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Encyclopedia > Sun glasses
Brown sunglasses
Brown sunglasses

Sunglasses are a visual aid, variously termed spectacles or glasses, which feature lenses that are coloured or darkened to screen out strong light from the eyes. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 173 KB) Photographer: Dasha Title: Sunglasses Taken on: 2004-08-09 16:38:15 Original source: Flickr. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 173 KB) Photographer: Dasha Title: Sunglasses Taken on: 2004-08-09 16:38:15 Original source: Flickr. ... Glasses, spectacles, or eyeglasses are frames bearing lenses worn in front of the eyes, sometimes for purely aesthetic reasons but normally for vision correction or eye protection. ... A pair of modern glasses A pair of more traditional glasses Glasses, spectacles, or eyeglasses are frames bearing lenses worn in front of the human eyes, sometimes for purely aesthetic reasons but normally for vision correction or eye protection. ... This article refers to the sight organ. ...


Many people find direct sunlight too bright to be comfortable, especially when reading from paper on which the sun directly shines. In outdoor activities like skiing and flying, the eye can receive more light than usual. It has been recommended to wear these kind of glasses on sunny days to protect the eyes from ultraviolet radiation, which can lead to the development of a cataract. Sunglasses have also been associated with celebrities and film actors primarily due to the desire to mask identity, but in part due to the lighting involved in production being typically stronger than natural light and uncomfortable to the naked eye. Prism splitting light Sunlight in the broad sense is the total spectrum of electromagnetic radiation given off by the Sun. ... Members of the US Air Force skiing (and snowboarding) at Keystone Resorts 14th Annual SnoFest An alpine skier Deep powder skiing Skiing is the activity of gliding over snow using skis (originally wooden planks, now usually made from fiberglass or related composites) strapped to the feet with ski bindings. ... This article concerns the process of flying. ... Note: Ultraviolet is also the name of a 1998 UK television miniseries about vampires. ... For the band with this name, see Cataract (band). ... For the 1998 movie, see Celebrity (1998 movie). ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Cinematographer Bruno Delbonnel, AFC, meters Audrey Tautou on the set of A Very Long Engagement. ...


From the 1950s to the 1990s sunglasses were popular as a fashion statement, especially on the beach. // Events and trends This map shows two essential global spheres during the Cold War in 1959. ... The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive. ... 90 mile beach Australia A beach or strand is a geological formation consisting of loose rock particles such as sand, shingle, cobble, or even shell along the shoreline of a body of water. ...

Augusto Pinochet sits with sunglasses in the front of the Chilean Junta
Augusto Pinochet sits with sunglasses in the front of the Chilean Junta

Contents

Download high resolution version (500x748, 66 KB)Subject: Chiles military Junta Source: http://www. ... Download high resolution version (500x748, 66 KB)Subject: Chiles military Junta Source: http://www. ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military dictatorship that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ...


Uses

Hiding one's eyes has implications in face-to-face communication: It can hide weeping, being one of the signs of mourning, makes eye contact impossible which can be intimidating, as in the stereotype of the guardian of a chain gang, or can show detachment, which is considered cool in some circles. Many cultures do not take them kindly. Darkened sunglasses of particular shapes may be in vogue as a fashion accessory. Note that normal glasses are very rarely worn without a practical purpose. Curiously, they can project an image of uncool nerdiness that sunglasses do not have. The impact on nonverbal communication and the cool image can be the reasons for wearing sunglasses by night or indoors. People also wear sunglasses when they do not wish others to see that they are intoxicated from recreational drug use, this can be to hide dilated or contracted pupils or bloodshot eyes. Tears trickling down the cheeks Lacrimation is the bodys process of producing tears, which are a liquid to clean and lubricate the eyes. ... Mourning is in the simplest sense synonymous with grief over the death of someone. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... A chain gang of convicts going to work near Sydney, New South Wales. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Fashion accessories Fashion accessories are items apart from the garment itself, which compliments the whole outfit. ... The character of Steve Urkel in the television show Family Matters is portrayed as being a nerd. ... Often defined as communication without words, nonverbal communication (NVC) refers to all aspects Sex which are not conveyed by the literal meaning of words. ...


People with severe visual impairment, such as the blind, often wear sunglasses so they do not make others uncomfortable with the fact that they cannot make eye contact with them (not seeing eyes may be better than seeing eyes which seem to look in the wrong direction), or to hide the eyes if their appearance is abnormal, for example due to cataracts. Before the introduction of sunglasses, one-eyed people could wear an eyepatch to not disturb other people. Some people who are severely visually impaired but still sighted wear sunglasses in order to protect their vision against glare. Blindness can be defined physiologically as the condition of lacking visual perception. ... For the band with this name, see Cataract (band). ... An eyepatch is a small patch, usually of black cloth, that is worn in front of one eye and usually attached around the head by an elastic band or by a string. ...


Visual clarity and comfort

Sunglasses can improve visual comfort and visual clarity by protecting the eye from glare[1]. Various types of disposable sunglasses are dispensed to patients after receiving mydriatic eye drops during eye examinations. Categories: Medicine stubs | Sign (medicine) ... Categories: Medicine stubs | Ophthalmology | Medical tests ...


Protection

Excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV) can cause short-term and long-term ocular problems such as photokeratitis, snow blindness, cataracts, pterygium, and various eye cancers[2]. Medical experts often advise the public on the importance of wearing sunglasses to protect the eyes from UV[2]. In the European Union, a CE mark ( ) identifies glasses fulfilling quality regulations. In the preparation for solar eclipses, health authorities often warn against looking at the sun through only sunglasses. Cheaper sunglasses look good but maximum protection is not guaranteed. The rule of thumb is, the more expensive and the more known the manufacturer of the sunglasses the more protection[citation needed]; however, a 1995 study reported that "Expensive brands and polarizing sunglasses do not guarantee optimal UVA protection." [3]. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has also reported that "[c]onsumers cannot rely on price as an indicator of quality" [1]. Note: Ultraviolet is also the name of a 1998 UK television miniseries about vampires. ... Arc eye is a painful condition sometimes experienced by welders who have failed to use adequate eye protection. ... Snowblind redirects here. ... For the band with this name, see Cataract (band). ... A pterygium, meaning wing, is a benign growth of the conjunctiva. ... Cancers can affect the eye. ... The CE mark is a declaration on manufactured products sold in the European Economic Area (EEA), Switzerland, and Turkey that the item meets all the requirements of relevant EU directives. ... Image File history File links CE-logo. ... Photo taken during the 1999 eclipse. ... The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), formerly known as the Trade Practices Commission (TPC), is an independent Australian commonwealth government authority established in 1995 to protect consumer rights, business rights and obligations, perform industry regulation and price monitoring and prevent unauthorised anti-competitive behaviour. ...


More recently, High energy visible light (HEV) has been implicated as a cause of age-related macular degeneration[4][5], and some manufacturers design to block it. Sunglasses may be especially important for children, as their ocular lenses are thought to transmit far more HEV light than adults (lenses "yellow" with age). In ophthalmology, high energy visible light (HEV light) is high frequency light from 380 nm to 530 nm in the visible spectrum[1]. HEV light has been implicated as a cause of age-related macular degeneration[2][3]. Some sunglasses are now designed specifically to block HEV. References ↑ Dykas, Carol. ...


Some sunglasses also pass ANSI Z87.1 requirements for basic impact and high impact protection. These are voluntary standards, so not all sunglasses comply, nor are manufacturers required to comply. In the basic impact test, a 1 in (2.54 cm) steel ball is dropped on the lens from 50 in (127 cm). In the high velocity test, a 1/4 in (6.35mm) steel ball is shot at the lens at 150 ft/s(45.72 m/s). In both tests, no part of the lens can touch the eye. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) is a private, non-profit standards organization that produces industrial standards in the United States. ...


Construction

Lens

The color of the lens can vary by style, fashion, and purpose, but for general use, green, grey, or brown is recommended to avoid or minimize color distortion, that could be dangerous when, for instance, driving a car. Grey lenses are considered neutral because they do not enhance contrast or distort colors. Brown and green lenses cause some minimal color distortion, but have contrast-enhancing properties. Red lenses are good for medium and lower light conditions because they are good at enhancing contrast but causes color distortion. Orange and yellow lenses have the best contrast enhancement and depth perception but cause color distortion. Yellow lenses are commonly used by golfers and shooters for its contrast enhancement and depth perception properties. Blue and purple lenses offer no real benefits and are mainly cosmetic. Clear lenses are used typically to protect the eyes from impact, debris, dust, or chemicals. Some sunglasses with interchangeable lens have optional clear lenses to protect the eyes during low light or night time activities. Debate exists as to whether "blue blocking" or amber tinted lenses may have a protective effect[6]. Green is any of a number of similar colors. ... Grey or gray (in American English) is a color seen commonly in nature. ... The color brown is produced by mixing complementary colors, such as red and green, orange and blue, or yellow and purple. ... Color vision is a psychophysical phenomenon that exists only in our minds. ... Driving is the controlled operation of a vehicle, which is usually a motor vehicle such as a truck, bus, or car. ... This article is about the sport of golf. ... A shooter can be: A person who takes part in the sport of shooting. ...


Some models have polarized lenses (made from Polaroid or a similar material) to reduce glare caused by light reflected from polarizing surfaces such as water as well as by polarized diffuse sky radiation (skylight). This article treats polarization in electrodynamics. ... Polaroid (a trademark of the Polaroid Corporation) is the name of a type of synthetic plastic sheet which is used to polarise light. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Some models use a degradation where the top of the glass (through which the sky is looked at) is darker and the bottom is transparent.


A mirrored coating can also be applied to the lens. This mirrored coating reflects some of the light when it hits the lens before it is transmitted through the lens making it useful in bright conditions. These mirrored coatings can be made any color by the manufacturer for styling and fashion purposes. The color of the mirrored surface is irrelevant to the color of the lens. For example, a gray lens can have a blue mirror coating, and a brown lens can have a silver coating. These type of sunglasses are sometimes called mirrorshades. A mirror is a surface with good specular reflection that is smooth enough to form an image. ... Mirrorshades are sunglasses with a special coating on the outside of the lenses to make them appear like small mirrors, although the wearer just sees things in a brown or grey tinted point of view, usually. ...


The manufacturer, any of the above features: color, polarization, degradation, and mirroring, can be combined into a set of lenses for a pair of sunglasses.


With the introduction of office computing, ergonomists can recommend mildly tinted glasses for display operators to increase contrast. Office Computing Office computing has evolved from the simple electronic typewriter to a sophisticated set of computer programs covering everything from word processing to graphic design. ... Ergonomics (from Greek ergon work and nomoi natural laws) is the study of designing objects to be better adapted to the shape of the human body and/or to correct the users posture. ...


Corrective lenses can be darkened to serve the same purpose, or secondary clip-on dark lenses can be placed in front of the regular lenses. Some lenses gradually darken with bright light and lighten in darkness. These are known as photochromic lenses. Reversible photochromics (PCs) work by changing their chemical structure after absorbing UV light, usually from the sun or a UV light. ...


Sunglass lenses are made from either glass or plastic. Plastic lenses are typically made from acrylic, polycarbonate, or CR-39. Glass lenses have the best optical clarity and scratch resistance, but are heavier than plastic lenses. They can also shatter or break on impact. Plastic lenses are lighter than glass lenses, but are more prone to scratching. They do however, offer more resistance to shattering than glass. Polycarbonate lenses are the lightest, and are also almost shatterproof, making them good for impact protection. CR-39 lenses are the most common plastic lenses, due to their low weight, high scratch resistance, low transparency for ultraviolet and infrared radiation, and other advantageous properties. This article refers to the material. ... Plastic covers a range of synthetic or semisynthetic polymerization products. ... Structure of methyl methacrylate Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or poly(methyl 2-methylpropanoate) is the synthetic polymer of methyl methacrylate. ... Polycarbonates are a particular group of thermoplastics. ... CR-39, or allyl diglycol polycarbonate, is a plastic polymer commonly used in the manufacture of eyeglass lenses. ...


Frames

Frames are generally made from plastic, nylon, a metal or metal alloy. Nylon frames are usually used in sports because they are light weight and flexible. They are able to bend slightly instead of breaking when pressure is applied to them. This flex can also help the glasses grip better on the wearer's face. Metal frames are usually more rigid than nylon frames thus they can be more easily damaged when participating in sporty activities, but this is not to say that they cannot be used for such activities. Because metal frames are more rigid, some models have spring loaded hinges to help them grip the wearer's face better. The end of the ear pieces and the bridge over the nose can be textured or have a rubber or plastic material to hold better. The end of the ear pieces are usually curved so that they wrap around the ear; however, some models have straight ear pieces. Oakley, for example, has straight ear pieces on all their glasses. Nylon represents a family of synthetic polymers, a thermoplastic material, invented in 1935 by Wallace Carothers at DuPont. ... Hot metal work from a blacksmith Look up Metal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary In chemistry, a metal (Greek: Metallon) is an element that readily forms ions (cations) and has metallic bonds, and metals are sometimes described as a lattice of positive ions (cations) surrounded by a sea of delocolised... Alloy is a combination, either in solution or compound, of two or more elements, which has a combination of at least one metal, and where the resultant material has metallic properties. ... Springs A spring is a flexible elastic object used to store mechanical energy. ... Rubber is an elastic hydrocarbon polymer which occurs as a milky emulsion (known as latex) in the sap of a number of plants but can also be produced synthetically. ... Oakley is a eyewear company, known mostly for their high end sunglasses and ski goggles. ...


Frames can be made to hold the lenses in several different ways. There are three common styles: full frame, half frame, and frameless. Full frame glasses have the frame go all around the lenses. Half frames go around only half the lens, typically the frames attach to the top of the lenses and on the side near the top. Frameless glasses have no frame around the lenses and the ear stems are attached directly to the lenses. There are two styles of frameless glasses, those that have a piece of frame material connecting the two lenses together, and those that are a single lens with ear stems on each side.


Some sports oriented sunglasses have interchangeable lens options. Lenses can be easily removed and swapped with a different lens, usually a different colored lens. The purpose of this is to allow the wearer to easily change lenses when light conditions or activities change. The reason for this is because the cost of a set of lenses is less than the cost of a separate pair of glasses and carrying extra lenses is less bulky than carrying multiple pairs of glasses. It also allows easy replacement of a set of lenses if they are damaged. The most common type of sunglasses with interchangeable lenses have a single lens or shield that covers both eyes. Styles that use two lenses also exist, but less common.


Fashion

Onassis glasses

Onassis glasses are very large sunglasses worn by women. This style of sunglasses is said to mimic the kind most famously worn by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. While originally worn by Onassis in the 1960's, the glasses eventually became popular with younger American girls around the year 2000. First official White House portrait. ...


Mirrorshades

Mirrorshades are sunglasses with a mirrored coating on the surface. Their popularity with police officers in the United States has earned them the nickname "cop shades". The two most popular styles for these are dual lenses set in metal frames (which are often confused with Aviators), and "Wraparound" (a single, smooth, semi-circular lense that covers both eyes and much of the same area of the face covered by protective goggles, combined with a minimal plastic frame and single piece of plastic serving as a nosepad). Wraparound sunglasses are also quite popular in the world of extreme sports. Mirrorshades are sunglasses with a special coating on the outside of the lenses to make them appear like small mirrors, although the wearer just sees things in a brown or grey tinted point of view, usually. ... Extreme sports (now also known as action sports) is a general, somewhat hazily-defined term for a collection of newer sports involving adrenaline-inducing action. ...


Aviators

Aviators are sunglasses with a dark lens, a oversized teardrop lens shape and thin metal frames. This design first appeared in 1936 by Ray-Ban for issue to U.S. military aviators. Their popularity with pilots, military and law enforcement personnel in the United States has never wavered. In recent years aviator sunglasses have again become popular with all sorts of wearers. Aviators are people who fly aircraft either for pleasure or for a job. ...


Wayfarers

First introduced by Ray-Ban, the Wayfarer design popularized since the 1950s by Hollywood celebrities such as James Dean is thought to be the bestselling sunglasses design to date.


Teashades

Teashades were a type of psychedelic wire-rim sunglasses that were often worn, usually for purely aesthetic reasons, by members of the 60's drug counterculture. The common teashade is supported by pads on the bridge of the nose and has a thin wire frame. A uniquely-colored or darkened glass lens was usually preferred, perhaps to hide bloodshot eyes from cannabis use, but probably more often simply as a fashion statement. Santanas Abraxas (album) cover by Mati Klarwein The Psychedelic Era (1965-1975), associated with the use of psychedelic drugs such as LSD, mescaline and psilocybin, produced psychedelic art which may be enjoyed by both those who have, and who have not, had a personal psychedelic experience. ... The drug cannabis, commonly known as marijuana, is produced from parts of the cannabis plant, primarily the cured flowers and gathered trichomes of the female plant. ...


The term has now fallen into disuse, although references can still be found in literature of the time. Teashades are briefly referenced during a police traning video in Hunter S. Thompson's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) – was an American journalist and author. ... The hard cover version of the book. ...


History

It is said that the Roman emperor Nero liked to watch gladiator fights through polished gems. Sunglasses were first used in China in the 12th century or possibly earlier. The "lenses" of these glasses were flat panes of smoky quartz, which offered no corrective powers but did protect the eyes from glare. Contemporary documents describe the use of such glasses by judges in Chinese courts to conceal their facial expressions while questioning witnesses. Compare the representation of "blind Justice" in Western art. Nero Claudius Cæsar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, 37–June 9, 68), born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty (54–68). ... Pollice Verso, an 1872 painting by Jean-Léon Gérôme, is a well known history painters researched conception of a gladiatorial combat. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Categories: Mineral stubs | Minerals | Quartz varieties ... A court is an official, public forum which a sovereign establishes by lawful authority to adjudicate disputes, and to dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under the law. ... Lady Justice - allegory of Justice as woman with sword and with book - statue at court building. ...


James Ayscough began experimenting with tinted lenses in spectacles in the mid-18th century. These were not "sunglasses" as such; Ayscough believed blue- or green-tinted glass could correct for specific vision impairments. Protection from the sun's rays was not a concern of his. James Ayscough (?-1759) was an English designer and maker of scientific instruments. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


Sunglasses as such were introduced in America by Sam Foster in 1929. Foster found a ready market on the beaches of Atlantic City, New Jersey, where he began selling Foster Grants from a Woolworth on the Boardwalk. 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 90 mile beach Australia A beach or strand is a geological formation consisting of loose rock particles such as sand, shingle, cobble, or even shell along the shoreline of a body of water. ... Motto: Nickname: Map Map of Atlantic City in Atlantic County Political Statistics Founded Sister Cities {{{sister cities}}} Incorporated March 1854 County Atlantic County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Bob Levy Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Water 44. ... F.W. Woolworth Company the original USA based chain of high street shops. ...


Sunglasses would not become polarized, however, until 1936, when Edwin H. Land began experimenting with making lenses with his patented Polaroid filter. This article treats polarization in electrodynamics. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Edwin Herbert Land (May 12, 1906 â€“ March 1, 1991) was an American scientist and inventor. ... Polaroid (a trademark of the Polaroid Corporation) is the name of a type of synthetic plastic sheet which is used to polarise light. ...


In 2004, Oakley developed Thump, sunglasses with built-in digital audio player. It has been designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) 2004 World Health Day topic was Road Safety (by World Health Organization) Year of the Monkey (by the Chinese calendar) See the world in... Oakley is a eyewear company, known mostly for their high end sunglasses and ski goggles. ... A hard-drive-based player (Apple iPod) An MP3 CD player (Philips Expanium) A flash-based player (iBox Mediaman) A digital audio player (DAP) is a device that stores, organizes and plays digital music files. ...


Other names for sunglasses

There are also various words referring to eyepieces with darkened lenses:

  • Sun spectacles is a term used by some opticians.
  • Spekkies is a term used predominantly in southern Australia.
  • Sun specs (also sunspecs) is the shortened form of the above term.
  • Sunglasses is a term in common usage in Britain and North America, and it is also used when preceded by "pair of".
  • Sun-shades can also refer to the sun-shading eyepiece-type, although the term is not exclusive to these. Also in use is the derivative abbreviation, shades.
  • Dark glasses (also preceded by 'pair of') - generic term in common usage.
  • Sunnies is Australian slang.
  • Smoked Spectacles usually refers to the darkened eyepieces worn by blind people.

Blindness can be defined physiologically as the condition of lacking visual perception. ...

Some celebrities predominantly seen wearing sunglasses

Some celebrities are predominantly seen in public wearing sunglasses, even indoors. These people include: From U.S. Centennial of Flight Commission webpage [1] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... From U.S. Centennial of Flight Commission webpage [1] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... For Ray Charles of the Ray Charles Singers and longtime vocal conductor for Perry Como, see Ray Charles (elder). ... Takashi Miike This is a copyrighted promotional photo with a known source. ... Takashi Miike This is a copyrighted promotional photo with a known source. ... Takashi Miike Takashi Miike ) (born August 24, 1960 in Osaka, Japan) is a highly prolific Japanese filmmaker. ... Image File history File links Masayuki_Suzuki. ... Image File history File links Masayuki_Suzuki. ... Masayuki Suzuki (鈴木雅之, Suzuki Masayuki, born on September 22, 1956 in Ota, Tokyo) is a Japanese singer best known as a former member of Rats & Star (previously called Chanels). ... For the 1998 movie, see Celebrity (1998 movie). ...

Pedro Abrunhosa is a Portuguese singer, musician and songwriter. ... Robert Ashley (born March 28, 1930) is a contemporary composer, best known for his operas and other theatrical works. ... Richard Belzer Richard Belzer (born August 4, 1944) is an American stand up comedian, writer and actor. ... Bono at a press conference for the film Million Dollar Hotel, 2000 Paul David Hewson (born 10 May 1960), nicknamed Bono Vox, stage name Bono, is the lead singer of the Irish rock band, U2. ... U2 is an Irish rock band featuring Bono (Paul David Hewson) on vocals, guitar and harmonica, The Edge (David Howell Evans) on guitar, keyboards and vocals, Adam Clayton on bass, and Larry Mullen, Jr. ... For Ray Charles of the Ray Charles Singers and longtime vocal conductor for Perry Como, see Ray Charles (elder). ... Ronnie Milsap Ronnie Lee Milsap (born January 16, 1946 (though the internet, including Wikipedia, lists a variety of contradictory years) in Robbinsville, North Carolina, USA) is an American country music singer and musician with 40 number one hit songs to his credit. ... Bootsy Collins on the cover of Bootsys Rubber Bands Live in Louisville 1978 William Bootsy Collins (born October 26, 1951 in Cincinnati, Ohio,) is a pioneering funk bassist, singer, and songwriter. ... Funk is a distinct style of music originated by African-Americans, e. ... José Montserrate Feliciano (born September 10, 1945 in Lares) is a Puerto Rican singer. ... Enzo Ferrari Enzo Anselmo Ferrari (February 18, 1898 - August 14, 1988) was the founder of the Scuderia Ferrari Grand Prix motor racing team, and subsequently of the Ferrari car manufacturer. ... William John Paul Liam Gallagher (born September 21, 1972, Longsight, Manchester) is the lead vocalist for Britpop band Oasis. ... Noel Thomas David Gallagher (born May 29, 1967) is the lead songwriter, guitarist and sometime lead-singer with the British rock band Oasis. ... Oasis are a British Britpop group originally formed in Manchester. ... The one and only Heino! Heino (born December 13, 1938 Düsseldorf as Heinz Georg Kramm) is a German singer of popular music (Schlager and Volksmusik). ... For other people with the same name, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation) Michael Joseph Jackson (born August 29, 1958), also known by the nicknames King of Pop and Wacko Jacko, is an American musician whose successful music career and controversial personal life have been at the forefront of pop culture for... Office Head of Government Term of office from July 19, 1989 until December 22, 1990 Profession Officer Political party PZPR Spouse Barbara Jaruzelska Date of birth July 6, 1923 Place of birth Kurów near PuÅ‚awy, Poland Date of death Place of death Wojciech Witold Jaruzelski (pronounced: ) (born July... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Umm Kulthum (أم كلثوم, Oum Kalsoum) (c. ... Lenny Kravitz, 2005 (José Cruz/ABr) Leonard Albert Kravitz (born May 26, 1964) is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, and guitarist whose retro-style amalgam of rock, pop, funk, and even techno is inspired by such music icons as Jimi Hendrix and John Lennon. ... Karl (Otto) Lagerfeld (born September 10, 1938 (according to some sources 1933) in Hamburg, Germany) is widely recognized as one of the most influential fashion designers of the late twentieth century. ... Takashi Miike Takashi Miike ) (born August 24, 1960 in Osaka, Japan) is a highly prolific Japanese filmmaker. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Jack Nicholson at Cannes, (2001). ... First official White House portrait. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Ric Ocasek (born Richard Otcasek on March 23, 1949) is the former vocalist and frontman for The Cars and a producer for several other groups, including Bad Brains and Suicide. ... Yoko Ono on the cover of her album Fly Yoko Ono Lennon (born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese musician and artist who has lived most of her life in the United States. ... John Winston Ono Lennon(October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980) was best known as a singer, songwriter, poet and guitarist for the British music group The Beatles. ... Roy Orbison at a London press conference, late 1988. ... Richard Lee Petty (born July 2, 1937 in Level Cross, North Carolina) is a renowned former NASCAR Winston Cup Series driver. ... Paul Shaffer Paul Allen Wood Shaffer (born November 28, 1949 in Fort William (now Thunder Bay), Ontario, Canada, is a Jewish-Canadian musician, actor, author, comedian and composer. ... Howard Stern, circa 2000. ... A shock jock is a slang term used to describe a type of radio broadcaster (sometimes a disk jockey) who attracts attention using humor that a significant portion of the listening audience may find offensive. ... Masayuki Suzuki (鈴木雅之, Suzuki Masayuki, born on September 22, 1956 in Ota, Tokyo) is a Japanese singer best known as a former member of Rats & Star (previously called Chanels). ... Rats & Star, formerly called Chanels, is a male J-pop group which specializes in doo-wop-influenced music. ... Jean Toots Thielemans (born Brussels, April 29, 1922) is a Belgian jazz artist well known for his harmonica play. ... Jazz is an original American musical art form originating around the early 1920s in New Orleans, rooted in Western music technique and theory, and is marked by the profound cultural contributions of African Americans. ... Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) – was an American journalist and author. ... Andy Warhol, photographed by Helmut Newton. ... Hank Williams, Jr. ... Country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic Music, Blues, Gospel music, and Old-time music. ... Stevie Wonder (born May 13, 1950 as Stevland Judkins, later changed to Stevland Morris) is an American singer, songwriter, producer, musician, humanitarian and social activist. ... ZZ Top on the cover of the March 1991 issue of the Guitar World magazine. ... See also: 1979 in music, other events of 1980, 1981 in music, 1980s in music and the list of years in music // Events January January 1 - Cliff Richard is appointed an MBE by Queen Elizabeth II. The only other pop music acts to be created MBEs are the Beatles and... Heath Ledger Heathcliff Andrew Ledger (born April 4, 1979) is an Academy Award-nominated Australian film actor. ... Original members (left to right) Toru (Drum Wolf), Seiji (Guitar Wolf), and Billy (Bass Wolf) The band Guitar Wolf, founded in Japan in 1987, are known for their piercing vocals and extremely loud style of garage punk that emphasized heavy distortion. ...

Some fictional characters predominantly seen wearing sunglasses

The Blues Brothers' sunglasses contribute to their distinctive style
The Blues Brothers' sunglasses contribute to their distinctive style

Some fictional characters are predominantly depicted as wearing sunglasses. These include: Publicity picture, also featured on the cover. ... Publicity picture, also featured on the cover. ...

The character Blade was created in 1973 for Marvel Comics by writer Marv Wolfman and artist Gene Colan and was a supporting character in the 1970s comic Tomb of Dracula. ... It has been suggested that Felicia (pseudonym) be merged into this article or section. ... Detective John Munch Detective John Munch is a fictional character played by actor Richard Belzer. ... Homicide: Life on the Street is an American television drama series chronicling the life of a fictional Baltimore police homicide unit. ... Law & Order: Special Victims Unit - Season 5 DVD Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (also known as Law & Order: SVU) is the first of three spin-offs of Law & Order (the other two being Law & Order: Criminal Intent and Law & Order: Trial by Jury; all series are presented on the NBC... It has been suggested that Blues brothers bar be merged into this article or section. ... Caiga Quien Caiga (CQC) is a very popular weekly news, humor and politics television show in Argentina. ... Max Headroom doing a promotion for Cinemax Max Headroom was the name of a fictional television character in the late 1980s and of the science fiction television series in which he starred. ... The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive. ... Cyclops (Scott Summers, occasionally nicknamed Slim) is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe and the field leader of the X-Men. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Cover to Daredevil v2 #41. ... Daredevil (alter ego Matthew Murdock) is a fictional superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Men in Black is a 1997 science fiction comedy action film directed by Barry Sonnenfeld, starring Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith and Vincent DOnofrio. ... In UFO conspiracy theories, the term Men in Black (MIBs), also known as Men in Gray, are alleged to be men dressed in black suits claiming to be government agents who attempt to harass or threaten UFO witnesses into silence. ... The Matrix is a science-fiction/action film first released in the USA on March 31, 1999, written and directed by Larry and Andy Wachowski. ... The protagonist is the central figure of a story, and is often referred to as a storys main character. ... The antagonist is the character (or group of characters, or, sometimes an institution) of a story who represents the opposition against which the heroes and/or protagonists must contend. ... Reservoir Dogs is Quentin Tarantinos 1992 debut as a feature film director. ... The Mafia, also referred to in Italian as Cosa Nostra, which is generally translated our thing in the Italian language, is an organized criminal secret society which evolved in mid-19th century Sicily. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Albert Wesker is a recurring antagonist in Capcoms Resident Evil video game series. ... Resident Evil, known as Biohazard (バイオハザード) in Japan, is a successful franchise of survival-horror video games developed by Capcom and created by Shinji Mikami. ... Clifford is a Muppet character performed by Kevin Clash. ... John Denver and the Muppets: A Christmas Together The Muppets are a group of puppets and costume characters created by Jim Henson and the company he created. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A. J. Crowley is a fictional demon in the novel Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. ... Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (1990) is a fantasy novel written in collaboration between Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE is an English fantasy author (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England), best known for his Discworld series. ... Neil Gaiman (November 2004) Neil Richard Gaiman () (November 10, 1960, Portchester, Hampshire) is an English Jewish author of numerous science fiction and fantasy works, including many comic books. ... Gendo Ikari (碇ゲンドウ Ikari Gendō) is a fictional character from the anime Neon Genesis Evangelion and The End of Evangelion movie. ... Neon Genesis Evangelion ) is a Japanese animated television series, begun in 1995, directed and written by Hideaki Anno, and produced by Gainax. ... Final Fantasy VII (ファイナルファンタジーVII Fainaru FantajÄ« VII), or Final Fantasy 7, is a console and computer role-playing game released by Square Co. ... Cool Hand Luke is a 1967 American film starring Paul Newman and directed by Stuart Rosenberg. ... Danny Masterson as Steven Hyde Steven Hyde (born c. ... That 70s Show is a Fox Network television sitcom centered on the lives of a group of teenagers living in the fictional town of Point Place, Wisconsin during the late 1970s. ... Johnny Bravo is an American animated television series about the boorish, skirt-chasing title character who constantly searches for a woman willing to date him, but even when he seems to find one, something goes wrong. ... Jimmy with his cell phone Jimmy T. (the T stands for Thang) is a ficitional character in the WarioWare series of microgames. ... WarioWare, Inc. ... Duke Nukem is an action hero created by computer game developer 3D Realms/Apogee Software. ... Duke Nukem 3D is a first-person shooter developed by 3D Realms and released on January 29, 1996 by Apogee Software, featuring the adventures of Duke Nukem, based on a character that had appeared in earlier platform games by the company: Duke Nukem and Duke Nukem II. // Synopsis Murderous aliens... The Boondock Saints (1999) is a cult film about two Irish brothers in South Boston who, in response to rampant organized crime, turn to vigilantism and are named Saints by the Boston press. ... Fullmetal Alchemist ), or commonly abbreviated FMA or Hagaren by fans, is a manga series created by Hiromu Arakawa and serialized in Monthly Shonen Gangan. ... Sluggy Freelance is one of the longest running, best-known and most popular webcomics, with a new comic released daily since August 25, 1997, except for 8 days in August 2001 and filler art on many other occasions. ... The Terminator is a 1984 science fiction-action film which became the break-through role for former body-builder Arnold Schwarzenegger. ... JC Denton is a fictional character in the computer game Deus Ex. ... Deus Ex (DX) is a first-person shooter/role-playing computer game developed by Ion Storm Inc. ... Joe Cool is a nickname given primarily to those who display a calm or placid attitude, especially in the face of adversity. ... Look up Alias in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The term alias may refer to— an assumed name, or pseudonym. ... USPS stamp featuring Snoopy as the World War I Flying Ace This article is about a comic strip character. ... Charlie Brown is the principal character of the Peanuts comic strip Peanuts was a syndicated daily comic strip written and drawn by American cartoonist Charles M. Schulz, which ran from 2 October 1950 to 13 February 2000. ...

References

  1. Sakamoto Y, Sasaki K, Kojima M, Sasaki H, Sakamoto A, Sakai M, Tatami A. "The effects of protective eyewear on glare and crystalline lens transparency. Dev Ophthalmol. 2002;35:93-103. PMID 12061282.
  2. a b Cancer Council Australia; Centre for Eye Research Australia."Position Statement: Eye Protection." August 2005.
  3. Leow YH, Tham SN. "UV-protective sunglasses for UVA irradiation protection." Int J Dermatol. 1995 Nov;34(11):808-10. PMID 8543419.
  4. Glazer-Hockstein C, Dunaief JL. "Could blue light-blocking lenses decrease the risk of age-related macular degeneration?" Retina. 2006 Jan;26(1):1-4. PMID 16395131
  5. Margrain TH, Boulton M, Marshall J, Sliney DH. "Do blue light filters confer protection against age-related macular degeneration?" Prog Retin Eye Res. 2004 Sep;23(5):523-31. PMID 15302349
  6. American Academy of Ophthalmology. "Information from Your Eye M.D.: Sunglasses." November 2003.

 
 

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