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Encyclopedia > Subject matter jurisdiction

Subject matter jurisdiction is a legal term used in civil procedure to indicate that a case must be entered in the proper court of law based on the nature of the claim. Civil procedure is the written set of rules that sets out the process that courts will follow when hearing cases of a civil nature (a civil action). These rules explain how a lawsuit must be commenced, what kind of service of process is required, the types of pleadings, motions, and... This article is about courts of law. ...


State Courts

In the United States, many state court systems are divided into divisions such as criminal, civil, family, and probate. A court within any one of those divisions would lack subject matter jurisdiction to hear a case regarding matters assigned to another jurisdiction. for other uses please see Crime (disambiguation) A crime is an act that violates a political or moral law. ... Look up Civil in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The word Civil is derived from the Latin word civilis, from civis (citizen). Used as an adjective, it may describe several fields, concepts, and people: Civil death Civil defense Civil disobedience Civil engineering Civil law Civil liberties Civil libertarianism Civil marriage Civil... A family court is a court convened in the UK to make orders in respect of childrens residence. ... Probate is the legal process of settling a dead persons estate: specifically, distributing his property. ...


Federal Courts

The term is most broadly developed at the level of the United States Federal Courts. There, litigants must show that they fall into one of two broad categories of subject matter jurisdiction: diversity jurisdiction and federal question jurisdiction. According to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, a federal court may dismiss a case for lack of subject matter jurisdiction upon motion of a party or sua sponte, upon its own initiative. Diversity jurisdiction is a term used in civil procedure to refer to the situation in which a United States federal court has subject matter jurisdiction to hear a civil case because the parties are diverse, meaning that they come from different states. ... Federal question jurisdiction is a term used in the United States law of civil procedure to refer to the situation in which a United States federal court has subject matter jurisdiction to hear a civil case because the plaintiff has alleged a violation of the Constitution, laws, or treaties of... The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP) govern civil procedure in the United States district courts, or more simply, court procedures for civil suits. ... Acting spontaneously without prompting from another party. ...

United States Federal civil procedure doctrines
Justiciability
Advisory opinions
Standing · Ripeness · Mootness
Political questions
Jurisdiction
Subject matter jurisdiction Personal jurisdiction
Federal question jurisdiction
Diversity jurisdiction· Minimum contacts
Amount in controversy· Jurisdiction in rem
Federalism
Erie doctrine
Abstention doctrines
Abrogation doctrine
Rooker-Feldman doctrine

  Results from FactBites:
 
Subject Matter Jurisdiction @ lawschoolhelp.com (1659 words)
Subject matter jurisdiction (as opposed to personal jurisdiction) refers to the question of whether a particular court has the power or competence to decide the kind of controversy that is involved.
In diversity cases the subject matter jurisdiction of the federal courts is defined by who the parties to the lawsuit are rather than the subject matter of the underlying dispute.
Ancillary jurisdiction allows a federal court to assert jurisdiction over claims that are sufficiently related or subordinated to an action properly within the court's subject matter jurisdiction.
Subject-matter jurisdiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (244 words)
Subject matter jurisdiction, in civil procedure, is a legal term that signifies the types of claims or disputes over which a particular court has jurisdiction, or the power to render a decision.
Subject matter jurisdiction is broadly developed in the United States federal courts, which derive their jurisdiction exclusively from the U.S. Constitution.
According to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, a federal court may dismiss a case for lack of subject matter jurisdiction upon motion of a party or sua sponte, upon its own initiative.
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