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Encyclopedia > Suitcase bomb

A suitcase bomb is a bomb which uses a suitcase as its delivery method. While conventional bombs can be hidden in any type of container, suitcase bombs have been threats primarily in two different contexts: conventional bombs in suitcases on airplanes (where there are many suitcases, and where even a small bomb will cause a crash), and suitcases with small nuclear weapons inside (sometimes called suitcase nukes). The Massive Ordnance Air Blast (MOAB) bomb produced in the United States. ... A typical suitcase A suitcase is a narrow box-shaped bag, usually made of cloth or vinyl that more or less keeps its shape, has a handle at one end and is used mainly for transporting clothes and other possessions during trips. ... Fixed-wing aircraft is a term used to refer to what are more commonly known as aeroplanes in Commonwealth English (excluding Canada) or airplanes in North American English. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter. ...


Suitcase bombs have been used in terrorist attacks in Israel — particularly cellphone-detonated bombs which are left behind in a public bus and set off. Cellular redirects here. ...

H-912 transport container for Mk-54 SADM.
H-912 transport container for Mk-54 SADM.

Contents

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... H-912 transport container for Mk-54 SADM The Special Atomic Demolition Munition (SADM) was a United States Navy and Marines project that was demonstrated as feasible in the mid-to-late 1960s, but was never used. ...

Production of suitcase nukes

Only a nation with an extremely advanced nuclear program could manufacture warheads small enough to fit into a suitcase. Both the United States and the Soviet Union manufactured nuclear weapons small enough to fit into large backpacks during the Cold War, but neither have ever made public the existence or development of weapons small enough to fit into a suitcase. The smallest nuclear warhead manufactured by the USA was the W54, used for the Davy Crockett warhead which could be fired from a 120 mm recoilless rifle, and a backpack version called the Mk-54 SADM (Small Atomic Demolition Munition). While this warhead, with a weight of only 51 lb (23 kg), could potentially fit into a large suitcase, it would be a very tight fit. While the explosive power of the W54 — up to an equivalent of 1 kiloton of TNT — is not much by the normal standards of a nuclear weapon (the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of World War II were around 13 to 15 kilotons each), it could still do tremendous physical damage to a structure (it would be many times more powerful than the explosive attack on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1995, for example, with a yield of 0.002 kiloton). One of the most influential doctrines in history is that all humans are divided into groups called nations. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The W54 nuclear warhead was used in the man-portable M-388 Davy Crockett projectile. ... Davy Crockett mounted to a recoilless rifle on a tripod The M-388 Davy Crockett was a tactical nuclear recoilless rifle projectile that was deployed by the United States during the Cold War. ... M67 recoilless rifle. ... The Special Atomic Demolition Munition (SADM) was a United States Navy and Marines project that was demonstrated as feasible in the mid-to-late 1960s, but was never used. ... // The explosive yield of a nuclear weapon is the amount of energy discharged when the weapon is detonated, expressed usually in the equivalent mass of trinitrotoluene (TNT), either in kilotons (thousands of tons of TNT) or megatons (million of tons of TNT), but sometimes also in terajoules (1 kiloton of... Unit of energy commonly used to quantify laerge amounts of energy. ... R-phrases S-phrases Related Compounds Related compounds picric acid hexanitrobenzene Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a chemical compound with the formula C6H2(NO2)3CH3. ... Citizens of Hiroshima walk by the A-Bomb Dome, the closest building to have survived the citys atomic bombing. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Oklahoma City bombing was a terrorist attack on April 19, 1995 aimed at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, a U.S. government office complex in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... Alfred P. Murrah building during demolition Aerial view of Alfred P. Murrah building after bombing The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was a United States Federal Government complex located at 200 N.W. 5th Street in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... Nickname: Location in Oklahoma County and the state of Oklahoma. ...


The technology required to manufacture a nuclear warhead miniaturized to such an extent that it could fit into a suitcase restricts the independent development of "suitcase nukes" to only nations with highly advanced nuclear weapons programs which have performed many nuclear tests. Preparation for an underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site in the 1980s. ...


Controversy surrounding suitcase nukes

In 1997, former Russian National Security Advisor Alexander Lebed made public claims about lost "suitcase nukes" following the dissolution of the Soviet Union. In an interview with the newsmagazine Sixty Minutes, Lebed said: Aleksandr Ivanovich Lebed (Алексáндр Ивáнович Лéбедь) ( April 20, 1950– April 28, 2002) was a Russian general and politician. ... 60 Minutes is the name of an American magazine-format television news program produced by CBS News. ...

I'm saying that more than a hundred weapons out of the supposed number of 250 are not under the control of the armed forces of Russia. I don't know their location. I don't know whether they have been destroyed or whether they are stored or whether they've been sold or stolen, I don't know.

However, the Russian government immediately rejected Lebed's claims. Russia's atomic energy ministry went so far as to dispute that suitcase nuclear weapons had even ever been developed by the Soviet Union. Later testimony however insinuated that the suitcase bombs had been under the control of the KGB and not the army or the atomic energy ministry, so they might not know of their existence. Russian president Vladimir Putin, in an interview with Barbara Walters in 2001, stated about suitcase nukes, "I don't really believe this is true. These are just legends. One can probably assume that somebody tried to sell some nuclear secrets. But there is no documentary confirmation of those developments." The KGB emblem and motto: The sword and the shield KGB (transliteration of КГБ) is the Russian-language abbreviation for Committee for State Security, (Russian: ; Komitet Gosudarstvennoy Bezopasnosti). ... Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: ) (born October 7, 1952) is the current President of Russia. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


The Russian government's statements on this matter have been contradictory. First they denied that such weapons had ever existed; then they said that all of them had been destroyed. However, the highest-ranking GRU defector Stanislav Lunev confirmed that such Russian-made devices do exist and described them in more detail [1]. These devices, “identified as RA-115s (or RA-115-01s for submersible weapons)” weigh from fifty to sixty pounds. They can last for many years if wired to an electric source. “In case there is a loss of power, there is a battery backup. If the battery runs low, the weapon has a transmitter that sends a coded message – either by satellite or directly to a GRU post at a Russian embassy or consulate.” According to Lunev, the number of “missing” nuclear devices (as found by General Lebed) “is almost identical to the number of strategic targets upon which those bombs would be used”. He suggested that they might be already deployed by the GRU operatives. For other uses, see GRU (disambiguation). ... Stanislav Lunev (born 1946 in Leningrad) is the highest-ranking GRU officer to defect from Russia to the United States. ... For other uses, see GRU (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see GRU (disambiguation). ...


Whether or not Russian "suitcase nukes" exist, the threat of the old Soviet nuclear arsenal falling into malicious hands has been behind many American and Russian joint-initiatives after the Cold War to bolster Russia's ability to keep its nuclear weapons secure and accounted for, while the amount of weapons is being scaled down as well. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


References in popular culture

  • Five Russian nuclear suitcase bombs are the primary threat in the sixth season of 24. Only one was successfully detonated, which was in Valencia, CA. The death toll was over 12,000 people and the nuclear fallout spread towards Los Angeles County and its surrounding counties.
  • In Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell, Washington, D.C. is threatened by a suitcase bomb codenamed "The Ark."
  • In the first level of the video game James Bond 007: Everything or Nothing, Bond must retrieve a nuclear suitcase bomb before it is sold to terrorists.
  • In the South Park Episode The Snuke, which parodies the 24 series, a suitcase nuke was discovered in Hillary Clinton's vagina. The bomb was a distraction to aid an upcoming British invasion, which was foiled eventually by Stan, Kyle and the authorities.
  • In the Jericho TV series, Russian nuclear suitcase bombs (acquired by CIA and then stolen from Department of Energy storage) were used in terrorist attacks on U.S. major cities.

Season Six, also known as Day 6, of the television series 24 premiered on Sunday, January 14, 2007. ... A typical stretch of Valencia Boulevard. ... Fallout is the residual radiation hazard from a nuclear explosion, so named because it falls out of the atmosphere into which it is spread during the explosion. ... Map of California showing Los Angeles County. ... Tom Clancys Splinter Cell is a critically-acclaimed stealth-based video game, developed by Ubisoft Montreal. ... Terrorism refers to the use of violence for the purpose of achieving a political, religious, or ideological goal. ... This article is about the animated television series. ... The Snuke is episode 1104 of Comedy Centrals animated comedy series South Park. ... The vagina, (from Latin, literally sheath or scabbard ) is the tubular tract leading from the uterus to the exterior of the body in female placental mammals and marsupials, or to the cloaca in female birds, monotremes, and some reptiles. ... Cities destroyed in the Jericho TV series Jericho is an American serial drama produced by CBS Paramount Network Television, with executive producers Jon Turteltaub, Stephen Chbosky and Carol Barbee. ...

References

  1. ^ Stanislav Lunev. Through the Eyes of the Enemy: The Autobiography of Stanislav Lunev, Regnery Publishing, Inc., 1998. ISBN 0-89526-390-4

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Suitcase bomb - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (809 words)
While conventional bombs can be hidden in any type of container, suitcase bombs have been threats primarily in two different contexts: conventional bombs in suitcases on airplanes (where there are many suitcases, and where even a small bomb will cause a crash), and suitcases with small nuclear weapons inside (sometimes called suitcase nukes).
Suitcase bombs have been used in terrorist attacks in Israel — particularly cellphone-detonated bombs which are left behind in a public bus and set off.
Later testimony however insinuated that the suitcase bombs had been under the control of the KGB and not the army or the atomic energy ministry, so they might not know of their existence.
frontline: russian roulette: atomic suitcase bombs: comments on russia's atomic suitcase bombs (4062 words)
My personal judgment is that there probably aren't 100 or 20 or however many suitcase bombs that are missing in the former Soviet Union, although I would guess that Lebed, when he made his initial statements, probably in good faith believed there were.
He said one of his assignments was to account for 132 suitcase size nuclear weapons that the Soviet Union had manufactured during the sixties, the seventies and the eighties, much like we manufactured in our country, even though today we no longer have small atomic demolition munitions, we've destroyed them all.
You're talking about a bomb, a device with a capability of one kiloton of destruction, which is a massive capability that would cause severe destruction of a major inner city area, perhaps causing a multitude of buildings to collapse with the people inside of them.
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