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Encyclopedia > Sunday in the Park with George
Sunday in the Park with George
Window card from Original Broadway Production
Music Stephen Sondheim
Lyrics Stephen Sondheim
Book James Lapine
Based upon A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat
Productions 1984 Broadway
2007 West End
Awards 1985 Pulitzer Prize for Drama


Sunday in the Park with George is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. The musical was inspired by the painting "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte" by Georges Seurat. A complex work revolving around a fictionalized Seurat immersed in singleminded concentration while painting the masterpiece, its Broadway production was greeted with mixed praise by the critics, but it has enjoyed several major revivals, including an upcoming 2008 Broadway revival. Nominated for ten Tony Awards, it won only two design awards but won numerous Drama Desk Awards and the 1985 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. The upcoming 2008 Broadway show is to be the UK production first shown at the Menier Cholocate Factory in 2005, and then at the West End's Wyndham's Theatre in 2006. The production was nominated for 6 Olivier Awards, winning 5 of these, including Best Set Design and Best Actor and Actress in a Musical. Image File history File links Sunday_in_the_Park_with_George_Poster. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an Jewish-American director and librettist. ... Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (Un dimanche après-midi à lIle de la Grande Jatte) is Georges Seurats most famous work, and is an example of pointillism that is widely considered to be one of the most remarkable paintings of the 19th century, belonging... Le Chahut was painted by Seurat from 1889 to 1890. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Note on spelling: While most Americans use er (as per American spelling conventions), the majority of venues, performers and trade groups for live theatre use re. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... // West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland . Along with New Yorks Broadway Theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of theatre in the... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an Jewish-American director and librettist. ... Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (Un dimanche après-midi à lIle de la Grande Jatte) is Georges Seurats most famous work, and is an example of pointillism that is widely considered to be one of the most remarkable paintings of the 19th century, belonging... Le Chahut was painted by Seurat from 1889 to 1890. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ...

Contents

History

Following the failure and scathing critical reception of Merrily We Roll Along in 1981 (the show closed after 16 performances), Sondheim announced his intention to leave the musical theatre to write mystery novels. However, he was convinced by Lapine to return to the theatrical world after the two were inspired by "Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte", the masterpiece of the French Pointillist painter Georges Seurat. In discussing the painting, Lapine noted that one major figure was missing from the canvas: the artist himself. This observation provided the springboard for the creation of "Sunday", and the production evolved into a meditation on art, emotional connection, and community. Merrily We Roll Along is a play by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart, and a musical loosely based on it by Stephen Sondheim and George Furth. ... Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (Un dimanche après-midi à lIle de la Grande Jatte) is Georges Seurats most famous work, and is an example of pointillism that is widely considered to be one of the most remarkable paintings of the 19th century, belonging... Detail from Seurats La Parade (1889), showing the contrasting dots of paint used in pointillism. ... Le Chahut was painted by Seurat from 1889 to 1890. ...


Original Broadway production

When the show first opened to subscription audiences at the off-Broadway theater Playwrights Horizons starring Mandy Patinkin and Bernadette Peters in July 1983, only the first act was written, and still with many holes. However, the first act was fleshed out and the second act began development. The second act was performed only during the last three performances. After seeing the show at Playwrights, legendary composer Leonard Bernstein wrote to his friend Sondheim, calling the show "brilliant, deeply conceived, canny, magisterial, and by far the most personal statement I've heard from you thus far. Bravo."[1] Following its 25-performance run at Playwrights, the show transferred to the Booth Theatre on Broadway on May 2, 1984, but the second act was finished and the show "frozen" only a few days before the opening. Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... Located in New York City, Playwrights Horizons is a major off-broadway theater dedicated to the development and production of new work by American playwrights. ... Mandy Patinkin as Rube John Sofer from the television show Dead Like Me. ... Bernadette Peters (born February 28, 1948) is an American Tony Award-winning actress and singer. ... Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... The Booth Theatre in 2006 The Booth Theatre on September 25, 2005 The Booth Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 222 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


When Sunday opened on Broadway, it received mixed praise from the critics: a much more positive reaction than what had greeted Merrily three years earlier. The New York Times theatre critic, Frank Rich, wrote: "I do know... that Mr. Sondheim and Mr. Lapine have created an audacious, haunting and, in its own intensely personal way, touching work. Even when it fails - as it does on occasion - Sunday in the Park is setting the stage for even more sustained theatrical innovations yet to come."[2] Sunday enjoyed a healthy box office, though the show would ultimately lose money; it closed after 604 performances. The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Frank Rich (born June 2, 1949 in Washington, D.C.) is a columnist for The New York Times. ...


It was, however, considered a brilliant artistic achievement for Sondheim and, although Sunday was nominated for ten Tony Awards, it won only two design awards. The big winner of the night was Jerry Herman's La Cage aux Folles, and in his acceptance speech, Herman announced that the "simple, hummable tune" was still alive on Broadway, a remark some perceived as a swipe at Sondheim's pointillistic score for Sunday. (Herman has since denied that that was his intent.)[3] Jerry Herman Jerry Herman (born Gerald Herman on July 10, 1933 in New York City) is an American composer/lyricist of the Broadway musical theater. ... La Cage aux Folles is a Tony Award-winning musical with a book by Harvey Fierstein and lyrics and music by Jerry Herman. ...


Sondheim tried to incorporate George's concentration in his painting into his score. "Red, red, red, red, red, red-orange, red, red-orange..." etc. Though widely shunned at the Tonys, Sunday won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Musical, and Sondheim and Lapine were awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, only the sixth time a musical had been so honored. The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ...


London productions

"Sunday" received its UK premiere at London's Royal National Theatre on March 15, 1990 and ran for 117 performances, with a cast headed by Philip Quast (George), who received the Olivier Award for his performance, and Maria Friedman (Dot/Marie). This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Royal National Theatre from Waterloo Bridge The Royal National Theatre is a building complex and theatre company located on the South Bank in London, England immediately east of the southern end of Waterloo Bridge. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (75th in leap years). ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... Philip Quast is an Australian actor perhaps best known for his role as Inspector Javert in the 10th Anniversary production of Les Misérables at the Royal Albert Hall, London. ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


In 2005, the musical made its second appearance on the London stage at the Menier Chocolate Factory, where the score was afforded new orchestrations by Jason Carr. This revival, starring Olivier Award-winner Daniel Evans and Anna Jane Casey, and directed by Sam Buntrock, won unanimously glowing reviews. The production transferred to historic Wyndham's Theatre in London's West End in May 2006 and ended its run in September 2006. Jenna Russell replaced the unavailable Casey. At the Olivier Awards, the production won in five of the six categories in which it was nominated - including Outstanding Musical Production, Best Actor and Best Actress - only losing out on the Director trophy. (The show's competition included Wicked, Spamalot, Avenue Q, Evita, Porgy and Bess and The Sound of Music, all of which went away with nothing.) Wyndhams Theatre Wyndhams Theatre is a West End theatre, one of two opened by the actor/manager Charles Wyndham (cp Criterion Theatre). ... // West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland . Along with New Yorks Broadway Theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of theatre in the... Jenna Russell (born 5 October 1967) is an English actress who appeared as Maggie in the comedy On The Up and as Deborah Gilder in Born and Bred. ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ...


The London cast, nearly all experienced Sondheim performers, are preserved on a recording by PS Classics. This 2-disc album is the most complete recording of the score, and contains a bonus track: the original, full version of "The One on the Left" (of which only a fraction survives in the final show) performed by Christopher Colley, Sarah French Ellis and Kaisa Hammarlund. PS Classics is a record label that specializes in musical theater and standard vocals. ...


2008 Broadway revival (of the 2005/6 London production)

The Menier Chocolate Factory production of Sunday in the Park with George is scheduled to be presented by the Roundabout Theatre Company at Studio 54. This will be a limited engagement, with previews starting January 18, 2008 and opening date February 14, 2008. It has been reported[4] that Daniel Evans and Jenna Russell, who played George and Dot in the 2005-2006 London production, will reprise their roles on Broadway, with Sam Buntrock directing. Daniel Evans and Jenna Russell are appearing with the permission of Actors’ Equity Association. // 51/53 Southwark Street London SE1 1RU A former chocolate factory located in London that has been converted into a leading arts complex which includes a gallery, restaurant, theatre and rehearsal space. ... The Roundabout Theatre Company is a non-profit, subscription based theatre company, based in New York City. ... January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jenna Russell (born 5 October 1967) is an English actress who appeared as Maggie in the comedy On The Up and as Deborah Gilder in Born and Bred. ...

This article contains information about an upcoming Broadway play or musical. The content is expected to change as more information becomes available and/or it has its official opening night.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Characters

Act One



George, an artist


Dot, his mistress


Jules, another artist


Yvonne, his wife


an Old Lady


her Nurse


Celeste #1, a shop girl


Celeste #2, another shop girl


a Soldier


a Boatman


Franz, coachman to Jules and Yvonne


Frieda, cook for Jules and Yvonne and wife to Franz


Louise, the little daughter of Jules and Yvonne


Mr. & Mrs., an American couple


Louis, a baker



Act Two



George, an artist


Marie, his grandmother


Bob Greenberg, the museum director


Dennis, a technician


Naomi Eisen, a composer


Elaine, George's former wife


Harriet Pawling, a board member of the museum


Billy Webster, her friend


Charles Redmond, a visiting curator from Texas


Alex, an artist


Betty, another artist


Lee Randolph, the museum's publicist


Blair Daniels, an art critic


Casts

1984 Broadway production

  • Man Lying on Bank/Louis/Billy Webster - Cris Groenendaal
  • Young Man on Bank/Frieda/Betty - Nancy Opel
  • Celeste #2/Elaine - Mary D'Arcy
  • Louise/A Boy - Danielle Ferland
  • Celeste #1/A Waitress - Melanie Vaughan
  • Man with Bicycle/Museum Assistant - John Jellison
  • Mr./Lee Randolph - Kurt Knudson
  • Woman with Baby Carriage/Photographer - Sue Anne Gershenson
  • Little Girl - Michele Rigan

2006 London production Mandy Patinkin as Rube John Sofer from the television show Dead Like Me. ... Bernadette Peters (born February 28, 1948) is an American Tony Award-winning actress and singer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Brent Jay Spiner (born February 2, 1949) is an American actor, best known for his portrayal of the android Lieutenant Commander Data in the television and movie series Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Charles Kimbrough (born May 23, 1936) is an American character actor best known for playing the straight-faced anchor Jim Dial on Murphy Brown. ... Dana Ivey (born August 14, 1942) is an American actress. ... Robert Westenberg (also commonly called Bob Westenberg) is a musical theatre actor who has appeared in such shows as Sunday in the Park with George, Into the Woods and The Secret Garden. ... Nancy Opel is a Broadway singer and actress who started as Penelope Pennywise in the Original Cast Production of Urinetown. ... Danielle Ferland (b. ...

  • George - Daniel Evans
  • Dot / Marie - Jenna Russell (taking over from Anna Jane Casey)
  • Old Lady / Blair Daniels - Gay Soper
  • Nurse / Mrs. / Harriet Pawling - Joanne Redman
  • Jules / Bob Greenberg - Simon Green
  • Yvonne / Naomi Eisen - Liza Sadovy
  • Boatman / Dennis - Alasdair Harvey
  • Soldier / Alex - Christopher Colley
  • Celeste #1 / Elaine - Sarah French Ellis
  • Celeste #2 / Silent Artist - Kaisa Hammarlund
  • Mr. / Charles Redmond - Mark McKerracher
  • Louis / Billy Webster - Ian McLarnon
  • Franz / Lee Randolph - Steven Kynman
  • Frieda / Betty - Anna Lowe
  • Louise - Lauren Calpin / Georgina Hendry / Natalie Paris

Jenna Russell (born 5 October 1967) is an English actress who appeared as Maggie in the comedy On The Up and as Deborah Gilder in Born and Bred. ... Gay Soper is an English actress. ...

Synopsis

In 1884, George Seurat is painting what is considered by many to be his (Seurat's) masterpiece, "Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte." His longtime mistress and model, Dot, sings of the frustrations of her vocation in the opening number, Sunday In The Park With George. Meanwhile, an Old Lady and her Nurse discuss the changes being made to Paris to make way for the upcoming construction of 'a tower'. Suddenly we are transported to an art gallery, where Seurat's first painting is on display. Jules, another, more successful artist and a friend of George's, and his wife Yvonne discuss the flaws with George's 'mechanical' work (No Life). Immediately following the song, we are back in the park and following an encounter with George regarding the painting being shown in an independent exhibition, Jules and Yvonne depart, taking their coachman Franz with them, interrupting his rendez-vous with the Nurse. George and Dot return home for the day, with George promising to take Dot to the follies that night. Back at the studio, George and Dot sing of the the cohesion (or lack thereof) between art and life (Color And Light). George tells Dot that he can't take her to the follies as he has to continue work on his painting, the obsession that was hinted at during the preceding song being made even more clear through his cold dismissal. Back in the park, George sketches a grumpy and mean Boatman. Dot enters on the arm of Louis, a baker. Two chatting shopgirls, both named Celeste, notice Dot with a new man, and comment in Gossip, joined by the Boatman, and the Old Lady and her Nurse. Jules and Yvonne enter during the song and mock the unconventional nature of George's art, before protesting wildly against the new initiative to have his work included in the next group show. After the Boatman leaves in fury, George sings joyfully whilst sketching his dog (The Day Off). During the song, the two Celestes begin trying to attract the attention of a handsome Soldier and his companion, Franz and his wife Frieda argue with Jules and Yvonne's daughter, Louise, and Jules returns to further lecture George on his shortcomings as an artist. The Boatman returns and laments the condescending attitude of artists. George leaves the park just as Dot and Louis enter, as Dot sings about her replacement for George (Everybody Loves Louis). The two Celestes and the Soldier sing a short trio, as the shopgirls fight over the more handsome of the military pair (The One On The Left). As the park empties for the evening, George returns and tells of how he misses Dot, and laments how his art has alienated him from those important to him (Finishing The Hat). After it has been revealed that Dot is pregnant, we are transported back to George's studio, where Dot has come to tell George that she and Louis are getting married and leaving for America with a young couple they have met, Mr. and Mrs.. She asks for the painting of her powdering that he once made, but he refuses. Jules and Yvonne come to the studio, and whilst Yvonne and Dot talk apart about the alienating nature of artists, Jules and George discuss George's painting in progress, with Jules heatedly telling George that his methods are wrong. They leave, and Dot and George sing of their failed relationship in We Do Not Belong Together. Back in the park, George and his mother, the Old Lady, sadly sing about the changes that are being made to the park (Beautiful). The Celestes and the Soldier argue about their recent falling out with their respective companions, whilst Jules and Frieda enter to have a sordid affair in the park. Little Louise informs her mother, Yvonne, of her father's infidelity and a fight breaks out between Jules, Yvonne, Franz, and Frieda. Whilst this conflict is developing, the Celestes and the Soldier are also squabbling noisily, as are the Boatman, Dot, and all the other characters of the park; all except the Old Lady, who tells George to remember to connect with his art. George begins to perfectly control the subjects of his painting, moving them gracefully into their positions for the painting, replacing their disagreements with beautiful harmony (Sunday). The first act ends in a tableau of the characters which perfectly mimics the painting, as George freezes the scene in its perfect position. Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (Un dimanche après-midi à lIle de la Grande Jatte) is Georges Seurats most famous work, and is an example of pointillism that is widely considered to be one of the most remarkable paintings of the 19th century, belonging...

Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat


The second act opens with the same tableau, however rather than rapturously singing about the beauty of the park, the characters sing about the torture of being trapped forever in the painting, in It's Hot Up Here. After the song the characters one by one deliver short eulogies, relating to George's sudden death at the age of 31. When all the characters of the painting have disappeared, the action fast-forwards one hundred years later, to 1984, where George and Dot's great-grandson, also named George and also a struggling artist, is unveiling his latest artistic work at an art museum; a color and light machine called 'Chromolume #7', which is an artistic reflection on the painting from the first act. Helping George through the presentation of the piece are his grandmother (George and Dot's daughter) Marie, his technician Dennis, his composer Naomi Eisen, and the museum director Bob Greenberg. Following the presentation, the action moves to a drinks reception in the gallery where the painting hangs, where various patrons and curators congratulate George on his work, whilst George moves seamlessly between them, struggling to keep them all happy with the many different sides of his personality. All the characters join together in a song discussing the troubles of creating modern art, Putting It Together. After most of the museum's patrons have vacated, Marie sings about the significance of leaving a legacy, in a moving number, Children And Art. Weeks later, George has been invited by the French government to do a presentation of the Chromolume on the island where the painting was made, and since Marie has passed away, he has brought the grammar book that Dot learnt from in the first act, handed down from generation to generation, as something to remember her by. He reads the notes in the back of the book, referring to the George of the first act, and sings about the similarities between himself and his great-grandfather (Lesson #8). In a surreal moment, Dot appears and discusses 'her' book with George. George and this vision of Dot sing together, as she tells him to stop caring about the criticisms levelled at his Chromolumes and continue working for his own benefit (Move On). As George continues to read the words that Seurat used to utter so often whilst working, more and more characters from the original painting fill the stage, until they join together in song once more, demonstrating George's longing for harmony, and the artistic memory of his great-grandfather (Sunday). Finally, all the characters leave, as George reads the final words of his first act counterpart, until he turns round and sees that Dot too has disappeared, and he is left with simply a blank canvas, and so many possibilities. Image File history File links Georges_Seurat_-_Un_dimanche_après-midi_à_l'Île_de_la_Grande_Jatte. ... Image File history File links Georges_Seurat_-_Un_dimanche_après-midi_à_l'Île_de_la_Grande_Jatte. ... Le Chahut was painted by Seurat from 1889 to 1890. ...


Musical numbers

Act I

  1. Sunday In The Park With George (Dot)
  2. No Life (Jules, Yvonne)
  3. Color And Light (Dot, George)
  4. Gossip (Celeste #1, Celeste #2, Boatman, Nurse, Old Lady, Jules, Yvonne)
  5. The Day Off (Company)
  6. Everybody Loves Louis (Dot)
  7. The One On The Left (Soldier, Celeste #1, Celeste #2)
  8. Finishing The Hat (George)
  9. We Do Not Belong Together (Dot, George)
  10. Beautiful (Old Lady, George)
  11. Sunday (Company)

Act II

  1. It's Hot Up Here (Company)
  2. Putting It Together (Company)
  3. Children and Art (Marie)
  4. Lesson #8 (George)
  5. Move On (George, Dot)
  6. Sunday (Company)

Cast recordings

  • 1984 Original Broadway Cast Recording (RCA)
  • 2006 London Cast Recording (PS Classics, 2 disc set)

RCAs logo as seen today on many products. ... PS Classics is a record label that specializes in musical theater and standard vocals. ...

Awards

Tony Awards, Broadway 1984

Drama Desk Award, Broadway, 1984 The Tony Award winners for Best Lighting Design are: In 2005, the award was split into Best Lighting Design of a Play and Best Lighting Design of a Musical. ... The Tony Award for Best Scenic Design is the Tony Award given to a designer for outstanding set design of either a play or musical. ... // 1940s 1949 Kiss Me, Kate - Music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Bella and Samuel Spewack. ... The Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical has been given since 1960. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an Jewish-American director and librettist. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical is the Tony awarded to the librettist(s) of the musical. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an Jewish-American director and librettist. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a musical play, whether a new production or a revival. ... Mandy Patinkin as Rube John Sofer from the television show Dead Like Me. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... Bernadette Peters (born February 28, 1948) is an American Tony Award-winning actress and singer. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical is awarded to the actress who is voted the best non-starring actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... Dana Ivey (born August 14, 1942) is an American actress. ... ...

  • Won
    • Outstanding Musical
    • Outstanding Book - James Lapine
    • Outstanding Director of a Musical - James Lapine
    • Outstanding Orchestration - Michael Starobin
    • Outstanding Lyrics - Stephen Sondheim
    • Outstanding Lighting Design - Richard Nelson
    • Outstanding Set Design - Tony Straiges
    • Outstanding Special Effects - Bran Ferren
  • Nominated
    • Outstanding Actor in a Musical - Mandy Patinkin
    • Outstanding Actress in a Musical - Bernadette Peters
    • Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical - Charles Kimbrough
    • Outstanding Music - Stephen Sondheim
    • Outstanding Costume Design - Patricia Zipprodt, Ann Hould-Ward

New York Drama Critics' Award - Best Musical, Broadway 1983-84


Olivier Awards, London 2007

  • Won
    • Outstanding Musical Production
    • Best Actor - Daniel Evans
    • Best Actress - Jenna Russell
    • Set Design - Timothy Bird and David Farley
    • Lighting Design - Natasha Chivers and Mike Robertson
  • Nominated
    • Best Director - Sam Buntrock

1985 Pulitzer Prize for Drama[7] Daniel Jackson Dan Evans (born 1925) was a United States Senator from Washington State. ... Jenna Russell (born 5 October 1967) is an English actress who appeared as Maggie in the comedy On The Up and as Deborah Gilder in Born and Bred. ...


Television video

Sunday in the Park with George was taped on October 21-25, 1985 at the Booth Theatre with the original Broadway cast. It was broadcast on American television on February 18, 1986 on Showtime and on June 16, 1986 on Public Television's "American Playhouse". (Bernadette Peters, who was performing in Song and Dance at the time of the taping, was given time off from that play in order to be able to tape this production. New York Times, October 17, 1985, Section C; Page 25) Showtime is a subscription television brand used by a number of channels and platforms around the world, but primarily refers to a group of channels in the United States. ... Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ...


References

  1. ^ Brown, Chip. "Sondheim!", Smithsonian, Aug. 2002, 33(5).
  2. ^ Rich, Frank. "STAGE: 'SUNDAY IN THE PARK WITH GEORGE'", The New York Times, 1984-05-03. Retrieved on 2007-03-21. 
  3. ^ Ask a Star: Jerry Herman, Broadway.com, 2004-12-08.
  4. ^ Playbill.com, May 7, 2007
  5. ^ Patinkin was replaced by Robert Westenberg, followed by Harry Groener. Patinkin returned to the show shortly before it closed.
  6. ^ Peters was replaced by Betsy Joslyn, followed by Maryann Plunkett.
  7. ^ Information from the official Pulitzer website

1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (81st in leap years). ... Harry Groener (born 10 September 1951 in Augsburg, Bavaria, Germany) is an American actor and dancer, best known for playing Mayor Wilkins in Buffy the Vampire Slayer (season 3). ... Betsy Joslyn (born April 19, 1954 in Staten Island, New York) is a Broadway musical and dramatic actress and soprano. ... Maryann Plunkett is a Tony award winning actress. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
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Between the first comprehensive park planning of 1902 and naming the park Balboa in 1910, when preparation began for the 1915 Panama-California Exposition on the City land, the seeds of two great urban improvement movements were brought to San Diego by dedicated citizens.
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The first act deals with George and his life, the loss of his love, and his struggle to complete the masterpiece which at the time was seen, at best, as a dubious effort.
George had the idea of painting with little dots of paint, arguing that the eye would see the two or three colors of the dots, and the mind would fill in the rest of the hues, thus making the viewer a complete participant in the experience.
The exhibit is more a way or the two Georges connecting and a chance to hear from Seurat’s daughter, Marie, now in her 90’s, who had been raised in America when Dot left George to marry the baker and start a new life.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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