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Encyclopedia > Sunday
The Trundholm sun chariot pulled by a horse is believed to be a sculpture illustrating an important part of Nordic Bronze Age mythology. The sun itself was called Alfrodull, meaning "glory of elves". Sol was also called Sunna, Sunne and Frau Sunne, which is a derivation of the words sun.
The Trundholm sun chariot pulled by a horse is believed to be a sculpture illustrating an important part of Nordic Bronze Age mythology. The sun itself was called Alfrodull, meaning "glory of elves". Sol was also called Sunna, Sunne and Frau Sunne, which is a derivation of the words sun.

Sunday is the day of the week between Saturday and Monday and is commonly thought of as the last day of the week. In the Judaeo-Christian tradition it is the first day of the week. Since the second half of the 20th century it has often been counted as the seventh day of the week. In Slavic languages Sunday (undividable day - referencing seven) is both the first and seventh days of the week. It is first because Wednesday is literally the "middle" of the week, while it is seventh because Tuesday, Thursday and Friday are literally the "second", "fourth" and "fifth" days of the week. It is named after Sunne, German goddess of the sun, which is where the word "sun" also derives its name. Look up sunday in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links en: Solvognen (The Sun Carriage) from the Bronze Age, at display at the National Museum (Nationalmuseet) in Denmark da: Solvognen fra bronzealderen, udstillet på Nationalmuseet Date: 29. ... Image File history File links en: Solvognen (The Sun Carriage) from the Bronze Age, at display at the National Museum (Nationalmuseet) in Denmark da: Solvognen fra bronzealderen, udstillet på Nationalmuseet Date: 29. ... The Sun Chariot pulled by a horse is believed to be a sculpture illustrating an important part of Nordic Bronze Age mythology. ... Map of the Nordic Bronze Age culture, ca 1200 BC The Nordic Bronze Age (also Northern Bronze Age) is the name given by Oscar Montelius (1843-1921) to a period and a Bronze Age culture in Scandinavian pre-history, ca 1800 BC - 600 BC, with sites that reached as far... For other uses, see Elf (disambiguation). ... Sol redirects here. ... The days of the week in various world languages can be classified as either planetary or numerical, both of which may have the names of one or more days changed due to religious or secular reasons. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Judeo-Christian tradition (also spelled Judaeo-Christian) is the body of concepts and values held in common by Christianity and Judaism. ... The Trundholm Sun Chariot pulled by a horse is believed to be a sculpture illustrating an important part of Nordic Bronze Age mythology. ...


Sunday is considered a holiday in most countries of the world and as part of the weekend. Only countries influenced by Islamic (or Jewish) culture often have Friday (or Saturday) as a weekly holiday instead. For other uses, see Holiday (disambiguation). ...


The Gregorian calendar repeats every 400 years, and no century starts on a Sunday. The Jewish New Year never falls on a Sunday. Any month beginning on a Sunday will contain a Friday the 13th. The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used calendar in the world. ... A century (From the Latin cent, one hundred) is one hundred consecutive years. ... This article is about the Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah. ... A Friday occurring on the 13th day of any month is considered to be a day of bad luck in English, German, Polish, Bulgarian and Portuguese-speaking cultures around the globe. ...


In the folk rhyme Monday's Child, "... the child that is born on the Sabbath Day is bonny and blithe and good and gay." Mondays Child is one of many fortune-telling songs, popular as nursery rhymes for children. ...


In Thailand, the color associated with Sunday is red. [1]

Contents

The name Sunday

In Ptolemaic Egyptian astrology, the seven planets, Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, the Sun, Venus, Mercury, and the Moon, had an hour of the day assigned to each in that order, but the planet which was "regent" during the first hour of any day of the week gave its name to that day. The Egyptian form of the seven-day week spread to Rome during the first and second century when the Roman names of the planets were given to each successive day. A planet (from the Greek πλανήτης, planetes or wanderers) is a body of considerable mass that orbits a star and that produces very little or no energy through nuclear fusion. ... Adjectives: Saturnian Atmosphere [3] Scale height: 59. ... For other uses, see Jupiter (disambiguation). ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... Sol redirects here. ... Adjectives: Venusian or (rarely) Cytherean Atmosphere Surface pressure: 9. ... This article is about the planet. ... This article is about Earths moon. ...


Germanic-speaking nations apparently adopted the seven-day week from the Romans, so that the Roman dies Solis became Sunday (German, Sonntag), likely in reference to the Germanic sun goddess Sol. The Christians reinterpreted the indigenous name as implying the Sun of Righteousness with reference to his "arising" (Malachi 4:2) [citation needed]. It was also called Dies Panis (Day of Bread), because it was an early custom to break bread on that day.[2] The Trundholm Sun Chariot pulled by a horse is believed to be a sculpture illustrating an important part of Nordic Bronze Age mythology. ...


The Hindi word for Sunday is Ravivar, with Ravi being the Sanskrit name for the sun. Hindi ( , Devanagari: or , IAST: , IPA: ), an Indo-European language spoken mainly in northern and central India, is one of the two official languages of India, the other being English. ...


The first Christian reference to Sunday is found in the First Apology of St. Justin Martyr (circa 150 A.D.). In a well-known passage of the Apology (Chapter 67), Justin describes the Christian custom of gathering for worship on Sunday. "And on the day called Sunday [τῇ τοῦ ῾Ηλίου λεγομένη ἡμέρᾳ], all who live in cities or in the country gather together to one place, and the memoirs of the apostles or the writings of the prophets are read, as long as time permits . . .", he writes. Evidently Justin used the term "Sunday" because he was writing to a non-Christian, pagan audience. In Justin's time, Christians usually called Sunday the Lord's Day (because they observed it as a weekly memorial of Jesus Christ's resurrection).[3] The First Apology was an early work of Christian apologetics addressed by Justin Martyr to the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius. ... Justin Martyr (also Justin the Martyr, Justin of Caesarea, Justin the Philosopher) (100–165) was an early Christian apologist and saint. ... The Lords Day is one of the traditional Christian names for Sunday, the first day of the Judaeo-Christian seven-day week, observed by most Christians as the memorial of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, which is said in the four canonical gospels of the New Testament to have...


Sunday has also been called "the Eighth Day" (because of the Roman Catholic belief that Christ's resurrection on the day following the seventh-day Sabbath is a portal to timeless eternity that transcends the seven-day weekly cycle).[4][5]


== Position during a week == In the Judaeo-Christian tradition Sunday has been considered as the first day of the week. However, in most countries calendars show Monday as day 1 of the week. There are also countries where both types of calendar can be found. A number of languages reflect Sunday's status as the first day of the week: the name for Wednesday in German has Mittwoch ("midweek"); Finnish has keskiviikko ("center of the week"); and Icelandic has Miðvikudagur ("mid-week day"); Russian Среда (Sreda) cf. средний (sredniy: "middle, adj."). Note: In Russian Среда (Sreda) means middle of work week, since the names of Tuesday, Thursday and Friday have roots of words second, fourth and fifth day respectively In Greek, the names of the days Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday (Δευτέρα, Τρίτη, Τετάρτη, και Πέμπτη) mean Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth. This suggests that Sunday was once counted as Πρώτη, that is, First. The current Greek name for Sunday, Κυριακή, means Lord's Day. A similar system of naming days of the week occurs in Portuguese. Monday is "Segunda-feira" which means second day also showing Sunday ("domingo") being counted as day 1. In Hebrew, the names of the first six days literally mean their order (ראשון, שני, שלישי, רביעי, חמישי, שישי) with Sabbath (שבת) as the seventh day. Sabbath literally means rest, not seven. The beginning of the week is on Sunday (ראשון). The Arabic language also counts Sunday as first day of the week (أحد - "ahad = one") and keeps on counting Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday as "two - three - four". This count has been passed on to a number of languages in cultures influenced by Islam like in Persian, [[Tajik language|Tajik]], Tartar, Malay, Indonesian. While Islamic cultures by the way of the Arab language took over the original Jewish concept of the week starting after Sabbath on Sunday as the first day, the rhythm of modern life has even here changed the perception of the numbering of the working week. In many Arab countries the weekend is on Thursday and Friday, thus making Saturday (in Arabic: سبت - sabat) the first day of the working week. ==Sunday and the Sabbath== Among Christians (with the exception of seventh-day Sabbatarians, such as the denominations listed above) Sunday is considered holy and often a day of rest and church-attendance. The first Christians were Jews and maintained the observance of the Sabbath rest on Saturday, but by the first half of the second century most Christians no longer observed the Sabbath, instead gathering for traditional worship on Sunday (although for some time the Sabbath continued to be held in a special regard even among Christians who observed Sunday). Consequently, Christians would avoid secular activities to allow time for worship. Saturday is the sabbath to Jews, however Christians moved their observance of the Sabbath to Sunday as Jesus was crucified on good Friday and arose on a Sunday, making it a holy day. However, it is not until the fourth century that ecclesiastical and civil legislation was enacted forbidding work in a manner similar to the observance of the Jewish Sabbath. Constantine I decreed (March 7, 321) dies Solis as the Roman day of rest [CJ3.12.2]: The god Woden, after whom Wednesday was named. ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... “Farsi” redirects here. ... The Tatar language (Tatar tele, Tatarça, Татар теле, Татарча) is a Turkic language spoken by the Tatars. ... The Malay language (; Jawi script: ‎), is an Austronesian language spoken by the Malay people who reside in the Malay Peninsula, southern Thailand, the Philippines, Singapore, central eastern Sumatra, the Riau islands, parts of the coast of Borneo, Cocos and Christmas Islands in Australia, and even in the Netherlands[1]. It... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Holiness means the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of a god or gods. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Sabbath. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In Christianity, the Sabbath... The Lords Day is one of the traditional Christian names for Sunday, the first day of the Judaeo-Christian seven-day week, observed by most Christians as the memorial of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, which is said in the four canonical gospels of the New Testament to have... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February c. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Publication of the first blue law by Constantine I of the Roman Empire: trade is forbidden on Sundays; agriculture is allowed The Roman Catholic church is allowed to hold property Births Deaths Categories: 321 ...

On the venerable day of the Sun let the magistrates and people

residing in cities rest, and let all workshops be closed. In the country however persons engaged in agriculture may freely and lawfully continue their pursuits because it often happens that another day is not suitable for grain-sowing or vine planting; lest by neglecting the proper moment for such operations the bounty of heaven should be lost. Throughout history there have been Christians, especially Protestants, who believe Sunday must be observed with just the sort of rigorous abstinence from work associated with the Jewish Sabbath (exemplified by Eric Liddell in the film Chariots of Fire), but for most Christians the custom and obligation of Sunday rest has not been as strict. In Orthodox Christian families and communities, some activities are not done, e.g. working, doing something that requires somebody else to work such as buying goods or services (including the use of public transport), driving a car, gardening, washing a car, etc. Exceptions which are allowed are making use of religious services, and, usually, using electricity, and urgent medical matters. In Roman Catholicism, those who work in the medical field, in law enforcement, or soldiers in a war zone are dispensed from the usual obligation to avoid work on Sunday. The majority of Christians have continued to observe Sunday ever since, although throughout history one sometimes finds Christian groups that continued or revived the observance of the Saturday Sabbath. More recently in history, Christians in the [[Seventh-day Adventist Church|Seventh-day Adventist]], Seventh Day Baptist, and [[Church of God]] (Seventh-Day) denominations (along with many related or similar sects), as well as many Messianic Jews, have revived the practice of gathering for worship, and abstaining from work, on the Saturday Sabbath. Many languages lack separate words for "Saturday" and "Sabbath". Eastern Orthodox churches, as well as many Roman Catholics, distinguish between the Sabbath (Saturday) and Sunday, which some Christians traditionally call the Lord's Day. However, many Protestants and Roman Catholics refer to Sunday as the Sabbath, though this is by no means a universal practice among Protestants and Catholics. Quakers traditionally refer to Sunday as "First Day" eschewing the pagan origin of the name. Sunday began, in 1064, at nones (8 P.M.) on Saturday and lasted until Monday. In 994 parishioners were required to attend even-song and nocturns on Saturday. In 696 the Lord's day was reckoned from evening to evening, but in 958 from Saturday nones till light on Monday morning. Islip's Constitutions and The Councils of Aix (789), Frejus (791), and Frankfort (794) assign as the cause that vespers are the first office of the morrow.[2] Eric Henry Liddell, circa 1923. ... Chariots of Fire is a British film released in 1981. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... Bangkok Skytrain. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A gardener Gardening is the practice of growing flowering plants, vegetables, and fruits. ... Seventh Day Baptists are Christian Baptists who observe the Sabbath on Saturday, the seventh day of the week. ... Messianic Judaism is any of a group of loosely related religious movements, all claiming a connection with Judaism but predominantly evangelical Christian in their beliefs, believing Jesus to be the Messiah, and using the New Testament as scripture. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Lords Day is one of the traditional Christian names for Sunday, the first day of the Judaeo-Christian seven-day week, observed by most Christians as the memorial of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, which is said in the four canonical gospels of the New Testament to have... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... -1... Look up pagan, heathen in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Events Sunset Crater Volcano first erupts. ... Events Otto III reaches his majority and begins to rule Germany in his own right. ... Events Births Deaths Categories: 696 ... Events Kshemgupta, King of Kashmir dies and is succeeded by his young son Abhimanyu. ... Events Uprising in Japan leads to a major defeat for Emperor Kammu, alongside a severe drought and famine Constantine becomes king of the Picts Herford founded by Charlemagne Fes founded by Idris I Eadburh marries Beorhtric of Wessex Births Deaths Categories: 789 ... The Avars invade Europe again, but are defeated by Charlemagne in 796. ... Events Kyoto becomes the Japanese capital. ...


Common occurrences on Sunday

In the United States, professional football is usually played on Sunday, although Saturday and Monday (via Monday Night Football) also see some professional games. College football usually occurs on Saturday, and high-school football tends to take place on Friday night or Saturday afternoon. It is not uncommon for church attendance to shift on days when a late morning or early afternoon game is anticipated by a local community. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Monday Night Football (MNF) is a live television broadcast of the National Football League. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ...


Also in the United States, many federal government buildings are closed on Sunday. Privately owned businesses also tend to close or are open for shorter periods of the day than on other days of the week.


Many American and British television networks and stations also broadcast their political interview shows on Sunday mornings. The Sunday-morning interview shows in the United States are influential television talk programs which often feature national leaders as guests for interviews and debates. ...


Many American and British daily newspapers publish a larger edition on Sundays, which often includes color comic strips, a magazine, and a coupon section. Color is an important part of the visual arts. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In marketing a coupon is a ticket or document that can be exchanged for a financial discount or rebate when purchasing a product. ...


Most NASCAR Nextel Cup, Indy Racing League, Champ Car events are held on Sundays. The NASCAR Championship is the championship held in NASCARs top stock car racing series. ... The Indy Racing League, better known as IRL, is the sanctioning body of a predominantly American based open-wheel racing series. ... “CART” redirects here. ...


Formula One and MotoGP races are also held on Sundays with qualifying taking place on Saturday. Formula One - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Grand Prix motorcycle racing refers to the premier categories of motorcycle road racing. ...


In Ireland, Gaelic football and hurling matches are predominantly played on Sundays, with the second and fourth Sundays in September always playing host to the All-Ireland hurling and football championship finals, respectively. Gaelic football (Irish: Peil or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, Gaelic or GAA (gah), is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ...


Radio stations often play specialty radio shows such as Casey Kasem's countdown or other nationally syndicated radio shows that may differ from their regular weekly music patterns on Sunday morning and/or Sunday evening. Casey Kasem in 1989 Casey Kasem (born Kemal Amin Kasem on April 27, 1932, in Detroit, Michigan, USA, of Palestinian and Lebanese heritage) is an American radio personality and voice actor. ...


Named days

Easter (also called Pascha) is generally accounted the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed March or April each year to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead (after his death by crucifixion; see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year, almost two... The Octave of Easter, formerly know as Low Sunday (also known as , or Quasimodo Sunday) is the first Sunday after Easter. ... The Feast of the Divine Mercy or Divine Mercy Sunday is the second Sunday of Easter (formerly designated Low Sunday), and dedicated to the devotion to the Divine Mercy promoted by St. ... Palm Sunday is a moveable feast in the Christian calendar which falls on the Sunday before Easter. ... Passion Sunday is a term formerly used to denote the fifth Sunday of Lent in the Christian liturgical calendar; since 1970, when the new church calendar approved by the Second Vatican Council went into effect, the term has been applied to the following Sunday, until then officially called Palm Sunday... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... Septuagesima (in full, Septuagesima Sunday) is the name given to the third from the last Sunday before Lent in the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches. ... Stir-up Sunday is an informal term in the Anglican Church for the last Sunday before the season of Advent. ... Advent (from the Latin Adventus, implicitly coupled with Redemptoris, the coming of the Saviour) is a holy season of the Christian church, the period of expectant waiting and preparation for the celebration of the Nativity of Christ, also known as the season of Christmas. ... Trinity Sunday is the first Sunday after Pentecost in the Western Christian liturgical calendar. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Gaudete Sunday is the third Sunday of Advent in the Christian calendar. ... Laetare Sunday (from the Latin verb laetari, meaning to be joyful) is a name formerly often used, and less commonly used today, to denote the fourth Sunday of the season of Lent in the Christian liturgical calendar. ... Good Shepherd Sunday is the Fourth Sunday of Easter in the Catholic Liturgical Calendar; that is, the Sunday three weeks after Easter Sunday. ... The term Whitsunday may refer to: The Sunday of the feast of Whitsun or Pentecost in the Christian calendar, observed 50 days after Easter. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Bloody Sunday refers to several historical events (listed in chronological order): Bloody Sunday (1887), a demonstration in London against coercion in Ireland Bloody Sunday (1900), a day of high casualties in the Second Boer War Bloody Sunday (1905), a massacre in Saint Petersburg A violent event during the 1913 Dublin... Selection Sunday is the day when the NCAA College basketball tournament participants are announced, placed and seeded accordingly. ... Wreaths of artificial poppies used as a symbol of remembrance Remembrance Day (United Kingdom, Australia, Canada), also known as Poppy Day (South Africa and Malta), and Armistice Day (United States, New Zealand, France, and many other Commonwealth countries; and the original name of the day internationally) is a day to...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sunday

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... A blue law, in the United States and Canada, is a type of law designed to enforce moral standards, particularly the observance of Sunday as a day of worship or rest. ... This article is about the novel. ... Cold Sunday was a meteorological event which took place on January 17, 1982, when unprecedentedly cold air swept down from Canada and plunged temperatures across much of the United States far below existing all-time record lows. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Coin of Emperor Probus, circa 280, with Sol Invictus riding a quadriga, with legend SOLI INVICTO, to the Unconquered Sun. Note how the Emperor (on the left) wears a radiated solar crown, worn also by the god (to the right). ... In Hinduism, Surya (Devanagari: सूर्य, sūrya) is the chief solar deity,one of the Adityas, son of Kasyapa and one of his wife Aditi[1] ,in Nordics Tyr he is said to be the son of Dyaus Pitar. ... Sunday shopping refers to the ability of retailers to operate stores on Sunday, a day that Christian tradition typically recognizes as the Sabbath, a day of rest. Rules governing shopping hours, such as Sunday shopping, vary around the world but some European nations continue to ban Sunday shopping. ... Sunday roast consisting of roast beef, roast potatoes, vegetables and yorkshire pudding The Sunday roast is a traditional British main meal served on Sundays (usually in the early afternoon), and consisting of roasted meat together with accompaniments. ... Sunday Christian (also Once-a-weeker) is a derisive term used to refer to someone who typically goes to church on Sundays but does not strictly adhere to the doctrines or rules of the religion otherwise. ... Sunday school, Indians and whites. ... Sunday Morning may refer to: Sunday Morning, a Canadian radio program formerly aired on CBC Radio One, CBS Sunday Morning, a television news program on CBS in the United States. ... Sunday is a computer virus, a member of the Jerusalem virus family. ... The Sunday League was the precursor tournament to the National League. ... Sunday Island may refer to: Sunday Islet, Queensland Sunday Island, Western Australia Sunday Island, Victoria Two small uninhabited islands in Western Australia (see [1]): in the Pilbara region, near Dirk Hartog Island, Category: ...

References

  1. ^ Thailand colour
  2. ^ a b McClintock, John; James Strong (1891). "Sunday", Cyclopædia of Biblical, Theological, and Ecclesiastical Literature. New York: Harper & Brothers. 
  3. ^ in Alexander Roberts, D.D. & James Donaldson, LL.D.: Chapter LXVII.—Weekly worship of the Christians.. Retrieved on 2007-01-13. 
  4. ^ John Paul II (1998-07-05). "APOSTOLIC LETTER DIES DOMINI OF THE HOLY FATHER JOHN PAUL II TO THE BISHOPS, CLERGY AND FAITHFUL OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH ON KEEPING THE LORD'S DAY HOLY". The Vatican. Retrieved on 2007-01-13.
  5. ^ THE THIRD COMMANDMENT. Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2nd edition. Retrieved on 2007-01-13.

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