location in Miami-Dade County and the state of Florida. ... The AFL-NFL Merger of 1970 involved the merger of the two major professional American football leagues in the United States during the time: the National Football League (NFL) and the American Football League (AFL). ...


After boldly guaranteeing a victory prior to the game, Jets quarterback Joe Namath completed 17 out of 28 passes for 206 yards, and was named the Super Bowl's Most Valuable Player. New York recorded 337 total yards, forced 5 turnovers and limited Baltimore to only one touchdown. Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... Joseph William Joe Willie Namath (born May 31, 1943), also known as Broadway Joe, was an American football Hall of Fame quarterback in the American Football League and National Football League during the 1960s and 1970s. ... The Super Bowl MVP, or Super Bowl Most Valuable Player, is an award given at the conclusion of the Super Bowl, the National Football Leagues championship game, to the player deemed to have made the most significant positive impact on the outcome of the game. ...

Contents

Background

Baltimore Colts

To many observers, the Colts were a surprise choice to make it to the Super Bowl because of the way they started the regular season. Starting quarterback Johnny Unitas, considered by some to be the best quarterback in NFL history, suffered an injury to his elbow on his throwing arm early in the season. His replacement, veteran backup Earl Morrall, had played for four different teams in 12 years and had never been a permanent starter on any of them. But Morrall surprised everyone by leading the Colts to a 13-1 record and winning the NFL Most Valuable Player Award. He threw for 2,909 yards and 26 touchdowns, with 17 interceptions, giving him the highest passer rating in the league (93.2) during the regular season. His performance was so impressive that Colts coach Don Shula decided to keep Morrall in the starting lineup after Unitas was healthy enough to play. The Colts had won 10 games in a row, including four shutouts. In those 10 games, they had allowed only seven touchdowns. Then, the Colts avenged their sole regular season loss against the Cleveland Browns by crushing them, 34-0, in the NFL Championship Game. Many people thought the Colts were one of the best teams of all time. John Constantine Johnny Unitas (May 7, 1933 – September 11, 2002) was a professional American football player in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. ... Earl Edwin Morrall (born May 17, 1934, in Muskegon, Michigan) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. ... The NFL Most Valuable Player Award is given by various entities, most notably the Associated Press, to the player who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... Passer rating is a measure of the performance of quarterbacks or any other passers in American football and Canadian football. ... Donald Francis Shula (born January 4, 1930 in Grand River, Ohio) is a former professional football coach for the National Football League. ... ...


The Colts offense ranked second in the NFL in points scored (402). Wide receivers Jimmy Orr (29 receptions, 743 yards, 6 touchdowns) and Wille Richardson (37 receptions, 698 yards, 8 touchdowns) provided Baltimore with two deep threats, with Orr averaging 25.6 yards per catch, and Richardson averaging 18.9. Tight end John Mackey also recorded 45 receptions for 644 yards and 5 touchdowns. Pro Bowl running back Tom Matte was the team's top rusher with 662 yards and 9 touchdowns. He also caught 25 passes for 275 yards and another touchdown. Running backs Terry Cole and Jerry Hill combined for 778 rushing yards and 236 receiving yards. Jimmy Orr (born November 4, 1935, in Seneca, South Carolina) is a former American Football wide receiver who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Colts for 13 seasons from 1958 to 1970. ... John Mackey (born September 24, 1941, New York, New York) is a former American Football tight end who played for the Baltimore Colts and the San Diego Chargers. ... The Pro Bowl is the National Football Leagues all-star game. ... Tom Matte (born 1939, near Pittsburgh) was an American football player who played running back in the NFL in the 1960s and 1970s and earned a Super Bowl Ring. ... Category: Possible copyright violations ... Jerry Hill, born July 25, 1961 in Brandywine, MD, is a former NASCAR driver. ...


The Colts defense led the NFL in fewest points allowed (144, tying the then all-time league record), and ranked third in total rushing yards allowed (1,339). Bubba Smith, a 6'7 295 pound defensive end considered the NFL's best pass rusher, anchored the line. Linebacker Mike Curtis was considered one of the top linebackers in the NFL. Baltimore secondary consisted of defensive backs Bobby Boyd (8 interceptions), Rick Volk (6 interceptions), Lenny Lyles (5 interceptions), and Jerry Logan (3 interceptions). The Colts were the only NFL team to routinely play a zone defense. That gave them an advantage in the NFL because the other NFL teams were inexperienced against a zone defense. (This would not give them an advantage over the Jets, however, because zone defenses were common in the AFL and the Jets knew how to attack them.)[1] Charles Aaron Bubba Smith (born February 28, 1945 in Orange, Texas) is an American actor and former athlete. ... Mike Curtis (born March 27, 1943) is a former American Football player for the Baltimore Colts, the Seattle Seahawks and the Washington Redskins who played 14 seasons from 1965 to 1978 in the National Football League. ... Bobby Boyd (born December 3, 1937) is a former defensive back who played for the Baltimore Colts in a nine year career from 1960 to 1968. ... Richard Robert Volk (born March 15, 1945 in Toledo, Ohio) was an football player. ... Lenny Lyles (born January 26, 1936 in Nashville, Tennessee), is a former professional American Football defensive back. ... Jerry Don Logan (born August 27, 1941 in Graham, Texas) was an football player. ...


New York Jets

The New York Jets, led by head coach Weeb Ewbank, finished the season with an 11-3 regular season record (one of the losses was to the Oakland Raiders in the infamous Heidi Game) and barely defeated the Raiders, 27-23, in the AFL Championship Game, after recovering a fumbled lateral on their own 27-yard line with less than two minutes left. Wilbur Weeb Ewbank (May 6, 1907 - November 17, 1998) was an American professional football coach. ... City Oakland, California Other nicknames The Silver and Black, Da Raidahs Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Lane Kiffin Owner Al Davis General manager Michael Lombardi League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC... In American football, the Heidi Game (also sometimes called the Heidi Bowl) refers to a famous 1968 American Football League (AFL) game between the New York Jets and the Oakland Raiders, played on November 17 in Oakland, California. ...


Jets quarterback Joe Namath threw for 3,147 yards during the regular season, but completed just 49.2 percent of his passes, and threw more interceptions (17) than touchdowns (15). Still, he led the offense effectively enough for them to finish the regular season with more total points scored (419) than Baltimore. More importantly, Namath usually found ways to win. For example, late in the fourth quarter of the AFL championship game, Namath threw an interception that allowed the Raiders to take the lead. But he then made up for his mistake by completing 3 consecutive passes on the ensuing drive, advancing the ball 68 yards in just 55 seconds to score a touchdown to regain the lead for New York. Joseph William Joe Willie Namath (born May 31, 1943), also known as Broadway Joe, was an American football Hall of Fame quarterback in the American Football League and National Football League during the 1960s and 1970s. ...


The Jets had a number of offensive weapons that Namath used. Future Hall of Fame wide receiver Don Maynard had the best season of his career, catching 57 passes for 1,297 yards (an average of 22.8 yards per catch) and 10 touchdowns. Wide receiver George Sauer recorded 66 receptions for 1,141 yards and 3 touchdowns. Fullback Matt Snell was the top rusher on the team with 747 yards and 6 touchdowns, while halfback Emerson Boozer contributed 441 yards and 5 touchdowns, despite a 3.1 average per carry. Meanwhile, kicker Jim Turner made 34 field goals and 43 extra points for a combined total of 145 points. The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ... The very first New York Titan, Don Maynard (born 1935) of Texas Western College (now University of Texas at El Paso) was an example of the lack of player-evaluation skills of NFL teams in the 1960s. ... George H. Sauer(December 11, 1910 to February 5, 1994) was the head football coach at the University of Kansas from 1946 to 1947. ... Though New York Jets owner Sonny Werblin made history with his 1965 acquisition of Joe Namath, Werblin’s first coup over the NFL was the 1964 signing of Ohio State‘s powerful fullback Matt Snell (born 1941). ... Emerson Boozer (born July 4, 1943) was a running back in the AFL and the NFL. Other American Football League players Georgia Sports Hall of Fame Friday Nights, Emerson Boozer, and Me Categories: | | | | | | ...


The Jets defense led the AFL in total rushing yards allowed (1,195). Gerry Philbin, John Elliott, and Verlon Biggs anchored the defensive line. The Jets linebacking core was led by middle linebacker Al Atkinson. The secondary was led by defensive backs Johnny Sample, who recorded 7 interceptions, and Jim Hudson, who recorded 5. Gerry Philbin, a defensive end from the University of Buffalo, joined the New York Jets in 1964 and played stellar defense for them for nine seasons. ... John Elliott (born October 26, 1944 in Beaumont, Texas) was an American college and professional football defensive tackle. ... Verlon Biggs (born March 16, 1943 - June, 1994) was a defensive end in the AFL and NFL. He played for the American Football League New York Jets in Super Bowl III but felt he didnt receive enough credit for the Jets play-off win against the Raiders in the... Al Atkinson was a linebacker in the NFL. For most of his career, he played for the New York Jets. ... John B. Sample(June 15, 1937 - April 26, 2005) was an American football defensive back who played for the Baltimore Colts(1958-1960), Pittsburgh Steelers(1961-1962), Washington Redskins(1963-1965) and New York Jets(1966-1968). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Several of the Jets' players had been cut by NFL teams. Maynard had been cut by the New York Giants after they lost the 1958 NFL Championship to the Colts. "I kept a little bitterness in me," he says.[2] Sample had been cut by the Colts. "I was almost in a frenzy by the time the game arrived," he says. "I held a private grudge against the Colts. I was really ready for that game. All of us were."[2] Offensive tackle Winston Hill had been cut five years earlier by the Colts as a rookie in training camp. "Ordell Braase kept making me look bad in practice," he says.[2] Hill would be blocking Braase in Super Bowl III. City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Big Blue Wrecking Crew, Big Blue, G-Men, The Jints, The New York Football Giants Team colors Royal Blue, Red, Gray, and White Head Coach Tom Coughlin Owner John Mara (50%) and Steve Tisch (50%) General manager Jerry Reese League/Conference affiliations National... The 1958 National Football League Championship Game was played on December 28, 1958 at Yankee Stadium in New York City. ... Winston Hill (born October 23, 1941) was a Tennis Champion in High School and an American college and professional football player. ... Ordell Braase was a defensive end in the NFL. He played with the Baltimore Colts throughout his career. ...


Super Bowl pregame news and notes

After winning the AFL championship, Namath said there were at least four quarterbacks in the AFL, including himself and his backup, 38-year old Babe Parilli, who were better than Earl Morrall.[2]


"The Guarantee"

Despite the Jets' accomplishments, AFL teams were generally not regarded as having the same caliber of talent as NFL teams. However, three days before the game, Namath appeared at the Miami Touchdown Club and boldly predicted to the audience, "We're (Jets) gonna win the game. I guarantee it." Namath later claimed he only made his famous "guarantee" in response to a rowdy Colts fan at the club, who boasted the Colts would easily defeat the Jets. Namath later claimed he never intended to make such a public prediction, and never would have done so if he had not been confronted by the fan.[3] According to Matt Snell, all of the Jets, not just Namath, were insulted and angry that they were 18-point underdogs.[1] Considering the differences between the leagues, however, the Colts should have been heavily favored. Some analysts have suggested that the Jets' record in the NFL might have been 9-5, so against the Colts in the Super Bowl a 9 or 10-point spread would not have been unreasonable.


Television and entertainment

The game was broadcast in the United States by NBC with Curt Gowdy handling the play-by-play duties and color commentators Al DeRogatis and Kyle Rote in the broadcast booth. Also helping with NBC's coverage were Jim Simpson and Pat Summerall. In an interview done by NFL films, Gowdy called it the most memorable game he ever called because of its historical significance.[citation needed] While the Orange Bowl was sold out for the game, the live telecast was not shown in Miami due to both leagues' unconditional blackout rules at the time. NBC (an acronym for National Broadcasting Company) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Curtis Edward Gowdy (July 31, 1919 – February 20, 2006) was an American sportscaster, well-known as the longtime voice of the Boston Red Sox and for his coverage of many nationally-televised sporting events, primarily for NBC Sports in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Play-by-play, in broadcasting, is a North American term and means the reporting of a sporting event with a voiceover describing the details of the action of the game in progress. ... A color commentator (or colour commentator in Canada), sometimes known as a color analyst (or colour analyst), is a member of the broadcasting team for a sporting event who assists the play-by-play announcer by filling in any time when play is not in progress. ... Al DeRogatis (born May 5, 1927 in Newark, New Jersey; died December 26, 1995 in Spring Lake, New Jersey) was an American football player and television sportscaster. ... Kyle Rote Born October 27, 1928 Died August 15, 2002 Kyle Rote, an All-American running back at Southern Methodist University, Class of 1951, played for 11 years for the New York Giants, 1951-1961. ... Jim Simpson is a retired American sportscaster, known for his smooth delivery as a play-by-play man and his versatility in covering many different sports. ... George Allen Pat Summerall (born May 10, 1930 in Lake City, Florida) is a former American football player and well-known television sportscaster, having worked at CBS, FOX, and, briefly, ESPN. Summerall is best known for his work with John Madden on CBS and Fox NFL telecasts, and in 1999...


For the first time, famous celebrities appeared for the Super Bowl ceremonies. Entertainer Bob Hope led a pregame ceremony honoring the astronauts of Project Apollo and the recently completed Apollo 8 mission, the first manned flight around the Moon. An entertainer is someone who is hired to entertain people. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... Project Apollo was a series of human spaceflight missions undertaken by the United States of America (NASA) using the Apollo spacecraft and Saturn launch vehicle, conducted during the years 1961–1974. ... Apollo 8 was the second manned mission of the Apollo space program, in which Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot James Lovell and Lunar Module Pilot William Anders became the first humans to orbit around the Moon. ...


Singer Anita Bryant later sang the national anthem, while the Florida A&M University band performed during the "America Thanks" halftime show. Anita Jane Bryant (born March 25, 1940, in Barnsdall, Oklahoma) is an American singer who made a series of television commercials for Florida orange juice. ... Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, commonly known as Florida A&M or FAMU (pronounced fam-you), is a historically black university located in Tallahassee, Florida, the state capital, and is one of eleven institutions in Floridas State University System. ...


The NFL Network reaired the original NBC Broadcast of Super Bowl III in the days leading up to Super Bowl XLI.


Game summary

New York entered the game with their primary deep threat, wide receiver Don Maynard, playing with a pulled hamstring. But his 112-yard, two touchdown performance against the Oakland Raiders in the AFL championship game made the Colts defense pay him special attention (they didn't know he was injured). Using Maynard as a decoy (he had no receptions in the game) Joe Namath was able to take advantage of single coverage on wide receiver George Sauer, Jr.. (After studying the Colts' zone defense, Ewbank had told his receivers, "Find the dead spots in the zone, hook up, and Joe will hit you.")[1] The Jets had a conservative game plan, emphasizing the run and short, high-percentage passes to minimize interceptions. Meanwhile, with the help of many fortunate plays, the Jets defense kept the Colts offense from scoring for most of the game. The very first New York Titan, Don Maynard (born 1935) of Texas Western College (now University of Texas at El Paso) was an example of the lack of player-evaluation skills of NFL teams in the 1960s. ... City Oakland, California Other nicknames The Silver and Black, Da Raidahs Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Lane Kiffin Owner Al Davis General manager Michael Lombardi League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC... George Sauer, Jr. ...


The game started badly for the Jets. After taking the opening kickoff, they gained only 15 yards on five plays and were forced to punt. (However, Colts safety Rick Volk was knocked out and sustained a concussion on the game's second play tackling Snell and would miss much of the game.) Then on the Colts' first drive, they advanced the ball from their own 27-yard line to the Jets' 19-yard line in an 11-play drive, aided by a 19-yard catch-and-run from Earl Morrall to tight end John Mackey on their first play. But after two incomplete passes and a quarterback run for no gain, they came up empty when defensive lineman/kicker Lou Michaels' easy 27-yard field goal attempt went wide right. "You could almost feel the steam go out of them," said Snell.[1] Earl Edwin Morrall (born May 17, 1934, in Muskegon, Michigan) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. ... John Mackey (born September 24, 1941, New York, New York) is a former American Football tight end who played for the Baltimore Colts (1963-1971) and the San Diego Chargers (1972). ... Lou Michaels was an American football player who was a standout defensive lineman for the University of Kentucky Wildcats and later for the Baltimore Colts of the National Football League. ...


On the Jets' second possession, Namath threw deep to Maynard, who, despite his pulled hamstring, was open by a step. The ball was overthrown, but the Colts decided to rotate their zone defense to help cover Maynard, leaving Sauer covered one-on-one by Lenny Lyles. (Although the Colts were unaware of Maynard's injury, the Jets were aware that Lyles had been weakened by tonsillitis all week.)[citation needed] Lenny Lyles (born January 26, 1936 in Nashville, Tennessee), is a former professional American Football defensive back. ...


With less than two minutes left in the period, Colts punter David Lee booted a 51-yard kick that pinned the Jets back at their own 4-yard line. Three plays later, Sauer caught a 3-yard pass from Namath, but fumbled while being tackled by Lyles, and Colts linebacker Ron Porter recovered it at New York's 12-yard line. However, on third down (the second play of the second quarter) Baltimore quarterback Earl Morrall's pass was tipped by Jets linebacker Al Atkinson, bounced crazily, high into the air off tight end Tom Mitchell, and was intercepted by Jets cornerback Randy Beverly in the end zone for a touchback. "That was the game in a nutshell," says Matte.[2] Starting from their own 20-yard line, Jets running back Matt Snell rushed on the next 4 plays, advancing the ball 26 yards. (The Jets would have success all day running off left tackle behind the blocking of Winston Hill, who, according to Snell, was overpowering 36-year-old defensive end Ordell Braase, the man who had tormented the rookie Hill in Colts' training camp. Said Snell, "Braase pretty much faded out.")[1] Namath later completed 3 consecutive passes, moving the ball to the Colts 23-yard line. Running back Emerson Boozer gained just 2 yards on the next play, but Snell followed it up with a 12-yard reception at the 9-yard line, a 5-yard run to the 4-yard line, and capped the drive with a 4-yard touchdown run, once again off left tackle. The score gave the Jets a 7-0 lead, and marked the first time in history that an AFL team led in the Super Bowl. David Allen Lee (born 1943) played football for the former Baltimore Colts and subsequently retired from a career as a General Motors executive in Shreveport, the seat of Caddo Parish in northwestern Louisiana. ... Earl Edwin Morrall (born May 17, 1934, in Muskegon, Michigan) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. ... Randy Beverly (born 1944) is a former professional American football player. ... Though New York Jets owner Sonny Werblin made history with his 1965 acquisition of Joe Namath, Werblin’s first coup over the NFL was the 1964 signing of Ohio State‘s powerful fullback Matt Snell (born 1941). ... Emerson Boozer (born July 4, 1943) was a running back in the AFL and the NFL. Other American Football League players Georgia Sports Hall of Fame Friday Nights, Emerson Boozer, and Me Categories: | | | | | | ...


On Baltimore's ensuing drive, a 30-yard completion from Morrall to running back Tom Matte helped the Colts advance to the New York 38-yard line, but they once again failed to score as Jets cornerback Johnny Sample broke up Morrall's third down pass and Micheals' missed his second field goal attempt, this time from 46 yards. Two plays after the Jets took over following the missed field goal, Namath's 35-yard completion to Sauer enabled to New York to eventually reach the Baltimore 32-yard line. But Namath then threw two incompletions and was then sacked on third down by Colts linebacker Dennis Gaubatz for a 2-yard loss. New York kicker Jim Turner tried to salvage the drive with a 41-yard field goal attempt, but he missed. Tom Matte (born 1939, near Pittsburgh) was an American football player who played running back in the NFL in the 1960s and 1970s and earned a Super Bowl Ring. ... John B. Sample(June 15, 1937 - April 26, 2005) was an American football defensive back who played for the Baltimore Colts(1958-1960), Pittsburgh Steelers(1961-1962), Washington Redskins(1963-1965) and New York Jets(1966-1968). ... Dennis Gaubatz was a linebacker in the NFL. Categories: | | ... Jim Turner can refer to: Jim Turner, the American football player Jim Turner, the U.S. Congressman from Texas This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


On their ensuing possession, Baltimore went from their own 20-yard line to New York's 15-yard line in three plays, aided by Matte's Super Bowl record 58-yard run. But with 2 minutes left in the half, Morrall was intercepted again, at the Jets' 2-yard line, deflating the Colts considerably. The Jets then were forced to punt on their ensuing drive, and the Colts advanced the ball to New York's 41-yard line. What followed is one of the most famous plays in Super Bowl history. Baltimore tried a flea flicker play which had a huge impact on the momentum of the game. Matte ran off right tackle after taking a handoff, then pitched the ball back to Morrall. The play completely fooled the Jets defense, leaving receiver Jimmy Orr wide open and waving frantically near the end zone for an easy touchdown. But Morrall failed to spot him due to the presence of the similarly blue-clad half-time marching band at the back of the endzone,[citation needed] and instead threw a pass intended for running back Jerry Hill that was intercepted by Jets safety Jim Hudson as time expired, maintaining the Jets' 7-0 lead at halftime. (The irony is that earlier in the season, against the Atlanta Falcons, on the same play, Morrall had completed the same pass for a touchdown to Orr, the play's intended target.) Had Morrall thrown to Orr, many believe the game would have turned in the Colts' favor. A flea-flicker is an unorthodox play (often called a trick play) in American football. ... Jimmy Orr (born November 4, 1935, in Seneca, South Carolina) is a former American Football wide receiver who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Colts for 13 seasons from 1958 to 1970. ... Jerry Hill, born July 25, 1961 in Brandywine, MD, is a former NASCAR driver. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


The third quarter belonged to the Jets, who controlled the ball for all but three minutes of the period. Baltimore ran only seven offensive plays all quarter, gaining only 11 yards. Matte lost a fumble on the first play from scrimmage in the second half, yet another demoralizing event, which led to Turner's 32-yard field goal to increase the Jets' lead, 10-0. Then, after forcing the Colts to punt again, Namath completed 4 passes for 40 yards to setup Turner's 30-yard field goal to increase the lead, 13-0. On that drive, Namath temporarily went out of the game after injuring his right thumb, and was replaced by backup quarterback Babe Parilli for a few plays. Vito Babe Parilli (born 1930) of the University of Kentucky was an All-American starting quarterback for the Wildcats under Coach Paul Bear Bryant. ...


Said Matt Snell, "By this time, the Colts were pressing. You saw the frustration and worry on all their faces..."[1] Then After Turner's second field goal, with four minutes left in the third quarter, Colts head coach Don Shula took Morrall out of the game and put in the sore-armed Johnny Unitas to see if he could provide a spark to Baltimore's offense. But Unitas could not get the Colts offense moving on their next drive and they were forced to punt again after 3 plays. Then aided by a 39-yard pass from Namath to Sauer, the Jets drove all the way to the Colts 2-yard line. Baltimore's defense wouldn't quit, and kept them out of the end zone, but Turner kicked his third field goal early in the final period to make the score 16-0. Donald Francis Shula (born January 4, 1930 in Grand River, Ohio) is a former professional football coach for the National Football League. ... John Constantine Johnny Unitas (May 7, 1933 – September 11, 2002) was a professional American football player in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. ...


On Baltimore's next possession, they managed to drive all the way to the Jets' 25-yard line. However, Beverly ended the drive by intercepting a pass from Unitas in the end zone, the Jets' fourth interception of the game. New York then drove to the Colts 35-yard line with 7 consecutive running plays, but ended up with no points after Turner missed a 42-yard field goal attempt.


Unitas started out the next drive with 3 incomplete passes, but completed a key 17-yard pass to Orr on fourth down. Ten plays later, aided by three Jets penalties, Baltimore finally scored a touchdown on a 1-yard run by Hill to cut their deficit to 16-7, but with only 3:19 left in the game. The Colts then recovered an onside kick and drove to the Jets 19-yard line with 3 consecutive completions by Unitas, but they turned the ball over on downs after his next 3 passes fell incomplete. That ended any chance of a Baltimore comeback, as the Jets ran the ball for 6 plays before being forced to punt. The announcers (and later commentators of the game) failed to mention that if the Colts had kicked a field goal on fourth down that they would have had 3 time outs left with 2:20 left in the game, and only trailed 16-10. However, considering kicker Michaels' earlier lack of success (one missed FG), going for it on 4th down was somewhat understandable. What is not understandable is that neither NBC commentator Curt Gowdy nor NFL Films have ever made any mention of Shula's decision to go for it with the game on the line. It is difficult to imagine that such a decision being made today would escape any controversy or even discussion. An onside kick is a term used in American football and Canadian football for a play on a kickoff in which the ball is kicked a shorter distance than usual in order for the team that kicked it to regain possession of the ball. ...


When the Colts got the ball back, only 8 seconds remained in the game. Said Matt Snell, "Leaving the field, I saw the Colts were exhausted and in a state of shock. I don't remember any Colt coming over to congratulate me."[1] As he ran off the field, Namath, in a spontaneous show of defiance held up his index finger, signaling "number one."


Years later Morrall said, "I thought we would win handily. We'd only lost twice in our last thirty games. I'm still not sure what happened that day at the Orange Bowl, however; it's still hard to account for."[2] Wrote Matt Snell, "The most distinct image I have from that whole game is of Ordell Braase and some other guys--not so much Mike Curtis--having a bewildered look."[1]


Snell rushed for 121 yards on 30 carries with a touchdown, and caught 4 passes for 40 yards. Sauer caught eight passes for 133 yards. Beverly became the first player in Super Bowl history to record 2 interceptions. Morrall had a terrible day -- just 6 of 17 completions for 71 yards and was intercepted 3 times. Despite not being put into the game until the fourth quarter, Unitas finished with more pass completions (11) and passing yards (110) than Morrall, but he was intercepted once. Matte was the Colts' top rusher with 116 yards on just 11 carries, an average of 10.5 yards per run, and caught 2 passes for 30 yards. The Colts were minus-4 in turnovers, four of five deep in Jet territory, which, along with the turnovers, was the real story of this game.


Scoring Summary

First Quarter: None


Second Quarter

  • NYJ - Matt Snell 4 run (Jim Turner kick) 7-0 NYJ

Third Quarter

  • NYJ - FG Jim Turner 32 10-0 NYJ
  • NYJ - FG Jim Turner 30 13-0 NYJ

Fourth Quarter

  • NYJ - FG Jim Turner 9 16-0 NYJ
  • BAL - Jerry Hill 1 run (Lou Michaels kick) 16-7 NYJ

Starting Lineups

Source:[4]

N.Y. Jets Position Baltimore
OFFENSE
George Sauer, Jr. SE Jimmy Orr
Winston Hill LT Bob Vogel
Bob Talamini LG Glenn Ressler
John Schmitt C Bill Curry
Randy Rasmussen RG Dan Sullivan
Dave Herman RT Sam Ball
Pete Lammons TE John Mackey
Don Maynard FL Willie Richardson
Joe Namath QB Earl Morrall
Emerson Boozer RB Tom Matte
Matt Snell RB Jerry Hill
DEFENSE
Gerry Philbin LE Bubba Smith
Paul Rochester LT Billy Ray Smith Sr.
John Elliott RT Fred Miller
Verlon Biggs RE Ordell Braase
Ralph Baker LLB Mike Curtis
Al Atkinson MLB Dennis Gaubatz
Larry Grantham RLB Don Shinnick
Johnny Sample LCB Bobby Boyd
Randy Beverly RCB Lenny Lyles
Jim Hudson LS Jerry Logan
Bill Baird RS Rick Volk

George Sauer, Jr. ... Jimmy Orr (born November 4, 1935, in Seneca, South Carolina) is a former American Football wide receiver who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Colts for 13 seasons from 1958 to 1970. ... Winston Hill (born October 23, 1941) was a Tennis Champion in High School and an American college and professional football player. ... Robert Louis Vogel (born September 23, 1941 in Columbus, Ohio) was a National Football League offensive lineman from 1963 through 1972. ... Robert Guy Bob Talamini (born January 8, 1939 in Louisville, Kentucky), a stout, 61, 250 lb lineman, earned third-team All-SEC honors at the University of Kentucky and was drafted by the Houston Oilers of the American Football League. ... Glenn Emanuel Ressler (born May 21, 1943 in Dornsife, Pennsylvania) was a National Football League offensive lineman from 1965 through 1974. ... John Schmitt (born November 12, 1942 in Brooklyn, New York) was a center in the National Football League who played ten seasons for the New York Jets, from whom he started in Super Bowl III. Categories: | | | | | | ... Bill Curry is a sports analyst with ESPN. Prior to ESPN, Curry spent 17 years (1980-96) as a head coach in the college ranks, accumulating a 79-98-4 record at Georgia Tech (1980-86), Alabama (1987-89) and Kentucky (1990-96). ... Randall Lee Rasmussen (born May 10, 1945 in St. ... Daniel Joseph Sullivan (born September 1, 1939 in Dorchester, Massachussetts) was a National Football League offensive lineman from 1962 through 1972. ... Dave Herman (born September 3, 1941 in Bryan, Ohio) was a tackle in the National Football League who played ten seasons for the New York Jets, from whom he started in Super Bowl III. Categories: | | | | | | | ... Sam Ball (born June 7, 1944 in Henderson, Kentucky) was a National Football League offensive lineman from 1966 through 1970. ... Pete Lammons (born October 20, 1943 in Crockett, Texas) is a former professional American football player who played tight end for seven seasons for the New York Jets and Green Bay Packers. ... John Mackey can refer to: John Mackey an American football player John Mackey the CEO of Whole Foods Market This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The very first New York Titan, Don Maynard (born 1935) of Texas Western College (now University of Texas at El Paso) was an example of the lack of player-evaluation skills of NFL teams in the 1960s. ... Willie Richardson (born November 17, 1939 in Clarksdale, Mississippi) is a former professional American football player who played wide receiver for nine seasons for the Baltimore Colts and Miami Dolphins. ... Joseph William Joe Willie Namath (born May 31, 1943), also known as Broadway Joe, was an American football Hall of Fame quarterback in the American Football League and National Football League during the 1960s and 1970s. ... Earl Edwin Morrall (born May 17, 1934, in Muskegon, Michigan) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. ... Emerson Boozer (born July 4, 1943) was a running back in the AFL and the NFL. Other American Football League players Georgia Sports Hall of Fame Friday Nights, Emerson Boozer, and Me Categories: | | | | | | ... Tom Matte (born 1939, near Pittsburgh) was an American football player who played running back in the NFL in the 1960s and 1970s and earned a Super Bowl Ring. ... Though New York Jets owner Sonny Werblin made history with his 1965 acquisition of Joe Namath, Werblin’s first coup over the NFL was the 1964 signing of Ohio State‘s powerful fullback Matt Snell (born 1941). ... Jerry Hill, born July 25, 1961 in Brandywine, MD, is a former NASCAR driver. ... Gerry Philbin, a defensive end from the University of Buffalo, joined the New York Jets in 1964 and played stellar defense for them for nine seasons. ... Charles Aaron Bubba Smith (born February 28, 1945 in Orange, Texas) is an American actor and former athlete. ... Paul Rochester (born 1938) attended Michigan State University. ... Billy Ray Smith, Sr. ... John Elliott (born October 26, 1944 in Beaumont, Texas) was an American college and professional football defensive tackle. ... Fred Miller may refer to: Fred Miller (American football player) Fred Miller (politician) from Australia Fred Miller (Michigan politician) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Verlon Biggs (born March 16, 1943 - June, 1994) was a defensive end in the AFL and NFL. He played for the American Football League New York Jets in Super Bowl III but felt he didnt receive enough credit for the Jets play-off win against the Raiders in the... Ordell Braase was a defensive end in the NFL. He played with the Baltimore Colts throughout his career. ... Ralph Baker was an American college and professional football player. ... Mike Curtis is the owner and founder of the comic book publishing company Shanda Fantasy Arts and creator of popular Furry comic Shanda the Panda. ... Al Atkinson was a linebacker in the NFL. For most of his career, he played for the New York Jets. ... Dennis Gaubatz was a linebacker in the NFL. Categories: | | ... Larry Grantham is an American Football player, born 1938. ... Don Shinnick was a linebacker who played thirteen seasons in the NFL. Categories: | | | | ... John B. Sample(June 15, 1937 - April 26, 2005) was an American football defensive back who played for the Baltimore Colts(1958-1960), Pittsburgh Steelers(1961-1962), Washington Redskins(1963-1965) and New York Jets(1966-1968). ... Bobby Boyd (born December 3, 1937) is a former defensive back who played for the Baltimore Colts in a nine year career from 1960 to 1968. ... Randy Beverly (born 1944) is a former professional American football player. ... Lenny Lyles (born January 26, 1936 in Nashville, Tennessee), is a former professional American Football defensive back. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Jerry Don Logan (born August 27, 1941 in Graham, Texas) was an football player. ... Bill Baird was an American college and professional football player. ... Richard Robert Volk (born March 15, 1945 in Toledo, Ohio) was an football player. ...

Trivia

  • This game was the only time a Super Bowl was played at the same site as the previous year's Super Bowl. Super Bowl II was also played at the Orange Bowl.
  • Joe Namath had the same room at the Galt Ocean Mile Hotel as Vince Lombardi had the previous year for Super Bowl II.[2]
  • This game is thought to be the earliest surviving Super Bowl game preserved on videotape in its entirety.
  • The Jets did not throw a single pass in the fourth quarter.
  • Namath is the only Super Bowl MVP quarterback to not throw a touchdown in his MVP performance.
  • Baltimore defensive end-turned actor, Bubba Smith, has stated in several interviews that he believes that Super Bowl III was rigged.[citation needed]
  • Shortly after the Colts were declared 18-point favorites, a New York professional astrologer named Jonathan Booth predicted the Jets would win. When asked if he would guarantee it, he said, "Only a fool would guarantee such a thing."[2]
  • Matt Snell says that Namath got the "I guarantee it" line from Jets tight end Pete Lammons, who, tiring of watching film of the Colts defense, stood up and said "Don't show us any more. I guarantee we'll beat these guys if they play the same way."[1]
  • When the Jets returned to New York, they inadvertently left the Super Bowl trophy and the game ball in the hotel vault.[5]

Date January 14, 1968 Stadium Miami Orange Bowl City Miami, Florida MVP Bart Starr, Quarterback Favorite Packers by 13½ National anthem Grambling State University Band Coin toss Game referee Referee Jack Vest Halftime show Grambling State University Band Attendance 75,546 TV in the United States Network CBS Announcers Ray... Pete Lammons (born October 20, 1943 in Crockett, Texas) is a former professional American football player who played tight end for seven seasons for the New York Jets and Green Bay Packers. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... The AFL-NFL Merger of 1970 involved the merger of the two major professional American football leagues in the United States during the time: the National Football League (NFL) and the American Football League (AFL). ... City Indianapolis, Indiana Team colors Dark Blue and White Head Coach Tony Dungy Owner Jim Irsay General manager Bill Polian Mascot Blue League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002... The American Football Conference (AFC) is one of the two conferences of the National Football League (NFL). ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White Team colors Green and White Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970...

Officials

  • Referee: Tom Bell (NFL)
  • Umpire: Walt Parker (AFL)
  • Head Linesman: George Murphy (NFL)
  • Line Judge: Cal Lepore (AFL)
  • Field Judge: Joe Gonzalez (NFL)
  • Back Judge: Jack Reader (AFL)

Note: A seven-official system was not used until 1978


Weather Conditions

  • 73 degrees, overcast, threat of rain

See also

The 1968 NFL season was the 49th regular season of the National Football League. ... The 1968 NFL playoffs determined who would represent the NFL in Super Bowl III. // Conference playoff games Eastern Conference Cleveland Browns 31, Dallas Cowboys 20 December 21, 1968 at Cleveland Municipal Stadium, Cleveland, Ohio Scoring CLE - FG Cockroft 38 DAL - Howley 44 fumble return (Clark kick) DAL - FG Clark 16... From 1960 to 1968, the American Football League determined its champion via a single playoff game between the winners of its two divisions (although ties in the standings during the 1963 and 1968 seasons necessitated a divisional playoff game). ... Since the National Football League was founded in 1920, it has grown from an informal network of teams based mostly in small towns and cities into the most popular and successful sports league in the United States. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Matt Snell, "Super Bowl III," Super Bowl: The Game of Their Lives, Danny Peary, editor. Macmillan, 1997. ISBN 0-02-860841-0
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Shelby Strother, "It came with a Guarantee," The Super Bowl: Celebrating a Quarter-Century of America's Greatest Game. Simon and Schuster, 1990 ISBN 0-671-72798-2
  3. ^ http://www.profootballhof.com/history/release.jsp?release_id=822
  4. ^ Neft, David S., Cohen, Richard M., and Korch, Rick. The Complete History of Professional Football from 1892 to the Present. 1994 ISBN 0312114354
  5. ^ Shelby Strother, NFL Top 40, p. 103. Viking, 1988. ISBN 0-670-82490-9
  • http://www.superbowl3.net - Analysis of Super Bowl III
  • He guaranteed it: Joe Namath made the Super Bowl truly 'Super' from the Pro Football Hall of Fame
  • Super Bowl official website
  • 2006 NFL Record and Fact Book. Time Inc. Home Entertainment. ISBN 1-933405-32-5. 
  • Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. Harper Collins. ISBN 1-933405-32-5. 
  • The Official NFL Encyclopedia Pro Football. NAL Books. ISBN 0-453-00431-8. 
  • The Sporting News Complete Super Bowl Book 1995. ISBN 0-89204-523-X. 
  • http://www.pro-football-reference.com - Large online database of NFL data and statistics
  • Super Bowl play-by-plays from USA Today (Last accessed September 28, 2005)
  • All-Time Super Bowl Odds from The Sports Network (Last accessed October 16, 2005)
Super Bowl
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NFL | Super Bowl Champions | Most Valuable Players | Records | Broadcasters | Halftime | Pre-Super Bowl NFL champions

  Results from FactBites:
 
Super Bowl III - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3326 words)
Super Bowl III was the third AFL-NFL Championship Game in professional American football, but the first to officially bear the name "Super Bowl" (The two previous AFL-NFL Championship Games would retroactively be called "Super Bowls" as well).
Super Bowl II was also played at the Orange Bowl.
Namath is the only Super Bowl MVP quarterback to not throw a touchdown in his MVP performance.
Super Bowl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3418 words)
The last time the Los Angeles area hosted the game was Super Bowl XXVII in 1993; the area is currently not considered a possible venue after the league's two teams vacated the city in 1995: the Raiders moved back to Oakland, California, and the Rams moved to St.
However, Super Bowl XIV (which involved the then-Los Angeles Rams) was played at nearby Pasadena's Rose Bowl stadium; and Super Bowl XIX (which involved the San Francisco 49ers) was played at the nearby Stanford Stadium on the Stanford University campus near Palo Alto.
Super Bowl VII with Miami Dolphins kicker Garo Yepremian's failed field goal attempt is perhaps the most dramatic example of a near shutout.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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