FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Summer Olympic Games

The Summer Olympic Games or the Games of the Olympiad are an international multi-sport event usually Quadrennial, organised by the International Olympic Committee. The Olympics are the most prestigious such event in the world, though they are not the world's most-watched sporting event - the television audience for the single-sport FIFA World Cup is larger. Medals are awarded in each event, with gold medals for first place, silver for second and bronze for third, a tradition which started in 1904. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A multi-sport event is a competition in which athletes compete in a number of different sports. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... The FIFA World Cup, sometimes called the Football World Cup or the Soccer World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the mens national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... A silver medal is a medal awarded to the second place finisher of contests (typically athletics competitions) such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. ... A bronze medal is a medal awarded to the third place finisher of contests (typically athletics competitions) such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. ...


The Games have expanded from a 42-event competition with fewer than 250 men competing to including over 10,000 competitors of both genders from 202 nations. Organisers for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing expect approximately 10,500 athletes to take part in the 302 events on the programme for the Games.[1] The 2004 Summer Olympics, for which organisers had also expected 10,500 competitors, drew a total of 11,099 in the 301 events offered. The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... Peking redirects here. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ...


Competitors are entered by a National Olympic Committee (NOC) to represent their country of citizenship. National anthems and flags accompany the medal ceremonies, and tables showing the number of medals won by each country are widely used. In general only recognised nations are represented, but a few sovereign-disputed countries are allowed to take part. National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... For other uses, see Flag (disambiguation). ...


The United States has hosted the most Summer Olympics games, hosting four. The United Kingdom will have hosted three Summer Olympics games, all in London, when they return to the British capital in 2012. Australia, France, Germany and Greece have all hosted the Summer Olympic Games twice. Countries that have hosted the Summer Olympics once are: Belgium, Canada, Finland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, South Korea, Spain, the Soviet Union and Sweden. China will host the Summer Olympics for the first time in Beijing in 2008. Four cities have hosted two Summer Olympic Games: Los Angeles, London, Paris and Athens. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Peking redirects here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ...


Five countries - Australia, France, Great Britain, Greece and Switzerland - have sent teams to every single Summer Olympic Games. The only country to have won at least one gold medal at every Summer Olympic Games is Great Britain, ranging from one gold in 1904, 1952 and 1996 to fifty-six golds in 1908.

Contents

Qualification

Qualification rules for each of the Olympic sports are set by the International Federation (IF) that governs that sport's international competition. A sport governing body comes in several forms. ...


For individual sports, competitors typically qualify through attaining a certain place in a major international event or on the IF's ranking list. National Olympic Committees may enter a limited number of qualified competitors in each event (3 is a common number), and the NOC decides which qualified competitors to select as representatives in each event if more have attained the benchmark than can be entered. Many events provide for a certain number of wildcard entries, given to athletes from developing nations.


Nations qualify teams for team sports through continental qualifying tournaments, in which each continental association is given a certain number of spots in the Olympic tournament. The host nation is generally given an automatic qualification.


History

The early years

The opening ceremony of the first Olympic Games in the Panathenaic Stadium.
The opening ceremony of the first Olympic Games in the Panathenaic Stadium.

The modern Olympic Games were founded in 1894 when Pierre Fredi, Baron de Coubertin sought to promote international understanding through sporting competition. He based his Olympics on the Wenlock Olympian Society Annual Games, which had been contested in Much Wenlock since 1850.[2] The first edition of de Coubertin's games, held in Athens in 1896, attracted just 245 competitors, of whom more than 200 were Greek, and only 14 countries were represented. Nevertheless, no international events of this magnitude had been organized before. Female athletes were not allowed to compete, though one woman, Stamata Revithi, ran the marathon course on her own, saying "[i]f the committee doesn’t let me compete I will go after them regardless".[3] Image File history File links From it: The opening ceremony of the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... Image File history File links From it: The opening ceremony of the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... Panathinaiko Stadium (also known as the Kallimarmaro) in Athens is the only major stadium in the world thats constructed fully of white marble from mount Penteli. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... His statue at the Centennial Olympic Park, Atlanta. ... The Wenlock Olympian Society Annual Games are usually held every year in Much Wenlock in Shropshire, England. ... Much Wenlock is a town in Shropshire, England. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... Stamata Revithi was a Greek woman who attempted to compete at the 1896 Summer Olympics. ...


Four years later the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris attracted more than four times as many athletes, including 11 women, who were allowed to officially compete for the first time, in croquet, golf, sailing, and tennis. The Games were integrated with the Paris World's Fair and lasted over 5 months. It is still disputed which events exactly were Olympic, since few or maybe even none of the events were advertised as such at the time. The 1900 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For the Smalltalk based 3D software platform, see Croquet project. ... This article is about the game. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ...


Numbers declined again for the 1904 Games in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, due in part to the lengthy transatlantic boat trip required of the European competitors, and the integration with the Louisiana Purchase Exposition World's Fair, which again spread the event out over an extended period. In contrast with Paris 1900, the word Olympic was used for practically every contest, including those exclusively for school boys or for Irish-Americans. The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Entrance to Creation Exhibit on the Pike Map of the St. ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ...


A series of smaller games were held in Athens in 1906. These were to be the first of an alternating series of games to be held in Athens, but the series failed to materialise. The games were held in 1906 to celebrate the "tenth birthday" of the games. The IOC does not currently recognise these games as being official Olympic Games, although many historians do. The 1906 Athens games, which had over 900 athletes competing, were more successful than the 1900 and 1904 games and contributed positively to the success of future games. The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ...

Dorando Pietri finishes the first modern marathon.
Dorando Pietri finishes the first modern marathon.

The 1908 London Games saw numbers rise again, as well as the first running of the marathon over its now-standard distance of 42.195 km (26 miles 385 yards). This distance was chosen to ensure that the race finished in front of the box occupied by the British royal family. The marathon had been 40 km for the first games in 1896, but was subsequently varied by up to 2 km due to local conditions such as street and stadium layout. At the six Olympic games between 1900 and 1920, the marathon was raced over six different distances. Image File history File links Dorando_Pietri. ... Image File history File links Dorando_Pietri. ... The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. ... Modern day marathon runners The word marathon refers to a long-distance road running event of 42. ...


At the end of the 1908 marathon the Italian runner Dorando Pietri was first to enter the stadium, but he was clearly in distress, and collapsed of exhaustion before he could complete the event. He was helped over the finish line by concerned race officials, but later he was disqualified and the gold medal was awarded to John Hayes, who had trailed him by around 30 seconds. Dorando Pietri. ... John Joseph Johnny Hayes (April 10, 1886 - August 25, 1965) was an American athlete, winner of the marathon race at the 1908 Summer Olympics. ...


The Games continued to grow, attracting 2,504 competitors, to Stockholm in 1912, including the great all-rounder Jim Thorpe, who won both the decathlon and pentathlon. Thorpe had previously played a few games of baseball for a fee, and saw his medals stripped for this breach of amateurism after complaints from his own country men. They were reinstated in 1983, 30 years after his death. The Games at Stockholm were the first to fulfill Pierre de Coubertin's original idea. For the first time since the Games started in 1896 were all continents represented with athletes competing in the same stadium. The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... For other uses, see Jim Thorpe (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Amateur. ...


The scheduled Berlin Games of 1916 were cancelled following the onset of World War I. This article is about the capital of Germany. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


The interwar era

The 1920 Antwerp games in war-ravaged Belgium were a subdued affair, but again drew a record number of competitors. This record only stood until 1924, when the Paris Games would involve 3,000 competitors, the greatest of whom was Finnish runner Paavo Nurmi. "The Flying Finn", won three team gold medals and the individual 1,500 and 5,000 meter runs, the latter two on the same day. For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Paavo Johannes Nurmi ( ) (June 13, 1897 Turku – October 2, 1973 Helsinki) was a Finnish runner. ... The Flying Finn was a nickname given to several Finnish runners including Olympic gold medalists, Ville Ritola and Paavo Nurmi. ...


The 1928 Amsterdam games were notable for being the first games which allowed females to compete at track & field athletics, and benefited greatly from the general prosperity of the times alongside the first appearance of sponsorship of the games, from Coca-Cola. This was in stark contrast to 1932 when the Los Angeles games were affected by the Great Depression, which contributed to the fewest competitors since the St. Louis games. For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


The 1936 Berlin Games were seen by the German government as a golden opportunity to promote their ideology. The ruling Nazi Party commissioned film-maker Leni Riefenstahl to film the games. The result, Olympia, was a masterpiece, despite Hitler's theories of Aryan racial superiority being repeatedly shown up by "non-Aryan" athletes. In particular, African-American sprinter and long jumper Jesse Owens won 4 gold medals. The tale of Hitler snubbing Owens at the ensuing medal ceremony is a fabrication.[4] (Redirected from 1936 Berlin Games) The Games of the XI Olympiad were held in 1936 in Germany. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Helene Bertha Amalie Leni Riefenstahl (August 22, 1902 – September 8, 2003) was a German film director, dancer and actress, and widely noted for her aesthetics and advances in film technique. ... Olympia is a 1938 film by Leni Riefenstahl documenting the 1936 Summer Olympics. ... Hitler redirects here. ... The Aryan race is a concept in European culture that was influential in the period of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. ... James Cleveland Jesse Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an African American track and field athlete. ...


Due to World War II, the Games of 1940 (due to be held in Tokyo and temporarily relocated to Helsinki upon the outbreak of war) were cancelled. The Games of 1944 were due to be held in London but were also cancelled; instead, London hosted the first games after the end of the war, in 1948. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Location of Helsinki in Northern Europe Coordinates: , Country Province Region Uusimaa Sub-region Helsinki Charter 1550 Capital city 1812 Government  - Mayor Jussi Pajunen Area  - Total 187. ... The Games of the XIII Olympiad were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in London, United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ...


After WWII

The first post-war Games were held in 1948 in London, with both Germany and Japan excluded. Dutch sprinter Fanny Blankers-Koen won four gold medals on the track, emulating Owens' achievement in Berlin. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Fanny Blankers-Koen speeding towards the gold medal in the final of the 80 m hurdles event at the 1948 Summer Olympics. ...


At the 1952 Games in Helsinki the USSR team competed for the first time and at once became one of the dominant teams. Finland made a legend of an amiable Czech army lieutenant named Emil Zátopek, who was intent on improving on his single gold and silver medals from 1948. Having first won both the 10,000 and 5,000 metre races, he also entered the marathon, despite having never previously raced at that distance. Pacing himself by chatting with the other leaders, Zátopek led from about half way, slowly dropping the remaining contenders to win by two and a half minutes, and completed a trio of wins. Location of Helsinki in Northern Europe Coordinates: , Country Province Region Uusimaa Sub-region Helsinki Charter 1550 Capital city 1812 Government  - Mayor Jussi Pajunen Area  - Total 187. ... Flag of the USSR NOC symbol of the USSR The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (IOC country code:URS) participated in the Summer Olympics nine times (1952-1988 except 1984). ... Emil Zátopek (IPA: ) (September 19, 1922 - November 22, 2000) was a Czech athlete probably best known for his amazing feat of winning three gold medals in athletics at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki. ...


The 1956 Melbourne Games were largely successful, barring a water polo match between Hungary and the Soviet Union, which political tensions caused to end as a pitched battle between the teams. Due to a foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in Britain at the time and the strict quarantine laws of Australia, the equestrian events were held in Stockholm. This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... Water polo is a team water sport. ... Ervin Zador after the match The Blood In The Water match (in Hungarian Melbourne-i vérfürdő, Blood Bath of Melbourne) was a water polo match between Hungary and the USSR at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics and is arguably the most famous match in water polo history. ...


The 1960 Rome Games saw the arrival on the world scene of a young light-heavyweight boxer named Cassius Clay, later known as Muhammad Ali, who would later throw his gold medal away in disgust after being refused service in a whites-only restaurant in his home town, Louisville, KY.[citation needed] Soviet women's artistic gymnastics team members won 15 of 16 possible medals. Other performers of note in 1960 included Wilma Rudolph, a gold medallist in the 100 metres, 200 metres and 4x100 metre relay events. For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Louisville redirects here. ... Artistic Gymnastics is a discipline of gymnastics in which competitors perform short routines (ranging from approximately 30 to 90 seconds) on different apparatus, obviously less for vaulting (see lists below). ... Wilma Glodean Rudolph (June 23, 1940 – November 12, 1994) was an American athlete, and in the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, Italy, she became the first American woman to win three gold medals in track and field during a single Olympic Games, despite running on a sprained ankle. ...


The 1964 Games held in Tokyo are notable for heralding the modern age of telecommunications. These games were the first to be broadcast worldwide on television, enabled by the recent advent of communication satellites. The 1964 Games were thus a turning point in the global visibility and popularity of the Olympics. For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ...


Performances at the 1968 Mexico City games were affected by the altitude of the host city.[5] No event was affected more than the long jump. American athlete Bob Beamon jumped 8.90 metres, setting a new world record and, in the words of fellow competitor and then-reigning champion Lynn Davies, "making the rest of us look silly."[citation needed] Beamon's world record would stand for 23 years. The 1968 Games also saw the introduction of the now-universal Fosbury flop, a technique which won American high jumper Dick Fosbury the gold medal. Politics took centre stage in the medal ceremony for the men's 200 metre dash, where Tommie Smith and John Carlos made a protest gesture on the podium against the segregation in the United States; their political act was condemned within the Olympic Movement, but was praised in the American Civil Rights Movement. Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... Robert (Bob) Beamon (born August 29, 1946) is a former American track and field athlete, best known for his long-standing world record in the long jump. ... Lynn Davies (born May 20, 1942 in Nantymoel, Wales) was captain of the British Olympic long jump team in 1968; he won a gold medal in the event in 1964. ... Richard Douglas Dick Fosbury (born March 6, 1947) is an American athlete who revolutionised the high jump using a back-first technique, now known as the Fosbury flop. ... Richard Douglas (Dick) Fosbury (born March 6, 1947) is an American athlete who revolutionized the high jump using a back-first technique, now known as the Fosbury Flop. ... Tommie Smith (born June 5, 1944) is a former American athlete, winner of 200 m run at the 1968 Summer Olympics. ... John Wesley Carlos (born June 5, 1945 in Harlem, New York) is an American former track and field athlete and professional football player. ... The raised fist (also closed fist or clenched fist) is a symbol and salute most often used by communists, anarchists, socialists, leftists, pacifists, trade unionists and others in opposition to oppressive regimes. ... Martin Luther King is perhaps most famous for his I Have a Dream speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom This article is about the civil rights movement following the Brown v. ...


Politics again intervened at Munich in 1972, with lethal consequences. A Palestinian terrorist group named Black September invaded the Olympic village and broke into the apartment of the Israeli delegation. They killed two Israelis and held 9 others as hostages. The terrorists demanded that Israel release numerous prisoners. When the Israeli government refused their demand, a tense stand-off ensued while negotiations continued. Eventually the captors, still holding their hostages, were offered safe passage and taken to an airport, where they were ambushed by German security forces. In the firefight that followed, 15 people, including the nine Israeli athletes and five of the terrorists, were killed. After much debate, it was decided that the Games would continue, but proceedings were obviously dominated by these events.[6] Some memorable athletic achievements did occur during these Games, notably the winning of a record seven gold medals by United States swimmer Mark Spitz, Lasse Viren's, of Finland, back to back gold in the 5,000 meters and 10,000 meters, defeating American distance great Steve Prefontaine in the former, and the winning of three gold medals by 16-year-old Soviet gymnast Olga Korbut, who, however failed to win the all-around to her teammate Ludmilla Tourischeva. For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ... A Black September terrorist on a balcony in the Olympic Village in September 1972, during what became known as the Munich Massacre, in which 11 Israeli athletes were kidnapped and killed. ... Mark Andrew Spitz (born February 10, 1950, in Modesto, California) is a former American swimmer. ... Lasse Virén (born July 22, 1949) is a former Finnish athlete, winner of four gold medals at the 1972 Summer Olympics and 1976 Summer Olympics. ... Steve Roland Prefontaine (January 25, 1951 – May 30, 1975) (nicknamed Pre) was an American Olympic runner who inspired a running boom in the 1970s along with contemporaries Frank Shorter and Bill Rodgers. ... Olga Valentinovna Korbut (Belarusian: Вольга Валянцінаўна Корбут, Volha Valyantsinawna Korbut; Russian: Ольга Валентиновна Корбут) (b. ... Ludmilla Ivanovna Turischeva (Russian: Людмила Ивановна Турищева alternate spellings: Lyudmilla Turischeva, Ludmilla Tourischeva, born July 10, 1952 in Grozny) is a former Russian gymnast and a nine-time Olympic medalist for the Soviet Union. ...


There was no such tragedy in Montreal in 1976, but bad planning led to the Games' cost far exceeding the budget. The Montreal Games are the most expensive in Olympic history, costing over $5 billion (equivalent to $20 billion in 2006). For a time, it seemed that the Olympics might no longer be a viable financial proposition. There was also a boycott by African nations to protest against a recent tour of apartheid-run South Africa by a New Zealand rugby side. The Romanian gymnast Nadia Comăneci won the women's individual all around gold medal with two of four possible perfect scores, thus giving birth to a gymnastics dynasty in Romania. Another female gymnast to earn the perfect score and three gold medals there was Nellie Kim of the USSR. Lasse Viren repeated his double gold in the 5,000 meters and 10,000 meters, making him the only athlete to ever win the distance double twice. Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... Nadia Elena Comaneci (originally Comăneci ; born November 12, 1961) is a Romanian gymnast, winner of five Olympic gold medals, and the first gymnast to be awarded a perfect score of 10 in an Olympic gymnastic event. ... Nellie Vladimirovna Kim (Russian: ; b. ... Lasse Virén (born July 22, 1949) is a former Finnish athlete, winner of four gold medals at the 1972 Summer Olympics and 1976 Summer Olympics. ...


End of the 20th century

Closing Ceremony of the 1980 Summer Olympics. Bear Cub Misha, the mascot, flying into the sky.
Closing Ceremony of the 1980 Summer Olympics. Bear Cub Misha, the mascot, flying into the sky.

Following the Soviet Union's participation to the Afghan Civil War, 66 nations, including the United States, Canada, West Germany and Japan, boycotted the 1980 games held in Moscow. Notably, Greece, Great Britain and Australia did not withdraw, and remain the only nations to have competed in all summer games. The boycott contributed to the 1980 Games being a less publicised and less competitive affair, which was dominated by the host country. Download high resolution version (399x1331, 93 KB)This image is taken from the Soviet magazine Olimpiiskaia panorama, 1990, issue 2, p. ... Download high resolution version (399x1331, 93 KB)This image is taken from the Soviet magazine Olimpiiskaia panorama, 1990, issue 2, p. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ... Misha Misha (Миша) is the name of the Russian Bear, the mascot of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games (the XXII Summer Olympics). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ...


In 1984 the Soviet Union, and 14 Eastern Bloc countries, reciprocated by boycotting the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. These games were perhaps the first games of a new era to make a profit. The games were again viable, but had become more commercial. Again, without the participation of the Eastern Bloc, the 1984 Games were dominated by their host country. A map of the Eastern Bloc 1948-1989. ...  Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


The 1988 Seoul games were very well planned but the games were sadly tainted when many of the athletes, most notably men's 100 metres winner Ben Johnson, failed mandatory drug tests. Despite splendid drug-free performances by many individuals, the number of people who failed screenings for performance-enhancing chemicals overshadowed the games. Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... Benjamin Sinclair Ben Johnson CM (born December 30, 1961) is a controversial former Canadian athlete, best known for his disqualification for doping use after winning the 100 m final in the 1988 Summer Olympics. ... For the episode of the American television series The Office, see Drug Testing. A drug test is commonly a technical examination of urine, semen, blood, sweat, or oral fluid samples to determine the presence or absence of specified drugs or their metabolized traces. ...


On the bright side, drug testing and regulation authorities were catching up with the cheating that had been endemic in athletics for some years. The 1992 Barcelona Games were cleaner, although not without incident. In evidence there was increased professionalism amongst Olympic athletes, exemplified by US basketball's "Dream Team". 1992 also saw the reintroduction to the Games of several smaller European states which had been incorporated into the Soviet Union since World War II. Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... The United States mens national basketball team is the representative for the United States of America in international mens basketball. ...


By then the process of choosing a location for the Games had itself become a commercial concern; allegations of corruption rocked the International Olympic Committee, in particular with reference to Salt Lake City's bid to host the 2002 Winter Olympics. It was also widely rumoured that The Coca-Cola Company, a key IOC sponsor, was highly influential in the 1996 Summer Olympics being hosted by its home city of Atlanta.[citation needed] In the stadium in 1996, the highlight was 200 metres runner Michael Johnson annihilating the world record in front of a home crowd. Canadians savoured Donovan Bailey's record-breaking gold medal run in the 100-metre dash. This was popularly felt to be an appropriate recompense for the previous national disgrace involving Ben Johnson. There were also emotional scenes, such as when Muhammad Ali, clearly affected by Parkinson's disease, lit the Olympic torch and received a replacement medal for the one he had discarded in 1960. The latter event took place not at the boxing ring but in the basketball arena, at the demand of US television. The atmosphere at the Games was marred however when a bomb exploded during the celebration in Centennial Park. In June 2003, the principal suspect in this bombing, Eric Robert Rudolph, was captured. The 2002 Winter Olympic bid scandal was a scandal involving allegations of bribery to obtain the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is Salt Lake Citys top tourist draw. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is the worlds largest beverage company, largest manufacturer, distributor and marketer of non-alcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups in the world, and one of the largest corporations in the United States. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Sprints are short running races in athletics. ... Michael Duane Johnson (born September 13, 1967) is a retired American sprinter who holds world records in the 200 meters, 400 meters and 4 x 400 m relay. ... Donovan Bailey (born December 16, 1967) is a Canadian former athlete. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... The Centennial Olympic Park bombing was a terrorist bombing on July 27, 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia during the 1996 Summer Olympics, the first of four committed by Eric Robert Rudolph. ... Eric Robert Rudolph (born September 19, 1966), also known as the Olympic Park Bomber, is an American domestic terrorist,[2][3] who committed a series of bombings across the southern United States, which killed three people and injured at least 150 others. ...


A new millennium

The 2000 Games were held in Sydney, Australia, and showcased individual performances by local favourite Ian Thorpe in the pool, Briton Steve Redgrave who won a rowing gold medal in an unprecedented fifth consecutive Olympics, and Cathy Freeman, an Indigenous Australian whose triumph in the 400 metres united a packed stadium. Eric "the Eel" Moussambani, a swimmer from Equatorial Guinea, had a memorably slow 100 metre freestyle swim that showed that, even in the commercial world of the twentieth century, some of de Coubertin's original vision still remained.[7] The Sydney Games were also memorable for the first appearance of a joint North and South Korean contingent (to a standing ovation) at the opening ceremonies, even if they competed as different countries. This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Ian James Thorpe OAM (born 13 October 1982 in Sydney, New South Wales), also known as the Thorpedo or Thorpey, is a former Australian freestyle swimmer. ... Image:Stevebook. ... Catherine Astrid Salome Freeman also known as just Cathy Freeman OAM (born 16 February 1973) is an Australian sprinter who is particularly associated with the 400 m race. ... Languages Several hundred Indigenous Australian languages (many extinct or nearly so), Australian English, Australian Aboriginal English, Torres Strait Creole, Kriol Religions Primarily Christian, with minorities of other religions including Islam and various forms of Traditional belief systems based around the Dreamtime Related ethnic groups see List of Indigenous Australian group... Sprints are short running races in athletics. ... Eric Moussambani swimming Eric Moussambani (born 1978) is a swimmer from Equatorial Guinea. ...


2004 saw the Games return to their birthplace in Athens, Greece. Greece spent at least $7.2 billion on the Games, including $1.5 billion on security alone. The games were praised and appreciated for their excellent quality in terms of organization, hospitality, symbolism, the level of the competition and athleticism, and the overall image transmitted worldwide. Although unfounded and wildly sensationalized reports of potential terrorism drove crowds away from the preliminary competitions of first weekend of the games (August 14-15), attendance picked up soon thereafter as the games progressed, the competitions got underway, and the terrorist attacks and security glitches failed to materialize. The Athens Games witnessed all NOCs participate for the first time since 1996, and the largest ever — with 202 NOCs and over 11,000 participants. This article is about the capital of Greece. ...


The 2008 Summer Olympics are to be held in Beijing, China. Several new events, including the new discipline of BMX for both men and women, are to be held. For the first time, women will compete in the steeplechase. The fencing programme will be expanded to include all six events for both men and women. Women had not previously been able to compete in team foil or sabre events. Marathon swimming events, over the distance of 10 kilometres, will be added. In addition, the doubles events in table tennis will be replaced by team events.[1] The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... Peking redirects here. ... A BMX race. ... The steeplechase is an obstacle race in athletics (track and field), which derives its name from the steeplechase in horse racing. ...


London, United Kingdom will hold the 2012 Summer Olympics, making London the only city to host the Games three times. The International Olympic Committee has removed baseball and softball from the 2012 programme. However, it may be re-added in programmes in later years. The International Olympic Committe has announced that the finalists to host the 2016 Summer Olympics are Chicago, USA; Tokyo, Japan; Madrid, Spain; and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... London 2012 redirects here. ... This article is about the sport. ... Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... The 2016 Summer Olympics, officially the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, is a major international sports and cultural festival to be celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games as governed by the International Olympic Committee. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ...


List of Olympic sports

Main article: Olympic sports

42 different sports, spanning 56 different disciplines, have been part of the Olympic programme at one point or another. 28 sports have comprised the schedule for the 2000, 2004, and 2008 Summer Olympics, though baseball and softball have been removed to give a list of 26 for the 2012 Games.[8] Archery competition at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... London 2012 redirects here. ...


The Summer Olympic Sports or Federations are regrouped under a common umbrella association, called the Association of Summer Olympic Federations (ASOIF).

Sport Years Sport Years
Archery 1900-1912, 1920, since 1972 Modern pentathlon since 1912
Athletics all Polo 1900, 1908, 1920, 1924, 1936
Badminton since 1992 Rackets 1908
Baseball 1992-2008 Roque 1904
Basketball since 1936 Rowing since 1900
Basque pelota 1900 Rugby union 1900, 1908, 1920, 1924
Boxing 1904, 1908, since 1920 Sailing 1900, since 1908
Canoeing since 1936 Shooting 1896, 1900, 1908-1924, since 1932
Cricket 1900 Softball 1996-2008
Croquet 1900 Swimming all
Cycling all Synchronized swimming since 1984
Diving since 1904 Table tennis since 1988
Equestrian 1900, since 1912 Taekwondo since 2000
Fencing all Tennis 1896-1924, since 1988
Football (soccer) 1900-1928, since 1936 Triathlon since 2000
Golf 1900, 1904 Tug of war 1900-1920
Gymnastics all Volleyball since 1964
Handball 1936, since 1972 Water motorsports 1908
Hockey (field) 1908, 1920, since 1928 Water polo 1900, since 1908
Jeu de paume 1908 Weightlifting 1896, 1904, since 1920
Judo 1964, since 1972 Wrestling 1896, since 1904
Lacrosse 1904, 1908

Archery at the Summer Olympics had its debut at the 1900 Summer Olympics and has been contested in 13 Olympiads. ... At the 1900 Summer Olympics, six of the archery events that took place in Paris, France, were considered Olympic, with 153 archers competing in them. ... Archery at the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp marked the return of the sport after a 12-year absence following it not being contested in the 1912 Summer Olympics and the cancellation of the 1916 Summer Olympics due to World War I. The only competitors were men, and from only... Archery at the 1972 Summer Olympics consisted of two medal events, one for men and one for women. ... Modern pentathlon is a sports contest created especially for the Summer Olympic Games by the founder of the modern Games, Baron Pierre de Coubertin, and was first contested in 1912. ... Athletics has been contested at every Summer Olympics since the birth of the modern Olympic movement at the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... Polo at the Summer Olympics has been contested five times. ... Badminton had its debut at the 1992 Summer Olympics and has been contested in 4 Olympiads. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, two rackets events were contested. ... Baseball at the Summer Olympics had its official debut at the 1992 Summer Olympics and has been contested in 4 Olympiads. ... At the 1904 Summer Olympics, a roque individual tournament was contested. ... Basketball has been played consistently at the Summer Olympic Games since 1936, with a demonstration event in 1904. ... Rowing has been contested since the 1900 Summer Olympics. ... At the 1900 Summer Olympics, a pelota tournament was contested. ... A postcard of the rugby event at the 1924 Olympics. ... Boxing has been contested at every Summer Olympic Games since its introduction to the programme at the 1904 Summer Olympics except 1912. ... Events Nations Category: ... Canoeing/kayaking has been featured as a sport in the Summer Olympic Games since the 1936 Games in Berlin. ... Shooting sports have been contested at every Summer Olympic Games since the birth of the modern Olympic movement at the 1896 Summer Olympics except the 1904 and 1928 editions. ... At the 1900 Summer Olympics, a cricket tournament was contested. ... Softball was introduced as an Olympic sport for women (only) in the 1996 Summer Olympics. ... At the 1900 Summer Olympics, three croquet events were contested. ... Swimming has been a sport at every modern Summer Olympics. ... Cycling has been contested at every Summer Olympic Games since the birth of the modern Olympic movement at the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... Synchronized swimming has been contested at the Summer Olympics since the 1984 Games. ... Diving was first introduced in the official programme of the Summer Olympic Games at the 1904 Games of St. ... Table tennis competition has been in the Summer Olympic Games since 1988, with singles and doubles events for both men and women. ... Equestrianism made its Summer Olympics debut at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris, France. ... Taekwondo has been part of the Summer Olympic Games since the 2000 Games, after being a demonstration sport in 1988 and 1992. ... Fencing has been contested at every Summer Olympic Games since the birth of the modern Olympic movement at the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... Tennis, in the form of lawn tennis, was a summer Olympic sport contested in every Games between 1896 and 1924 before disappearing from the Olympic scene until its revival as an Olympic event at the 1988 Summer Olympics. ... Football (soccer) has been included in every Summer Olympic Games except 1896 and 1932 as a mens competition sport. ... The Triathlon at the Summer Olympics had its debut at the 2000 Summer Olympics and has been contested in 2 Olympiads. ... Golf was featured at the 1900 and 1904 Summer Olympics. ... The team competition tug of war was contested in the Summer Olympics every four years from 1900 to 1920, except for the 1916 Olympics, which were cancelled. ... Gymnastics has been contested at every Summer Olympic Games since the birth of the modern Olympic movement at the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... Volleyball has been contested as an indoor sport at the Summer Olympic Games since 1964. ... Handball was introduced as an Olympic sport for men at the 1936 Summer Olympics, in Berlin, but dropped after that, only to be resumed at the 1972 Summer Olympics, again on German territory. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, three water motorsports events were contested. ... Field hockey (also referred to as simply hockey) was introduced at the Summer Olympic Games as a mens competition at the 1908 Games in London, with six teams, including four from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Water polo has been part of the Summer Olympics program since the second games, in 1900. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, one Jeu de paume event wes contested. ... Weightlifting has been contested at every Summer Olympic Games since the 1920 Summer Olympics, as well as twice before then. ... Judo was first included in the Summer Olympic Games at the 1964 Games in Tokyo, Japan. ... Wrestling has been contested at every Summer Olympic Games since the birth of the modern Olympic movement at the 1896 Summer Olympics except only the 1900 Summer Olympics. ... Lacrosse has been contested at two editions of the Summer Olympic Games, 1904 and 1908. ...

List of modern Summer Olympic Games

Note: Although the Games of 1916, 1940, and 1944 had been cancelled, the Roman numerals for those Games were still used because the Summer Games' official titles count Olympiads, not the Games themselves; those Olympiads occurred anyway per the Olympic Charter. This is in contrast to the Roman numerals in the official titles of the Winter Olympic Games, which ignore the cancelled Winter Games of 1940 & 1944; those titles count Games instead of Olympiads. An Olympiad is a period of four years, associated with the Olympic Games of Classical Greece. ... An athlete carries the Olympic torch during the 2002 torch relay The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ...

Map of Summer Olympics locations
Map of Summer Olympics locations
Year Games Location
1896   Games of the I Olympiad Flag of Greece Athens, Greece
1900 Games of the II Olympiad Flag of France Paris, France
1904 Games of the III Olympiad Flag of the United States St. Louis, Missouri, United States
1908 Games of the IV Olympiad Flag of the United Kingdom London, United Kingdom
1912 Games of the V Olympiad Flag of Sweden Stockholm, Sweden
1916 Games of the VI Olympiad Berlin, Germany – cancelled due to World War I
1920 Games of the VII Olympiad Flag of Belgium Antwerp, Belgium
1924 Games of the VIII Olympiad Flag of France Paris, France
1928 Games of the IX Olympiad Flag of the Netherlands Amsterdam, Netherlands
1932 Games of the X Olympiad Flag of the United States Los Angeles, California, United States
1936 Games of the XI Olympiad Flag of Germany Berlin, Germany
1940 Games of the XII Olympiad Tokyo, Japan → Helsinki, Finland – cancelled due to World War II
1944 Games of the XIII Olympiad London, United Kingdom – cancelled due to World War II
1948 Games of the XIV Olympiad Flag of the United Kingdom London, United Kingdom
1952 Games of the XV Olympiad Flag of Finland Helsinki, Finland
1956 Games of the XVI Olympiad Flag of Australia Melbourne, Australia
Flag of Sweden Stockholm, Sweden (Equestrian events)
1960 Games of the XVII Olympiad Flag of Italy Rome, Italy
1964 Games of the XVIII Olympiad Flag of Japan Tokyo, Japan
1968 Games of the XIX Olympiad Flag of Mexico Mexico City, Mexico
1972 Games of the XX Olympiad Flag of Germany Munich, West Germany
1976 Games of the XXI Olympiad Flag of Canada Montreal, Canada
1980 Games of the XXII Olympiad Flag of the Soviet Union Moscow, Soviet Union
1984 Games of the XXIII Olympiad Flag of the United States Los Angeles, California, United States
1988 Games of the XXIV Olympiad Flag of South Korea Seoul, South Korea
1992 Games of the XXV Olympiad Flag of Spain Barcelona, Spain
1996 Games of the XXVI Olympiad Flag of the United States Atlanta, Georgia, United States
2000 Games of the XXVII Olympiad Flag of Australia Sydney, Australia
2004 Games of the XXVIII Olympiad   Flag of Greece Athens, Greece
2008 Games of the XXIX Olympiad Flag of the People's Republic of China Beijing, China
2012 Games of the XXX Olympiad Flag of the United Kingdom London, United Kingdom

The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece_(1828-1978). ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... Image File history File links US_flag_45_stars. ... St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... The Games of the VI Olympiad were to have been held in 1916 in Berlin, Germany. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The Olympisch Stadion in 1928 The 1928 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IX Olympiad, were celebrated in 1928 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Image File history File links US_flag_48_stars. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany_1933. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... The Games of the XII Olympiad originally programmed to celebrated between September 21 to October 6, 1940 were cancelled due to World War II. Originally slated to be held in Tokyo, Japan, but the Games were given back to the IOC, because the Second Sino-Japanese War broke out in... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Location of Helsinki in Northern Europe Coordinates: , Country Province Region Uusimaa Sub-region Helsinki Charter 1550 Capital city 1812 Government  - Mayor Jussi Pajunen Area  - Total 187. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Games of the XIII Olympiad were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in London, United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The 1952 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad, were held in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... Location of Helsinki in Northern Europe Coordinates: , Country Province Region Uusimaa Sub-region Helsinki Charter 1550 Capital city 1812 Government  - Mayor Jussi Pajunen Area  - Total 187. ... The 1956 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVI Olympiad, were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... Equestrianism made its Summer Olympics debut at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris, France. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were celebrated in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... The 1968 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were celebrated in Munich, in what was then West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were celebrated in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ...  Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Peking redirects here. ... London 2012 redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

References

  1. ^ a b "Beijing 2008: Games Programme Finalised", International Olympic Committee, 2006-04-27. Retrieved on 2006-05-10. 
  2. ^ Jeffrey, Ben. "Father of the modern Olympics", British Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved on 2006-05-06. 
  3. ^ Tarasouleas, Athanasios (Summer 1993). "The Female Spiridon Loues". Citius, Altius, Fortius 1 (3): 11–12. 
  4. ^ German Myth: Hitler and Jesse Owens. German Misnomers, Myths and Mistakes. About, Inc. Retrieved on 2006-05-06.
  5. ^ Games of the XIX Olympiad (British English). Olympic Games. International Olympic Committee. Retrieved on 2006-05-06.
  6. ^ Games of the XX Olympiad (British English). Olympic Games. International Olympic Committee. Retrieved on 2006-05-06.
  7. ^ His female compatriot Paula Barila Bolopa also received media attention for her record-slow and struggling but courageous performance.
  8. ^ "Fewer sports for London Olympics", BBC Sport, British Broadcasting Corporation, 2005-07-08. Retrieved on 2006-05-05. 

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

An all-time medal count for all Olympic Games from 1896 to 2006, including Summer Olympic Games, Winter Olympic Games and a combined total of both, is tabulated below. ... Both the Summer Olympic Games and Winter Olympic Games have been marred by various incidents and scandals. ... An athlete carries the Olympic torch during the 2002 torch relay The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ... Athens Olympic Stadium The Olympic Stadium is the name usually given to the big centrepiece stadium of the Summer Olympic Games. ... A multi-sport event is a competition in which athletes compete in a number of different sports. ...

External links

The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Archery competition at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics. ... An all-time medal count for all Olympic Games from 1896 to 2006, including Summer Olympic Games, Winter Olympic Games and a combined total of both, is tabulated below. ... National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ... This article includes lists of all Olympic medalists since 1896, organized by each Olympic sport or discipline. ... The Olympic symbols are the icons, flags and symbols used by the International Olympic Committee to promote the Olympic Games. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. ... The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... The Games of the VI Olympiad were to have been held in 1916 in Berlin, Germany. ... The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... The Olympisch Stadion in 1928 The 1928 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IX Olympiad, were celebrated in 1928 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... The Games of the XII Olympiad originally programmed to celebrated between September 21 to October 6, 1940 were cancelled due to World War II. Originally slated to be held in Tokyo, Japan, but the Games were given back to the IOC, because the Second Sino-Japanese War broke out in... The Games of the XIII Olympiad were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in London, United Kingdom. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ... The 1952 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad, were held in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland. ... The 1956 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVI Olympiad, were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were celebrated in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... The 1968 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were celebrated in Munich, in what was then West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were celebrated in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ...  Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... London 2012 redirects here. ... The 2016 Summer Olympics, officially the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, is a major international sports and cultural festival to be celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games as governed by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2020 Summer Olympics The International Olympic Committee has yet to begin the selection process for the host city; the site of the Games of the XXXII Olympiad—as they will be officially known—is expected to be announced in mid 2013. ... The 2024 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIII Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2028 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIV Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... An athlete carries the Olympic torch during the 2002 torch relay The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ... The 1924 Winter Olympics, officially known as the I Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1924 in Chamonix, France. ... The II Olympic Winter Games were held in 1928 in Sankt-Moritz, Switzerland. ... The 1932 Winter Olympics, officially known as the III Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1932 in Lake Placid, New York, United States. ... The 1936 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1936 in the villages of Garmisch and Partenkirchen in Bavaria, Germany. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Sapporo, Japan. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... The V Olympic Winter Games were held in St. ... The 1952 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1952 in Oslo, Norway. ... The VII Olympic Winter Games were held in 1956 in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... Sign outside Olympic Village at Squaw Valley The 1960 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1960 in Squaw Valley, California, United States (located in the Lake Tahoe basin). ... The 1964 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IX Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1964 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1968 Winter Olympics, officially known as the X Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1968 Grenoble, France and opened on February 6. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1976 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1976 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1980 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in February 13 through February 24, 1980 in Lake Placid, New York, United States of America. ... The 1984 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1984 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Yugoslavia. ... The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and opened by Governor General Jeanne Sauvé. The Olympics were highly successful financially as they brought in million-dollar profits. ... The 1992 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1992 in Albertville, France. ... The 1994 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway. ... The 1998 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1998 in Nagano, Japan. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The 2014 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXII Olympic Winter Games, is an international winter multiple sports event that will be celebrated from February 7 to February 23, 2014. ... The 2018 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXIII Olympic Winter Games, will be celebrated in 2018, and are an international winter sports athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). ... The 2022 Winter Olympics, formally called the XXIV Olympic Winter Games is an event that the International Olympic Committee has yet to organize. ... The Youth Olympic Games (YOG)[1] are planned to be an international multi-sport event held every four years in staggered summer and winter events complementing the current Olympic Games,[2] and will feature athletes between the ages of 14 and 18. ... The Youth Olympic Games (YOG)[1] are planned to be an international multi-sport event held every four years in staggered summer and winter events complementing the current Olympic Games,[2] and will feature athletes between the ages of 14 and 18. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Olympic games information and news on past & future olympics and paralympics. (327 words)
Olympic games information and news on past & future olympics and paralympics.
Cities throughout the world bid to host the Olympic Games and there is always keen competition, firstly between cities within each country who would like to be considered as potential hosts, and then internationally between the successful cities.
The Olympic Games Bid Procedure is quite a long, demanding and often nerve racking process.
Summer Olympic Games - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3175 words)
1896 - Games of the I Olympiad - Athens, Greece
1920 - Games of the VII Olympiad - Antwerp, Belgium
2004 - Games of the XXVIII Olympiad - Athens, Greece
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m