FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Summer
Part of the Nature series on
Weather
 
Seasons

Spring · Summer
Autumn · Winter Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Summer can refer to: Summer, the season In electronics, a summer is a circuit or system that adds one or more input voltages or currents together (usually by means of operational amplifiers), giving an output equal to the algebraic sum of the inputs. ... This article is about the physical universe. ... For the geological process, see Weathering or Erosion. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... For other uses, see Spring. ... This article is about the temperate season. ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ...

Dry season
Wet season The tropics are the geographic region of the Earth centered on the equator and limited in latitude by the two tropics: the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern hemisphere. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A wet season or rainy season is a season in which the average rainfall in a region is significantly increased. ...

Storms

Thunderstorm · Tornado
Tropical cyclone (Hurricane)
Extratropical cyclone
Winter storm · Blizzard
Ice storm For other uses, see Storm (disambiguation). ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... A fictitious synoptic chart of an extratropical cyclone affecting the UK & Ireland. ... A typical view of a winter storm. ... This article is about the winter storm condition. ... Ice storm could refer to: A type of winter storm characterized by freezing rain. ...

Precipitation

Fog · Drizzle · Rain
Freezing rain · Sleet
Hail · Snow · Graupel For other uses, see Fog (disambiguation). ... Drizzle is fairly steady, light precipitation. ... This article is about precipitation. ... Freezing Rain is a type of precipitation that begins as snow at higher altitude, falling from a cloud towards earth, melts completely on its way down while passing through a layer of air above freezing temperature, and then encounters a layer below freezing at lower level to become supercooled. ... Sleet is a term used in a variety of ways to describe precipitation intermediate between rain and snow but distinct from hail. ... This article is about the precipitation. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... Graupel can be any of the following types of solid-ice precipitation: hail - large chunks of ice such as from a strong or severe thunderstorm sleet - small pellets of raindrops that have frozen in mid-air, in winter or a thunderstorm snow pellets - when freezing fog forms 2-5mm balls...

Topics

Meteorology
Weather forecasting
Climate · Air pollution This page has a list of meteorology topics. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... Modern weather predictions aid in timely evacuations and potentially save lives and property damage Human beings have attempted to predict the weather since time immemorial. ... Air pollution is the modification of the natural characteristics of the atmosphere by a chemical, particulate matter, or biological agent. ...

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Summer is one of the four temperate seasons. Summer marks the warmest time of year with the longest days. For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Contents

Dates

A field in Summer
A field in Summer

The seasons are considered by some Western countries to start at the equinoxes and solstices, based on astronomical reckoning. In North American-printed English-language calendars, based on astronomy, summer begins on 21st June, the day of the summer solstice and ends on the day on 20th September, the autumn equinox. When it is summer in the Southern Hemisphere, it is winter in the Northern Hemisphere, and vice versa. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 401 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1950 × 2916 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 401 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1950 × 2916 pixel, file size: 4. ... For other uses, see Equinox (disambiguation). ... “Summer solstice” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... “Summer solstice” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Equinox (disambiguation). ... southern hemisphere highlighted in yellow (Antarctica not depicted). ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ... Northern hemisphere highlighted in yellow. ...


But, because the seasonal lag is less than 2/20 of a year (except near large bodies of water), the meteorological start of the season, which is based on average temperature patterns, precedes by about three weeks the start of the astronomical season. According to meteorology, summer is the whole months of December, January, and February in the Southern Hemisphere, and the whole year of June, July, and August in the Northern Hemisphere. This meteorological definition of summer also aligns with commonly viewed notion of summer as the season with the longest (and warmest) days of the year, in which the daylight predominates, through varying degrees. The use of astronomical beginning of the seasons means that spring and summer have an almost equal pattern of the length of the days, with spring lengthening from the equinox to the solstice and summer shortening from the solstice to the equinox, while meteorological summer encompasses the build up to the longest day and decline thereafter, so that summer has many more hours of daylight than spring. Seasonal lag is the phenomenon whereby the date of maximum average air temperature at a geographical location on a planet is delayed until some time after the date of maximum insolation. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see January (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see February (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see June (disambiguation). ... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... For other uses, see August (disambiguation). ...


Today, the meteorological reckoning of the seasons is used in Australia, Denmark, the former USSR and by many people in the United Kingdom, but the astronomical definition is still more frequently used in the United States.


In Ireland, summer starts as early as May 1[citation needed] In some countries, summer begins on June 1,[citation needed] while in others it arrives as late as July 1.[citation needed] In general, seasonal changes occur later in coastal regions, so countries close to the oceans go for a later start to summer (with the exception of Ireland) than inland ones. Elsewhere, however, the solstices and the equinoxes are taken to mark the mid-points, not the beginnings, of the seasons. In Chinese astronomy, for example, summer starts on or around May 6, with the jiéqì (solar term) known as Lixia (立夏), i.e. "establishment of summer". An example of Western usage would be William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, where the play takes place over the shortest night of the year, which is the summer solstice. is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dunhuang map from the Tang Dynasty (North Polar region). ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Jiéqì is one of 24 points spaced 15° apart along the ecliptic used by all traditional East Asian lunisolar calendars to stay synchronized with the seasons. ... A Solar term is one of 24 days in the traditional East Asian lunisolar calendars that match a particular astronomical events or signify some natural phenomenon. ... Source: JPL Horizons On-Line Ephemeris System The traditional East Asian calendars divide a year into 24 solar terms (節氣). Lìxià (pÄ«nyÄ«n) or Rikka (rōmaji) (Chinese and Japanese: 立夏; Korean: ; Vietnamese: ; literally: start of summer) is 7th solar term. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ...


In Southern and Southeast Asia where the monsoon occurs, summer is more generally defined as March to May or early June, their warmest time of the year, ending with the onset of the monsoon rains. For other uses, see Monsoon (disambiguation). ...


Effects

Summer in Maceió, Brazil.
Summer in Maceió, Brazil.

In most countries children are out of school during this time of year for summer vacation, although dates vary. Some begin as early as mid-May, although in England, from the ages of 5-16, school ends in the middle of July. In the Southern Hemisphere, school holiday dates include the major holidays of Christmas and New Year's Day. Summer school holidays in Australia begin a few days before Christmas and end in late January to mid-February, with the dates varying in different states. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1023 × 682 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1023 × 682 pixel, file size: 1. ... Maceió (Mah-say-oh) is the capital and the largest city of the coastal state Alagoas in Brazil. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Summer is also the season in which many fruits, vegetables, and other plants are in full growth. For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ...


Summer in the southern hemisphere occurs when that hemisphere tilts towards the sun. Summer in the northern hemisphere occurs when the north tilts toward the sun. The eliptical orbit of the earth does not factor into the temperature changes, as this is a mere 4 million miles. Not enough distance to greatly alter heat.


Gallery

References

This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... For other uses, see Spring. ... This article is about the temperate season. ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Naples beach in Florida lined with coconut trees is an example of a tropical climate. ... A wet season or rainy season is a season in which the average rainfall in a region is significantly increased. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
CalendarHome.com - Summer - Calendar Encyclopedia (380 words)
Summer is a season, defined by convention in meteorology as the whole months of June, July, and August, in the Northern hemisphere, and the whole months of December, January, and February, in the Southern hemisphere.
Summer is commonly viewed as the season with the longest (and warmest) days of the year, in which the daylight predominates, through varying degrees.
Summer is also the season in which many fruits, vegetables, and other plants are in full growth.
Encyclopedia4U - Donna Summer - Encyclopedia Article (800 words)
Summer was a rarity in the 1970s disco scene because her career began before the disco explosion, and continued afterward.
Summer's songwriting was showcased on Bad Girls (1979), which included a hit single in the title track, as well as "Hot Stuff", which won Summer the grammy for Best Female Rock Vocalist.
Summer's career began to slow down drastically in the mid 1980s but was revamped in 1989 with her Stock Aitken Waterman collaboration "Another Place and Time".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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