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Encyclopedia > Sudden death (sport)

Sudden death (or a sudden death round) is a way of providing a winner for a contest or game (typically a sport) which would otherwise end in a tie. It provides a victor for the contest without a specific amount of time being required, usually by making the first team or participant scoring in the additional time of play the winner. Sudden death is often referred to as sudden victory in the official jargon of sports utilizing it to avoid the generally negative context of "death". For similar reasons, in football (soccer), the concept is referred to as the golden goal. Sudden death is a way of providing a winner for a sports contest which would otherwise end in a tie. ... Contest may refer to: A contest, is an event in which two or more individuals or teams compete against each other, often for a prize or similar incentive. ... For other uses, see Game (disambiguation). ... For the River in the North-East of England, see River Team. ... In a game the score refers to the amount of points achieved by a player or team. ... For the glossary of hacker slang, see Jargon File. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ... Soccer redirects here. ... The golden goal was a method used in football to decide the winner of games in elimination matches which end in a draw after the end of ordinary time (90 minutes). ...


North American professional sports using a sudden death method of settling a tied game include the National Football League, the National Hockey League and, in a modified sense, the Arena Football League and the PGA Tour (golf). Baseball uses a method of tie-breaking that is somewhat unique to it and incorporates elements of sudden death, but is not a sudden death sport in the strictest sense. NFL redirects here. ... NHL redirects here. ... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... The PGA Tour is an organization that operates the USAs main professional golf tours. ... This article is about the game. ... This article is about the sport. ...

Contents

Ice hockey

Sudden death overtime has traditionally been used in playoff and championship games in hockey. It has been used in the National Hockey League throughout the league's history. The first NHL game with sudden death overtime was game four of the 1919 Stanley Cup Finals. Currently, the NHL, American Hockey League, and ECHL also use sudden-death system in their regular seasons, playing a five minute overtime period when the score is tied at the end of regulation time. NHL redirects here. ... The 1919 Stanley Cup Finals ended with a no decision after an outbreak of Spanish Influenza forced the cancellation of the series between the National Hockey League (NHL) champion Montreal Canadiens and the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA) champion Seattle Metropolitans. ... The American Hockey League (AHL) is a professional ice hockey league in North America, that serves as the primary developmental circuit for the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The ECHL (formerly the East Coast Hockey League) is a professional ice hockey league based in Princeton, New Jersey, with teams scattered across the United States and Canada, generally regarded as a tier below the American Hockey League. ...


In 2000, the AHL changed overtime by having the teams reduced to four players each during the five-minute overtime, and any two-man advantage will be awarded by having the team with the two-man advantage being able to play five-on-three during the two-man advantage. The ECHL and NHL both changed to the four-on-four overtime format in 2001.


If neither team scores during this period the teams will go to a penalty-shot shootout consisting of three players in the NHL or five players in the minor leagues (AHL, ECHL, UHL, Central) to determine the winner. In the NHL, if no team comes out victorious in the shootout, 1 by 1 sudden death shootout continues. No player may shoot twice until everyone on the bench has taken a shot.


During championship playoffs, however, all games are played to a conclusion resulting in a victory for one team and a loss for the other. These are "true" sudden death games, which have gone on into as many as six additional full 20-minute periods with five players, instead of the five-minute period with four players. The practice has been widely criticized because the prospects of a six- or seven, or even eight-period match seem to threaten the well-being of the players, coaches, officials, and even fans, and there are other ways of ending the matches and providing a victor, such as the penalty shot shootout.


A penalty shot shootout is used in international hockey for knockout rounds if neither team scores after one 20-minute period of sudden death. (There is no overtime in round-robin games.)


American football

The National Football League uses a modified sudden-death system in their regular season. Prior to 1974, an NFL regular-season game which was a tie at the end of regulation time ended as a tie. Sudden-death overtime was used only in playoff games, with the 1958 NFL championship ending in overtime. NFL redirects here. ...


In 1974, however, the NFL adopted a 15-minute sudden death overtime period. The game ends and is recorded as a tie if neither team scores in the overtime. This rarely happens, since as soon as a team gets near the end zone, they will almost certainly attempt to kick a field goal. While most overtime games are won by field goals, it is also possible to win by scoring a touchdown. This most frequently happens on a play that begins far enough away from the end zone to make a field goal difficult, but it can also result from a team exercising solid ball control and simply never getting to a fourth down situation. A far more rare occurrence is for an overtime game to be won by a safety; indeed, this has only happened twice. In recent years, game-winning touchdowns or field goals were referred to by sportscasters as "walk-off"s, meaning both teams walk off the field when one of the teams score in OT thus ending the game. (If the winning score in sudden death is a touchdown, no extra point is attempted.) Latrell loves him some MIRACLE WHIP!! sho nuff and mashmell The end zone is a term in both Canadian football and American football. ... A field goal (formerly goal from the field) in American football and Canadian football (collectively called gridiron football) is a goal that may be scored during general play (from the field). Execution of a field goal A field goal may be scored by a placekick or the very rare drop... Texas Longhorn quarterback Vince Young (center top of picture), now with the Tennessee Titans, rushing for a touchdown vs. ... A safety or safety touch, is a type of score in American football and Canadian football where a defensive team gains two points when the offensive team is tackled or loses possession in their own end zone. ...


During championship playoffs, however, all games are played to a conclusion resulting in a victory for one team and a loss for the other. These are "true" sudden death games, which have gone on into a third additional period. The practice has been widely criticized in the case of the NFL, as games often are decided when the team receiving the ball at the start of the sudden death overtime scores during that initial possession (often with a field goal) and the opponent loses without having ever had possession of the ball in overtime. Largely in answer to this criticism, the tiebreaking system adopted in college and Canadian football involves baseball-style "innings" in which each team alternates possessions until one outscores the other during a corresponding "inning" rather than the sudden death system, and where a team must attempt a two-point conversion starting with the third overtime "inning". A field goal (formerly goal from the field) in American football and Canadian football (collectively called gridiron football) is a goal that may be scored during general play (from the field). Execution of a field goal A field goal may be scored by a placekick or the very rare drop... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... Diagram of a Canadian football field. ...


In January 2004, a Carolina Panthers at St. Louis Rams playoff game ended on the first play of the second overtime, on a long touchdown pass, the most recent second overtime in an NFL game.


The now-defunct United States Football League had a triple-overtime game in 1984, between the Los Angeles Express and Michigan Panthers, which ended with a walk-off touchdown 3:33 into the third overtime. It is to date the longest professional football game ever played in the United States. “USFL” redirects here. ...


Arena football

The Arena Football League uses a modified version of sudden death, in which each team is allowed one overtime possession and the team which has scored the most points at that juncture being declared the winner, with sudden death going into effect if the score is still tied at this point. Previous to the Dallas Desperados and the Nashville Kats ended in a 41-41 tie on April 8, 2005, until the 2006 season regular season games ended as time expires after one additional fifteen-minute quarter. Now, a game will continue until either team had scored. Arena football is a sport invented by Jim Foster, a former executive of the United States Football League and the National Football League. ... Conference National Division Eastern Year founded 2002 Home arena American Airlines Center City, State Dallas, Texas Head Coach Will McClay ArenaBowl championships None Conference titles None Division titles 3: 2003, 2006, 2007 Wild Card berths 1: 2002 The Dallas Desperados are an Arena Football League team that began play in... Conference American Division Central Year founded 1997 Home arena Sommet Center City, State Nashville, Tennessee Head Coach Pat Sperduto ArenaBowl championships none Conference titles none Division titles 2: 1997, 2001 Wild Card berths 4: 1998, 1999, 2000, 2006 This page is for the current Nashville Kats, which began play in... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The same system was used in the NFL Europa League. NFL Europa is an American football league which operates in Europe. ...


Golf

Traditionally, professional golf tournaments ending in a tie were played off the next day with an eighteen-hole match. Modern considerations such as television coverage and the tight travel schedule of most leading golfers have led to this practice being almost entirely abandoned, and in all but the most important tournaments, the champion is determined by sudden death. All players tied after the completion of regulation play are taken to a predetermined hole, and then play it and others in order as needed. If more than two players are tied, each player who scores higher on a hole than the other competitors is immediately eliminated, and those still tied continue play until one remaining player has a lower score for a hole than any of the others remaining, and that player is declared the winner.


Of the four men's major championships, only The Masters uses a sudden-death playoff format. The U.S. Open still uses an 18-hole playoff at stroke play on the day after the main tournament, with sudden death if two (or more) contestants remain tied after 18 holes. The Open Championship uses a four-hole total-stroke playoff, while the PGA Championship uses a three-hole total-stroke playoff. In both cases, sudden death is used if a tie exists at the end of the scheduled playoff. Majors redirects here. ... This article is about the golf tournament. ... The United States Open Championship, commonly known as the U.S. Open, is the annual open golf tournament of the United States. ... “British Open” redirects here. ... The PGA Championship (often referred to as the U.S. PGA Championship outside of North America) is an annual golf tournament conducted by the Professional Golfers Association of America as part of the PGA Tour. ...


Baseball

Baseball is not truly a sudden death sport, but has important elements of the practice. Traditionally a baseball game cannot end until both teams have had an equal number of turns at bat, or the home team leads in the middle of the ninth inning. This means that if a baseball game is tied headed into the home half of the ninth or any subsequent extra inning, the game will end on the next scored run, courtesy of a walk-off base hit, base on balls, error, sacrifice fly, sacrifice hit, passed ball, wild pitch, balk, or interference call. This is the why the home team batting last is an advantage. The same can be said for games in which the visitors are leading headed into the last of the ninth/extra inning. In that case, if the home team (again by any of the aforementioned walk-off varieties) exceeds the visitor's run total, the game ends. A prime example of this is the walk-off home run (see below for some famous walk-off home runs). No matter what happens in the top of the ninth/extra inning, the home team will always have a turn at bat to attempt to tie or win the game. If the bottom of the ninth/extra inning ends with the home team still behind, the visitors win. An innings, or inning, is a fixed-length segment of a game in any of a variety of sports – most notably baseball and cricket – during which one team attempts to score while the other team attempts to prevent the first from scoring. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... Rashad Eldridge of the Oklahoma Redhawks walks to first base after drawing a base on balls. ... In baseball, an error is the act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to reach one or more additional bases, when such an advance should have been prevented given ordinary effort by the fielder. ... In baseball, a batted ball is considered a sacrifice fly (denoted by SF) if the following four criteria are met: There are fewer than two outs when the ball is hit. ... In baseball, a sacrifice hit (also called a sacrifice bunt) is the act of deliberately bunting the ball in a manner that allows a runner on base to advance to another base, while the batter is himself put out. ... In baseball, a catcher shall be charged with a passed ball when he fails to hold or to control a legally pitched ball which should have been held or controlled with ordinary effort, thereby permitting a runner or runners to advance. ... In baseball, a wild pitch (WP) is charged to a pitcher when a pitch is too high, too low, or too wide of home plate for the catcher to field capably, thereby allowing one or more runners to advance or to score. ... In baseball, a pitcher may commit a number of illegal motions or actions which constitute a balk. ... Alex Rodriguez commits interference, 2004 In baseball, interference is an infraction where a person illegally changes the course of play from what is expected. ... In baseball, a walk-off home run is a home run which ends the game. ...


Famous walk-off home runs

Solo home runs except where noted

Game Batter Pitcher Final Score Notes
1951 National League Pennant Playoff Series Game 3 at Polo Grounds Bobby Thomson,
New York Giants
(three-run)
Ralph Branca,
Brooklyn Dodgers
Giants 5,
Dodgers 4
Giants won N.L. pennant 2-1
1960 World Series Game 7 at Forbes Field Bill Mazeroski,
Pittsburgh Pirates
Ralph Terry,
New York Yankees
Pirates 10,
Yankees 9
Pirates won World Series 4-3
1975 World Series Game 6 at Fenway Park Carlton Fisk,
Boston Red Sox
Pat Darcy,
Cincinnati Reds
Red Sox 7,
Reds 6,
12 innings
Red Sox tied World Series 3-3
1976 ALCS Game 5 at Yankee Stadium Chris Chambliss,
New York Yankees
Mark Littell,
Kansas City Royals
Yankees 7,
Royals 6
Yankees won A.L. pennant 3-2
1985 NLCS Game 5 at Busch Memorial Stadium Ozzie Smith,
St. Louis Cardinals
Tom Niedenfuer,
Los Angeles Dodgers
Cardinals 3,
Dodgers 2
Cardinals took 3-2 series lead
1988 World Series Game 1 Kirk Gibson,
Los Angeles Dodgers
(two-run)
Dennis Eckersley,
Oakland Athletics
Dodgers 5,
Athletics 4
Dodgers took 1-0 lead in World Series
1991 World Series Game 6 at Metrodome Kirby Puckett,
Minnesota Twins
Charlie Liebrandt,
Atlanta Braves
Twins 7,
Braves 6,
11 innings
Twins tied World Series 3-3
1993 World Series Game 6 at Skydome Joe Carter,
Toronto Blue Jays
(three-run)
Mitch Williams,
Philadelphia Phillies
Blue Jays 8,
Phillies 6
Blue Jays won World Series 4-2
2003 ALCS Game 7 at Yankee Stadium Aaron Boone,
New York Yankees
Tim Wakefield,
Boston Red Sox
Yankees 6,
Red Sox 5,
11 innings
Yankees won A.L. pennant 4-3
2004 ALCS Game 4 at Fenway Park David Ortiz,
Boston Red Sox
(two-run)
Paul Quantrill,
New York Yankees
Red Sox 6,
Yankees 4,
12 innings
Red Sox trimmed Yankees' series lead to 3-1

The Shot Heard Round the World In baseball, the Shot Heard Round the World is the term given to the walk-off home run hit by New York Giants outfielder Bobby Thomson off Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher Ralph Branca at the Polo Grounds to win the National League pennant at 3... The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in Manhattan, New York City used by baseballs New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in their... Robert Brown Bobby Thomson (born October 25, 1923 in Glasgow, Scotland), nicknamed The Staten Island Scot, is a Scottish-American former Major League Baseball outfielder and right-handed batter who played for the New York Giants (1946-53, 1957), Milwaukee Braves (1954-57), Chicago Cubs (1958-59), Boston Red Sox... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–85) Other nicknames The Jints, The Gigantes, The G... Ralph Branca at age 78. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... Bill Mazeroskis famous game-winning home run at Forbes Field to win the 1960 World Series The 1960 World Series was played between the Pittsburgh Pirates (NL) and New York Yankees (AL). ... For other uses, see Forbes Field (disambiguation). ... William Stanley Mazeroski (born September 5, 1936 in Wheeling, West Virginia), nicknamed Maz, and also called simply The Glove by radio broadcaster Bob Prince, is a former Major League Baseball player who spent his entire career (1956-72) with the Pittsburgh Pirates. ... This article is about the baseball team. ... Ralph Willard Terry (born on January 9, 1936 in Big Cabin, Oklahoma) is a former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees (1956-57, 1959-64), Kansas City Athletics (1957-59, 1966), Cleveland Indians (1965) and New York Mets (1966-67). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The 1975 World Series was between the Boston Red Sox and Cincinnati Reds. ... Fenway redirects here. ... Carlton Ernest Fisk (born December 26, 1947 in Bellows Falls, Vermont) is a former Major League Baseball catcher who played for 24 years with the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Patrick Leonard Darcy (born May 12, 1950 in Troy, Ohio) is a former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Cincinnati Reds from 1974 to 1976. ... For other uses, see Cincinnati Reds (disambiguation). ... The 1976 American League Championship Series was won by the New York Yankees, who defeated the Kansas City Royals 3-2. ... This page is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Chris Chambliss (born Carroll Christopher Chambliss on December 26, 1948 in Dayton, Ohio) was a Major League Baseball player from 1971-1988 for the Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees and Atlanta Braves. ... Mark Alan Littell (January 17, 1953 in Cape Girardeau, Missouri), is a professional baseball player who played pitcher in the Major Leagues from 1973-1982. ... Major league affiliations American League (1969–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 10, 20, 42 Name Kansas City Royals (1969–present) Other nicknames The Boys in Blue Ballpark Kauffman Stadium (1973–present) a. ... The 1985 National League Championship series was played between the St. ... Busch Memorial Stadium, or Busch Stadium was the home of the St. ... Osborne Earl Ozzie Smith (born December 26, 1954, in Mobile, Alabama) is a former Major League Baseball shortstop who was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2002. ... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... Tom Niedenfuer (born August 13, 1959 in St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... Dates: October 15, 1988–October 20, 1988 MVP: Orel Hershiser (Los Angeles) Television: NBC CBS Radio (Jack Buck and Bill White announcing) Announcers: Vin Scully and Joe Garagiola Umpires: Doug Harvey (NL), Larry McCoy (AL), Bruce Froemming (NL), Durwood Merrill (AL), Jerry Crawford (NL), Derryl Cousins (AL) ALCS: Oakland Athletics... Kirk Harold Gibson (born May 28, 1957) is a former American two-sport athletic star, best known as a Major League Baseball player noted for his competitiveness and clutch hitting. ... Dennis Lee Eckersley (born October 3, 1954 in Oakland, California), nicknamed Eck, was a Major League Baseball player elected to Baseball Hall of Fame in 2004 (his first year of eligibility). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Dates October 19, 1991–October 27, 1991 MVP Jack Morris (Minnesota) Television network CBS Announcers Jack Buck, Tim McCarver Umpires Don Denkinger (AL), Harry Wendelstedt (NL), Drew Coble (AL), Terry Tata (NL), Rick Reed (AL), Ed Montague (NL) The 1991 World Series was played between the Minnesota Twins (95-67... The Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, often simply called The Metrodome, is a domed sports stadium in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Kirby Puckett (March 14, 1960 [1] – March 6, 2006) was a center fielder in Major League Baseball who played his entire career with the Minnesota Twins from 1984 to 1995. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... Charles Louis Charlie Leibrandt, Jr. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... Dates October 16, 1993–October 23, 1993 MVP Paul Molitor (Toronto) Television network CBS & Simulcast in Canada on CTV Announcers Sean McDonough, Tim McCarver Umpires Dave Phillips (AL), Paul Runge (NL), Tim McClelland (AL), Charlie Williams (NL), Mark Johnson (AL), Dana DeMuth (NL) The 1993 World Series was the second... Rogers Centre logo Rogers Centre, formerly known as SkyDome, is a multi-purpose stadium in Toronto, Ontario, situated next to the CN Tower near the shores of Lake Ontario. ... For others with similar names, see Joseph Carter (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Other nicknames The Jays Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) Formerly named SkyDome (1989-2005) Exhibition Stadium (1977-1989) Major league titles World Series titles (2) 1992 â€¢ 1993 AL... Mitchell Steven Williams (born November 17, 1964, in Santa Ana, California) was a baseball relief pitcher who appeared for six teams in Major League Baseball from 1986 to 1997. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... The 2003 American League Championship Series was played between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees from October 8 to October 16, 2003. ... Aaron John Boone (born March 9, 1973 in La Mesa, California) is a major league third baseman who plays for the Florida Marlins. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Timothy Stephen Wakefield (born August 2, 1966 in Melbourne, Florida) is a right-handed knuckleball pitcher in Major League Baseball who has played with the Boston Red Sox since 1995. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... The 2004 American League Championship Series was a Major League Baseball playoff series played between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees. ... David Ortiz (IPA , or roughly or-TEES, according to Latin American pronunciation) (born November 18, 1975 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, as David Américo Ortiz Arias), is a Major League Baseball designated hitter who plays for the Boston Red Sox (since 2003). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Media:Example. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as...

Football (soccer)

Sudden death has a controversial history in soccer, in which ties in important matches were traditionally resolved by replaying the entire match, which in the era of television and tight travel schedules is obviously impracticable, but esteemed by the sport's purists as the only equitable way to settle a tied match. Indeed, replays are still used in some major competitions (like the FA Cup). Soccer redirects here. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ...


For the most part, if the score is tied after the full 90 minutes, a draw results; however, if one team must be eliminated, some form of tie-breaking must occur. Originally, two 15-minute halves of extra time were held and if the teams remained equal at the end of the halves, kicks from the penalty mark were held, which is generally held in lower regard by purists and traditionalists than even sudden death. To try to decrease the chances of requiring kicks from the penalty mark, the IFAB, the world law making body of the sport, experimented with new rules. Extra time is an additional period played at the end of some games of football (soccer) if the score is tied after the two standard periods (halves) of play. ... Penalty shootouts, officially named kicks from the penalty mark, are a method sometimes used to decide which team progresses to the next stage of a tournament (or wins the tournament) following a draw in a game of football. ... The International Football Association Board (IFAB) (also known as or simply The International Board) is the body that determines the Laws of the Game of association football (soccer). ...


The golden goal rule transformed the overtime periods into sudden death until the periods were over, where shootouts would occur. As this became unpopular, the silver goal rule was instituted, causing the game to end if the scores were not equal after the first 15 minute period as well as the second. The silver goal has also fallen into disrepute so Euro 2004 was the last event to use it; after which the original tie-breaking methods were restored. The golden goal was a method used in football to decide the winner of games in elimination matches which end in a draw after the end of ordinary time (90 minutes). ... Silver goal was a method used in association football to decide the result of games in elimination matches which end in a draw after the end of the ordinary time. ... Euro 2004 Logo The 2004 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly called Euro 2004, was held in Portugal between 12 June and 4 July 2004. ...


The main criticism of sudden death is the quickness of ending the game, and the pressure on coaches and players. To the coaches, it does not seem appropriate once the goal is scored, the game is over and the opponent cannot attempt to answer the goal within the remaining time, creating a game where extra pressure is placed as to not create any mistakes.


Sudden death would have made many legendary matches of the past impossible. Many historical matches have been settled in flamboyant extra-time play, with multiple goals scored by each team, such as the unforgettable "Game of the Century" between Italy and West Germany in Mexico 1970, with Italy winning 4–3 after extra time. Following a 1–1 draw in regular time, the remaining five out of seven scores happened in the extra time. If sudden death had been in effect, the game would have ended on Gerd Müller's goal at 95', giving West Germany the victory instead of Italy. Gerd Müllers header for West Germany in the 110th minute. ... Gerd Müller (IPA—German: ) (born November 3, 1945 in Nördlingen) is a former West German football player. ...


In NCAA collegiate play in the United States, however, sudden death, adopted in 1999 for all championship play in addition to regular season play, remains. In 2005, the Division II Women's Championship game ended in sudden death as a goal was scored three minutes into the overtime to end the championship match. NCAA redirects here. ...


Sudden death is also prevalent in youth play, for the safety of players. [1] [2]


If the teams are still tied after the initial allocated number in a penalty shootout, the game goes to sudden-death penalties, where each team takes a further one penalty each, repeated until only one team scores, resulting in the winning of the game. Penalty shootouts, officially named kicks from the penalty mark, are a method sometimes used to decide which team progresses to the next stage of a tournament (or wins the tournament) following a draw in a game of football. ...


Rugby league

See List of National Rugby League golden point games

Drawn National Rugby League and State of Origin games are subject to sudden death extra time after 80 minutes of play, called the golden point. Golden point consists of two five-minute halves, with the teams swapping ends at the end of the first half. This is a list of golden point games played in the National Rugby League. ... The National Rugby League (NRL) is the top league of professional rugby league football clubs in Australasia. ... Players are selected to play for the state in which they played their first senior football, hence the name state of origin. Prior to 1980 players were selected for interstate matches on the basis of where they were playing their club football at the time. ... A recent innovation to the National Rugby League competition (in 2003), is sudden death overtime, referred in the NRL as the golden point - a term borrowed from soccers now defunct golden goal. ...


Any score (try, penalty goal, or field goal) in golden point wins the game for the scoring team - no conversion is attempted if a try is the winning score. This article refers to the use of the word Try in rugby football terminology. ...


In the NRL, the victor in golden point receives two competition points, the loser none. In the event that no further scoring occurs, the game is drawn, and each team receives one point each.


Tennis

The use of sudden death tiebreakers has even influenced sports such as tennis which have not strictly speaking adopted them. The requirement that a tennis set be won by a minimum margin of two games sometimes resulted in five-set matches lasting six hours or longer, which is an anathema for television. In order to shorten matches somewhat, sets tied at six games each can now be broken by a tiebreaker which is most often the first player to score seven points in the tiebreaker, but these must be won by at least two points and thus can become quite lengthy in their own right. For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ...


Tiebreakers are not used in major tournaments in the third or fifth set, respectively, with the exception of the US Open. For other uses, see U.S. Open. ...


Fencing

An individual fencing bout lasts for five touches in a poule match, or 15 touches in a direct elimination (DE) match. In épée and foil, matches are also timed (three minutes for a poule match, and three periods of three minutes for a DE). If neither fencer has reached five or 15 points within the time limit, the leading fencer is deemed the winner. However, if the fencers are tied after the allotted time, one minute of extra time is added. Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ...


Before resuming the bout, one fencer is randomly awarded "priority". The first fencer to score a valid hit within extra time wins the match; if no valid hits are scored within the time, that fencer with priority is declared the victor.


In the normal course of a match, there is a de facto sudden death situation if both fencers are tied at four (or 14) touches each. The final hit is called "la belle". The fencers may salute each other before playing for the final point.


Computer gaming

Sudden death also occurs in computer gaming when both teams have the same score and a method of breaking a tie is needed. For example, in a Capture the Flag area for Quake III Arena, when neither team has gotten a score, or if no team leads, a sudden death match will decide who will be the victor. All the teams have to do is get the flag and deliver it to the base one time only in order to win automatically. In other games, players have some handicap in order to end the game faster; for example, in a Super Smash Bros. sudden death round, players fight beginning at 300% damage, which usually causes the game to end almost immediately after a blow is dealt. For other uses, see Capture the flag (disambiguation). ... Quake III Arena or Quake 3, abbreviated as Q3A or Q3, is a multiplayer first-person shooter computer and video game released on December 2, 1999. ... This article is about the original Nintendo 64 game. ...


Board games

In board games such as chess where there is a time limit, "sudden death" refers to a requirement that all the remaining moves, rather than a fixed number of moves, be played within the remaining time allotted. This ensures an upper limit for how long games can last. Some games are played with an immediate sudden death time control, others have one or more regular time controls before the sudden death control. A shelf of board games. ... This article is about the Western board game. ... A time control is imposed on the tournament play of almost all two-player board games to ensure that neither player delays the game or gains an unfair advantage by thinking for an unduly long time. ...


Wrestling

Sudden death in wrestling is most commonly seen in Real Canadian Wrestling tournament matches, in which a victor must be decided. This happens in the case of a double knockout or double countout. In World Wrestling Entertainment, Sudden Death rules occurs mainly in an Iron Man match when there is a tie after the 1 hour time limit have expired. World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ...


Competition Judo

In the case of a tie in competition Judo, the match proceeds to Golden Score, another form of Sudden Death. Sudden Death in competition Judo is comprised of a 5 minute long match, during which the first competitor to achieve a score is awarded the match. Penalties in Judo award points to the other competitor, making fair-play of absolute importance. If no victor is decided in Golden Score, the match is decided based on a Referee's Decision. A Referee's Decision is a vote amongst the Referee and both Judges of the match. This article is about the martial art and sport. ...


Mixed martial arts

In mixed martial arts competitions that consist of an even number of rounds, a type of sudden death is sometimes used in the event that each competitor wins an equal number of rounds. This is not a true sudden death that ends on the first point scored, since MMA competitions do not generally score individual points. Rather, it is a final round of combat, the winner of which is declared the winner of the match. This particular rule, known as "Sudden Victory", has been commonly seen in previous seasons of the reality television show The Ultimate Fighter when the competition has consisted of two rounds. For the fighting styles that combine different arts, see hybrid martial arts. ... // This article is about the genre of TV shows. ... The Ultimate Fighter is a reality television series and mixed martial arts (MMA) competition, originating from United States, and produced by Spike TV and the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC). ...


Future

Sudden death endings for sporting events have been roundly criticized ever since they were first proposed as both untraditional and unfair, but seem likely to become more rather than less widespread in the future given the exigencies of television coverage and stringent travel schedules for both individual athletes and sports teams.[citation needed]


 
 

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