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Encyclopedia > Sun Valley, Idaho
Sun Valley, Idaho
Location in Blaine County and the state of Idaho
Location in Blaine County and the state of Idaho
Coordinates: 43°40′50″N 114°20′34″W / 43.68056, -114.34278
Country United States
State Idaho
County Blaine
Area
 - Total 9.9 sq mi (25.6 km²)
 - Land 9.9 sq mi (25.6 km²)
 - Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km²)
Elevation 5,945 ft (1,812 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 1,427
 - Density 144.6/sq mi (55.8/km²)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 - Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP codes 83353-83354
Area code(s) 208
FIPS code 16-78850
GNIS feature ID 0398200
Sun Valley, Idaho - Bald Mountain - View from Sun Valley Lake
Sun Valley, Idaho - Bald Mountain - View from Sun Valley Lake

Sun Valley is a city and affluent resort community in the central part of the U.S. state of Idaho, adjacent to the city of Ketchum in Blaine County. Tourists from around the world enjoy its skiing, hiking, ice skating, trail riding, tennis, and more. The population was 1,427 at the 2000 census. Very few of its residents stay there year-round, with most coming from major cities like Seattle, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago and New York. The elevation of Sun Valley (at the Lodge) is 5920 feet (1804 m) above sea level. The area is served by Friedman Memorial Airport. Image File history File links Blaine_County_Idaho_Incorporated_and_Unincorporated_areas_Sun_Valley_Highlighted. ... Blaine County is a county located in the U.S. state of Idaho. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... 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Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Mountain Standard Time (MST) is UTC-7, Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) is UTC-6 The Mountain Time Zone of North America keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-7) during the shortest days of autumn and winter, and by subtracting six hours during daylight saving time... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Mountain Standard Time (MST) is UTC-7, Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) is UTC-6 The Mountain Time Zone of North America keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-7) during the shortest days of autumn and winter, and by subtracting six hours during daylight saving time... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... The area code 208 is the area code for the state of Idaho. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 681 pixels, file size: 233 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 681 pixels, file size: 233 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Ketchum is a city located in Blaine County, Idaho, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 3,003. ... Blaine County is a county located in the U.S. state of Idaho. ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... Outdoor ice skating in Austria Ice skating is travelling on ice with skates, narrow (and sometimes parabolic) blade-like devices moulded into special boots (or, more primitively, without boots, tied to regular footwear). ... Trail riding is riding on trails as opposed to riding on roads or courses. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... This article is about the state. ... The term above mean sea level (AMSL) refers to the elevation (on the ground) or altitude (in the air) of any object, relative to the average sea level. ... Friedman Memorial Airport (IATA: SUN, ICAO: KSUN), formerly known as Sun Valley Airport is a public airport located in the town of Hailey serving Sun Valley, Idaho and the surrounding areas in the Wood River Valley. ...


The term, "Sun Valley," among skiers, refers to the alpine ski area, which consists of Bald Mountain, the main ski mountain, and Dollar Mountain, which is geared toward novice and lower intermediate skiers. Bald Mountain, or "Baldy," has a summit of 9150 feet (2789 m) and a vertical drop of 3400 feet (1036 m). With its abundance of constant-pitch terrain, at varying degrees of difficulty, coupled with its substantial vertical drop and absence of wind, Baldy has often been referred to as the best single ski mountain in the world. The treeless "Dollar" at 6638 feet (2023 m) has a vertical drop of only 628 feet (191 m). Bald mountian is a ski mountian located in Sun Valley, Idaho. ... Dollar Mountain is a part of the Sun Valley, Idaho ski area and is a mountain that caters primarily to beginner and lower intermediate skiers. ... Dollar Mountain is a part of the Sun Valley, Idaho ski area and is a mountain that caters primarily to beginner and lower intermediate skiers. ...


The term "Sun Valley" is also used more generally to speak of the region surrounding the city, including the neighboring city of Ketchum and the valley area winding south to Hailey. The region has been home to the rich, famous, and powerful, including Mats Wilander, Walter Annenberg, Adam West, Ernest Hemingway, Teresa Heinz Kerry, Demi Moore, Bruce Willis, Ashton Kutcher and Arnold Schwarzenegger. Ketchum is a city located in Blaine County, Idaho, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 3,003. ... Hailey is a city in central Idaho. ... Mats Wilander (born August 22, 1964, in Vaxjo, Sweden) is a former World No. ... Walter H. Annenberg Walter H. Annenberg KBE (March 13, 1908 – October 1, 2002) was an American billionaire publisher, philanthropist, and diplomat. ... Adam West (born William West Anderson on September 19, 1928) is an American actor who is best known for playing the role of Batman/Bruce Wayne on the 1960s TV series Batman (which also had a film adaptation). ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Maria Teresa Thierstein Simões-Ferreira Heinz Kerry (born October 5, 1938), is a philanthropist and the wife of U.S. Senator John Kerry. ... Demi Kutcher (born Demetria Gene Guynes on November 11, 1962) is an American actress. ... Walter Bruce Willis (born March 19, 1955 in Idar-Oberstein, Germany) is an American actor and singer. ... This article is about the actor. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German pronunciation IPA: ) (born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-born American bodybuilder, actor, and politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ...

Contents

History

Union Pacific Railroad (1936-64)

The first destination winter resort in the U.S. was developed by W. Averell Harriman, the chairman of the Union Pacific Railroad, primarily to increase ridership on passenger trains. The success of the 1932 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York, spurred an increase in participation in winter sports (and alpine skiing in particular). A lifelong skier, Harriman determined that America would embrace a destination mountain resort, similar to those in the European Alps, such as St. Moritz. During the winter of 1935-1936, Harriman enlisted the services of an Austrian count, Felix Schaffgotsch, to travel across the western U.S. to locate an ideal site for a winter resort. The Count toured Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Yosemite, the San Bernardino Mountains, Zion National Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, the Wasatch Mountains, Pocatello, Jackson Hole, and Grand Targhee areas. Late in his trip and on the verge of abandoning his search, he was steered to the Ketchum area in central Idaho. A Union Pacific employee had mentioned that the rail line to Ketchum had cost the company more money for snow removal than any other branch line. Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... William Averell Harriman (November 15, 1891 – July 26, 1986) was an American Democratic Party politician, businessman and diplomat. ... Union Pacific redirects here. ... The 1932 Winter Olympics, officially known as the III Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1932 in Lake Placid, New York, United States. ... For other places with the same name, see Lake Placid (disambiguation). ... Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... St. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Mount Rainier (disambiguation). ... This article is about the tallest mountain in Oregon. ... Yosemite National Park (pron. ... San Bernardino Mountains The San Bernardino Mountains are short transverse mountain range northeast of Los Angeles in southern California in the United States. ... Zion Canyon as seen from the top of Angels Landing at sunset Zion National Park is a United States National Park located in the Southwestern United States, near Springdale, Utah. ... Rocky Mountain National Park is located in the north-central region of the U.S. state of Colorado. ... The Wasatch Range (also seen as Wasatch Mountains and Wahsatch Range) is a mountain range that stretches from southern Idaho and Wyoming south through central Utah in the Western United States. ... Nickname: Motto: Gateway to the Northwest Location in Bannock County and the state of Idaho Coordinates: , Country State Counties Bannock, Power Government  - Mayor Roger W. Chase Area  - City 28. ... Jackson is a town located in the Jackson Hole valley of Teton County, Wyoming. ... The Grand Targhee Resort is located in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest through Alta, Wyoming. ... Ketchum is a city located in Blaine County, Idaho, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 3,003. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ...


Schaffgotsch was impressed by the combination of Bald Mountain and its surrounding mountains, adequate snowfall, abundant sunshine, moderate elevation, and absence of wind, and selected it as the site. Harriman visited several weeks later and agreed. The 3,888-acre Brass Ranch was purchased for about $4 per acre and construction commenced that spring; it was built in seven months for $1.5 million.


Pioneering publicist Steve Hannigan, who had successfully promoted Miami Beach, was hired and named the resort "Sun Valley." (Count Schaffgotsch returned to Austria and was killed on the Eastern Front during World War II.) Miami Beach is a city located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. ... Combatants Soviet Union,[1] Poland, Tannu Tuva (until 1944 incorporation with USSR), Mongolia Germany,[2] Italy (to 1943), Romania (to 1944), Finland (to 1944), Hungary, Slovakia, Croatia, Spain (to 1943, unofficial) Commanders Joseph Stalin, Aleksei Antonov, Ivan Konev, Rodion Malinovsky, Ivan Bagramyan, Kirill Meretskov, Ivan Petrov, Alexander Rodimtsev, Konstantin Rokossovsky... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


The centerpiece of the new resort was the Sun Valley Lodge, which opened in December 1936. The 220-room, X-shaped lodge's exterior was constructed of concrete, poured inside rough-sawn forms. The wood grain was impressed on the concrete finish, which was acid-stained brown to imitate wood. Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Challenger Inn (Sun Valley Inn)
Challenger Inn (Sun Valley Inn)

The Swiss-style Challenger Inn (now Sun Valley Inn) and village were also part of the initial resort, opening in 1937. Hannigan wanted swimming pools at the resort, "so people won't think skiing is too cold." Both the Lodge and the Inn had heated outdoor swimming pools, circular in shape. Hannigan had the pools designed this way, unique at the time, in the hope they would be widely photographed, providing free publicity. It worked. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 562 pixelsFull resolution‎ (5,095 × 3,582 pixels, file size: 4. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 562 pixelsFull resolution‎ (5,095 × 3,582 pixels, file size: 4. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Chairlifts

The world's first chairlifts were installed on the resort's Proctor and Dollar Mountains in the fall of 1936. (Proctor Mountain is northeast of Dollar Mountain). The chairlift design was adapted from banana loading equipment used on fruit ships in the tropics. The single-seat chairlifts were developed at the Union Pacific headquarters in Omaha in the summer of 1936. The chairlift went on to replace the primitive rope tow and other technologies used at ski areas at the time. [1] Hunter Mountain chairlift A chairlift in Bad Hofgastein, Austria A chairlift (technically, an elevated passenger ropeway), is a type of aerial lift, which consists of a continuously circulating steel cable loop strung between two end terminals and usually over intermediate towers, carrying a series of chairs. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Omaha” redirects here. ... A ski tow, also called rope tow, is a mechanised system for pulling skiers uphill. ...


Bald Mountain

While Bald Mountain was one of the reasons for the selection of the site, it was not initially part of the resort. The plan was to develop it as a ski mountain, but sometime in the future. Alpine skiing was still in its infancy in America, and it was believed by management that there were not enough accomplished skiers to justify its development in 1936. But it was quickly realized by the resort's restless Austrian ski instructors that this fantastic mountain needed to be opened to the skiing public (and promoted) as soon as possible. The instructors had been hiking up and skiing down Baldy on their off days during the resort's first few seasons. These men were among the best skiers in the world, and had fled Austria just before it had come under control of the Nazis in 1938 (Anschluss). Bald mountian is a ski mountian located in Sun Valley, Idaho. ... Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... German troops march into Austria on 12 March 1938. ...

Historic Ski School Sign
Historic Ski School Sign

For Sun Valley's fourth season, three chairlifts (in series) were installed on Bald Mountain during the summer of 1939, in the River Run area, the northeast face of the mountain overlooking Ketchum and Sun Valley. Ski runs had been cut out of the forest during the summers of 1938 & 1939. Friedl Pfeiffer, the new head of the ski school from St. Anton, Austria, wanted the lifts to go to the very top of the mountain, something that had yet to be done anywhere, even in Europe. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 496 pixelsFull resolution‎ (5,135 × 3,185 pixels, file size: 6. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 496 pixelsFull resolution‎ (5,135 × 3,185 pixels, file size: 6. ... Lysa Hora or Bald Mountain (Ukrainian: Лиса гора, Lysa hora, pl. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


The loading point of the lowest chairlift (River) was on the Ketchum side of the Big Wood River, at an elevation of 5,750 feet (1,752 m). The single chairs loaded near the parking lot, then horizontally crossed the river (about eight feet above the water) before ascending the mountain, gaining 600 vertical feet (183 m). The middle lift (Canyon) gained over 1,300 vertical feet and unloaded at the Roundhouse (a day lodge at 7,700' (2347 m), built in 1939). The upper lift (Ridge) also climbed over 1,300 vertical feet (396 m), unloading at just above 9,000 feet (2,743 m) AMSL. Its lift capacity was a mere 426 skiers per hour (7 per minute). The three chairlifts that are in approximately the same lines today (2006) are: River Run (quad), Exhibition (triple), and Christmas (quad). The original lower single chairlift was replaced in the 1960s and the loading base was moved across the river; a footbridge provides walking access from the parking lot to the River Run base area. The Big Wood River is a river in Idaho in the United States. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term above mean sea level (AMSL) refers to the elevation (on the ground) or altitude (in the air) of any object, relative to the average sea level. ... A chairlift in Bad Hofgastein, Austria A chairlift, more correctly known as an elevated passenger ropeway, is a type of aerial lift, which consists of a continuously circulating steel cable strung in a loop between two end terminals and generally over intermediate towers. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... ...


Celebrities

Ernest Hemingway completed For Whom the Bell Tolls (which many consider his greatest novel) while staying in suite 206 of the Lodge in the fall of 1939. Averell Harriman had invited Hemingway and other celebrities, primarily from Hollywood, to the resort to help promote it. Gary Cooper was a frequent visitor and hunting/fishing partner, as was Clark Gable. Hemingway was a part-time resident over the next twenty years, eventually relocating to Ketchum (Papa and his fourth wife are buried in the Ketchum Cemetery). The Hemingway Memorial, dedicated in 1966, is just off Trail Creek Road, about a mile northeast of the Sun Valley Lodge. Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... For other uses, see For Whom the Bell Tolls (disambiguation). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor of English heritage. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Ketchum is a city located in Blaine County, Idaho, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 3,003. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...


Sun Valley was featured (and promoted) in the 1941 movie Sun Valley Serenade, starring Sonja Henie, John Payne, Milton Berle, and bandleader Glenn Miller. Scenes were shot at the resort in March 1941. Sun Valley local and future gold medalist Gretchen Fraser was the skiing stand-in for Henie. The film is shown continuously on television in the resort's guest rooms. For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Sun Valley Serenade is a 1941 film starring Sonja Henie, John Payne and Milton Berle. ... Sonja Henie (April 8, 1912 - October 12, 1969) was a Norwegian figure skater and actress. ... Payne in Kansas City Confidental John Payne was an American movie actor who is mainly remembered as a singer in 20th Century Fox film musicals. ... Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an Emmy-winning American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger. ... This article is about the jazz musician. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Gretchen Kunigk Fraser (February 11, 1919 – February 17, 1994) was an American alpine skier. ... Sonja Henie (April 8, 1912 - October 12, 1969) was a Norwegian figure skater and actress. ...


World War II

During World War II, the resort was closed and converted to a convalescent hospital for the U.S. Navy (Pacific Theater). It re-opened to the public in December 1946. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... USN redirects here. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After the war, the clinic for the resort operated on the third floor of the northern wing of the Lodge (wing closest to the Trail Creek Rd.) until the Sun Valley Community Hospital was built in 1961. That facility was named after Dr. John Moritz when he retired in 1973; the Nebraska-born surgeon had served as the resort's year-round physician for 33 years. The Moritz Hospital was closed shortly after the new St. Luke's branch hospital opened (south of Ketchum) in November 2000 and the Moritz building now serves as employee housing. Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the medical specialty. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Warren Miller

Noted ski film producer Warren Miller, while in his early 20's, wintered in Sun Valley from 1946-1949, first living in a car and small teardrop trailer in the River Run parking lot. Miller would later rent an unheated garage for five dollars per month and sublet floor space to friends to pitch their sleeping bags (at fifty cents per night). One of these friends was Edward Scott, the future inventor of the lightweight aluminum ski pole. This extra cash helped Miller purchase his first rolls of 16 mm movie film, jump-starting his motion picture career. During this time he evolved from ski bum to ski instructor to ski filmmaker. Warren Miller is an acclaimed filmmaker, entrepreneur, and author. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The trailer is so named for its resemblance to a teardrop. ...


Miller has since traveled and filmed all over the world, but until recent years he continued to return to Sun Valley virtually every year. He has featured Sun Valley in dozens of his annual films, which has helped publicize the Sun Valley region worldwide. In the 1950s and 1960s he was credited with drawing some of California's rich and famous to the area.[citation needed] It is widely surmised that Miller's work over the years has played a significant role in Sun Valley's economic boom. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ...


Bill Janss (1964-77)

After World War II, Harriman focused on his career in government service and the Union Pacific gradually lost interest in the resort. Rail service was discontinued to Ketchum in 1964 and that November the resort was sold to the Janss Corporation, a major Southern California real estate developer headed by a former Olympic ski team member, Bill Janss, founder of Snowmass. (Janss was selected to the 1940 team, but the games were cancelled due to the war). Janss gained full control of Sun Valley in 1968. During this Janss era of ownership, the north-facing Warm Springs area was developed, as well as Seattle Ridge, and condominium and home construction increased significantly. Seven chairlifts were added, and the number of trails increased from 33 to 62. The original Seattle Ridge double chairlift was installed in 1976, but due to a very poor snow year in 1976-77 it was not operated until December 20, 1977, christened by local legend Gretchen Fraser. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... This article is about the region of Southern California. ... A real estate developer (American English) or property developer (British English) makes improvements of some kind to real property, thereby increasing its value. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... For other places with the same name, see Snowmass (disambiguation). ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Gretchen Kunigk Fraser (February 11, 1919 – February 17, 1994) was an American alpine skier. ...


Earl Holding (1977-Present)

In 1977 Janss was running low on funds and had entered into negotiations to sell the resort to the Walt Disney Company. While the negotiations were strung out by Disney, Earl Holding, a Utah businessman, learned of the situation through a small article in The Wall Street Journal and contacted Janss and arranged for a meeting. For about $12 million, Holding purchased Sun Valley through his company, Sinclair Oil, which operates the Little America Hotels & Resorts. Holding was initially distrusted by many locals: "Earl is a Four Letter Word" was a popular bumper sticker in the late 1970s in Blaine County. But time proved that Holding did not buy the resort for property speculation; like his other assets he meant to operate and improve for the long-term. Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Alternate meanings: Disney (disambiguation) The Walt Disney Company (also known as Disney Enterprises, Inc. ... Robert Earl Holding (born 1927) is the owner of Sinclair Oil, Little America Hotels, and two ski resorts, Sun Valley in central Idaho, and Snowbasin near Ogden, Utah. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... Sinclair Oil is an American petroleum company based in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... There are four Little America hotels in the western United States. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


Under Holding's ownership there have been substantial improvements on the mountain: extensive snowmaking and grooming, high-capacity chairlifts, and the construction of three impressive day lodges, and the renovation of the classic Roundhouse restaurant. Snow cannon at Mölltaler Gletscher, Austria A snow cannon is a device used to produce snow artificially. ...


During the late 1980s, significant snowmaking was introduced on Bald Mountain. Three high-speed quad chairlifts were installed during the summer of 1988 (Christmas, Challenger & Greyhawk). An impressive day lodge, constructed of logs, river rock, and glass, opened at the base of Warm Springs in the fall of 1992, replacing the mid-1960s "Northface Hut" cafeteria. Similar day lodges were later opened at the Seattle Ridge summit (1993), and the River Run base (1995). (An older cafeteria, the modest one-floor "Lookout Restaurant," is 120 feet below the summit at 9030 ft. (2752 m), at the top of three chairlifts. Built in 1973, it is the ground floor of a multi-story building that was never completed, resulting in its "basement-like" atmosphere. Nevertheless, the mountain views from this near-summit lodge are quite impressive.) The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Snow cannon at Mölltaler Gletscher, Austria A snow cannon is a device used to produce snow artificially. ... A chairlift in Bad Hofgastein, Austria A chairlift, more correctly known as an elevated passenger ropeway, is a type of aerial lift, which consists of a continuously circulating steel cable strung in a loop between two end terminals and generally over intermediate towers. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


Four additional high-speed quads were installed in the 1990s. Two of these replaced older chairlifts on River Run (1992) and Seattle Ridge (1993), and two cut brand new paths: Lookout Express (1993) and Frenchman's (1994). Baldy's 13 chairlifts have a capacity of over 23,000 skiers per hour. With an average of 3500 skiers per day (& less than 6000 skiers per day during peak periods), Sun Valley has kept the lift lines to a minimum, a rarity among major resorts. For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...


The Dollar Mountain Lodge opened in November 2004. This day lodge replaces the Dollar Cabin, and also serves as the headquarters for the Sun Valley Ski School. It is similar in construction to the newer day lodges at the big mountain. Dollar Mountain is a part of the Sun Valley, Idaho ski area and is a mountain that caters primarily to beginner and lower intermediate skiers. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The interior of the original Sun Valley Lodge has been remodeled twice during Holding's ownership, in 1985 for the golden anniversary and again in 2004. The Sun Valley Inn has been remodeled and the golf course has been improved as well. This article is about the year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Forbes magazine estimated in 2006 that Sun Valley is now worth in the range of $300 million. Alternate meaning: For the Boston Brahmin family associated with John Forbes Kerry, see Forbes family. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ski Racing

In the years before the World Cup circuit, the Harriman Cup at Sun Valley was one of the major ski races held in North America, along with the "Snow Cup" at Alta, the "Roach Cup" at Aspen Mountain, and the "Silver Belt" races at Sugar Bowl, north of Lake Tahoe. Originally known as the "Sun Valley International Open," the Harriman Cup races were the first major international ski competitions held in North America, beginning in 1937. The first three competitions of 1937-39 were held in the Boulder Mountains north of Sun Valley. Beginning in 1940, the Harriman Cup was held on the Warm Springs side of Bald Mountain, decades before chairlifts were installed on that north face of the mountain. American Dick Durrance won three of the first four Harriman Cups, stunning the over-confident Europeans. !The alpine skiing World Cup is a circuit of alpine skiing competitions launched in 1966 by a group of ski racing friends and experts which included Alpine Directors from France (Honore Bonnet) and USA (Bob Beattie) and French reporter at LEquipe in Paris, Serge Lang. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Alta Ski Area, one of the worlds premier ski resorts, is located in the Wasatch Mountains just east of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Aspen Mountain (often called by its former name of Ajax among locals) is a ski area located in Pitkin County, Colorado just outside and above the city of Aspen. ... This article is about the lake in California/Nevada. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Dick Durrance (October 14, 1914 - June 13, 2004) was an 17-time national championship skier and one of the first American skiiers to compete successfully with European skiiers. ...


In March of 1975 and 1977, Sun Valley hosted World Cup ski races, with slalom and giant slalom events for both genders, run on the Warm Springs side of the mountain. Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... !The alpine skiing World Cup is a circuit of alpine skiing competitions launched in 1966 by a group of ski racing friends and experts which included Alpine Directors from France (Honore Bonnet) and USA (Bob Beattie) and French reporter at LEquipe in Paris, Serge Lang. ... Slalom from the Morgedal dialect of Norwegian slalåm: sla, meaning slightly inclining hillside, and låm, meaning track after skis. ... Giant Slalom is an alpine skiing discipline. ...


The 1975 slalom was won by Gustavo Thoeni, the dominant World Cup skier of the early 1970s (which turned out to be his last win in the slalom discipline). A young Ingemar Stenmark of Sweden, perhaps the greatest technical ski racer ever, took the giant slalom title both years. Phil Mahre of White Pass, Washington, age 19, won the 1977 slalom race over Stenmark, with twin brother Steve placing third. It was Phil's second win (he had won a GS in France in December), but his first victory in the slalom and first in the U.S., and being from the Northwest, very close to home. Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Slalom from the Morgedal dialect of Norwegian slalåm: sla, meaning slightly inclining hillside, and låm, meaning track after skis. ... Gustav Thöni (born 28 February 1951) is an Italian former alpine skier. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Slalom from the Morgedal dialect of Norwegian slalåm: sla, meaning slightly inclining hillside, and låm, meaning track after skis. ... Ingemar Stenmark (born March 18, 1956 in Joesjö, Storumans kommun) is a Swedish former slalom and giant slalom skier, competing for Fjällvinden Tärnaby. ... Giant Slalom is an alpine skiing discipline. ... Philip Mahre (born May 10, 1957, Yakima, Washington, USA) is an American alpine ski racer, widely regarded as one of the greatest American skiers of all time. ... White Pass (el. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Slalom from the Morgedal dialect of Norwegian slalåm: sla, meaning slightly inclining hillside, and låm, meaning track after skis. ... Basically an asshole with sticks on his feet. ... Giant Slalom is an alpine skiing discipline. ... Slalom from the Morgedal dialect of Norwegian slalåm: sla, meaning slightly inclining hillside, and låm, meaning track after skis. ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ...


The present ownership has declined to host any World Cup races since, as it involves closing off runs for a significant time. But during the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake (300 miles to the southeast), Sun Valley was used as a training site for many nations' alpine and Nordic ski teams. The alpine speed events for the Olympics were held at a sister resort, Snowbasin, outside of Ogden, Utah. !The alpine skiing World Cup is a circuit of alpine skiing competitions launched in 1966 by a group of ski racing friends and experts which included Alpine Directors from France (Honore Bonnet) and USA (Bob Beattie) and French reporter at LEquipe in Paris, Serge Lang. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... For ships of the United States Navy of the same name, see USS Salt Lake City. ... Skiing at Snowbasin in June Snowbasin is one of the oldest ski resorts in the United States. ... Ogden sign over Washington Boulevard at the Ogden River; toward downtown Ogden is the county seat of Weber County,GR6 Utah, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Olympic medalists from Sun Valley include Gretchen Fraser, Christin Cooper, Picabo Street, and disabled skier Muffy Davis. All four have runs named after them on Bald Mountain. Gretchen Kunigk Fraser (February 11, 1919 – February 17, 1994) was an American alpine skier. ... Christin Cooper (born October 8, 1959) is an American alpine skier from Ketchum, Idaho. ... Picabo Street (born April 3, 1971 in Triumph, Idaho) is an American skier, now retired and living in Portland, Oregon. ...


2007 Castle Rock Fire

On August 16, 2007 the Castle Rock Fire began with a lightning strike Thursday afternoon where Castle Rock and Bar Gulch join, 12 miles west-southwest of Ketchum, Idaho. August 18 it jumped across Warm Springs Road and journeyed north into Rooks Creek and proceed to grow over 48,000 acres and threatened Sun Valley Bald Mountain. Numerous citizens documented the fire on a community photo gallery of the fire as well as on YouTube. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Towns Several towns in the United States are named Castle Rock: Castle Rock, Colorado Castle Rock, Washington Castle Rock, Wisconsin Castle Rock Township, Minnesota There is also Castle Rock, Maine, a fictional town used by Stephen King as the setting for a number of his works. ... Ketchum is a city located in Blaine County, Idaho, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 3,003. ...


Culture

The Sun Valley Center for the Arts and Humanities, is a non-profit arts organization founded in 1971 by Glenn and Bill Janss. The original five acre campus was located off Dollar Road in Sun Valley. Studios and workshops where open to the public, and focused upon Ceramics, founded by James Romberg; Photography, founded by Sheri Heiser and Peter deLory; Fine Arts, founded by [[David W. Wharton]] The SVC offered year-round workshops, lectures and exhibitions by nationally recognized artists and craft persons to both residents and tourists to Blaine County. The Sun Valley Art Center, as it is commonly known today, is located in nearby Ketchum, Idaho and It continues to present an impressive list of venues in the visual, and performing arts. Blaine County is the name of several counties in the United States: Blaine County, Idaho Blaine County, Montana Blaine County, Nebraska Blaine County, Oklahoma This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


One City, Two Sections

A small mountain saddle splits the city of Sun Valley into two sections. The northern section is centered around the famous Sun Valley Lodge, Sun Valley Inn, and the "village" complex of shops, condominiums, and original 18-hole golf course (27 holes by 2008), which winds its way up the Trail Creek valley to the northeast. This area is referred to as simply "Sun Valley." 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


The southern area, called Elkhorn, has its own shopping/hotel/condo complex and 18-hole golf course (now private), and is in many ways quite distinct and separate (including a drier "sagebrush" appearance). This area, near Dollar Mountain, was initially developed during the late 1960s and 1970s. Elkhorn is the name of some places in the United States of America: Elkhorn, California Elkhorn, Idaho Elkhorn, Michigan Elkhorn, Missouri Elkhorn, Beaverhead County, Montana Elkhorn, Jefferson County, Montana Elkhorn, Nebraska Elkhorn, Oregon Elkhorn, Pennsylvania Elkhorn, Tennessee Elkhorn, Virginia Elkhorn, West Virginia Elkhorn, Wisconsin Theres also Elk Horn, Iowa... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


Adjacent to Sun Valley is the older city of Ketchum, which is just a mile downstream of the Sun Valley Lodge (along Trail Creek). Ketchum is primarily comprised of the 19th century town center (with its limited grid system) and lands adjacent to Bald Mountain: along the Big Wood River and Warm Springs Creek. Ketchum is a city located in Blaine County, Idaho, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 3,003. ...


On September 11, 2005, the Dalai Lama visited Wood River High School in Hailey, Idaho to give a speech on understanding and friendship in remembrance of the September 11, 2001 Attacks and offered condolences to the many thousands affected by the recent Hurricane Katrina. is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Dalai Lama lineage. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


Geography

Sun Valley is located at 43°40′50″N, 114°20′34″W (43.680491, -114.342711)GR1.


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 25.6 km² (9.9 mi²). 25.6 km² (9.9 mi²) of it is land and 0.10% is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 1427 people, 594 households, and 343 families residing in the city. The population density was 55.8/km² (144.6/mi²). There were 2339 housing units at an average density of 91.5/km² (237.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 92.43% White, 0.35% African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.77% Asian, 4.20% from other races, and 1.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.15% of the population. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 594 households out of which 16.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.5% were married couples living together, 4.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.1% were non-families. 34.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.97 and the average family size was 2.50. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 11.9% under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 21.9% from 25 to 44, 36.7% from 45 to 64, and 17.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48 years. For every 100 females there were 104.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 105.4 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $71,000, and the median income for a family was $85,000. Males had a median income of $31,979 versus $27,143 for females. The per capita income for the city was $50,563. About 2.7% of families and 14.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.7% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


References

  • "Idaho for the Curious", by Cort Conley, ©1982, ISBN 0-9603566-3-0, p.348-355
  • "Ski & Snow Country, The Golden Years of Skiing in the West 1930s-1950s", photos by Ray Atkeson, text by Warren Miller, ©2000, ISBN 1-55868-538-3
  • "Idaho", photos by John Marshall, text by Cort Conley, ©1985, ISBN 0-912856-93-9,
  • SKI Magazine "Sun Valley Refrain," by Stu Campbell, October 2000, p.128-134
  • SKI Magazine, "The Sun Rises Again," by Jamie Marshall, December 1996, p.108-112
  • The Idaho Statesman, 21-Dec-1977

The Idaho Statesman is a daily newspaper serving the Boise, Idaho metropolitan area. ...

External links

  • www.sunvalley.com Official site of Sun Valley resort & ski area
  • City of Sun Valley - official site
  • City of Ketchum - official site
  • [2] official site of art organization/gallery
  • SunValleyOnline - news, blogs, ski/trails reports, webcams, entertainment, dining, shopping info
  • Sun Valley Info from SnowGuide.org
  • Ski Lifts.org - photos of Bald Mountain's lifts
  • Ski Lifts.org - photos of Dollar Mountain's lifts
  • Ski Lifts.org - photos of Ruud Mountain's lift
  • Sun Valley's Bald Mountain - Skiing, Snowboarding, Hiking and Biking trail maps, ski run tips, etc.
  • Sun Valley/Ketchum Chamber & Visitors Bureau
  • Idaho Ski Resorts.com - Sun Valley
  • Idaho Winter.org - official state tourism site
  • Sun Valley Dining Guide
  • Idaho Outdoor.net - outdoor guide to Sun Valley area
  • Idaho Outdoor.net - a history of Sun Valley
  • Idaho Summits.com - photo from Proctor Mtn.
  • Union Pacific Railroad - 70th anniversary of the chairlift - 2006
  • Proctor, Ruud, & Dollar Mountains - history from Sun Valley Guide.com - Winter 2004
  • Sun Valley Serenade at the Internet Movie Database
  • SunValleyPedia - community generated area guide with Trails Guide, Youth Activities/Camps, History, Geography, Demographics, Restaurant info, etc.
  • Hemingway Haunts - from Sun Valley Guide.com
  • Hemingway Memorial - photo
  • Hemingway grave site - photos from Ketchum Cemetery
  • 1977 World Cup race results: Sun Valley - from FIS-Ski.com
  • 1975 World Cup race results: Sun Valley - from FIS-Ski.com
  • Sun Valley Central.com - includes weekly newspaper: Idaho Mountain Express
  • Wood River Journal - newspaper from Hailey, Idaho
  • Idaho Mtn Express - 25 January 2006 - Valley pays tribute to Earl Holding
  • Idaho Mtn Express - Dr. John Moritz (1905-98), Sun Valley's MD (1940-73)
  • Univ. of Utah Library - photo of Freidl Pfeifer, Claudette Colbert, late 1930s
  • The Chicago Tribune - "Classics of the West," - 30 October 2005
  • Sun Valley area Trails Guide
  • Sun Valley, Idaho is at coordinates 43°40′50″N 114°20′34″W / 43.680491, -114.342711Coordinates: 43°40′50″N 114°20′34″W / 43.680491, -114.342711

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sun Valley, Idaho - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2398 words)
Sun Valley is an affluent resort community in Blaine County, Idaho, USA, adjacent to the city of Ketchum.
The centerpiece of the new resort was the Sun Valley Lodge, which opened in December 1936.
For Sun Valley's fourth season, three chairlifts (in series) were installed on Bald Mountain during the summer of 1939, in the River Run area, the northeast face of the mountain overlooking Ketchum and Sun Valley.
VIA Online: Sun Valley, Idaho, Still Shines (1827 words)
Sun Valley was the swankest winter resort in the United States, a fabled high-country retreat where the likes of Clark Gable and Ingrid Bergman came to ski and skate and be photographed building snowmen.
Aspen has surpassed Sun Valley as the glitzy wintering spot for the celebrity set; Park City has the big, artsy film festival; California's mountains are more convenient for the masses.
In the spring Sun Valley is blanketed with wildflowers—lupine, yarrow, sego lilies.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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