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Encyclopedia > SupaDriv
Part of the series on
Screw draw types
Slotted
Phillips
Pozidriv
Torx
Hex
Robertson
Tri-Wing
Torq-Set
Spanner Head
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The Pozidriv® is a type of screw head and screwdriver, jointly patented by the Phillips Screw Company and American Screw Company. It is similar in appearance to the classic Phillips cross-head, but in fact is substantially different. The largest advantage it offers is that it does not cam out, allowing great torque to be applied. Screws come in a variety of shapes and sizes for different purposes. ... Image File history File links Screw_a. ... Image File history File links Screw_b. ... Phillips Head refers to the shape of the head of the screw as a plus sign. ... Image File history File links Screw_c. ... Image File history File links Screw_d. ... TORX, developed by Textron Fastening Systems (formerly Camcar Textron), is the trademark for a type of screw head characterized by a 6-point star-shaped pattern (in the same way that slotted heads, Phillips, Hex, and Robertson have flat, ×-shaped, hexagonal, and square tips, respectively). ... Image File history File links Screw_e. ... Hex keys of various sizes. ... Image File history File links Screw_f. ... Robertson screwdrivers A Robertson screwdriver is a type of screwdriver with a square-shaped tip with a slight taper (in the same way that flatheads, Phillips, Allen, and Torx have flat, ×-shaped, hexagonal, and hexagrammal tips, respectively). ... Image File history File links Screw_g. ... The Tri-Wing is a type of screws and screw head. ... Image File history File links Screw_h. ... Image File history File links Screw_i. ... Screws come in a variety of shapes and sizes for different purposes. ... A basic screwdriver (slotted tip shown) The screwdriver is a device specifically designed to insert and tighten, or to loosen and remove, screws. ... Henry F. Phillips (1890 - 1958) was a businessman from Portland, Oregon and inventor of the Phillips-head screw and screwdriver. ... To cam out (or cam-out) is a process by which a screwdriver slips out of the head of a screw being driven once the torque required to turn the screw exceeds a certain amount. ...

Contents

Differences

The differences lie in the way that the drivers are machined. The Phillips driver has 4 simple slots cut out of it, whereas in the case of the Pozidriv each slot is the result of two machining processes at right angles. The result of this is that the arms of the cross are parallel sided in the case of Pozidriv, and tapered in the case of Phillips. The pozidriv has four additional points of contact, and does not have the rounded corners that the Phillips screw drive has. In ANSI standards it is referred to as type IA.[1] The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) is a private, non-profit standards organization that produces industrial standards in the United States. ...


The pozidriv screw can easily be distinguished by a line embossed in the screw head at 45 degrees to the slots for the driver. Thus, if the driver slots are at 0, 90, 180 and 270 degrees, the marker lines are at 45, 135, 225 and 315 degrees. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Advantages over Phillips type

This design is intended to decrease the likelihood that the Pozidriv screwdriver will slip out, provide a greater driving surface, and decrease wear and tear.[2] The marker lines on a Pozidriv screwdriver will not fit a Phillips screw correctly, and are likely to slip or tear out the screw head. Phillips screwdrivers will fit in and turn Pozidriv screws, but will cam out if enough torque is applied, potentially stripping the screw. To cam out (or cam-out) is a process by which a screwdriver slips out of the head of a screw being driven once the torque required to turn the screw exceeds a certain amount. ...


References

  1. ^ screw drive systems.
  2. ^ Pozidriv page at Phillips Screw Company

External links

  • Posidriv versus Phillips image English
  • Phillips or Pozidriv?
  • What's the difference between Phillips, Pozidrive and Robertson (square) screws?

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tools, Screwdrivers, Accessories, Parts at Cell Phone Accessories For Sale (1581 words)
A screw has a head with a contour such that an appropriate screwdriver tip can be engaged in it in such a way that the application of sufficient torque to the screwdriver will cause the screw to rotate.
This is less important for PoziDriv and SupaDriv, which are designed specifically to be more tolerant of size mismatch.
When tightening a screw with force, it is important to press the head hard into the screw, again to avoid damaging the screw.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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