FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Sugarloaf (band)
Sugarloaf
(clockwise from top left): Bob Yeazel, Jerry Corbetta, Bob MacVittie, Bob Webber and Bob Raymond in 1971.
(clockwise from top left): Bob Yeazel, Jerry Corbetta, Bob MacVittie, Bob Webber and Bob Raymond in 1971.
Background information
Origin Denver, Colorado
Genre(s) Rock, Psychedelic Rock
Occupation(s) musicians
Years active 19691975
Label(s) Liberty Records
United Artists
Brut Records
Claridge Records
Former members
Jerry Corbetta
Bob Webber
Bob Raymond
Bob MacVittie
Veeder Van Dorn (1970)
Bob Yeazel (1971-1973)

Sugarloaf was a Denver, Colorado based rock and roll band in the 1970s featuring Jerry Corbetta. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Sugarloaf was a Denver, Colorado-based rock & roll band in the 1970s featuring Jerry Corbetta. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State Colorado City-County Denver (coextensive) Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rock is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars, and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles, however saxophones have been omitted from newer subgenres of rock music since the 90s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A musician is a person who plays or composes music. ... // Perhaps the most famous musical events of 1969 are two legendary concerts. ... See also: 1970s in music. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Liberty Records was a United States-based record label. ... The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... Sugarloaf was a Denver, Colorado-based rock & roll band in the 1970s featuring Jerry Corbetta. ... // Charles Wuorinen, aged 32, becomes the youngest composer ever to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music. ... See also: 1970 in music, other events of 1971, 1972 in music, 1970s in music and the list of years in music // February 8 - Bob Dylans hour-long documentary film, Eat the Document, premieres at New Yorks Academy of Music. ... See also: 1970s in music. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State Colorado City-County Denver (coextensive) Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... In music, a band is a company of musicians, or musical ensemble, usually popular or folk, playing parts of or improvising a musical arrangement on different musical instruments. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Sugarloaf was a Denver, Colorado-based rock & roll band in the 1970s featuring Jerry Corbetta. ...


The band was originally known as Chocolate Hair. They changed their name to Sugarloaf, named after a mountain in Colorado, when they received their first recording contract. A recording contract (commonly called a record deal) is a legal agreement between a record label and a recording artist (or group), where the artist makes a record (or series of records) for the label to sell and promote. ...


They are best known for two songs, both of which hit the top 10 charts in the United States: "Green-Eyed Lady" in the autumn of 1970, and "Don't Call Us, We'll Call You" in 1975. Other songs which charted on the Billboard Hot 100 were "Mother Nature's Wine" (1971), "Tongue in Cheek" (1971), and "Stars In Our Eyes" (1976). In addition, "West of Tomorrow" and "Myra Myra" were not hit singles, but received modest airplay at the time of their release on album rock radio stations. For other uses, see Song (disambiguation). ... A top 10 list is a generic term used to indicate a list of items, usually ten in number, which are considered to be best, worst, or notable in some other way, typically a record chart. ... // A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... In popular music, a chart-topper is an extremely popular recording, identified by its inclusion in a ranked list—a chart—of top selling or otherwise judged most popular releases. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... Airplay is a technical term used in the radio industry to state how frequently a song is being played on a radio station. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ...


The 1975 album Don't Call Us, We'll Call You was a re-release of their 1973 album I Got A Song, with one of the tracks on the earlier album replaced by the title track of the later album, which had become a hit single.


The song "Don't Call Us, We'll Call You" is notable because it contained a practical joke at the expense of CBS Records, which had just turned them down for a recording contract. The song includes the sound of a touch-tone telephone number being dialed near the beginning and ending of the song. Those numbers were an unlisted phone number at CBS Records and a public number at the White House respectively. In addition, the recording includes snippets of the guitar riff of The Beatles' "I Feel Fine," Stevie Wonder's "Superstition," and a line of dialogue from Wolfman Jack stating the call sign of a radio station. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Columbia Records is the oldest continually used brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888. ... Dual-tone multi-frequency (DTMF), also known as Touch Tone® is used for telephone signaling over the line in the voice frequency band to the call switching center. ... For other uses, see Telephone (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... I Feel Fine is the name of a song written by John Lennon (although credited to Lennon-McCartney) and released in 1964 by The Beatles as the A side of their seventh UK single. ... Stevie Wonder (born Stevland Hardaway Judkins on May 13, 1950, name later changed to Stevland Hardaway Morris),[1] is an American singer, songwriter, and record producer. ... For other uses, see Superstition (disambiguation). ... Robert Weston (Bob) Smith (21 January 1938 – 1 July 1995) became world famous in the 1960s and 1970s as a disc jockey using the stage name of Wolfman Jack. ... Call sign can refer to different types of call signs: Airline call sign Aviator call sign Cosmonaut call sign Radio and television call signs Tactical call sign, also known as a tactical designator See also: International Callsign Allocations, Maritime Mobile Service Identity This is a disambiguation page — a navigational...


Corbetta later went on to perform with the groups Wild Cherry (best known for their hit "Play That Funky Music"), and Disco Tex and the Sex-o-Lettes (best known for their hit "Get Dancin'"). In 1980, he became a member of The Four Seasons. He currently performs with the group Classic Rock All Stars. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Discography

Albums

  • Sugarloaf (1970)
  • Spaceship Earth (1971)
  • I Got A Song (1973)
  • Don't Call Us, We'll Call You (1975)

Singles

  • "Green-Eyed Lady" (Liberty 56183) 1970 charted #7 in US
  • "Don't Call Us, We'll Call You" / "Texas Two Lane" (Claridge 402) 1975

Liberty Records was a United States-based record label. ...

External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sugarloaf (band) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (316 words)
Sugarloaf was a Denver, Colorado-based rock and roll band in the 1970s featuring Jerry Corbetta.
They changed their name to Sugarloaf, named after a mountain range in Colorado, when they received their first recording contract.
The 1975 album Don't Call Us, We'll Call You was a re-release of their 1973 album I Got A Song, with one of the tracks on the earlier album replaced by the title track of the later album, which had become a hit single.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m