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Encyclopedia > Students' union
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A students' union, student government, student senate, students' association, or guild of students is a student organization present in many colleges and universities. In the latter, said organization is often accorded its own building on the campus, dedicated to social and organizational activities of the student body. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Nuvola_apps_bookcase. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Organization (disambiguation). ... A college (Latin collegium) can be the name of any group of colleagues; originally it meant a group of people living together under a common set of rules (con-, together + leg-, law). As a consequence members of colleges were originally styled fellow and still are in some places. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Social refers to human society or its organization. ...


Many students' unions are run by students for students, independent of the educational facility. The purpose of these organizations is to represent students both within the institution and externally, including on local and national issues. They are also responsible for providing a variety of services to students. Students can get involved in its management through numerous and varied committees, councils and general meetings, or become one of its elected officers.

The largest Students' Union building at Oklahoma State University, which doubles as a student activity center ("student union" in the USA)
The largest Students' Union building at Oklahoma State University, which doubles as a student activity center ("student union" in the USA)

Many students' unions are highly politicised bodies, and often serve as a training ground for aspiring politicians. Campaigning and debate is often very vigorous, with the youthful enthusiasm of the various partisans, a student media that is itself often partisan, inexperienced, and under no financial pressure to slant coverage to please a broad readership, and a general lack of serious consequences for decision all encouraging political gamesmanship. Other unions however are less politicised. Students' Unions generally have similar aims irrespective of the extent of politicization, and focus on providing facilities, support and services to students as well as political goals. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (922x691, 581 KB) Summary Student Union at Oklahoma State University - Stillwater, the largest student center in the world. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (922x691, 581 KB) Summary Student Union at Oklahoma State University - Stillwater, the largest student center in the world. ... Oklahoma State University, located in Stillwater, Oklahoma, is an institution of higher learning founded in 1890 as a land-grant university, known as Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College (Oklahoma A&M). ... A student activity center or SAC, is a type of building found on university campuses. ... A student activity center or SAC, is a type of building found on university campuses. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics, sometimes this may include political scientists. ... “Electioneering” redirects here. ... Gamesmanship is the use of dubious (although not technically illegal) methods to win a game, such as golf or snooker. ...


Students' unions often officially recognize and allocate an annual budget to other organizations on campus. In some institutions, postgraduate students are within the general students' unions, whereas in others they have their own Postgraduate Representative Body. In some cases graduate students to lack formal representation in student government. The allocation of production and consumption is a key element of any model of economics. ... For the rental car company, see Budget Rent a Car. ... A national postgraduate representative body exists in many countries representing postgraduate students/researchers undertaking their doctorate (PhD) or postdoctoral research. ...

Contents

Australia

In Australia, all universities have one or more student organizations. As of July 2006, membership and union fees are voluntary by law. All major Australian universities have one or more student organisations, known variously as student associations, student guilds, student unions, or student representative councils. ... This is a list of Australian universities and other higher education institutions in Australia. ...


Australian student unions typically provide such services as eateries, small retail outlets (e.g., newsagencies), student media (e.g., campus newspapers), advocacy, and support for a variety of social, arts, political, recreational, special interest and sporting clubs and societies. Most also operate specialized support services for female, LGBT, international and indigenous students. Many have expressed concerns over the introduction of voluntary student unionism (VSU). The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... Indigenous peoples are: Peoples living in an area prior to colonization by a state Peoples living in an area within a nation-state, prior to the formation of a nation-state, but who do not identify with the dominant nation. ... Voluntary student unionism (VSU) is a policy under which membership of – and payment of membership fees to – university student organisations is not compulsory. ...


The National Union of Students of Australia represents most student unions at a national level. With VSU becoming law, its future is in doubt. The National Union of Students is the peak representative body for Australian university students. ...


Canada

In Canada, membership in a college or university students' union is mandatory. Included in Canadian students' tuition fees is anywhere from an additional $10-$300 fee to pay for the services of the union. The money raised from dues is often used to support a staff and office. Student elections usually happen around March as the student bodies elect their unions' executives. Student voter turnout for student elections varies widely depending on the part of the country, and the size of the institution. The largest student union in Canada is the Alma Mater Society (AMS), at the University of British Columbia, with around 45,000 members. Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ...


Canadian student unions are not-for-profit organizations and often provide numerous services not only to their own students, but to the educational institution and community at large. Running things like newspapers, radio stations, various consumer businesses, clubs, societies and cultural groups, concerts, bars, various entertainment, athletic programs, financial support, scholarships, medical and dental plans are quite common throughout Canadian schools. Student unions are also well known for their political involvement.


Most student governments are charged by their student body to protect their best interests at the university, municipal, provincial and federal government levels. Generally, student unions in Canada are members of either the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations or the Canadian Federation of Students, the two federal lobby groups representing post-secondary students. One exception is the Province of Quebec, which has its own federations, the largest youth group in Quebec, called Quebec Federation of University Students (Fédération étudiante universitaire du Québec or FEUQ). CEGEP students are represented by the Fédération étudiante collégiale du Québec or FECQ, while the Association pour une solidarité syndicale étudiante or ASSE is a more radical organisation grouping students from both levels of education. The Canadian Alliance of Student Associations (CASA) was formed in 1995, by several post-secondary institutions students unions who had withdrawn from the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS) in a dispute over its policies and organizational structure. ... The Canadian Federation of Students (CFS) is the largest student organization in Canada. ... A CEGEP (IPA: or ; French: Cégep) is a post-secondary education institution exclusive to the province of Quebec in Canada. ...


Denmark

In Denmark the higher education system comprises two parallel sectors: universities and university colleges of applied sciences (e.g. nursing and engineering schools or teachers' colleges). Universities are characterised by scientific research and the highest education based thereon. University colleges of applied sciences are oriented towards working life and base their operations on the high vocational skill requirements set by it. These vocational institutions offer 3-4 year 'professional bachelor degrees'. Besides that there are a number of art schools. Universities belong under the Ministry of Science, University Colleges belong under the Ministry of Education, and the Art Schools belong under the Ministry of Culture. There are 12 universities at the moment, but in 2006 there is a major merger process going on to make fewer, bigger institutions. The student unions at universities (and some of the art schools' student unions) are generally members of the National Union of Students in Denmark which represents these students on the national level. The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ...


Every university has a student union (In Danish, Studenterråd). Membership is not mandatory. The student unions are funded by the university and the Ministry of Science on the basis of the percentage of votes received every year at the university election. The student union is autonomous, its internal life organized by its by-laws. The student unions are responsible for all representation of the students and elect the student members of different administrative organs. They usually coordinate and finance the activities of smaller, more specialized student organizations. For the financing of their activities, some student unions exact a membership fee and/or engage in different businesses.


In the Ministry of Culture institutions there are also local student organisations. In the Ministry of Education institutions, The student activities are very much related to a student division of the Labor Union in the different areas. For instance, the teachers' students are organised in the national labor union for teachers and so forth.


Upper-Seconday schools The Upper-Seconday schools(In Danish, Gymnasier), It is in Denmark a law that there has to be a studentscouncill at the Upper-Secondary schools. The studentscouncils are organized in the organisation DGS. 1sh of January 2008 120 of the 145 gymnasier where paying members.


Finland

In Finland the higher education system comprises two parallel sectors: universities and universities of applied sciences (polytechnics). Universities are characterised by scientific research and the highest education based thereon. Universities of applied sciences are oriented towards working life and base their operations on the high vocational skill requirements set by it. The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ...


Universities - ylioppilaskunta

Every university has a student union (In Finnish, ylioppilaskunta). Membership is mandatory by law for all students studying for Master's or Bachelor's degree. Visiting (non-degree) students are ineligible to join a student union [1]. The student unions are based on a parliamentary model, the general assembly (varying from 20 to 60 members) elected every second year using an open list election. The student union is autonomous, its internal life organised by its by-laws. The student unions are considered a part of Finnish administration, however, and their decisions can be appealed against to the Ministry of Education, although this is extremely rare. In such case, the claimant must prove that the decision has violated the law or by-laws.


The student unions are responsible for all representation of the students and elect the student members of different administrative organs, including the board of the university. According to the law, there must be student representation in every administrative body of the university. The student unions are also responsible for the health care of the students and usually coordinate and finance the activities of smaller, more specialized student organizations. For the financing of their activities, the student unions exact a membership fee and engage in different businesses. Differences in the scale of such businesses are mirrored in the fees exacted by the student unions. Generally, the older universities have wealthier student unions. For example, at Helsinki University of Technology, the student union owns and governs the dormitory village on the campus and rents some of their properties to the university itself, while The Student Union of the University of Helsinki owns several buildings in the very centre of the Helsinki city and has assets of more than 0.5 billion euros. Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) (Finnish: Teknillinen korkeakoulu; Swedish: Tekniska högskolan) is the premier technical university in Finland and the largest in the Nordic Countries with over 15000 students. ...


The university student unions organise extra curriculum activities, such as parties, sports events and access to sports facilities. They own a large number of cafeteria chains and even a multinational travel agency. Nearly all student unions publish one or more magazines, and some larger student unions offer nursing services for mothers while they go to the lectures. They are also a very active political power, commenting anything from municipal plans to national abortion laws. Student unions have organised demonstrations with up to 100,000 demonstrators and also run campaigns to affect the national and local politics during the elections. The National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL) pushed meal support into legistlation in the 1970s, which nowadays provides all higher education students meals costing only €2.35, not depending in the chain where one eats at. SYL also was able to negotiotiate even up to -50% discount on public transportation for the students. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


The Helsinki university student union status was written into laws by the Russian emperor Alexander II in 1868. And some of the university organisations' status is still nowadays effective with the 1800's laws. Later on, during the civil war of Finland, the student unions held significant role in flourishing the Finnish culture, and the Finnish national anthem was first sung by the university students. Many of the Finnish presidents and high-ranking politicians have started their career in universities' student union politics.


The student unions are members of the The National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL) [1], which represents the university students on the national and the international levels (a member of ESIB). SYL also takes part in the national law making process in topics related to the universities, students economical issues and the education. Part of the student unions are politically active, while in others, nations and subject association groups are dominant in the general assembly. Some of the student unions are active in municipal, global and local political questions, whereas some of the student unions see the protection of their students economical situation and educational rights as their only mission. National Unions of Students in Europe (ESIB) is an association of 50 National Unions of Students from 37 European Nations. ... Corporation refers to all different kinds of fraternities and sororities worldwide. ...


Polytechnics / Universities of Applied Sciences

Every university of applied sciences also has a student union, and its status is guaranteed by law (according to the law it is a public corporation like ylioppilaskunta). The student unions are much younger in this sector because the dual model system that makes the higher education in Finland came in 1996. Membership in opiskelijakunta differs from ylioppilaskunta, because the membership is not mandatory and every student can decide if he or she wants to join the student union.


In Finland, the student union is autonomous, its internal life organized by its by-laws which are confirmed by the rector. The student unions are based on a parliamentary model, the general assembly elected every year. The student union represents all students and is responsible in electing the student members of different administrative organs. The student union finances its operations mainly with membership fees, financial support from the university and small business operations.


The student unions are members of the organization The National Union of Finnish Polytechnic Students (SAMOK) [2]. SAMOK represents students on both the national and international level (a member of ESIB). Student unions in Finland are not politically active and the candidate lists for general assembly elections are not divided into political parties such as usually the case in universities. National Unions of Students in Europe (ESIB) is an association of 50 National Unions of Students from 37 European Nations. ...


Secondary schools / Junior highs student council

Some junior high schools have an elected student body, which keeps in contact with the rector and the staff. The Junior high students have a national central student organisation Suomen lukiolaisten liitto.


Conscription army - Reserve Officer School

The Finnish conscription army conscripts, whom have been recruited as the aspiring officers-in-reserve form a Reserve Officer School student council. As a curiosity, it is being a democratically governed and is an autonomous organization of conscripts within a military structure. The Finnish defence doctrine relies on the principle of territorial defence which means that the whole of Finland must be defended in all cases. ...


France

The French higher education system is centrally organized, so that local university bodies have restricted decision-making power. As a consequence, student unions are generally established at national level with local sections in most universities. The largest national student unions have a strong political identity and their actions are generally restricted to the defense of their vision of higher education rather than the particular interests of the student body of a single university. Union membership is regarded as an essentially political decision, without any particular advantage for students. The strength of unions can be best measured by their effectiveness in national protests rather than by membership figures. The most important student unions in France are: the left-leaning Union nationale des étudiants de France (National Students Union of France, UNEF) , the conservative Union Nationale Inter-Universitaire (National Inter-Universitary Union, UNI), the pro-European Confédération étudiante [3] (Student Confederation), and the Fédération des associations générales étudiantes [4] (Federation of General Students Associations, FAGE) regrouping different disciplinary associations. The National Union of Students of France (Union Nationale des Etudiants de France or UNEF) is the main national students union in France. ... Union Nationale Interuniversitaire (UNI) or Inter-University Union is a French right-wing union of university students, created in 1969 under the initiative of the Service dAction Civique, a secret service used by the gaullist movement, in particular by Robert Pandraud, Charles Pasqua and Jacques Foccart, which was dissolved...


In the Grandes écoles, the premium league in the French higher education system, students are generally members of the official Student Offices (Bureau des Elèves) in charge of the organization of social activities and sports events. The constitutions of these societies, which work in close partnership with the school administration, usually prevent union members from running for executive positions in order to keep the school independent from political groups that would eventually harm to the school prestige. For the film released in 2004, see Grande École (film). ...


Greece

In Greece every university department has its corresponding Student Union (in Greek: Σύλλογος Φοιτητών) and all students belonging to the department have the right to register as members. The main objective of a student union is to solve students' problems that can either be related to academic life or have a general political and social nature. Furthermore, Student Unions organize and support numerous activities such as political debates, demonstrations, university occupations, educational lectures, cultural and artistic events, conferences and so on.


The structure of a Student Union is rather simple and comprises two bodies: The General Assembly and the Board of Directors. The General Assembly consists of all student-members of the Union. It takes place on a regular basis and is the only decision-making body. During the General Assembly, many topics of student interest are discussed and the decisions are taken after open vote. The Board of Directors makes sure that the decisions of the General Assembly will be materialized. Moreover, the members of the Board of Directors, among which is the Union's President, participate in various university administrative bodies as representatives of all students in the Union. General assembly could be: The United Nations General Assembly General Assembly (presbyterian church), a supreme governing body, such as the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland See also List of Christian denominations#Presbyterian and Reformed Churches The General Assembly of Unitarian... Chairman of the Board redirects here. ...


Every year in early spring the Student Elections take place nationwide, during which students vote for their representatives.


All Student Unions in Greece are members of the "National Student Union of Greece" (ΕΦΕΕ - Εθνική Φοιτητική Ένωση Ελλάδας).


Ireland

Most of Ireland's universities and colleges[2]have students' unions which were established to represent the students in the context of internal college issues and on wider student related issues and also a means of solidarity with other movements globally. An on going campaign of virtually every students' union in Ireland is to prevent the reintroduction of tuition fees which were abolished in 1995. Most of the students' unions are affiliated with the Union of Students in Ireland. The students' unions are operated in accordance with the rules set down in their constitution which invariable enumerates a strong democratic and inclusive procedure for the governance on the union. This is a list of colleges and universities in the Republic of Ireland, some colleges are constituent colleges of universities. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


India

India has developed a complex tradition of student politics dating from the era of Congress Party domination. Student unions are organised both within universities, like the Student Council of IISc and across universities, but affiliated with political parties, as in the case of NSUI, ABVP, SFI, etc. The latter compete in elections to control posts in the former. Examples of activist unions include the Delhi University Students Union. The Indian National Congress (also known as the Congress Party) is the largest subscription-based organisation in the world. ...


Japan

In Japan, the student body is called 学生自治会 (gakusei-jichi-kai). In Japanese, the word 学生自治会 (gakusei-jichi-kai) means students' self-government-organizations. The student body in Japan promotes extracurricular activities. Usually, a cultural association, 文化会 (bunka-kai), and a sports association, 体育会 (taiiku-kai), are included within a student body as autonomous organizations. A student belongs to one or more students' organizations, and he or she does extracurricular activities through these students' organizations. However, the extracurricular activities of universities and colleges have been declining since the 1990s. Extracurricular activities are activities performed by students that fall outside the realm of the normal curriculum of school or university education. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


Malaysia

Malaysia has 20 public institutions of higher learnings. Each of them has one Student Representative Council (Malay: Majlis Perwakilan Pelajar or MPP) which is the ultimate legislative body among the students. The MPP holds the highest administrative authority in the Student Union of each university. A general election is held every year, usually in September, to elect representatives to the Student Representative Council. The percentage of voter turn-outs are usually high (70% to 95%) largely due to enforcements from the universities' governance which at the same time acts as the Election Committee. Not to be confused with the Malayalam language, spoken in India. ...


Every year, the Malaysian Ministry of Higher Education would set meetings and arrange programmes with all MPP. Nevertheless, each MPP has their own autonomous right to govern their own student body. The size of the MPP differs from each university, from as little as 12 person to as many as 48 person. Notable Student Representative Councils are the MPP of Universiti Malaysia Sarawak and the MPP of Universiti Putra Malaysia. (note: There are no sabbatical officers in the Malaysian Students' Union system. All members of MPP are part-time officers) Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS) is the eighth public university in Malaysia, and the first one initiated by the aspirations of Vision 2020. ...


Netherlands

There are several students' unions in The Netherlands which act as labor unions for students. The largest ones are VSSD in Delft and ASVA Studentenunie in Amsterdam. These students' unions are all members of LSVb, the national students' union. There's also a similar organization called ISO, which consists of several formal participation organizations, as well as ASVA Studentenunie and VSSD. Both ISO and LSVb are members of ESIB. Coordinates: Country Netherlands Province South Holland Area (2006)  - Municipality 24. ... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... The DNSA (Dutch National Students Association) or ISO (Interstedelijk Studenten Overleg) is the national representation and spokesman of students in the Netherlands at the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, VSNU (Association of Universities in the Netherlands), Association of Higher Professional Education, IB-Groep, etc. ... National Unions of Students in Europe (ESIB) is an association of 50 National Unions of Students from 37 European Nations. ...


There is also a Student Union at Twente University. It was founded in 1999, succeeding the 'Raad voor de Campusvoorzieningen' and the 'Campuscollege'. This Student Union is largely funded by the university and responsible for most activities not related to education, such as sports and culture. It is also an umbrella organization for close to 100 student organizations at the university. The board is not elected: any student can apply for a one-year term. Selection is performed by a subcommittee of the 'Raad van Toezicht'. The board consists of six members, all full time.


New Zealand

Students associations have a strong history in New Zealand of involvement in political causes, notably the Halt All Racist Tours campaign during the 1981 Springbok Tour. All universities, and most polytechnics and colleges of education have a students association. Since the economic reforms of the 1990s and the introduction of user pays in tertiary education, students associations and the national body have shifted their focus to challenging inequities in the student loan scheme and high levels of student debt. Part-time work along side the introduction of internal assessment and the change of semester structure has been attributed to the declining involvement in extracurricular activities and a shift in focus of the student movement from mass protest to lobbying. Halt All Racist Tours was a group set up in New Zealand in 1969 to protest rugby union tours to and from Apartheid South Africa. ... The 1981 Springbok Tour (still known by many in New Zealand as The Tour) was a controversial tour of New Zealand by the South African Springbok rugby union team. ...


Previous to 1998 membership of Students' Associations was compulsory at all public Tertiary Education providers (universities, polytechnics and colleges of education). In 1997 the right-wing National party proposed the Voluntary Student Membership amendment to the Education act which would have made membership of Students' Associations voluntary at all Tertiary Education Providers. The New Zealand National Party (National or the Nats) currently forms the second-largest (in terms of parliamentary seats) political party represented in the New Zealand Parliament, and thus functions as the core of the parliamentary Opposition. ... Voluntary student unionism (VSU) is a policy under which membership of – and payment of membership fees to – university student organisations is not compulsory. ...


However the National Party relied on support from the centrist New Zealand First party to pass legislation. The New Zealand First party preferred that Tertiary Students themselves choose whether their provider should be voluntary or complusary and pushed through a compromise to the amendment that allowed for a Compulsory Vs Voluntary referendum to be held at every public Tertiary Education Provider. The amendment also allowed for subsequent referendums which could not be held until at least two years had passed since the previous referendum and only if a petition was signed by 10% of the student populace. New Zealand First functions as a political party in New Zealand. ...


The first wave of referendums were held in 1999, in which several Polytechnics and two Universities (the University of Waikato and the University of Auckland) elected to become voluntary. In 2002 a second referendum was held at the University of Waikato and students choose to return to compulsory student membership. Similar referendums at Auckland University in 2001, 2003 and 2005 have all elected to retain voluntary student membership. The University of Waikato is located in Hamilton and Tauranga, New Zealand, and was established in 1964. ... The University of Auckland (Māori: Te Whare Wānanga o Tāmaki Makaurau) is New Zealands largest research-based university. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Most of New Zealand Tertiary students' associations are confederated under the New Zealand Union of Students' Associations. The New Zealand Union of Students Associations (NZUSA) is a representative body that advocates for the interests of tertiary students in New Zealand. ...


Norway

In Norway, every university is instructed and required by law to have a Student Union elected by the pupils/students at the school. The goal for every Student Union is to improve their school environment through encouraging social, cultural and other extracurricular events that is happening in the local community. The student unions in Norway is governed by a Board of Directors which is elected directly from the Student Council. Chairman of the Board redirects here. ...


Portugal

In Portugal, every university, polytechnic institute and any other higher education schools has their own students' unions. Union organizations are generally aimed to organize and promote extracurricular activities such as sports and culture events, parties, and academic festivities. At the same time, they also act as "labour unions for students" promoting and defending the student's points of view and rights, and dealing with the teaching institutions and the State's education agencies policies. The oldest and biggest students' union of Portugal is the Associação Académica de Coimbra (founded in 1887) which belongs to the students of the University of Coimbra. A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... AACs Symbol The Associação Académica de Coimbra (AAC) is the students union of the University of Coimbra. ... Year 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The University of Coimbra (Portuguese: Universidade de Coimbra) is a Portuguese public university in Coimbra, Portugal. ...


Sweden

At Swedish universities, students' unions are responsible for representing the students in evaluation of the education and decision-making within the universities. The union normally holds about one-third of the votes within every decision making body and thus holds a great deal of power. The Swedish National Union of Students (Sveriges Förenade Studentkårer, SFS), is an umbrella organisation of students unions at higher education facilities in Sweden. ... This article is contains a list of Swedish universities and university colleges is based on the Higher Education Ordinance of 1993 (as amended until January 2006). ...


Membership is mandatory by law. Students pay a membership fee usually between €20 and €40. The unions are usually governed by a general assembly comprising of elected representatives. Students' unions generally provide counselling services to its members and publishes their own magazines or newspapers. Large universities often have several students' unions, where the smaller students' unions only provide basic services. Larger students' unions often own and run their own facilities at the university such as shops, restaurants and night clubs. Which students' union a student belongs to is decided by the course of study, and competing for members is as such not possible. Many students' unions, but not all, are affiliated with the Swedish National Union of Students. // A school counselor is a counselor and educator who works in schools, and are often referred to as guidance counselors or educational counselors. In professional literature, the term school counselor is preferred. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... The Swedish National Union of Students (Sveriges Förenade Studentkårer, SFS), is an umbrella organisation of students unions at higher education facilities in Sweden. ...

See also: Nations at Swedish universities

The student nations at the two ancient universities in Uppsala and Lund, of which there are now thirteen at each university, are the oldest student societies in Sweden. ...

United Kingdom

In universities in Great Britain students' unions are constituted under Section 2 of the Education Act 1994. The ultimate purpose of students' unions is to democratically represent the interests of their members. Students who resign their membership may still use Union social facilities provided (often the main or only such facilities available) since they are for the benefit of the students of the institution, not just Union members. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Education Act 1994 is an Act passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom under John Majors government. ...


Although "students' union" is by far the most common name adopted by these organisations in the UK, seven (including Exeter, Aston, Liverpool and Birmingham) are named Guilds of students while the term student association is also used at some institutions, particularly in Scotland, where the ancient universities used to have a pair of segregated student unions for men and women and/or had separate "unions" for social activities and "students' representative councils" for representational matters (an arrangement that still exists at the University of Glasgow). When these were amalgamated the term student association was introduced. The University of Exeter (usually abbreviated as Exon. ... Aston University from the Aston Expressway Aston University is a plate glass campus university, situated on a 40-acre (0. ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool, England. ... Website http://www. ... Ancient university is a term used to describe the medieval and renaissance universities of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland that have continued to exist. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ...


The vast majority of UK students' unions are affiliated with the National Union of Students (NUS). In addition to lobbying, campaigning, debating and carrying out other representative activities, most students' unions facilitate "student activities" (societies, volunteering opportunities, and sport) peer led support (through advice centres, helplines, job shops and more), and social venues to bring their members together. Most unions receive some funding through an annual allocation, also called the block grant, from their educational institution. Many unions supplement this income from commercial sales from their venues, shops, and marketing revenue. The National Union of Students (NUS) is the main federation of students unions that exist inside the United Kingdom. ...


The oldest students' union in Britain is St Andrews, founded in 1864. The oldest in England is believed by many to be King's College London Union Society, founded in 1889. Britain's oldest students' union building, which is also the world's oldest students' union building, is the purpose-built Teviot Row House at the University of Edinburgh, built in 1889. The oldest in England is believed to be the Imperial College Union building in Beit Quad built between 1910-11 and designed by Sir Aston Webb. The two largest students' union buildings in the United Kingdom are at the University of Bristol and the University of Sheffield. St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Imperial College Union is the students union of Imperial College London. ... Sir Aston Webb, portrait by Solomon Joseph Solomon, ca 1906 Sir Aston Webb (May 22, 1849 - August 21, 1930) was an English architect, active in the late 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The University of Bristol is a university in Bristol, England. ... The University of Sheffield is a research university, located in Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ...


Influence

Although the Conservative government under John Major attempted to severely reduce the influence of students' unions in Britain, the NUS and individual students' unions managed to successfully lobby against the moves to restrict their political activities. The then Education Secretary, John Patten aimed to end the 'closed shop' and ensure students would have to join their union (opt-in) rather than automatically becoming a member. As many unions receive funding based upon membership levels this threatened their ability to achieve their core business. In 2004, lobbying by the NUS against a bill to introduce variable student fees in English and Welsh universities contributed towards the Labour government's majority being slashed to just five in the Commons vote on the bill. However, the passing of this bill as the Higher Education Act 2004 has led to some observers suggesting that students' unions in the UK have been "broken"[citation needed]. The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... The National Union of Students (NUS) is the main federation of students unions that exist inside the United Kingdom. ... In North America a closed shop is a business or industrial factory in which union membership (often of a specific union and no other) is a precondition to employment. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A bill is a proposed new law introduced within a legislature that has not been ratified, adopted, or received assent. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... The Higher Education Act 2004 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which introduced several changes to the higher education system in the United Kingdom. ...


Law relating to students' unions

The role of students' unions is enshrined in the Education Act 1994 which requires educational institutions to have a Code of Practice and publicise the ability to opt-out from membership without forfeiting access to the majority of union services. The Act also requires that Unions have a written constitution and that elections to major union offices are held by a secret ballot of the membership. The Act states that if a petition signed by a minimum number of students (the threshold cannot exceed 5%) is lodged then a referendum must be held on whether or not to end one of the union's affiliations. Students' unions are exempt charities. Students' Union funds from their allocated block grant are subject to ultra vires law and can not be spent on any campaign on issues other than those that affect the students they represent in their capacity as students. The Education Act 1994 is an Act passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom under John Majors government. ... Ultra vires is a Latin phrase that literally means beyond the power. ...


Scotland

The oldest students' union in Scotland is in St Andrews founded in 1864 and the world's oldest students' union building is the purpose-built Teviot Row House at the University of Edinburgh, built in 1889. Under the Universities (Scotland) Act 1889, Students' Representative Councils were set up at the ancient universities of Scotland. All students are eligible to elect members to the SRC unless they opt out under the Education Act 1994, and the President of the SRC is often a member of the University Court, the governing body of a Scottish Ancient. Where separate students' unions still exist (for example at the University of Glasgow), they operate as private members' clubs. At other universities, the SRC and the former union or unions have been combined into a single students' association. St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... Teviot Row House, the oldest purpose built Student Union Building in the world Teviot Row House (colloquially known as just Teviot) is one of the Student Union buildings at Edinburgh University, Scotland. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Students Representative Councils (SRC) were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1896 and are present at the five ancient universities of St Andrews, Aberdeen, Glasgow and Edinburgh as well as Dundee University. ... The Ancient universities of Scotland are those universities founded during the medieval period, and comprise (list by year of being chartered): The University of St Andrews, founded 1411 by papal bull The University of Glasgow, founded 1451 by papal bull The University of Aberdeen, founded 1495 by papal bull (as... The Education Act 1994 is an Act passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom under John Majors government. ... A University Court is the supreme governing body of an Ancient university in Scotland, analogous to a Board of Directors or a Board of Trustees The University Courts were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 and they are responsible for the finances and administration of each university. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ...


Northern Ireland

In Northern Ireland, students' unions operate in a similar way to those in Britain, except that they cannot exclusively be members of NUS. At the height of the Troubles in 1972, a bilateral agreement between the National Union of Students UK and the Union of Students in Ireland, decided that all student unions within Northern Ireland would hold membership of both organisations, through a new group called NUS-USI. The move was an attempt to promote student unity despite the sectarian divide and the arrangement is still in place. Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Troubles is a term used to describe two periods of violence in Ireland during the twentieth century. ... The National Union of Students (NUS) is the main federation of students unions that exist inside the United Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article needs to be wikified. ...


Officers

In a British students' union a sabbatical officer is a full-time paid officer elected by the students from their membership. The sabbatical officers are generally trustees of the students' union. Many students' unions also have unpaid officers who continue as students during their term of office. Some of these non-sabbatical officers may sit on the Executive Committee of the Union, or on the Union Council. The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ...


British Students' Unions commonly include variants on the following offices:

  • President or General Secretary
  • Vice-President (Services) or Services Officer
  • Vice-President (Welfare) or Welfare Officer
  • Vice-President (Education), Education Officer, Academic Affairs Officer or Educational Campaigns Officer
  • Treasurer (or Finance Officer)
  • Press and Publicity or Communications Officer
  • Entertainments, commonly known as Ents Officer
  • Athletic Union President (or Sports Officer)
  • LGBT or sometimes LGB Officer
  • Environment and Ethics Officer
  • Equal Opportunities or Liberation Officer
  • Women's Officer
  • Racial Equality or Black Students' Officer
  • Societies, Clubs & Societies or Clubs, Societies and Associations (CSA) Officer
  • Campaigns or Policy and Campaigns Officer
  • Student Community Action Co-ordinator (SCA Co-ordinator)
  • RAG Chair (or RAG Officer)
  • Accommodation Officer

For other uses, see President (disambiguation). ... The term General Secretary (alternatively First Secretary) denotes a leader of various unions, parties or associations. ... An Athletic Union or Athletics Union (AU) usually refers to the group of student sports clubs within a university or other institute of higher education, in the United Kingdom. ... The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... The abbreviation LGB may refer to: Lesbians, Gays, and Bisexuals. ... Look up Liberation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... University Rag societies are student-run charitable fundraising organisations that are widespread in the United Kingdom and Ireland. ... University Rag societies are student-run charitable fundraising organisations that are widespread in the United Kingdom and Ireland. ...

United States

In the United States, these groups are often known as student government or "Associated Students." In the U.S., the phrase "student union" often refers to a "student activity center" (also known as a "student center" or "student commons"), a building containing a "union" of many dining halls, game rooms, lounges, student offices, and other spaces for student activities. At institutions with large graduate, medical school, and individual "college" populations, there are often student governments that serve those specific constituencies. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A student activity center or SAC, is a type of building found on university campuses. ... In set theory and other branches of mathematics, the union of a collection of sets is the set that contains everything that belongs to any of the sets, but nothing else. ...


The largest students' union/center building is at Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma,[3] however, it is unusual in the United States in that it combines the US terms of "student union" (meaning a "student activity center") and a "student government". Oklahoma State University–Stillwater, located in Stillwater, Oklahoma, is an institution of higher learning founded in 1890 as a land-grant university under the Morrill Act. ... A student activity center or SAC, is a type of building found on university campuses. ...


Universities that call their legislative councils "Student Assembly" include Michigan State University, the University of Michigan, Dartmouth College, Cornell University, the College of William and Mary, and the State University of New York (SUNY). Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM, U-M or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Cornell redirects here. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Not to be confused with University of the State of New York. ...


Officers

  • President (chief executive officer)
  • Vice President (sometimes also serves as chair of the council)
  • Secretary
  • Treasurer (sometimes combined with secretary to form the position of Secretary/Treasurer)
  • Speaker (and sometimes Deputy Speaker)
  • Senator (sometimes called a Councilman, Representative, or Member of Parliament)
  • Parliamentarian
  • Sergeant-at-Arms

Structures

Many student governments are structured similarly to the United States Government, consisting of distinct executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Alternatively, a parliamentary model is followed. As a result of the particularities of university environments, these structures often include elements which are not found in the federal government (e.g. legislative veto, programming branches, initiative, recall, referendum). In some cases, student governments follow a corporate model where offices reflect business roles such as Vice President of Finance, Director, etc. The government of the United States, established by the United States Constitution, is a federal republic of 50 states, a few territories and some protectorates. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... The judiciary, also referred to as the judicature, consists of justices, judges and magistrates among other types of adjudicators. ... A parliamentarian is a specialist in parliamentary procedure. ... A legislative veto exists in governments that separate executive and legislative functions if actions by the executive can be rejected by the legislative. ... Corporate may refer to either A corporation, a type of legal entity, often formed to conduct business Corporate (film), a 2006 Bollywood film starring Bipasha Basu. ...


Also, many universities with significant graduate, law, and medical school programs have separate student governments for the graduate and undergraduate student bodies. Similarly, multiple undergraduate student governments sometimes form to address specific facets of university decision-making. At the University of Texas, for example, students are served by three equal and independent student governance organizations: the Student Government represents students generally, but focuses on undergraduate student life matters; the Senate of College Councils represents undergraduate and graduate students in academic affairs; and the Graduate Student Assembly represents graduate students in both academic and student affairs. The areas of overlap among the three organizations leads to inevitable competition, which many commentators have suggested is healthy and leads to positive outcomes for the student body. Former Senate of College Councils chair Kate Nanney has recently written a History of the Senate of College Councils, which details the interactions of these groups over a period of more than 30 years. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ...


Responsibilities

Within their capacity as representatives of the student body, student governments may fulfill a range of responsibilities, such as:

  • Representing the interests and concerns of the student body and serving on college-wide committees made up of students, faculty, and administrators
  • Disbursing mandatory fees for student activities to clubs, organizations, and campus offices
  • Sponsoring campus-wide programs (e.g. Homecoming, concerts, parades, speakers, entertainment, etc.)
  • Chartering and regulating student organizations

A student organization is a voluntary association of students at institutions of secondary and higher education for a specific legal purpose. ...

Relationship to the Institution

Most universities and colleges (both public and private) in the United States are governed by a Board of Trustees or Regents. Student governments tend to be chartered by the Board but, in the case of public universities operated by a State, may be recognized by the state legislature. Their structure, purpose and responsibilities are usually established in a constitution ratified by the student body. Some states, such as California and Florida, specifically provide for "student body organizations" in their public institutions by statute. (e.g. Cal Education Code § 76060 (Community Colleges); Cal Education Code § 89300 (Universities)). The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a member of a trust, which can be set up for any of a variety of purposes, and is entrusted with the administration of property on behalf of others. ... For the insecticide Regent, see Regent (insecticide) A regent is an acting governor. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      In the United States of America, a state legislature is a generic term referring to the...


Student governments have historically been considered auxiliaries of the university to which they belong. Since ultimate responsibility over the direction of a university is usually vested in a Chancellor or President appointed by the Board, some conflicts may arise between Student Government and the university administration, especially in the area of fiscal matters. In addition to a student government, many universities also establish governments for faculty (e.g. Faculty Senate) and staff (e.g. Staff Assembly). In such cases, there often exist links and dependencies between these bodies. Many colleges/universities also allow the student governments to control the student activities (student life) funds generated by the fees students pay each quarter/semester. This usually establishes a strong power for the governing body of students because control over money is power and strong influence. A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... For other uses, see President (disambiguation). ...


Student government budgets range from as high as $30 million (the University of Colorado/Boulder) to less than a few thousand dollars. Large public residential universities tend to enjoy the largest operational budgets, while commuter-based public colleges and private colleges tend to have the smallest budgets. More than 71 percent of American "SG" officers are compensated through salaries, stipends, scholarships, and tuition waivers, according to the SG Salary Survey. The American Student Government Association, the professional association for collegiate student govoernments, maintains a database of student government information including budgets, number of members, salaries, corporate structure and number of recognized clubs. The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[3]; Colorado and CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado System in Boulder, Colorado. ... The American Student Government Association (ASGA) was founded in 2001 as Americas first professional association serving collegiate Student Governments and Student Government Associations. ...


Most American student governments are "official, on-campus organizations" recognized by their institutions. But particularly in California, Minnesota, and Oregon, the "Associated Students, Inc." are non-profit corporations that operate independently of the institution. They derive some of their funding through the sale of services such as "discount cards" that students can use at local establishments.


Average voter turnout in all 4,700 student governments nationwide is in the range of 2 to 4 percent, according to the ASGA SG databsae. This number is negatively skewed by poor participation overall in SG at the more than 2,000 American community colleges which have larger commuter and non-traditional populations and therefore have less emphasis on traditional student services and programs like student government. State universities and colleges tend to have a 10-15 percent voter turnout, while private colleges often have much higher totals, sometimes into 40 percent or higher, according to ASGA.


Most student government leaders serve one-year terms, but there are isolated examples of multi-year officers. This cyclical nature of student government officers often prevents them from attaining real influence on college campuses. By the time student leaders learn their roles, their terms of office are nearing completion.


Examples

Michigan State University

Main article: ASMSU

Michigan State's Student Assembly comprises one half of the ASMSU undergraduate student government, along with the Academic Assembly. At MSU, the Student Assembly has control over student-life affairs, and controls three seats in the University Academic Governance System, as well as 96.5% of the nearly $1.3 million ASMSU budget. The number of representatives per college varies on the population of the college, like the United States House of Representatives. The Associated Students of Michigan State University (ASMSU) is the undergraduate Student Government of Michigan State University. ... Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. ... The Associated Students of Michigan State University (ASMSU) is the undergraduate Student Government of Michigan State University. ... Academic Assembly is a common name the legislative branch of many university student governments. ... For the rental car company, see Budget Rent a Car. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party...


The ASMSU Student Assembly has five officers and forty-five staff members, with three of those being executive staff. The Chair, Vice-Chairperson of Internal Affairs, Vice-Chairperson of External Affairs, Vice-Chairperson of Student Funding, and Vice-Chairperson of Student Programming are elected each April by the newly-elected representatives. The Assembly usually - but not always - votes its own members to leadership positions. The staff members are hired by a Human Resources hiring committee. They include the Director and Assistant Director of Legislative Affairs, the Director of Community Affairs, the Director of Legal Services, and the Director of Student Defenders. Three of these staff members, the Director and Assistant Director of Legislative Affairs and the Director of Community Affairs, make up the E-Staff, a lobbying group that works closely with the ASMSU Academic Assembly Director of Education Policy to lobby the Michigan State Legislature on behalf of the almost 40,000 undergraduate students of Michigan State University. As of May 2006, the ASMSU Student Assembly is in its 43nd session. This article is about human resources as it applies to business, labor, and economies. ... A committee is a (relatively) small group that can serve one of several functions: Governance: in organizations too large for all the members to participate in decisions affecting the organization as a whole, a committee (such as a Board of Directors) is given the power to make decisions. ... The Michigan Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Michigan. ...


Structure

Below is the basic structure for the ASMSU Student Assembly. For the entire organizational flowchart, please see the article on ASMSU
A flowchart that a member of the Wikipedia community could use for guidance when dealing with a difficult editor. ... The Associated Students of Michigan State University (ASMSU) is the undergraduate Student Government of Michigan State University. ...

Student Assembly
47 elected seats
18 appointed seats
Student Assembly Chair
swarrow
downarrow
downarrow
searrow
Vice Chair for
Internal Affairs
Vice Chair for
External Affairs
Vice Chair for
Programming
Vice Chair for
Funding
Freshman Class Council
Senior Class Council
Legislative Affairs
Community Affairs
Programming Board Funding Board
Legal Services
Red Cedar Log Yearbook

A chairperson is the political correct term for the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... The phrase Parliamentarian can have different meanings based on its context: Most generally something parliamentarian is especially associated with a parliament or parliamentary system The proper noun Parliamentarian is a Member of Parliament, especially one who is particularly adept in the chamber, or an officer of a legislature charged with... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... Lobbying is the practice of private advocacy with the goal of influencing a governing body, in order to ensure that an individuals or organizations point of view is represented in the government. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... Computer programming (often simply programming) is the craft of implementing one or more interrelated abstract algorithms using a particular programming language to produce a concrete computer program. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... Funding or financing is to provide capital (funds), which means money for a project, a person, a business or any other private or public institutions. ... Freshman redirects here. ... This article is about the political effort. ... Location in Michigan Coordinates: , Country State Counties Ingham, Clinton Incorporation 1907 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Samir Singh (D)  - City Manager Theodore J. Stanton Area  - City  11. ... Computer programming (often simply programming) is the craft of implementing one or more interrelated abstract algorithms using a particular programming language to produce a concrete computer program. ... Funding or financing is to provide capital (funds), which means money for a project, a person, a business or any other private or public institutions. ... Most liberal democracies consider that it is necessary to provide some level of legal aid to persons otherwise unable to afford legal representation. ... For other uses, see Yearbook (disambiguation). ...

University of Michigan

The Michigan Student Assembly is the University of Michigan's central student government. It is composed of the Assembly, the Steering Committee, and the Central Student Judiciary. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM, U-M or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ...


The Assembly represents both undergraduate and graduate students, where the number of representatives per college varies on the population of the college. The College of Literature, Science and Arts (LSA) has almost half of the seats on the assembly (19), since it is by far the university's largest college. Following that is the Rackham Graduate School (7), Engineering (6), Business (3), as well as several schools with single student representation.


MSA is governed by a president and vice-president who are popularly elected by the student body at-large. Each college at the University of Michigan is given a representative number of seats (based on enrollment figures). Each representative on the Assembly was voted on by popular vote of their college or school. Elections for representatives and officers are highly competitive.


The executive positions include the President, Vice President, Student General Counsel, Treasurer, and Chief of Staff.


The 19 committees and commissions of MSA accomplish much of the work on the Assembly. These range from the External Relations Committee, to the Peace and Justice Commission, to the Budget Priorities Committee to the Voice Your Vote Commission. The Assembly runs many successful programs, including Airbus (an inexpensive airport shuttle service), a Rate Your Landlords website, Advice Online, a website with statistical information on every class and professor on campus, and is active in registering students to vote and get out the vote activities.


College of William and Mary

The Student Assembly of the College of William and Mary (SA) is the official student government of William and Mary. It is designed to represent all students at the college, both undergraduate and graduate. At William and Mary, the SA has control of over $500,000 in student activities fees, over $100,000 in reserve funding, and is the primary source of student representation to the college administration, the City of Williamsburg, and the Commonwealth of Virginia. Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Structure

The SA is divided into three branches, executive, legislative, and judicial, much like the United States government. The executive is headed by a President and Vice President, who run together on a ticket and are directly elected by all students each March. The executive branch also contains many non-elected officials, including a staff led by the Chief of Staff, a communications office, and many executive departments, such as the Department of Student Life and the Department of Public Affairs. For other uses, see President (disambiguation). ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... In politics, a chief of staff is the primary aide to a political leader or position. ...


The legislative branch is divided into three parts: the Senate, the Undergraduate Council, and the Graduate Council. The Senate is the upper house; it is charged with writing legislation that distributes student activity funds, expressing the will of the student body, and organizing the internal structure of the SA. Also, it confirms the principal officers of the executive departments and independent agencies. It is made up of 16 undergraduate students (four from each class), and 6 graduate students (one from the five graduate schools, plus an at-large seat). The Undergraduate Council consists of officers from each undergraduate class: a President, Vice President for Advocacy, Vice President for Social Affairs, Treasurer, and Secretary. The Graduate Council consists of officers from each graduate school. Only the Senate can pass binding legislation; however, the Councils may veto constitutional amendments. For the band, see Senate (band). ...


The judicial branch is the Review Board, which resolves disputes between all bodies. It functions much like the Supreme Court of the United States, in that it is a panel of justices deciding cases. There are six associate justices and one Chairman, appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate every year. The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ...


Finally, there are three independent agencies, not affiliated with any branch: the Elections Commission, led by a powerful Chairman and charged with overseeing the successful implementation of elections every semester, the Agency for Internal Affairs, which deals with matters internal to the SA, and the First Year Council, which orients freshmen to the SA. There are also various independent class councils such as the 2008 Class Council, which consist of students who want to help class officers plan events; these councils are not officially a part of the SA.


As of the now, the Assembly is in its 315th session (the numbering represents the number of years since the founding of the College), or its 93nd year (the organization itself being founded in 1915).


References

  1. ^ http://www.utu.fi/en/studying/studies/visiting.html
  2. ^ Although there's a difference between 'college' and 'university' the words have become almost synonymous in informal speech
  3. ^ ANSTHE, Oklahoma State University, retrieved April 23, 2006

See also

Students occupying Sheffield town hall over the introduction of higher education fees Student activism is work done by students to effect political, environmental, economic, or social change. ... A student court is a type of judicial system most often seen in schools, particularly middle and high schools. ... // Student Voice is a neologism describing the distinct perspectives and actions of young people throughout education focused on education. ... The character of Pedro Sanchez runs for Class President in the 2003 film Napoleon Dynamite A Class President is usually the leader of a class cabinet or organization within a Student Council at an elementary, junior high, high school, or college. ... The American Student Government Association (ASGA) was founded in 2001 as Americas first professional association serving collegiate Student Governments and Student Government Associations. ... National Unions of Students in Europe (ESIB) is an association of 50 National Unions of Students from 37 European Nations. ... The National Union of Students (NUS) is the main federation of students unions that exist inside the United Kingdom. ...

External links

  • ASBGOV.COM - Student Governments Unite! A free networking and research site for student government leaders.
  • The SG Consulting Group The SG Consulting Group is a firm specializing in training and consulting for collegiate student governments in the United States.
  • NOM - The Nordic Presidential Meeting (Nordiskt Ordförande Möte) - The network is a consultative meeting of the National Unions of Students of Nordic Countries who are members of the Nordic Council of Ministers.

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