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Encyclopedia > Summer of Love

The Summer of Love refers to the summer of 1967, when an unprecedented gathering of as many as 100,000 young people converged on the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco, creating a phenomenon of cultural and political rebellion. While hippies also gathered in New York, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Chicago, and across Europe, San Francisco was the epicenter of the hippie revolution,[1] a melting pot of music, psychedelic drugs, sexual freedom, creative expression, and politics. The Summer of Love became a defining moment of the 1960s, as the hippie counterculture movement came into public awareness.[2] Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: US geography stubs | San Francisco neighborhoods ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Hippies (singular hippie or sometimes hippy) were members of the 1960s counterculture movement who adopted a communal or nomadic lifestyle, renounced corporate nationalism and the Vietnam War, embraced aspects of Buddhism, Hinduism, and/or Native American religious culture, and were otherwise at odds with traditional middle class Western values. ... This article is about the state. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Counterculture (also counter-culture) is a sociological word used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day,[1] the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ...

Contents

Early 1967

Inspired by the Beats of the fifties, who declared themselves independent from the authoritarian order of America, the Haight-Ashbury 'anti-community' rested on a rejection of American commercialism. Haight residents eschewed the material benefits of modern life, encouraged by the distribution of free food and organized shelter by the Diggers, and the creation of institutions such as the Free Clinic for medical treatment.[3] Psychedelic drug use became but one means to find a 'new reality'. Grateful Dead guitarist Bob Weir comments, Beating is striking more than once, in violence, beating a drum, etc. ... The Diggers was a radical community-action and guerrilla-theater group from 1966-68, based in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco. ... A free clinic is a medical facility offering community healthcare on a free or low-cost basis. ... This article is about the band. ... Robert Hall Weir (October 16, 1947–) is an American guitar player, most recognized as a founding member of the Grateful Dead. ...

'Haight Ashbury was a ghetto of bohemians who wanted to do anything—and we did, but I don't think it has happened since. Yes, there was LSD. But Haight Ashbury was not about drugs. It was about exploration, finding new ways of expression, being aware of one's existence.' [4]

The prelude to the Summer of Love was the Human Be-In at Golden Gate Park on January 14, 1967, which was planned by the Diggers as a "gathering of tribes".[5] The event was announced by the Haight-Ashbury's own psychedelic newspaper, the San Francisco Oracle. The Human Be-In was a happening in San Franciscos Golden Gate Park, the afternoon and evening of January 14, 1967. ... Golden Gate Park, located in San Francisco, California, is a large urban park. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The Oracle of the City of San Francisco, also known as the San Francisco Oracle, was an underground newspaper published in the late 1960s. ...

"A new concept of celebrations beneath the human underground must emerge, become conscious, and be shared, so a revolution can be formed with a renaissance of compassion, awareness, and love, and the revelation of unity for all mankind."[6]

The gathering of approximately 50,000 like-minded people made the Human Be-In the first event that confirmed there was a viable hippie scene.[7]


Popularization through media and music

The ever-increasing numbers of youth making a pilgrimage to the Haight-Ashbury district alarmed the San Francisco authorities, whose public stance was that they would keep the hippies away. However Adam Kneeman, a long-time resident of the Haight-Ashbury, recalls that the police did little to help, leaving the organization of the hordes of newcomers to the overwhelmed residents.[8]


College and high-school students began streaming into the Haight during the spring break of 1967. City government leaders, determined to stop the influx of young people once schools let out for summer, unwittingly brought additional attention to the scene. An ongoing series of articles in local papers alerted national media to the hippies' growing momentum. That spring, Haight community leaders responded by forming the Council of the Summer of Love, giving the word-of-mouth event an official-sounding name.[9] Spring break at Panama City Beach, Florida, Florida Spring break, also more commonly known as March break in some parts of Canada, is a week-long recess from studying in early spring at universities and schools in the United States, Canada, Japan, Taiwan, Korea, China, and other countries. ...


The mainstream media's coverage of hippie life in the Haight-Ashbury drew the attention of youth from all over America. Hunter S. Thompson labeled the district "Hashbury" in the New York Times Magazine, and the activities in the area were reported almost daily.[10] Hunter Stockton Thompson (18 July 1937 – 20 February 2005) was an American journalist and author, famous for his novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


The movement was also fed by the counterculture's own media, particularly The San Francisco Oracle, whose pass-around readership topped a half-million at its peak that year.[11]


The media's fascination with the "counterculture" continued with the Monterey Pop Festival in June 1967, where approximately 30,000 people gathered for the first day of the music festival, with the number swelling to 60,000 on the final day.[12] The song "San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)" written by John Phillips of The Mamas and the Papas and sung by Scott McKenzie was initially designed to promote the Monterey Pop Festival: Poster promoting the festival The Monterey International Pop Music Festival took place from June 16 to June 18, 1967. ... San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair) is a song, written by John Phillips of The Mamas & The Papas, and sung by Scott McKenzie. ... John Phillips in the sixties. ... The Mamas & the Papas were a leading vocal group of the 1960s, and one of the few American groups to maintain widespread success during the British Invasion, along with The Beach Boys. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

If you're going to San Francisco,

be sure to wear some flowers in your hair...
If you're going to San Francisco,
Summertime will be a love-in there.

"San Francisco" became an instant hit (#4 in the U. S., #1 in the UK) and quickly transcended its original purpose by popularizing an idealized image of San Francisco. In addition, media coverage of the Monterey Pop Festival facilitated the Summer of Love, since large numbers of fledging hippies headed to San Francisco to hear their favorite bands, among them The Jefferson Airplane, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Otis Redding, The Byrds, the Grateful Dead, The Who, and Big Brother and the Holding Company with Janis Joplin.[13] Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the LSD-influenced psychedelic rock movement. ... The Experience redirects here. ... Otis Ray Redding, Jr. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... This article is about the band. ... The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ... Big Brother and the Holding Company is an American rock band that formed in San Francisco in 1965 as part of the psychedelic music scene that also produced the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane. ... Janis Lyn Joplin (19 January 1943 – 4 October 1970) was an American singer, songwriter, and music arranger, from Port Arthur, Texas. ...


The summer

During the Summer of Love, as many as 100,000 young people from around the world flocked to San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district, Berkeley and other San Francisco Bay Area cities to join in a popularized version of the hippie experience.[14] Free food, free drugs and free love were available in Golden Gate Park, a Free Clinic (whose work continues today) was established for medical treatment, and a Free Store gave away basic necessities to anyone who needed them.[15] Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in Northern California, in the United States. ... Bay Area redirects here. ... The term free love has been used since at least the nineteenth century to describe a social movement that rejects marriage, which is seen as a form of social bondage, especially for women. ...


The Summer of Love attracted a wide range of people of various ages: teenagers and college students drawn by their peers and the allure of joining a cultural utopia, middle-class vacationers, and even partying military personnel from bases within driving distance. The large influx of newcomers began to cause problems. The neighborhood could not accommodate so many people descending on it so quickly, and the Haight-Ashbury scene deteriorated rapidly. Overcrowding, homelessness, hunger, drug problems, and crime afflicted the neighborhood. Many people simply left in the fall to resume their college studies.[15]


When the newly recruited Flower Children returned home, they brought new ideas, ideals, behaviors, and styles of fashion to most major cities in the U.S., Canada, Britain, Western Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan. Flower child or Flower Children originated as a synonym for hippie, especially those who gathered in San Francisco and environs during the summer of 1967, which was called the Summer of Love. ... In modern usage, the term Bohemian (sometimes shortened to boho) is applied to people who live unconventional, usually artistic, lives. ...


On October 6, 1967, those remaining in the Haight staged a mock funeral, "The Death of the Hippie" ceremony, to signal the end of the played-out scene.[9] is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


The phrase "Summer of Love" (or, more accurately, the "Second Summer of Love") is sometimes used (particularly in the UK) to refer to the summers of 1988 and 1989 and the rise of Acid House music and rave culture. The Second Summer of Love is a name given to the period in 1988 in Britain, during the rise of Acid House music and the euphoric explosion of unlicensed Ecstasy-fuelled rave parties[1]. The term generally refers to both the summers of 1988/9[2] [3] when electronic dance... For the 1994 novel by Irvine Welsh, see The Acid House. ... This article is about a form of party. ...


Literature

  • Lee, Martin A.; Shlain, Bruce (1985). Acid Dreams: the CIA, LSD, and the sixties rebellion. New York: Grove Press. ISBN 0-394-55013-7, ISBN 0-394-62081-X. 

References

  1. ^ E. Vulliamy, "Love and Haight", Observer Music Monthly 20 May 2007
  2. ^ P. Braunstein, and M.W. Doyle (eds), Imagine Nation: The American Counterculture of the 1960s and '70s, (New York, 2002), p.7
  3. ^ M. Isserman, and M. Kazin (eds), America Divided: The Civil War of the 1960s, (Oxford University Press, 2004), pp.151-172/
  4. ^ J. McDonald quoted in E. Vulliamy, "Love and Haight", Observer Music Monthly, 20 May 2007
  5. ^ T.H. Anderson, The Movement and the Sixties: Protest in America from Greensboro to Wounded Knee, (Oxford University Press, 1995), p.172
  6. ^ San Francisco Oracle, Vol.1, Issue 5, p.2
  7. ^ T. Gitlin, The Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage, (New York, 1993), p.215
  8. ^ Stuart Maconie, "A Taste of Summer" broadcast, Radio 2, 9 October 2007
  9. ^ a b The Year of the Hippie: Timeline. PBS.org. Retrieved on 2007-04-24.
  10. ^ T. Anderson, The Movement and the Sixties: Protest in America from Greensboro to Wounded Knee, (Oxford University Press, 1995), p.174
  11. ^ Summer of Love: Underground News. PBS American Experience companion website. Retrieved on 2007-05-15.
  12. ^ T. Anderson, The Movement and the Sixties: Protest in America from Greensboro to Wounded Knee, (Oxford University Press, 1995), p.175
  13. ^ T. Gitlin, The Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage, (New York, 1993), p.215-217
  14. ^ Allen Cohen
  15. ^ a b Gail Dolgin; Vicente Franco. (2007). American Experience: The Summer of Love. PBS. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The year 1967 was an important year for psychedelic music, with releases from Small Faces Itchycoo Park,The Doors (The Doors, Strange Days), Jefferson Airplane (Surrealistic Pillow, After Bathing at Baxters), the Beatles Sgt. ... The Diggers was a radical community-action and guerrilla-theater group from 1966-68, based in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco. ... Kenneth Elton Kesey (September 17, 1935 – November 10, 2001) was an American author, best known for his novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest, and as a counter-cultural figure who, some consider, was a link between the beat generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... The term free love has been used since at least the nineteenth century to describe a social movement that rejects marriage, which is seen as a form of social bondage, especially for women. ... This article is about the band. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... For the British TV show, see Hippies (TV series). ... The Human Be-In was a happening in San Franciscos Golden Gate Park, the afternoon and evening of January 14, 1967. ... Subsequent to San Franciscos Human Be-In, and a prelude to the Summer of Love, thousands gathered in Central Parks Sheep Meadow on Easter Sunday, March 26, 1967. ... Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the psychedelic rock movement. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... The Doors were an American rock band formed in 1965 in Los Angeles by vocalist Jim Morrison, keyboardist Ray Manzarek, drummer John Densmore, and guitarist Robby Krieger. ... Poster promoting the festival The Monterey International Pop Music Festival took place from June 16 to June 18, 1967. ... The Oracle of the City of San Francisco, also known as the San Francisco Oracle, was an underground newspaper published in the late 1960s. ... Summer of Love is the third episode of the first season of Sliders, immediately following the second part of the pilot. ... For the American baseball player, see Tim Leary (baseball player). ... DOM (or STP, allegedly standing for Serenity, Tranquillity and Peace) is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug of the phenethylamine class of compounds, sometimes used as an entheogen. ... The Second Summer of Love is a name given to the period in 1988 in Britain, during the rise of Acid House music and the euphoric explosion of unlicensed Ecstasy-fuelled rave parties[1]. The term generally refers to both the summers of 1988/9[2] [3] when electronic dance... Été 67 (Summer of 67; the name is inspired by the 1967 Summer of Love) is a rock band created in 1998 in Esneux (nearby Liège), Belgium. ...

External links

Mark Jacobson (b. ... Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) is a radio and communications organization which is funded by the United States Congress. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Summer of Love - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (297 words)
The Summer of Love was a phrase given to the summer of 1967 to try to describe the feeling of being in San Francisco that summer, when the so-called "hippie movement" came to full fruition.
Later that summer, thousands of young people from around the nation flocked to the Haight-Ashbury district of the city to join in a popularized version of the hippie experience.
The phrase "Summer of Love" (or, more accurately, the "Second Summer of Love") is sometimes used (particularly in the UK) to refer to the summer of 1989 and the rise of Acid House music and rave culture.
Second Summer of Love - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (199 words)
The Second Summer of Love is a name sometimes given, particularly in Britain, to the time (1987-1989) of the rise in popularity of Acid House music and the euphoric explosion of unlicensed Ecstasy-fuelled rave parties.
The term generally refers to the summer of 1989, when hundreds of thousands of Ecstasy pills were consumed every weekend in the UK.
However, that summer was part of a larger period that led to the rise of electronic dance music from an obscure niche into a popular mass-market genre, and ultimately to the rise of large and highly commercial dance nightclubs such as Ministry of Sound.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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