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Encyclopedia > Summer Olympics

The Summer Olympic Games are an international multi-sport event held every four years, organised by the International Olympic Committee. The Olympics are the most prestigious of such events in the world, featuring a larger range of sports than others. Olympic victory is widely considered to be the most prestigious achievement in sports. Medals are awarded in each event, with gold for first place, silver for second and bronze for third, a tradition which started in 1904. A multi-sport event is a competition in which athletes compete in a number of different sports. ... The International Olympic Committee is an organisation based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin in 1894 to reinstate the Ancient Olympic Games held in Greece, and organise this sports event every four years. ... General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Atomic mass 196. ... General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Atomic mass 107. ... Bronze figurine, found at Öland Bronze is the traditional name for a broad range of alloys of copper. ...


Competitors are entered by a National Olympic Committee (NOC) to represent their country of citizenship. National anthems and flags accompany the medal ceremonies, and tables showing the number of medals won by each country are widely used. In general only recognised nations are represented, but a few non-sovereign countries are allowed to take part. The special case of Taiwan was handled by having it compete as Chinese Taipei, to avoid the issue of Taiwanese independence. National Olympic Committees are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ... NOC can refer to: National Olympic Committee, a group eligible to enter athletes and teams into an Olympic Games. ... A country, a land, or a state, is a geographical area that connotes an independent political entity, with its own government, administration, laws, often a constitution, police, military, tax rules, and population, who are one anothers countrymen. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is formally recognized by a countrys government as their states official national song. ... French Tricolore flag A flag is a piece of cloth flown from a pole or mast, usually intended for signaling or identification. ...


Though the most diverse sporting event in the world, the Olympics are perhaps not the most popular. The football World Cup attracts more global interest, as measured by the larger television audience. The Football World Cup (official name: FIFA World Cup) is the most important competition in international football (soccer). ...

Contents


History of the modern summer Olympics

The early years

The modern Olympic Games were founded in 1894 when Pierre Fredi, Baron de Coubertin sought to promote international understanding through sporting competition. The first games, held in Athens in 1896, attracted just 245 competitors, of whom more than 200 were Greek, and only 14 countries were represented. Nevertheless, no international events of this magnitude had been organised before. For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... Baron Pierre de Coubertin Baron Pierre de Coubertin (January 1, 1863-September 2, 1937), born as Pierre de Frédy, was a French pedagogue and historian, but is best known as the founder of the modern Olympic Games. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, formally called the Games of the I Olympiad, were the first modern Olympics and the first Games since Roman emperor Theodosius I banned the Ancient Olympic Games in AD 393 as part of the Christian campaign against paganism. ...


Four years later (in 1900) the Paris games attracted more than four times as many athletes, including 11 women, who were allowed to compete for the first time, in croquet and tennis. The Games were integrated with the Paris World's fair and lasted over 5 months. It is still disputed which events exactly were Olympic, since few or maybe even none of the events were advertised as such at the time. The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Croquet is a recreational game and, latterly, a competitive sport that involves hitting wooden or plastic balls with a mallet through hoops embedded into the grass playing arena. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... Worlds Fair is the generic name for various large expositions held since the mid 19th century. ...


Numbers declined again for the 1904 Games in St. Louis, USA, due in part to the lengthy transatlantic boat trip required of the European competitors, and the integration with the Louisiana Purchase Exposition World's fair, which again spread the event out over an extended period. In contrast with Paris 1900, the word Olympic was abused for many contests, such as those for school boys or for Irish-Americans. The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... Entrance to Creation Exhibit on the Pike Map of the St. ... Worlds Fair is the generic name for various large expositions held since the mid 19th century. ...


There followed a smaller games in Athens in 1906, the first of an alternating series of games to be held in Athens. As it also turned out to be the last, the reason for the games is now sought in the "tenth birthday" of the games. These games are not currently recognised as being Olympic Games by the IOC, though most historians do see them as such. Anyway, they certainly positively contributed to the success of future games after the less successful 1900 and 1904 Games.


The 1908 London Games saw numbers rise again, as well as the first running of the marathon over its now-standard distance of 42.195 km (26 miles 385 yards). This distance was chosen to ensure that the race finished in front of the box occupied by the British royal family. The marathon had been 40 km for the first games in 1896, but was subsequently varied by up to 2 km due to local conditions such as street and stadium layout. At the six Olympic games between 1900 and 1920, the marathon was raced over six different distances. London (see also different names) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Although marathon sometimes refers to any athletic event requiring great endurance, more specifically it refers to a long-distance road running event of 42,195 m (26 miles and 385 yards). ...


At the end of the 1908 marathon the Italian runner Dorando Pietri was first to enter the stadium, but he was clearly in distress, and collapsed of exhaustion before he could complete the event. He was helped over the finish line by concerned race officials, but later he was disqualified and the gold medal was awarded to John Hayes, who had trailed him by around 30 seconds.


The Games continued to grow, attracting 2,500 competitors to Stockholm in 1912, including the great all-arounder Jim Thorpe, who won both the decathlon and pentathlon. Thorpe had previously played a few games of baseball for a fee, and saw his medals stripped for this breach of amateurism. They were reinstated in 1983, 30 years after his death. Stockholm  listen? is the capital and the largest city of Sweden. ... Thorpe participated in the 1912 Summer Olympics. ...


The scheduled Berlin Games of 1916 were cancelled following the onset of World War I.   Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... WWI redirects here. ...


The interwar era

The 1920 Antwerp games in war-ravaged Belgium were a subdued affair, but again drew a record number of competitors. This record only stood until 1924, when the Paris Games would involve 3,000 competitors, the greatest of whom was Finnish runner Paavo Nurmi. "The Flying Finn", won three team gold medals and the individual 1,500 and 5,000 metre runs, the latter two on the same day. For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Born in Turku, Paavo Nurmi (June 13, 1897 - October 2, 1973) was a Finnish runner. ...


The 1928 Amsterdam games were notable for being the first games which allowed females to compete at track & field athletics, and benefitted greatly from the general prosperity of the times alongside the first appearance of sponsorship of the games, from Coca-Cola. This was in stark contrast to 1932 when the Los Angeles games were affected by the Great Depression, which contributed to the fewest competitors since the St. Louis games. Amsterdam Location Country The Netherlands Province North Holland Population 739,295 (1 January 2005) Coordinates 4°89E - 52°37N Website www. ... To sponsor something is to support an event, activity, person or organization by providing money or other resources in exchange for something, usually advertising or publicity, and always access to an audience. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... This article is about the largest city in California. ... The Great Depression was a massive global economic recession (or depression) that ran from 1929 to 1941. ...


The 1936 Berlin Games were seen by the German government as a golden opportunity to promote their ideology. The ruling Nazi Party commissioned film-maker Leni Riefenstahl to film the games. The result, Olympia, was a masterpiece, despite Hitler's theories of Aryan racial superiority being repeatedly shown up by non-Aryan athletes. In particular, the black sprinter and long jumper Jesse Owens won 4 gold medals. The tale of Hitler snubbing Owens at the ensuing medal ceremony is a fabrication. (Redirected from 1936 Berlin Games) The Games of the XI Olympiad were held in 1936 in Germany. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... Riefenstahl circa 1930 Berta Helene Amalie Leni Riefenstahl (August 22, 1902 - September 8, 2003) was an actress, a director, and subsequently a Nazi-era German filmmaker renowned for her aesthetics and advances in film technique. ... Olympia is a 1938 film` by Leni Riefenstahl documenting the 1936 Summer Olympics. ... Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... lol niggerz ...


The Games of 1940 and 1944 were cancelled due to World War II. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air, August 9, 1945 after the Allied atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. ...


After WWII

The first post-war Games were held in 1948 in London, with both Germany and Japan excluded. Dutch sprinter Fanny Blankers-Koen won four gold medals on the track, emulating Owens' achievement in Berlin. London (see also different names) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Fanny Blankers-Koen speeding towards the gold medal in the final of the 80 m hurdles event at the 1948 Summer Olympics. ...


At the 1952 Games in Helsinki, Finland made a legend of an amiable Czech army lieutenant named Emil Zátopek, who was intent on improving on his single gold and silver medals from 1948. Having first won both the 10,000 and 5,000 metre races, he also entered the marathon, despite having never previously raced at that distance. Pacing himself by chatting with the other leaders, Zátopek led from about half way, slowly dropping the remaining contenders to win by two and a half minutes, and completed a trio both of wins and Olympic records. Helsinki (pronounced with the stress on the first syllable in Finnish: ), or Helsingfors in Swedish   listen?, is the capital of Finland. ... Emil Zátopek  listen? (September 19, 1922 - November 22, 2000) was a Czech athlete and Olympic gold medalist in long distance running. ...


The 1956 Melbourne Games were largely successful, barring a water polo match between Hungary and the Soviet Union, which political tensions caused to end as a pitched battle between the teams. Melbourne is the capital and largest city of the state of Victoria, and the second largest city in Australia, with a population of 3,600,650 in the Melbourne metropolitan area (June 2004) and 52,118 in the City of Melbourne (which covers only the central city area). ... Water polo is a team water sport, which can be best described as a combination of swimming, football (soccer), basketball, ice hockey, rugby and wrestling. ...


The 1960 Rome Games saw the arrival on the world scene of a young light-heavyweight boxer named Cassius Clay, later known as Muhammad Ali, who would later throw his gold medal away in disgust after being refused service in a whites only restaurant in his home town. Other performers of note in 1960 included Wilma Rudolph, a gold medallist in the 100 m, 200 m and 4x100 m relay events. City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost 4,000,000 1... For the 19th century politician Cassius Clay, see Cassius M. Clay Muhammad Ali-Haj (born January 17, 1942 as Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. ... Wilma Rudolph Wilma Glodean Rudolph (June 23, 1940 – November 12, 1994) was an American athlete and triple Olympic champion. ...


The 1964 Games held in Tokyo are notable for heralding the modern age of telecommunications. These games were the first to be broadcast live on television, enabled by the recent advent of communication satellites, and helped introduce the world to colour television. The 1964 Games were thus a turning point in the global visibility and popularity of the Olympics. The modern skyline of Tokyo is highly decentralized. ...


Performances at the 1968 Mexico City games were affected by the altitude of the host city. No event was affected more than the long jump. In a previously tight competition, US athlete Bob Beamon jumped 8.90 m, destroying the world record and, in the words of fellow competitor and then-reigning champion Lynn Davies, "making the rest of us look silly." Beamon's world record would stand for 23 years. The 1968 Games also saw the introduction of the now-universal Fosbury flop, a technique which won American high jumper Dick Fosbury the gold medal. Politics took centre stage in the medal ceremony for the men's 200 meter dash, where Tommie Smith and John Carlos made a protest gesture on the podium against the segregation in the USA; their political act was condemned within the Olympic Movement, but was praised in the American Civil Rights Movement. Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the name of a megacity located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus (altiplano) at the center of Mexico, about 2,240 metres (7,349 feet) above sea-level, surrounded on most sides... Robert Bob Beamon (born August 29, 1946) is an American track and field athlete, best known for his long-standing world record in the long jump. ... Richard Douglas Dick Fosbury (born March 6, 1947) is an American athlete who revolutionised the high jump using a back-first technique, now known as the Fosbury flop. ... Richard Douglas Dick Fosbury (born March 6, 1947) is an American athlete who revolutionised the high jump using a back-first technique, now known as the Fosbury flop. ... Tommie Smith (born June 5, 1944) is a former American athlete, winner of 200 m run at the 1968 Summer Olympics. ... John Wesley Carlos (born June 5, 1945) is a former American champion athlete and bronze medal winner at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ...


Politics again intervened at Munich in 1972, with lethal consequences. An extreme Palestinian terrorist group named Black September invaded the Olympic village and held several members of the Israeli weightlifting team hostage, and killed two of them. The terrorists demanded that Israel release numerous Arab prisoners. When the Israelis refused to make concessions, a tense stand-off ensued while negotiations continued. Eventually the captors, still holding their hostages, were offered safe passage and taken to an airport, where they were ambushed by German security forces. In the firefight that followed, 15 people, including the remaining nine Israeli athletes and all but one of the terrorists, were killed. After much debate, it was decided that the Games would continue, but proceedings were obviously dominated by these events. Some memorable athletic achievements did occur during these Games, notably the winning of a record seven gold medals by United States swimmer Mark Spitz, and the winning of three gold medals by 16-year-old Soviet gymnast Olga Korbut. Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German state of Bavaria. ... The expression Black September may refer to: Black September, a Palestinian paramilitary organization The Black September in Jordan, a conflict between Palestinian militant organizations and Hashemite King Hussein of Jordan that began in September 1970 and ended in July 1971 with the expulsion of the PLO to Lebanon. ... Mark Andrew Spitz (born February 10, 1950) is a American swimmer. ... Olga Valentinovna Korbut (Belarusian: Вольга Валянцінаўна Корбут, Volha Valyantsinawna Korbut; Russian: Ольга Валентиновна Корбут) (b. ...


There was no such tragedy in Montreal in 1976, but bad planning led to the Games' cost far exceeding the budget. For a time, it seemed that the Olympics might no longer be a viable financial proposition. There was also a boycott by African nations to protest a recent tour of apartheid South Africa by a New Zealand rugby side. The Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci won every individual women's gymnastics gold medal with a succession of perfect scores. Please visit and contribute to the Montreal Wikiportal See and add to this ongoing discussion about English Names in Montreal {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Concordia Salus (Well-being through harmony) Ville de Montréal, Québec, Canada Location. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... Comaneci at the 1976 Montreal Olympic Games Nadia Elena Comaneci (originally Comăneci) (born November 12, 1961) is a Romanian-born American gymnast, winner of five Olympic medals, and the first to be awarded a perfect score of 10 in an Olympic gymnastic event. ...


1980s and beyond

Following the Soviet Union's invasion of Afghanistan, over 50 nations, including the United States, Canada, West Germany and Japan, boycotted the 1980 games held in Moscow. Notably, Great Britain and Greece did not withdraw. This contributed to the 1980 Games being a less publicised and less competitive affair, which was dominated by the host country. Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, IPA:   listen?) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 1097. ...


In 1984 the Soviet Union, and much of Eastern Europe, reciprocated by boycotting the Los Angeles games. These games were perhaps the first games of a new era. The games were again viable, but had become more commercial. Again, the games lost a measure of their appeal by the absence of one of the superpowers. During the Cold War, the Eastern Bloc (or Soviet Bloc) comprised the following Central and Eastern European countries: Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary, East Germany, Poland, Albania (until the early 1960s, see below), the Soviet Union, and Czechoslovakia. ... The Downtown Los Angeles skyline. ...


The 1988 Seoul games were sadly tainted when many of the athletes failed mandatory drug tests. Despite splendid drug-free performances by many individuals, the number of people who failed screenings for performance-enhancing chemicals overshadowed the games. The outcry reached its zenith when Ben Johnson, the Canadian winner of the men's 100 m sprint, was discovered to be a steroid user and disqualified. There was an additional scandal in the boxing ring, where Korean fighters were awarded dubious decisions by the judges. This culminated in local light-middleweight Park Si-hun being awarded the gold medal despite being conclusively outboxed in the final by American Roy Jones, Jr.. This decision in particular would lead to a total overhaul of the judging process before the next games. Seoul is the capital of South Korea. ... Drug testing is a subject of much controversy. ... Ben Johnson at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona. ... // Boxing Wiki For further information refer to the mediawiki based Boxing Wiki 2004 Armed Forces Amateur Boxing Championships, held in 2003. ... Roy Jones Jr. ...


On the bright side, drug testing and regulation authorities were catching up with the cheating that had been endemic in athletics for some years. The 1992 Barcelona Games were cleaner, although not without incident. In evidence there was increased professionalism amongst Olympic athletes, exemplified by U.S. basketball's "Dream Team." 1992 also saw the reintroduction to the Games of several smaller European states which had been incorporated into the USSR since World War II. Barcelona within Barcelonès Population (2003) 1,582,738 Area 1004 Km2 Population density (2001) 15,764/Km2 Barcelona is the capital of Catalonia, an autonomous community in northeastern Spain, and the countrys second-largest city (after Madrid). ... The Dream Team was the unofficial nickname of the United States mens basketball team that won the gold medal at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona. ...


By then the process of choosing a location for the Games had itself become a commercial concern; allegations of corruption rocked the International Olympic Committee, in particular with reference to Salt Lake City's bid to host the Winter Olympic Games. It was also widely rumoured that the Coca-Cola company was highly influential in the 1996 Games being hosted by their home city of Atlanta, Georgia. In the stadium in 1996, the highlight was 200 m runner Michael Johnson annihilating the world record in front of a home crowd. Canadians savoured Donovan Bailey's record-breaking gold medal run in the 100-metre dash. This was popularly felt to be an appropriate recompense for the previous national disgrace involving Ben Johnson. There were also emotional scenes, such as when Muhammad Ali, clearly affected by Parkinson's disease, lit the Olympic torch and received a replacement medal for the one he had discarded in 1960. The latter event took place not at the boxing ring but in the basketball arena, at the demand of U.S. television. The atmosphere at the Games was marred however when a bomb exploded during the celebration in Centennial Park. (In June 2003, the principal suspect in this bombing, Eric Robert Rudolph, was captured.) The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is Salt Lake Citys top tourist draw. ... A runner carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games, Winter Olympics for short but more correctly The Olympic Winter Games, are the cold-weather counterpart to the Summer Olympic Games. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... City nickname(s): The A-T-L, The Horizon City, The Capital of the South, The Phoenix City, The City Too Busy to Hate, Hotlanta, A-Town, The Big A, The New York of the South, The Big Peach County Fulton County, Georgia Area  - Total  - Water 343. ... Sprints are races where the runner tries to go as fast as humanly possible. ... Michael Johnson at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. ... Donovan Bailey with one of his Olympic gold medals. ... For the 19th century politician Cassius Clay, see Cassius M. Clay Muhammad Ali-Haj (born January 17, 1942 as Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. ... The Centennial Olympic Park bombing is one of a series of terrorist bombings committed by Eric Robert Rudolph. ... Eric Robert Rudolph (born September 19, 1966) is an extreme right-wing American terrorist who committed a series of bombings across the southern United States, resulting in the deaths of three people and injuries to at least 150 others. ...


A new millennium

The 2000 Games were held in Sydney, Australia, and showcased individual performances by local favourite Ian Thorpe in the pool, Briton Steve Redgrave who won a rowing Gold medal in an unprecedented fifth consecutive Olympics, and Cathy Freeman, whose triumph in the 400 m united a packed stadium and provided a bridge between white and aboriginal Australians. Eric "the Eel" Moussambani, a swimmer from Equatorial Guinea, had a memorably slow 100 m freestyle swim that showed that, even in the commercial world of the twentieth century, some of de Coubertin's original vision still remained. Sydney Harbour looking south from the vicinity of the Sydney Harbour Bridge towards the CBD skyline; the Opera House is visible in the background on the left. ... Ian Thorpe with the 6 gold medals he won at the 2001 World Swimming Championships in Fukuoka, Japan Ian James Thorpe (born October 13, 1982), Australian swimmer, is regarded as one of the greatest middle-distance swimmers of all time after winning the 200 and 400 metre freestyle races at... Sir Stephen Geoffrey Redgrave, or less formally Steve Redgrave, (born 23 March 1962 in Marlow, England), is a British rower who won a gold medal at five consecutive Olympic Games from 1984 to 2000, as well as an additional bronze medal in 1988. ... Catherine Astrid Salome Freeman (born February 16, 1973) is an Australian athlete. ... Sprints are races where the runner tries to go as fast as humanly possible. ... Eric Moussambani (born 1978) is a swimmer from Equatorial Guinea. ...


2004 saw the games return to their birthplace, in Athens, Greece. Many doubted the city would be ready to host the games in time. Also, as these were the first games after the September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States, there were many fears about terrorist attacks taking place. Greece spent at least $7.2 billion on the Games, including $1.5 billion on security alone -- an enormous sum that will take many years, if not decades, to pay off. Yet, none of those fears became a reality. The games were appreciated for their excellent quality, from the point of view of their organisation, hospitality, the excellence of the competition, and the image transmitted worldwide. The Acropolis in central Athens, one of the most important landmarks in world history. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated attacks carried out in the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ...


The future

The 2008 Summer Olympics are to be held in Beijing, China. The 2008 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be held in Beijing in the Peoples Republic of China from August 8, 2008 to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony to take place at 8 p. ... Beijing   listen? (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking) is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ...


The 2012 Summer Olympics are to be held in London, United Kingdom. The 2012 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXX Olympiad, will be held in London, United Kingdom from 27 July to 12 August 2012. ... London (see also different names) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ...


List of events

There are a large number of sports that involve water. ... Swimming is the method by which humans (or other animals) move themselves through water. ... Diving has several meanings:- Jumping or falling deliberately, often acrobatically, into water. ... A hybrid of swimming, gymnastics, and ballet, synchronized swimming involves competitors (either individuals or teams) performing aesthetically pleasing and difficult movements while holding their breath and keeping afloat in water. ... Water polo is a team water sport, which can be best described as a combination of swimming, football (soccer), basketball, ice hockey, rugby and wrestling. ... Archers in Competition Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The Games of the IV Olympiad, originally scheduled to be held in Rome, were instead held in 1908 in London, England. ... The Games of the VII Olympiad were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the XX Olympiad were held in 1972 in Munich, West Germany. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... This article is about the racquet sport badminton. ... The Games of the XXV Olympiad were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a defensive player called a pitcher and hit by an offensive player called a batter with a round, smooth stick called a bat. ... The Games of the XXV Olympiad were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be held in Beijing in the Peoples Republic of China from August 8, 2008 to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony to take place at 8 p. ... Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. ... The Games of the XI Olympiad were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... Pelota (in Basque and Catalan, pilota; in French pelote, from Latin pila) is a name for a variety of court sports played with a ball using ones hand, a racket, a wooden bat (pala), or a basket propulsor, against a wall (frontón in Spanish, frontoi in Basque, front... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... // Boxing Wiki For further information refer to the mediawiki based Boxing Wiki 2004 Armed Forces Amateur Boxing Championships, held in 2003. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The Games of the V Olympiad were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... Canoeing is the recreational or sporting activity of paddling a canoe or kayak. ... The Games of the XI Olympiad were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... This article discusses flatwater racing (sprint) and marathon racing, competitive forms of canoeing and kayaking on more or less flat water. ... Slalom canoeing is a competitive sport where the aim is to navigate a decked canoe or kayak through a course of gates on river rapids in the fastest time possible. ... For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket portal. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... Croquet is a recreational game and, latterly, a competitive sport that involves hitting wooden or plastic balls with a mallet through hoops embedded into the grass playing arena. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... Cycling is a recreation, a sport, and a means of transport across land. ... A road bicycle is a bicycle designed for use on roads, as opposed to rough terrain. ... Track cycling is a form of bicycle racing usually held on specially-built banked tracks or velodromes (but many events are held at older velodromes where the track banking is relatively shallow). ... Mountain biking (Mountain bicycling) is a form of offroad cycling which uses very sturdy bicycles (the mountain bike or cross-country bike) with (usually) straight handlebars and wide tires. ... BMX Racing is a type of off-road bicycle racing. ... Equestrian has several meanings: An equestrian is a horseback rider: see equestrianism An equestrian (Roman) is a member of one of the upper classes in ancient Rome. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The Games of the V Olympiad were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... Russian Ivan Tourchine and American Weston Kelsey fence in the second round of the Olympic Mens Individual Epee event at the Helliniko Fencing Hall on Aug. ... An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The Games of the X Olympiad were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, United States. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, and kinaesthetic awareness, such as handsprings and handstands. ... Artistic gymnastics is a discipline of gymnastics in which competitors perform short routines (ranging from approximately 10 to 90 seconds) on different apparatus (see lists below). ... The 5 apparatus: Ball, Ribbon, Hoop, Clubs, Rope Rhythmic gymnastics is a pseudo-sport where competitors manipulate 5 types of apparatus: Ball, Ribbon, Hoop, Clubs and Rope. ... For an alternative meaning, see Trampoline (computers) or Trampoline_(multihulls). ... Team handball (also known as field handball or Olympic handball) is a team sport where two teams of seven players each (six players and a goalkeeper) pass and bounce a ball trying to throw it in the goal of the opposing team. ... The Games of the XI Olympiad were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... The Games of the XX Olympiad were held in 1972 in Munich, West Germany. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a hard, round ball or a puck into the opponents goal, past the goalkeeper or goaltender (often abbreviated goalie), using a stick. ... The Games of the IV Olympiad, originally scheduled to be held in Rome, were instead held in 1908 in London, England. ... The Games of the VII Olympiad were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the IX Olympiad were held in 1928 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. ... Jeu de paume was originally a French precursor of tennis played without racquets. ... The Games of the VII Olympiad were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... Judo (Japanese: 柔道 JÅ«dō) is a martial art, a sport and a philosophy which originated in Japan. ... The Games of the XVIII Olympiad were held in 1964 in Japan. ... The Games of the XIX Olympiad were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... High School lacrosse action. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The Games of the IV Olympiad, originally scheduled to be held in Rome, were instead held in 1908 in London, England. ... Competitors in the final round of the Mens Modern Pentathlon pull for the finish line at the Goudi Sports Complex on August 26, 2004. ... The Games of the V Olympiad were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... Polo (also known as Cho-gan) is a team game played on a field with one goal for each team. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The Games of the IV Olympiad, originally scheduled to be held in Rome, were instead held in 1908 in London, England. ... The Games of the VII Olympiad were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... The Games of the XI Olympiad were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... Racket can denote: a systematised element of organized crime a sporting implement, otherwise: racquet This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Games of the IV Olympiad, originally scheduled to be held in Rome, were instead held in 1908 in London, England. ... Roque is an American variant of Croquet (the name was derived by removing the first and last letters). ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... Rowing refers to several forms of physical activity: For rowing boats in general, see Watercraft rowing. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... Rugby might refer to the sport called rugby: Rugby football Rugby league Rugby union Touch Rugby Tag Rugby Wheelchair Rugby Rugby is also the name of several places: Rugby, Warwickshire (England) within the Borough of Rugby Rugby, North Dakota Rugby, Tennessee Rugby, Brooklyn Rugby may also refer to: Rugby School... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The Games of the IV Olympiad, originally scheduled to be held in Rome, were instead held in 1908 in London, England. ... The Games of the VII Olympiad were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... Wooden sailing boat Sailing is motion across a body of water in a sailing ship, or smaller boat, powered by wind. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... Shooting is the act of causing a gun to fire at a target. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The Games of the IX Olympiad were held in 1928 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. ... Softball is a team sport in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches in circumference, is thrown by a player called a pitcher and hit by an offensive player called a batter with a round, smooth stick called a bat. ... The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be held in Beijing in the Peoples Republic of China from August 8, 2008 to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony to take place at 8 p. ... Regional competition level table tennis, showing table, net, and player getting ready to return the ball with a winning backhand topspin stroke. ... The Games of the XXIV Olympiad were held in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... Taekwondo, Tae Kwon Do, or Taekwon-Do is the Korean national sport and most commonly practiced form of mudo. ... The Games of the XXVII Olympiad were held in 2000 in Sydney, Australia. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, formally called the Games of the I Olympiad, were the first modern Olympics and the first Games since Roman emperor Theodosius I banned the Ancient Olympic Games in AD 393 as part of the Christian campaign against paganism. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... The Games of the XXIV Olympiad were held in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... A triathlon is an athletic event made up of three contests (from the Greek). ... The Games of the XXVII Olympiad were held in 2000 in Sydney, Australia. ... Tug of war Tug of war, also known as rope pulling, is a sport that directly pits two teams against each other in a test of strength. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The Games of the VII Olympiad were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... Volleyball is a popular sport where teams separated by a high net hit a ball back and forth between the teams. ... The Games of the XVIII Olympiad were held in 1964 in Japan. ... Some forms of motorboat racing: Hydroplane racing Jet sprint boat racing Offshore powerboat racing F1 Powerboat Racing Categories: Water-transport stubs | Sports stubs | Motorboat racing ... The Games of the IV Olympiad, originally scheduled to be held in Rome, were instead held in 1908 in London, England. ... Weightlifting is a sport where competitors attempt to lift heavy weights mounted on steel bars. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, formally called the Games of the I Olympiad, were the first modern Olympics and the first Games since Roman emperor Theodosius I banned the Ancient Olympic Games in AD 393 as part of the Christian campaign against paganism. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The Games of the VII Olympiad were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... Wrestling may refer to: Sport wrestling Professional wrestling grappling This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... Andrell Durden (top) and Edward Harris grapple for position during the All-Marine Wrestle Offs. ... Andrell Durden (top) and Edward Harris grapple for position during the All-Marine Wrestle Offs. ...

List of modern Summer Olympic Games

The 1896 Summer Olympics, formally called the Games of the I Olympiad, were the first modern Olympics and the first Games since Roman emperor Theodosius I banned the Ancient Olympic Games in AD 393 as part of the Christian campaign against paganism. ... The Acropolis in central Athens, one of the most important landmarks in world history. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... The fourth modern Olympic games, held in Athens. ... The Acropolis in central Athens, one of the most important landmarks in world history. ... The Games of the IV Olympiad, originally scheduled to be held in Rome, were instead held in 1908 in London, England. ... London (see also different names) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... The Games of the V Olympiad were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... Stockholm  listen? is the capital and the largest city of Sweden. ... The Games of the VI Olympiad were to have been held in 1916 in Berlin, Germany. ...   Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... WWI redirects here. ... The Games of the VII Olympiad were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The Games of the IX Olympiad were held in 1928 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. ... Amsterdam Location Country The Netherlands Province North Holland Population 739,295 (1 January 2005) Coordinates 4°89E - 52°37N Website www. ... The Games of the X Olympiad were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, United States. ... The Downtown Los Angeles skyline. ... The Games of the XI Olympiad were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ...   Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... The Games of the XII Olympiad were cancelled due to World War II. Originally slated to be held in Tokyo, Japan, they were later awarded to Helsinki, Finland before being cancelled completely. ... Helsinki (pronounced with the stress on the first syllable in Finnish: ), or Helsingfors in Swedish   listen?, is the capital of Finland. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air, August 9, 1945 after the Allied atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. ... The Games of the XIII Olympiad were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in London, United Kingdom. ... London (see also different names) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 in London, United Kingdom. ... London (see also different names) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... 1952 Summer Olympics - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Helsinki (pronounced with the stress on the first syllable in Finnish: ), or Helsingfors in Swedish   listen?, is the capital of Finland. ... The Games of the XVI Olympiad were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... The City of Melbournes coat of arms The central business district of Melbourne, viewed from the north Alternate meanings: Melbourne (disambiguation) Melbourne is the capital and largest city of the state of Victoria, and the second largest city in Australia, with a population of 52,117 in the Central... Stockholm  listen? is the capital and the largest city of Sweden. ... Equestrianism relates to the riding of horses. ... The Games of the XVII Olympiad were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost 4,000,000 1... The Games of the XVIII Olympiad were held in 1964 in Japan. ... The modern skyline of Tokyo is highly decentralized. ... The Games of the XIX Olympiad were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the name of a megacity located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus (altiplano) at the center of Mexico, about 2,240 metres (7,349 feet) above sea-level, surrounded on most sides... The Games of the XX Olympiad were held in 1972 in Munich, West Germany. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German state of Bavaria. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were held in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Please visit and contribute to the Montreal Wikiportal See and add to this ongoing discussion about English Names in Montreal {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Concordia Salus (Well-being through harmony) Ville de Montréal, Québec, Canada Location. ... The Games of the XXII Olympiad were held in 1980 in Moscow, Soviet Union. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, IPA:   listen?) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 1097. ... The Games of the XXIII Olympiad were held in 1984 in Los Angeles, United States. ... The Downtown Los Angeles skyline. ... The Games of the XXIV Olympiad were held in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... Seoul is the capital of South Korea. ... The Games of the XXV Olympiad were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... Barcelona within Barcelonès Population (2003) 1,582,738 Area 1004 Km2 Population density (2001) 15,764/Km2 Barcelona is the capital of Catalonia, an autonomous community in northeastern Spain, and the countrys second-largest city (after Madrid). ... The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... City nickname(s): The A-T-L, The Horizon City, The Capital of the South, The Phoenix City, The City Too Busy to Hate, Hotlanta, A-Town, The Big A, The New York of the South, The Big Peach County Fulton County, Georgia Area  - Total  - Water 343. ... The Games of the XXVII Olympiad were held in 2000 in Sydney, Australia. ... Sydney Harbour looking south from the vicinity of the Sydney Harbour Bridge towards the CBD skyline; the Opera House is visible in the background on the left. ... The 2004 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, were the 26th Summer Olympic Games. ... The Acropolis in central Athens, one of the most important landmarks in world history. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be held in Beijing in the Peoples Republic of China from August 8, 2008 to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony to take place at 8 p. ... Beijing   listen? (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking) is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... Sha Tin New Town is one of the new towns in Hong Kong. ... Hong Kong (香港; Cantonese IPA: ; Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2; Yale: heūng góng; pinyin: Xiānggǎng; Wade-Giles: Hsiang-kang) is one of the two Special Administrative Regions of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Equestrianism relates to the riding of horses. ... The 2012 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXX Olympiad, will be held in London, United Kingdom from 27 July to 12 August 2012. ... London (see also different names) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ...

See also

(*)In early Olympic Games team sports could be contested by squads made up of athletes from more than one country. ... A runner carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games, Winter Olympics for short but more correctly The Olympic Winter Games, are the cold-weather counterpart to the Summer Olympic Games. ... Both the Summer Olympic Games and Winter Olympic Games have been marred by various incidents and scandals. ... A runner carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games, Winter Olympics for short but more correctly The Olympic Winter Games, are the cold-weather counterpart to the Summer Olympic Games. ... Multi-Sport Events Arctic Winter Games Asian Games Canada Games Commonwealth Games Francophone Games Gaelic Games Gay Games Goodwill Games Nordic Games Pan American Games Paralympic Games Special Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Winter Olympic Games World Games World Wheelchair Games X Games American football Alamo Bowl Aztec Bowl Capital...

External links

  • Official Site of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games
  • Official Site of the Olympic Movement
  • Candidate Cities for future Olympic Games

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: 1936 Summer Olympics (3628 words)
The Canadian Olympic Team was the only olympic team from a non-fascist country to salute Hitler (in a gesture of friendship) while marching by during opening ceremonies.
The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States.
The 2008 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be held in Beijing in the Peoples Republic of China from August 8, 2008 to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony to take place at 8 p.
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