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Encyclopedia > Suite

In music, a suite is an organized set of instrumental or orchestral pieces normally performed at a single sitting, as a separate musical performance, not accompanying an opera, ballet, or theater-piece. In the Baroque era, the pieces are usually in the same key, [1] and generally modelled after dance music.[1] The suite was also known as Suite de danses, or Ordre (for example by François Couperin) or Partita. In the eighteenth century, suites were also known as concert overtures or ouvertures. After the symphonic poems of Franz Liszt in the 1840s and 1850s, suites also included collections of tone poems. // Music is an art form consisting of sound and silence expressed through time. ... An instrumental is, in contrast to a song, a musical composition or recording without lyrics or any other sort of vocal music; all of the music is produced by musical instruments. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Painting of ballet dancers by Edgar Degas, 1872. ... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1600 and 1750 (see Dates of classical music eras for a discussion of the problems inherent in defining the beginning and end points). ... François Couperin (born Paris November 10, 1668 – September 12, 1733 in Paris) was an esteemed French composer in the Baroque style. ... Overture (French ouverture, meaning opening) in music is the instrumental introduction to a dramatic, choral or, occasionally, instrumental composition. ... Symphonic Poems of Ray Buttigieg (1982) (1982) (1984) (1987) (1989) (1991) (1993) (1995) (1999) ... Portrait by Henri Lehmann, 1839 Franz Liszt (Hungarian: Liszt Ferenc; pronounced , in English: list) (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a Hungarian [1] virtuoso pianist and composer of the Romantic period. ... // First use of general anesthesia in an operation, by Crawford Long The first electrical telegraph sent by Samuel Morse on May 24, 1844 from Baltimore to Washington, D.C.. First signing of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi, Northland New Zealand. ... // Production of steel revolutionized by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Railroads begin to supplant canals in the United States as a primary means of transporting goods. ... A symphonic poem or tone poem is a piece of orchestral music in one movement in which some extra-musical programme provides a narrative or illustrative element. ...

Contents

History

Estienne du Tertre published suyttes de bransles in 1557, giving the first general use of the term "suite" (suyttes) in music, although the usual form of the time was as pairs of dances. The first recognizable suite is Peuerl's Newe Padouan, Intrada, Dantz, and Galliarda of 1611, in which the four dances of the title appear repeatedly in ten suites. The Banchetto musicale by Johann Schein (1617) contains 20 sequences of five different dances. Estienne du Tertre (mid-16th century) was a French composer. ... Events Spain is effectively bankrupt. ... Paul Peuerl (baptised June 13, 1570, died after 1625) was a German organist, organ builder, renovator and repairer, and composer of instrumental music. ... Events June 23 - Henry Hudsons crew maroons him, his son and 7 others in a boat November 1 - At Whitehall Palace in London, William Shakespeares romantic comedy The Tempest is presented for the first time. ... Johann Schein Johann Hermann Schein (January 20, 1586 – November 19, 1630) was a German composer of the early Baroque era. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed I (1603-1617) to Mustafa I (1617-1623). ...


The "classical" suite consisted of allemande, courante, sarabande, and gigue, in that order, and developed during the 17th century in France, the gigue appearing later than the others. Johann Jakob Froberger is usually credited with establishing the classical suite through his compositions in this form, which were widely published and copied. An allemande (also spelled allemanda, almain, or alman) (from French German) is a type of dance popular in Baroque music, and a standard element of a suite, generally the first or second movement. ... The courante, corrente, coranto and corant are just some of the names given to a family of triple metre dances from the late Renaissance and the Baroque era. ... In music, the sarabande (It. ... The gigue or giga is a lively baroque dance in a compound metre such as 3/8, 6/8, 6/4, 9/8 or 12/16. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Johann Jakob Froberger (baptized May 19, 1616 – May 7, 1667) was a German Baroque composer, keyboard virtuoso, and organist. ...


Many later suites included other movements placed between sarabande and gigue. These optional movements were known as galanteries: common examples are the minuet, gavotte, passepied, and bourree. Often there would be two contrasting galanteries with the same name, e.g. Minuet I and II, to be played alternativement, meaning that the first dance is played again after the second, thus I, II, I. A minuet, sometimes spelled menuet, is a social dance of French origin for two persons, usually in 3/4 time. ... A gavotte dance in Brittany, France, 1878 The gavotte (also gavot or gavote) originated as a French folk dance, taking its name from the Gavot people of the Pays de Gap region of Dauphiné, where the dance originated. ... The paspy (French: passepied - passing feet) is a 17th and 18th century dance that originated in Brittany. ... The bourree was a dance common in Auvergne and Biscay in Spain in the 17th century, danced in quick double time, somewhat resembling the gavotte. ...


The later addition of an overture to make up an "overture-suite" was extremely popular with German composers; Telemann claimed to have written over 200 overture-suites, J.S. Bach had his four orchestral suites along with other suites, and George Frideric Handel put his Water Music and Music for the Royal Fireworks in this form. Overture (French ouverture, meaning opening) in music is the instrumental introduction to a dramatic, choral or, occasionally, instrumental composition. ... Georg Philipp Telemann. ... Bach in a 1748 portrait by Haussmann Johann Sebastian Bach (pronounced ) (21 March 1685 O.S. – 28 July 1750 N.S.) was a prolific German composer and organist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it... George Frideric Handel, 1733 George Frideric Handel (23 February 1685 – 14 April 1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer who was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. ... Water Music may refer to Water Music (Handel), orchestral suites by George Frideric Handel Water Music (Boyle), a novel by T.C. Boyle Water Music (Kershaw), a novel by Melanie Kershaw Water Music (Ryerson), a photography book by Marjorie Ryerson Water Music Records, a record label Ouvertüre Wassermusik (Hamburger... The Fireworks Music (also known as Music for the Royal Fireworks) was composed by George Frideric Handel in 1749 under contract of George II of Great Britain for the celebration fireworks occasion in Londons Green Park on 27 April 1749. ...


Handel wrote 22 keyboard suites; Bach produced multiple suites for cello, violin, flute, and other instruments, as well as English suites, French suites and Partitas for keyboard. For Bach especially, the suite form was a base on which to spin more elaborate sequences. François Couperin's later suites often dispensed entirely with the standard dances and consisted entirely of character pieces with fanciful names. The violoncello, usually abbreviated to cello, or cello (the c is pronounced as in the ch of check), is a bowed stringed instrument, a member of the violin family. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... The flute is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... The English Suites (BWV 806–811) refer to a set of six suites written by the German composer Johann Sebastian Bach for harpsichord and generally thought to be the earliest of Bachs 18 suites for keyboard, the others being the 6 French Suites (BWV 812–817) and the 6... The French Suites, BWV 812-817, refer to six suites written by Johann Sebastian Bach for the clavier (harpsichord or clavichord). ... The Partitas, BWV 825–830, are a set of six harpsichord suites written by Johann Sebastian Bach, published from 1726 to 1730 as Clavier-übung I, and the first of his works to be published. ... François Couperin (born Paris November 10, 1668 – September 12, 1733 in Paris) was an esteemed French composer in the Baroque style. ...


By the 1750s, the suite had come to be seen as old-fashioned, superseded by the symphony and concerto, and few composers were still writing suites during that time. Scientific navigation is developed The Seven Years War (1756-1763) fought between two rival alliances: the first consisting of the Kingdom of Great Britain, Hanover, and Prussia; the second consisting of Austria, France, Imperial Russia, Saxony, and Sweden. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The term concerto (plural concertos or concerti) usually refers to a musical work in which one solo instrument is accompanied by an orchestra. ...


In the 19th century, the term "suite" made a comeback, but now meaning either: Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • an instrumental selection from a larger work such as an opera, ballet, film score, or musical;
  • a sequence of smaller pieces tied together by a common theme, such as the nationalistically inflected suites of Grieg, Sibelius, or Tchaikovsky and the Planets by Holst; or,
  • a work deliberately referential of Baroque themes, as in the mischievous Suite for Piano by Arnold Schoenberg.

Brought on by Impressionism, the piano suite was reintroduced in early 20th century French composers such as Maurice Ravel and Claude Debussy. Debussy's Suite bergamasque is most likely one of the most famous suites, especially the third movement, Clair de Lune. Ravel is particularly well known for his Mirroirs suite for piano and lesser known for Le Tombeau de Couperin, both requiring tremendous skill and dexterity by the pianist. The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Painting of ballet dancers by Edgar Degas, 1872. ... Edvard Hagerup Grieg (June 15, 1843–September 4, 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. ... Johan Julius Christian Jean / Janne Sibelius ( ; December 8, 1865 – September 20, 1957) was a Finnish composer of classical music and one of the most notable composers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr (Peter) Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian: Пётр Ильич Чайкoвский, Pëtr Il’ič ÄŒajkovskij;  )[1] (7 May [O.S. 25 April] 1840 – 6 November [O.S. 25 October] 1893), was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... Gustav Holst Gustav Holst (September 21, 1874, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - May 25, 1934, London) [1] [2] was an English composer and was a music teacher for over 20 years. ... Schoenberg redirects here. ... Impressionism was a 19th century art movement that began as a loose association of Paris-based artists, who began exhibiting their art publicly in the 1860s. ... Maurice Ravel. ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... The Suite Bergamasque (ber-gah-mask) is one of the most famous piano suites of Claude Debussy, and is widely regarded as the most fascinating. ... Le Tombeau de Couperin is a suite for solo piano by Maurice Ravel, composed between 1914 and 1917. ...


Other famous examples of early 20th century suites are The Planets by Gustav Holst, a 'Suite for Orchestra' in which each piece represents the astrological significance of one of the seven uninhabited planets then known, as well as his First Suite in E-flat and Second Suite in F for Military Band. LP album, Zubin Mehta conducting CD album, Herbert von Karajan conducting The Planets (also known as The Planets Suite), opus 32, [1] is a seven-movement orchestral suite by the English composer Gustav Holst, written between 1914 and 1916. ... Gustav Holst Gustav Holst (September 21, 1874, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - May 25, 1934, London) [1] [2] was an English composer and was a music teacher for over 20 years. ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... The First Suite in E-flat major for Military Band (Op. ... The Second Suite in F for Military Band (Op. ...


Form of suite de danses

The term suite de danses (IPA: [sɥit də dɑ̃s]) was the early 17th century name given to a set of dances, which was popularised in the Baroque era. Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Dance (from French danser, perhaps from Frankish) generally refers to movement used as a form of expression, social interaction or presented in a spiritual or performance setting. ... Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ...


Sections

The Suite de dances would contain the following sections:

  • Prelude (optional)
  • Allemande - The word Allemande is the French for a stately German dance with a meter of 4/4.
  • Courante - A Courante is a lively French dance in 3/4 time.
  • Sarabande - A Sarabande is a slow, stately Spanish dance in 3/4 time.
  • Intermezzi - This section consists of two to four dances at the discretion of the composer that may include a Minuet and/or a Gavotte).
  • Gigue - The Gigue or 'Jig' originates in England, and is a fast dance, normally with a meter of 6/8.

A prelude is a short piece of music, usually in no particular internal form, which may serve as an introduction to succeeding movements of a work that are usually longer and more complex. ... An allemande (also spelled allemanda, almain, or alman) (from French German) is a type of dance popular in Baroque music, and a standard element of a suite, generally the first or second movement. ... The courante, corrente, coranto and corant are just some of the names given to a family of triple metre dances from the late Renaissance and the Baroque era. ... In music, the sarabande (It. ... A minuet, sometimes spelled menuet, is a social dance of French origin for two persons, usually in 3/4 time. ... A gavotte dance in Brittany, France, 1878 The gavotte (also gavot or gavote) originated as a French folk dance, taking its name from the Gavot people of the Pays de Gap region of Dauphiné, where the dance originated. ... The gigue or giga is a lively baroque dance in a compound metre such as 3/8, 6/8, 6/4, 9/8 or 12/16. ...

References

  1. ^ a b "suite - Encyclopædia Britannica" (overview), Encyclopædia Britannica Online, 2006, Britannica.com webpage: BritannicaCom-suite.

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