FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Stump (cricket)

For other uses, see Stump (disambiguation). A stump is the remains of an object that has been cut or broken, for example, when a tree has been felled. ...



In the sport of cricket, the term stump has three different meanings: Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ...


1. part of the wicket, 2. a manner of dismissing a batsman, and 3. the end of the day's play ("stumps"). M*A*S*H, see Sticky Wicket (M*A*S*H episode). ... Warwickshire batsman Mike Powell A batsman in the sport of cricket is, depending on context: Any player in the act of batting. ...

Contents

Part of the wicket

A wicket consists of three stumps that are hammered into the ground, and topped with two bails.
A wicket consists of three stumps that are hammered into the ground, and topped with two bails.

The stumps are three vertical posts which support two bails. The stumps and bails are usually made of wood, and together form a wicket at each end of the pitch. The overall width of each wicket is 9 inches (22.9 cm). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... M*A*S*H, see Sticky Wicket (M*A*S*H episode). ... In the sport of cricket, a bail is one of the two smaller sticks placed on top of the three stumps to form a wicket. ... In the sport of cricket, a bail is one of the two smaller sticks placed on top of the three stumps to form a wicket. ... M*A*S*H, see Sticky Wicket (M*A*S*H episode). ... Cricket pitch (not to scale) A wicket consists of three stumps that are placed into the ground, and topped with two bails. ...


Each stump is 28 inches (71.1 cm) tall with maximum and minimum diameters of 112 inches (3.81 cm) and 138 inches (3.49 cm). They have a spike at one end for hammering into the ground, and the other end has a U-shaped 'through groove' to provide a resting place for the bails. A through groove (left) and a stopped groove In joinery, a groove is a slot or trench cut into a member which runs parallel to the grain. ...


Each stump is referred to by a specific name:

  • Off stump is the stump on the off side of the wicket (the same side as the batsman's bat).
  • Middle stump is the stump in the middle of the wicket.
  • Leg stump is the stump on the leg side of the wicket (the same side as the batsman's legs).

In modern professional play, the stumps are often emblazoned with a sponsor's logo. Although they are too far away from spectators to be seen, such logos are visible on television coverage. For usage in other sports, see offside rule. ... The leg side, or on side, is defined to be a particular half of the field used to play the sport of cricket. ...


For professional matches, often one or more of the stumps is hollow and contains a small television camera. This is aligned vertically, but can view through a small window on the side of the stump via a mirror. The so-called stump-cam gives a unique view of play for action replays, particularly when a batsman is bowled.


Manner of dismissing a batsman

In cricket, a batsman can be out stumped if: Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ...

  • the wicket-keeper puts down the wicket, while the batsman is:
    • out of his ground (because he has moved down the pitch beyond the crease, usually in an attempt to hit the ball);
    • receiving a delivery which is not a no ball; and
    • not attempting a run.

Being "out of his ground" is defined not as having any part of the batsman's body or his bat touching the ground behind the crease - ie, if his bat is slightly elevated from the floor despite being behind the crease then he would be considered out (if stumped). One of the fielding team must appeal for the wicket by asking the umpire, How is that?!. The appeal is normally directed to the square-leg umpire, who would be in the best position to adjudicate on the appeal. A wicket keeper in characteristic position, ready to face a delivery. ... In the sport of cricket, the crease is the area demarcated by white lines painted or chalked on the field of play. ... In the sport of cricket a no ball is an illegal delivery by the bowler. ...


Stumping is the fifth most common form of dismissal after caught, bowled, leg before wicket and run out. It is governed by Law 39 of the Laws of cricket. It is usually seen when a medium or slow bowler is bowling. It requires co-operation between a bowler and wicket-keeper: the bowler must induce the batsman to move out of his ground, and the wicket-keeper must be quick enough to break the wicket before the batsman makes his ground (i.e. places the bat or part of his body on the ground back behind the popping crease). If the bails are removed before the wicket-keeper has the ball, the batsman can still be stumped if the wicket-keeper removes one of the stumps from the ground, while holding the ball in his hand. The wicket-keeper and the bowler both obtain credit for dismissing a batsman who is stumped. A batsman may not be out stumped off a no ball, but may be stumped off a wide delivery. Caught is a method of dismissing a batsman in the sport of cricket. ... Bowled is a method of dismissing a batsman in the sport of cricket. ... In the sport of cricket, leg before wicket (LBW) is one of the ways in which a batsman can be dismissed. ... Run out is a method of dismissal in the sport of cricket. ... The laws of cricket are a set of rules framed by the Marylebone Cricket Club which serve to standardise the format of cricket matches across the world to ensure uniformity and fairness. ... Muttiah Muralitharan bowling A bowler in the sport of cricket is usually a player whose speciality is bowling, analogous to a pitcher in baseball. ... In the sport of cricket, the crease is the area demarcated by white lines painted or chalked on the field of play. ... In the sport of cricket a no ball is an illegal delivery by the bowler. ... In the sport of cricket, a wide is one of two things: The event of a ball being delivered by a bowler too wide or high to be hit by the batsman, and ruled so by the umpire. ...


Notes:

  • "On the crease" is not "behind the crease".
  • The wicket-keeper must break the wicket either with the ball or with the hand that is holding it, or that arm, or with both hands together; holding the ball in one hand and breaking the wicket with the other will not do. (A stumping is still valid even if the ball merely rebounds from the 'keeper and breaks the wicket, even though never controlled by him.)
  • The wicket-keeper must allow the ball to pass the stumps before taking it, unless it has touched either bat or batsman first.

End of the day's play

Stumps is used as a term to mean the end of a day's play, e.g. "The umpires called stumps" means that the umpires declared play over for the day. At the end of a session, i.e. before lunch or tea, the umpires will remove the bails; at the end of the day's play, the umpires will remove the stumps. An umpire in cricket (from the Old French Nompere meaning not equal, i. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Stump (cricket) - definition of Stump (cricket) in Encyclopedia (448 words)
Middle stump is the stump in the middle of the wicket.
Leg stump is the stump on the leg side of the wicket.
Stumping is the fifth most common form of dismissal after caught, bowled, leg before wicket and run out.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m