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Encyclopedia > Suicide methods
Suicide
History of suicide
List of suicides
Suicide rate
Views on suicide
Medical | Cultural
Legal | Philosophical
Religious | Right to die
Suicide crisis
Intervention | Prevention
Crisis hotline | Suicide watch
Types of suicide
Suicide methods | Copycat suicide
Cult suicide | Euthanasia
Familicide | Forced suicide
Internet suicide | Mass suicide
Murder-suicide | Ritual suicide
Suicide attack | Suicide pact
Suicide by cop | Teenage suicide
Related phenomena
Parasuicide | Self-harm
Suicidal ideation | Suicide note
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A suicide method is any means by which a person purposely kills him- or herself. Examples of methods that have been used to commit suicide are listed below. For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... Suicide has been committed by people from all walks of life since the beginning of known history. ... This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy certain standards for completeness. ... World map of suicide rates per 100,000. ... Modern medical views on suicide consider suicide to be a mental health issue. ... Various human cultures may have views on suicide not directly or solely linked to religious views of suicide. ... This page concerns suicide. ... In ethics and other branches of philosophy suicide poses a difficult question, answered differently by philosophers from different times and traditions. ... There are a variety of religious views of suicide. ... For the 1987 film, see Right to Die (film) The term right to die refers to various issues around the death of an individual when that person could continue to live with the aid of life support, or in a diminished or enfeebled capacity. ... A suicide crisis, suicidal crisis, or potential suicide, is a situation in which a person is attempting to kill himself or is seriously contemplating or planning to do so. ... Modern medical views on suicide consider suicide to be a mental health issue rather than allowing that individuals can make a sane or reasoned choice to take their own life. ... Various suicide prevention strategies have been used: Promoting mental resilience through optimism and connectedness. ... As a suicide prevention initiative, this sign on the Golden Gate Bridge promotes a special telephone that connects to a crisis hotline. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A copycat suicide is defined as a duplication or copycat of another suicide that the person attempting suicide knows about either from local knowledge or due to accounts or depictions of the original suicide on television and in other media. ... Cult suicide is that phenomenon by which some cults, have led to their membership committing suicide. ... For mercy killings not performed on humans, see Animal euthanasia. ... A familicide is a type of murder or murder-suicide in which at least one spouse and one or more children are killed. ... Forced suicide is a method of execution where the victim is given the choice of committing suicide or facing an alternative they perceive as worse, such as suffering torture; having friends or family members imprisoned, tortured or killed; or losing honor, position or means. ... An Internet suicide is a suicide pact made between individuals who meet on the Internet. ... Mass suicide occurs when a number of people kill themselves together with one another or for the same reason and is usually connected to a real or perceived persecution. ... A murder suicide is an act in which an individual kills one or more other persons immediately before, or while killing himself. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... A suicide attack is an attack on a military or civilian target, in which an attacker intends to kill others, and knows that they will either certainly or most likely die in the process (see suicide). ... A suicide pact describes the suicides of two or more individuals in an agreed-upon plan. ... Suicide-by-cop is a suicide method in which someone deliberately acts in a threatening way towards a law enforcement officer, with the main goal of provoking a lethal response (e. ... Teenage suicide is the self-killing of a teenager. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Self-harm (SH) is deliberate injury to ones own body. ... Suicidal ideation is common medical term for the mere thoughts about and of plans of committing suicide, not the actual following through or act itself. ... A suicide note is a message left by someone who later attempts or commits suicide. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Bleeding

Exsanguination is a method of death which is caused by blood loss. It is usually the result of damage inflicted on arteries. The carotid, radial, ulnar or femoral arteries would be targeted. Exsanguination (also known colloquially as bleeding out) is the fatal process of total blood loss. ... Bleeding is the loss of blood from the body. ... Section of an artery An artery or arterial is also a class of highway. ... The carotid artery is a major artery of the head and neck. ... In human anatomy, the radial artery is the main blood vessel, with oxygenated blood, of the lateral aspect of the forearm. ... The ulnar artery is the main blood vessel, with oxygenated blood, of the medial aspect of the forearm. ... Femoral artery and its major branches - right thigh, anterior view. ...


Cutting wrists

This entails cutting through the wrists and may damage the tendons, ulnar and median nerves which control the muscles of the hand, which can result in temporary or permanent reduction in sensory and motor ability (if one survives). [1] Wrist slitting is usually not fatal and it is thought that of all suicide attempts using this method, only 2% succeed.[citation needed]. A tendon or sinew is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue, attached on one end to a muscle and on the other to a bone. ... In human anatomy, the ulnar nerve is a nerve which runs from the shoulder to the hand, at one part running near the ulna bone. ... The median nerve is a nerve that runs down the arm and forearm. ...


Cutting the carotid artery

Cutting through the throat is one method of exsanguination. Damage is inflicted to the carotid artery which carries blood to the brain, and it takes no longer than a few minutes to lose enough blood for death to occur, although death could also be caused by blood clogging the trachea. People who do this often cut the recurrent laryngeal nerve, the nerve that goes up to the voicebox and larynx, and lose their voices. For other uses, see Throat (disambiguation). ... The carotid artery is a major artery of the head and neck. ... Human brain In animals, the brain (enkephale) (Greek for in the skull), is the control center of the central nervous system, responsible for behavior. ... Windpipe redirects here. ...


It was also practiced as a ritual suicide method in Japan called jigai, by noble women for the same purposes as seppuku was used by men. The wife of Onodera Junai, one of the Forty-seven Ronin, prepares for her suicide. ... Seppuku (Japanese: 切腹, belly-cutting) is a form of Japanese ritual suicide by disembowelment. ...


Carbon monoxide poisoning

A particular type of asphyxia involves inhalation of high levels of carbon monoxide.


Death usually occurs through hypoxia. In most cases carbon monoxide (CO) is used because it is easily available as a product of incomplete combustion; for example it may be released by cars and some types of heaters. Hypoxia is a pathological condition in which the body as a whole (generalised hypoxia) or region of the body (tissue hypoxia) is deprived of adequate oxygen supply. ... R-phrases , , , , S-phrases , , , , Flash point Flammable gas Related Compounds Related oxides carbon dioxide; carbon suboxide; dicarbon monoxide; carbon trioxide Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... This article is about the chemical reaction combustion. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Software being used to design HVAC systems HVAC (pronounced either H-V-A-C or, occasionally, H-VAK) is an initialism/acronym that stands for heating, ventilation and air-conditioning. This is sometimes referred to as climate control. ...


Carbon monoxide is a colorless and odorless gas, so its presence cannot be detected by sight or smell. It is harmful to humans since the CO molecules attach themselves irreversibly to hemoglobin in the blood, displacing oxygen molecules and progressively lowering the body's oxygenation, eventually resulting in death. Gas phase particles (atoms, molecules, or ions) move around freely Gas is one of the four major states of matter, consisting of freely moving atoms or molecules without a definite shape and without a definite volume. ... 3D (left and center) and 2D (right) representations of the terpenoid molecule atisane. ... Structure of hemoglobin. ... Oxygenation refers to the amount of oxygen in a medium. ...


In the past, before air-quality regulations and catalytic converters, suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning would often be achieved by running a car's engine in a closed space such as a garage, or by redirecting a running car's exhaust back inside the cabin with a hose. Motor car exhaust may have contained up to 25% carbon monoxide. However, catalytic converters can eliminate over 99% of carbon monoxide produced.[2] An air quality measurement station in Edinburgh, Scotland The Air Quality Index (AQI) is a standardized indicator of the air quality in a given location. ... Catalytic converter on a Dodge Ram Van. ... Carbon monoxide poisoning occurs after the inhalation of carbon monoxide gas. ... Automobile exhaust Exhaust gas is flue gas which occurs as a result of the combustion of fuels such as natural gas, gasoline/petrol, diesel, fuel oil or coal. ...


The incidence of suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning through burning charcoal within a confined space appears to have risen. This has been referred by some as "death by hibachi". [3] Charcoal-burning suicide is a new suicide method invented in Hong Kong in 1998. ...


Drowning

A homeless girl contemplates drowning herself.
A homeless girl contemplates drowning herself.

Suicide by drowning is the act of deliberately submerging oneself in water or other liquid and staying there long enough to prevent breathing and deprive the brain of oxygen. Due to the body's natural tendency to come up for air, one often ties a heavy object to oneself to circumvent this reflex and increase his or her chances of drowning. As with other deaths by one, if the drowning is stopped before death, oxygen deprivation can cause brain damage. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 367 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (464 × 757 pixel, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 367 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (464 × 757 pixel, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Breathing transports oxygen into the body and carbon dioxide out of the body. ... Suffocation redirects here, for the band, see Suffocation (band). ... General Name, symbol, number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals, chalcogens Group, period, block 16, 2, p Appearance colourless (gas) colourless (liquid) Standard atomic weight 15. ... Brain damage or brain injury is the destruction or degeneration of brain cells. ...


Suffocation

Suicide by suffocation is the act of holding one's breath, causing asphyxia to kill the suicidal person. Another method is to put a plastic bag tightly sealed over the head, or trapping oneself in a room without oxygen. This is usually not very effective, as the suicidees usually pass out from lack of oxygen before they can die, or, as well known, at the last minute tears at the plastic bag or other device, resulting in not death, but a grisly continuance, with a diminished brain capacity. These attempts usually involve using depressants to make the user pass out, preventing him from changing his mind and finding a way out. The best well-known and accepted method in terminally ill or sincere "want-to-die" candidates is to use a gas, such as nitrogen or helium. Suffocation can mean two things: Suffocation, or Asphyxia, is a medical condition where the body is depraved of oxygen. ... Suffocation redirects here, for the band, see Suffocation (band). ... General Name, symbol, number nitrogen, N, 7 Chemical series nonmetals Group, period, block 15, 2, p Appearance colorless gas Standard atomic weight 14. ... General Name, symbol, number helium, He, 2 Chemical series noble gases Group, period, block 18, 1, s Appearance colorless Standard atomic weight 4. ...


Drug overdosing

Suicide by pharmaceuticals ("overdosing") is a method which involves taking medication in doses of several times greater than the indicated levels, or in a combination which will enhance each drug's effect. Due to the unpredictability of dosing requirements, death is uncertain, and an attempt may leave a person alive but with severe organ damage (which may prove eventually fatal itself). Drugs taken orally may also be vomited back out before being absorbed. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the biological unit. ... Emesis redirects here. ...


Analgesic overdoses are among the most common[4] due to easy availability of over-the-counter substances. Overdosing may also be performed by mixing medications in a cocktail with one another or with alcohol or illegal drugs. An analgesic (colloquially known as a painkiller) is any member of the diverse group of drugs used to relieve pain (achieve analgesia). ... Over-the-counter substances, also abbreviated OTC, are drugs and other medical remedies that may be sold without a prescription and without a visit to a medical professional, in contrast to prescription only medicines (POM). ...


This method may leave confusion over whether the death was a suicide or accidental, especially when alcohol or other judgment-impairing substances are also involved.


Electrocuting

Suicide by electrocution involves using a lethal electric shock to kill oneself. A high enough voltage can overcome the high resistance of the skin and pass a sizable current through the body. A large alternating current through the body can seriously disrupt nerve signals and can cause the heart to go into fibrillation. Sign warning of possible electric shock hazard An electric shock can occur upon contact of a humans body with any source of voltage high enough to cause sufficient current flow through the muscles or hair. ... International safety symbol Caution, risk of electric shock (ISO 3864), colloquially known as high voltage symbol. ... Electrical resistance is a measure of the degree to which an electrical component opposes the passage of current. ... This box:      Electric current is the flow (movement) of electric charge. ... City lights viewed in a motion blurred exposure. ... Nerves (yellow) Nerves redirects here. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Fibrillation is the rapid, irregular, and unsynchronized contraction of the muscle fibers of the heart. ...


Explosives

Suicide by explosives involves putting explosives in bodily orifices or otherwise setting off explosives in near proximity. A sufficient quantity of explosive would cause death almost instantaneously by blowing the body into so many pieces that life would end instantly. Shattered organs, broken bones, internal bleeding from the blast wave and burning would be the causes of death in other cases. This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... A blast wave is a term from compressible fluid dynamics. ...


Hanging

Main article: Hanging
Suicide by hanging.
Suicide by hanging.

The traditional death penalty of hanging by gallows consists of a rope tied to some fixed object (i.e. the gallows), with one end tied into a hangman's noose and put around the neck. The person falls through the release of a trap door (or jumps, in the case of suicide) from a height, and death is instantaneous due to breaking of the neck. If the neck is not broken, asphyxiation due to the obstructed trachea may cause loss of consciousness and ultimately lead to death. Many people who attempt to hang themselves strangle themselves instead, with risk of brain damage from lack of oxygen if the attempt does not result in death. However, hanging is still the suicide method with the highest success rate[citation needed]. Hanging is the suspension of a person by a ligature, usually a cord wrapped around the neck, causing death. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (355x636, 64 KB) Giotto di Bondone (1267-1337), Cappella Scrovegni a Padova, Desperation File links The following pages link to this file: Hanging Suicide methods ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (355x636, 64 KB) Giotto di Bondone (1267-1337), Cappella Scrovegni a Padova, Desperation File links The following pages link to this file: Hanging Suicide methods ... Hanging is the suspension of a person by a ligature, usually a cord wrapped around the neck, causing death. ... These gallows in Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park are maintained by Arizona State Parks. ... Hangmans knot The hangmans knot or hangmans noose (also known as a collar during Elizabethan times) is a well-known knot most often associated with its use in hanging. ... Asphyxia is a condition of severely deficient supply of oxygen to the body. ... Windpipe redirects here. ...


Vehicular impact

Jumping in front of a fast-moving vehicle, especially a large one, such as a truck or train, can prove fatal. A classic example of suicide involves one tying himself to railroad tracks in order to be run over by an oncoming train. The self control required to stay on the tracks as the train approaches can be quite immense, and the result quite traumatizing to the driver of the train[citation needed]. Suicide is also sometimes attempted by driving a motor vehicle into a wall or other sturdy object at high speeds.


Jumping

See also: Defenestration

Jumping from a great height can shatter organs and tissues. If a person jumps from a tall bridge into water, the person may die by impact rather than by drowning. Such jumpings off the Golden Gate Bridge, of which there have been 1,300 between 1937 and 2006, were depicted in the documentary film The Bridge. Look up defenestration in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The 68.6-meter (225 ft) plunge from the Golden Gate Bridge has proven to be fatal in 98% of cases. The jumper would hit the water at 120 km/h (about 77 mph). Most die of internal bleeding due to broken ribs which pierce the heart, lungs, liver or spleen. Survivors, who generally have hit the water feet-first, have often had their femurs shattered.[5] The femur or thigh bone is the longest, most voluminous, and strongest bone of the mammalian bodies. ...


Authorities have tried to prevent jumping suicides by building fences or other barriers in potential areas, such as high towers and bridges. In some areas authorities have also installed telephones which link directly to suicide prevention hot lines.


Poisoning

Suicide can be committed by using fast-acting poisons, or substances which are known for their high levels of toxicity to humans. For example, the people of Jonestown, in northwestern Guyana, all died when the leader of a religious sect organised a mass suicide by drinking a cocktail of diazepam and cyanide in 1978.[6] Adolf Hitler bit into a cyanide capsule while simultaneously shooting himself in the head with a firearm. Sufficient doses of some plants like the belladonna family, castor beans, and others, are also toxic. This article is about the dangerous substance. ... // Toxic and Intoxicated redirect here – toxic has other uses, which can be found at Toxicity (disambiguation); for the state of being intoxicated by alcohol see Drunkenness. ... This article is about the Peoples Temple settlement. ... A sect is a small religious group that has branched off of a larger established religion. ... Mass suicide occurs when a number of people kill themselves together with one another or for the same reason and is usually connected to a real or perceived persecution. ... Diazepam (IPA: ), first marketed as Valium by Hoffmann-La Roche) is a benzodiazepine derivative drug. ... This article is about the chemical compound. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Hitler redirects here. ... Firearms redirects here. ...


Self-immolation

Thích Quảng Đức pictured during his self-immolation.

Simply put, self-immolation is suicide by immolation (fire). It has been used as a protest tactic. This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ...   (born Lâm Văn Tức in 1897 – June 11, 1963) was a Vietnamese Buddhist monk who burned himself to death at a busy Saigon intersection on June 11, 1963. ... Thích Quảng Đức pictured during his self-immolation. ...


Seppuku

Main article: Seppuku

Seppuku (colloquially "harakiri") is a Japanese ritual method of suicide, practiced mostly in the medieval era, though some isolated cases appear in modern times. For example, Yukio Mishima committed seppuku in 1970 after a failed coup d'etat intended to restore full power to the Japanese Emperor. Seppuku (Japanese: 切腹, belly-cutting) is a form of Japanese ritual suicide by disembowelment. ... For other senses of this word, see ritual (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Yukio Mishima ) was the public name of Kimitake Hiraoka , January 14, 1925–November 25, 1970), a Japanese author and playwright, famous for both his highly notable nihilistic post-war writings and the circumstances of his ritual suicide by seppuku. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... His Imperial Majesty, Emperor Akihito of Japan The Emperor of Japan (天皇, tennō) is Japans titular head of state and the head of the Japanese imperial family. ...


Unlike other methods of suicide, this was regarded as a way of preserving one's honor. The ritual is part of bushido, the code of the Samurai. Japanese samurai in armor, 1860s. ... For other uses, see Samurai (disambiguation). ...


Dressed ceremonially, with his sword placed in front of him and sometimes seated on special cloth, the warrior would prepare for death by writing a death poem. With a selected attendant (kaishakunin, his second) standing by, he would open his kimono, take up his wakizashi (short sword), fan, or a tanto (knife) and plunge it into his abdomen, making first a left-to-right cut and then a second slightly upward stroke. On the second stroke, the kaishakunin would perform daki-kubi, when the warrior is all but decapitated, leaving a slight band of flesh attaching the head to the body, so as to not let the head fall off the body and roll on the floor/ground; which was considered dishonorable in feudal Japan. Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Warrior (disambiguation). ... General Akashi Gidayu preparing to commit seppuku after losing a battle for his master in 1582. ... A kaishakunin (Japanese: 介錯人) is an appointed second whose duty is to behead one who has committed seppuku at the moment of agony. ... A traditional wedding kimono The kimono literally something worn) is the national costume of Japan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A tessen (iron fan), on display in Iwakuni Castle, Japan A number of war fans were used in Japanese feudal warfare, of varying size and material, for different purposes. ... A Tantō (短刀) is a Japanese blade or small sword. ... The human abdomen (from the Latin word meaning belly) is the part of the body between the pelvis and the thorax. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Decapitation (from Latin, caput, capitis, meaning head), or beheading, is the removal of a living organisms head. ... For other uses, see Head (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Body (disambiguation). ...


Shooting

Methods of suicide among persons aged 15-19. The use of a firearm is the leading method in the United States.
Methods of suicide among persons aged 15-19. The use of a firearm is the leading method in the United States.

This method involves using a firearm to cause a fatal injury to oneself. It is used more frequently in countries where firearms are easier to obtain, and is the leading method in the United States. This method may still be used in countries where firearms are harder to obtain, in particular by people who use firearms in their work, for example soldiers or police officers. Image File history File links Suicide_rates_by_methods,_aged_15-19_(1992-2001). ... Image File history File links Suicide_rates_by_methods,_aged_15-19_(1992-2001). ... Firearms redirects here. ...


Some studies have shown that in Western nations, men tend to use this method of suicide more often than women, which has been cited as one potential reason for the higher suicide success rate among men. Though most men shoot themselves in the head, women tend to shoot themselves in the heart.[7]


Because the requirements of renting a gun are not as strict as those for buying one, many people commit suicide at gun ranges. [1] Some gun ranges have countered this by requiring that those who do not already own a gun cannot rent one without being accompanied.

Further information: Multiple gunshot suicide

Multiple gunshot suicide occurs when an individual commits suicide by firearm and succeeds in inflicting two or more gunshots upon himself before incapacitation ensues. ...

Suicide attack

Main article: Suicide attack

The term "suicide attack" is somewhat of a misnomer, as the psychological motivation is not chiefly hatred of the self but of others. A suicide attack is an attack on a military or civilian target, in which an attacker intends to kill others, and knows that they will either certainly or most likely die in the process (see suicide). ...


A suicide attack is an attack in which the attacker (attacker being either an individual or a group) intends to kill others and intends to die in the process of doing so. In a suicide attack in the strict sense the attacker dies by the attack itself, for example in an explosion or crash caused by the attacker. The term is sometimes loosely applied to an incident in which the intention of the attacker is not clear though he is almost sure to die by the defense or retaliation of the attacked party.


Such attacks are typically motivated by religious or political ideologies and have been carried out using numerous methods. For example, attackers might attach explosives directly to their bodies before detonating themselves close to their target, or they may use car bombs or other machinery to cause maximum damage (e.g. Japanese kamikaze pilots during World War II). Some sources refer to this as a "homicide attack", to emphasize the idea that killing other people is usually the primary purpose of such an attack[citation needed]. However, this usage is ambiguous since the word "homicide" already refers to unlawful killing and the key aspect of a suicide attack that distinguishes it from other forms of homicide is the death of the perpetrator. For other uses, see Car bomb (disambiguation). ... USS Bunker Hill was hit by Ogawa (see picture left) and another kamikaze near Kyūshū on May 11, 1945. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Homicide (Latin homicidium, homo human being + caedere to cut, kill) refers to the act of killing another human being. ...


Islamist extremist terrorists have engaged in suicide attacks numerous times in the Arab-Israeli conflict, and also against the West at other times. Perpetrators believe that the gains to others, or to a religious, political or moral cause, outweigh their personal loss and/or that they will be rewarded in the afterlife. This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Combatants Arab nations Israel Arab-Israeli conflict series History of the Arab-Israeli conflict Views of the Arab-Israeli conflict International law and the Arab-Israeli conflict Arab-Israeli conflict facts, figures, and statistics Participants Israeli-Palestinian conflict · Israel-Lebanon conflict · Arab League · Soviet Union / Russia · Israel, Palestine and the... For other uses, see Afterlife (disambiguation). ...


The September 11, 2001, attacks by Al-Qaeda using civilian aircraft on the World Trade Center and The Pentagon are examples of suicide attacks.
Also students (mostly in America and Scandinavia) seem to commit suicide attacks recently, for this they often use a gun and kill everyone they see in the middle of class, and then they just shoot themselves. The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... This article is about the United States military building. ...


Suicide by cop

Main article: Suicide by cop

The term "suicide by cop" is used to describe a situation in which an individual behaves in a manner intended to provoke an armed law enforcement officer into use of lethal force against them. Common methods used involve charging at officers with a weapon (or even anything that closely resembles a weapon at a distance, such as a toy gun), repeatedly refusing lawful orders in threatening situations, or driving a vehicle at officers. Suicide-by-cop is a suicide method in which someone deliberately acts in a threatening way towards a law enforcement officer, with the main goal of provoking a lethal response (e. ... Police officers in South Australia A police officer (or policeman/policewoman) is a warranted worker of a police force. ...


To prevent suicide by cop, some officers are trained to determine whether the suspect is truly dangerous, or have resorted to less-lethal methods, such as pepper spray. Pepper spray (also known as OC spray (from Oleoresin Capsicum), OC gas, capsicum spray, or oleoresin capsicum) is a lachrymatory agent (a chemical compound that irritates the eyes to cause tears, pain, and even temporary blindness) that is used in riot control, crowd control and personal self-defense, including defense...


Further reading

Derek Humphry (b. ... Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide for the Dying, is a controversial 1991 book by Derek Humphry, a newspaper reporter and author whose wife Jean ended her life with an intentional overdose of medication after a long and painful decline from terminal cancer. ... alt. ... Book cover of The Complete Manual of Suicide, designed by Seiichi Suzuki Studio The Complete Manual of Suicide (Japanese:完全自殺マニュアル) is a best selling Japanese book written by Wataru Tsurumi, it first published on 4 July 1993. ...

External links

Derek Humphry (b. ...

References

  1. ^ Bukhari, AJ; Saleem M, Bhutta AR, Khan AZ, Abid KJ. (2004 Oct). "Spaghetti wrist: management and outcome". J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 14 ((10)): 608-11. PMID 15456551. 
  2. ^ Vossberg B, Skolnick J. (1999). "The role of catalytic converters in automobile carbon monoxide poisoning: a case report". Chest 115 (2): 580-1. PMID 10027464. 
  3. ^ Media influence on suicide: Media's role is double edged, British Medical Journal (326:498), Chan et al., 2003.
  4. ^ Brock, Anita; Sini Dominy, Clare Griffiths (6th). "Trends in suicide by method in England and Wales, 1979 to 2001". Health Statistics Quarterly 20: 7-18. ISSN 1465-1645. Retrieved on 2007-06-25. 
  5. ^ "The bridge of suicide", Catherine Philip, The Times, February 28, 2007.
  6. ^ Ministry of Terror - The Jonestown Cult Massacre, Elissayelle Haney, Infoplease, 2006.
  7. ^ "Some differences between men and women who commit suicide", American Journal of Psychiatry, Rich et al., 1988. Retrieved 3 May 2006.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Suicide methods - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2525 words)
Suicide by drowning is the act of deliberately submerging oneself in water or other liquid and staying there long enough to prevent breathing and deprive the brain of oxygen.
This method is also frequently used as self-harm, therefore, not all people who slash their wrists intend suicide (this is then called parasuicide where suicide is either not sought or is not accomplished).
This type of suicide, known as Upwas to Hindus and Jains, is considered by some cultures to be the only legitimate suicide method, because it cannot be done impulsively and the person spends the time beforehand detaching themselves from the world, in meditation.
Active & Passive Suicide Methods in the UK (505 words)
Active methods of suicide include hanging, shooting and jumping, methods that tend to be swift and effective and allow little scope for interruption or time to reconsider.
Self-poisoning is a more common method of suicide used by men and women in health care professions than in the population as a whole, partly due to the fact that they may have more ready access to prescription drugs.
Firearms are a common method of suicide for male farmers, accounting for 38 per cent of farming suicide deaths.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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