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Encyclopedia > Student

The word student is etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb "stŭdērĕ", meaning "to direct one's zeal at"; hence a student could be described as 'one who directs zeal at a subject'. In its widest use, "student" is used for anyone who is learning. The word student may refer to: A student in school William Sealey Gosset, who wrote under the pseudonym Student General Kurt Student Edinburgh newspaper Student This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Not to be confused with Entomology, the scientific study of insects. ... Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Conjugation is the creation of derived forms of a verb from one basic form. ... In linguistics, conjugation is the creation of derived forms of a verb from its principal parts by inflection (regular alteration according to rules of grammar). ... It has been suggested that Verbal agreement be merged into this article or section. ... In linguistics, meaning is the content carried by the words or signs exchanged by people when communicating through language. ...

Students attending a lecture at the Helsinki University of Technology
Students attending a lecture at the Helsinki University of Technology

Contents

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x900, 147 KB) A mathematics lecture, apparently about linear algebra, at Helsinki Univeristy of Technology - TKK. File links The following pages link to this file: Mathematics University Student Lecture ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x900, 147 KB) A mathematics lecture, apparently about linear algebra, at Helsinki Univeristy of Technology - TKK. File links The following pages link to this file: Mathematics University Student Lecture ... Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) (Finnish: Teknillinen korkeakoulu; Swedish: Tekniska högskolan) is the premier technical university in Finland and the largest in the Nordic Countries with over 15000 students. ...

Scope

In many countries, the word "student" or a cognate equivalent (e.g., French "étudiant") is reserved for higher education or university students. However derived adjectives in such languages (e.g., "estudiantin" in French) may also, or even especially (e.g., Dutch "studentikoos"), be associated with the non-academic, fun-loving side of stereotyped "student life" (in part organised, such as hazing, "Greek life" in North American Fraternities and sororities), although not all students induldge in this lifestyle. Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Hazing is an often ritualistic test, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...


Currently, many children and teenagers are subject to compulsory education: by law they are required to attend some form of school. The term 'pupil', defined as 'one under academic discipline' [1] serves as a useful distinction between those required to study (usually children), and those choosing to study (usually adults). Laws vary from country to country, but most pupils are allowed to abandon their education when they reach the age specified in their jurisdiction. For other uses, see Nation (disambiguation). ...


Researchers, educators and education administrators around the world are increasingly heeding student voice, a common reference to the experiences, opinions, ideas and actions of children and youth in schools. This practice provides authenticity and efficacy for school improvement efforts. The first European universities were student universities: the professors depended on payment from the students, who picked their own courses, often itinerant. // Student Voice is a neologism describing the distinct perspectives and actions of young people throughout education focused on education. ...


17 November is International Students Day, which commemorates those students who called for peace who were killed at the beginning of the Second World War; specifically, the date was chosen in memory of Jan Opletal and the events following his death. 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Amnesty International flyer International Students Day is an international observance of student activism, held annually on November 17. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Jan Opletal (January 1, 1915–November 11, 1939) was a student of the Medical Faculty of the Charles University in Prague, who was killed in an anti-Nazi demonstration during the German occupation. ...


International variations

Students in rural Sudan, 2002
Students in rural Sudan, 2002
Over one thousand students in uniform during an assembly at a secondary school in Singapore.
Over one thousand students in uniform during an assembly at a secondary school in Singapore.

Image File history File linksMetadata Village_school_in_Northern_Bahr_el_Ghazal,_Sudan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Village_school_in_Northern_Bahr_el_Ghazal,_Sudan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2321 KB) Summary Students of Nan Hua High School gathering in the School Hall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2321 KB) Summary Students of Nan Hua High School gathering in the School Hall. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ...

Australia

In Australia some university students favour the term "jaffy" for freshman, an acronym standing for "just another fucking first-year". The meaning refers to the fact that, having finished high-school as one of the most important students in a small school, the new students are suddenly the least important students in a large university, i.e. they are "just another" in a sea of irrelevant freshmen. Otherwise "first-years", "second-years", etc., are in common usage. Children in primary and secondary school are also referred to as students.


Canada

In Canada, special terms are occasionally used. In English provinces, the high school (known as Academy or secondary school) years can be referred to simply as first, second, third, fourth and fifth year. Some areas call it by grade such as Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12. There is no more Grade 13. In university, students are classified as first-, second-, third-, or fourth-year students. In some occasions, they can be called Senior One's, Two's, Three's, and Four's. First years are commonly known as frosh, and the first week of university for first year students is commonly known as Frosh week.


Continental Europe

In Belgian universities, first-year students are called schacht in Flemish, or bleu in French. Dutch (  ) is a West Germanic language spoken by around 23 million people, mainly in the Netherlands, Belgium and Suriname, but also by smaller groups of speakers in parts of France, Germany and several former Dutch colonies. ...


United Kingdom

At universities in the United Kingdom the derivative form "fresher" is more often used to describe new students; the term "first years" is also commonly used (especially after the first term). There is no derogatory connotation in this name unlike its US counterpart. The week before the start of a new year is called "Freshers' Week" at many universities, with a programme of special events to welcome new students; some universities, however, are attempting to drop the connotative associations of "freshers week" by renaming it "welcome week".[citation needed] An undergraduate in the last year of study before graduation is generally known as a "finalist", or simply a third year. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The ancient Scottish University of St Andrews uses the terms "bejant" for a first year (from the French "bec-jaune" – "yellow beak", "fledgling"). Second years are called "semi-bejants", third years are known as "tertians", and fourth years, or others in their final year of study, are called "magistrands". St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ...


Home tutoring also takes place in the UK.


United States

First year

A freshman (slang alternatives that are usually derogatory in nature include fish, fresher, frosh, newbie, freshie, snotter, fresh-meat, etc.) is a first-year student in college, university or high school. The gender-neutral variation "freshperson" is rare. College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In many traditions there is a remainder of the ancient (boarding, pre-commuting) tradition of fagging. He may also be subjected to a period of hazing or ragging as a pledge(r) or rookie, especially if joining a fraternity/sorority or certain other clubs, mainly athletic teams. For example, many high schools have initiation methods for freshmen, including, but not limited to, Freshman Duct-taped Throw, Freshman races, Freshman Orientation, Freshman Freshening (referring to poor hygiene among freshmen), and the Freshman Spread. Fagging in British English, is used (as a verb and a noun) to refer to a kind of apprenticeship practiced historically within public schools. ... Hazing is an often ritualistic test, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ... Ragging (known in the USA as hazing) is the systematic ritual physical and psychological abuse of freshmen or other juniors by their seniors in an educational setup, with the purported intent of socially inducting the newcomers into the group. ... Pledge is a verb, meaning to promise solemnly, and a noun, meaning the promise or its maker or its object. ... The Rookie: Norman Rockwells cover for The Saturday Evening Post Rookie is a term for a person who is in their first year of play of their sport and has little or no professional experience. ...


Even after that, specific rules may apply depending on the school's traditions (e.g., wearing a distinctive beanie), non-observance of which can be punished, even by a paddle line. A beanie is the name for two distinct types of cap or hat. ... Holed paddle designed for spanking. ...


Second year

In the U.S., a sophomore is a second-year student. Folk etymology has it that the word means "wise fool"; consequently "sophomoric" means "pretentious, bombastic, inflated in style or manner; immature, crude, superficial" (according to the Oxford English Dictionary). While it appears to be formed from Greek "sophos", meaning "wise", and "moros" meaning "foolish", it is in fact from the word "sophumer", an obsolete variant of "sophism"[2]. In Britain, the term "sophomore" is unknown, and second-year students are simply called "second years". Folk etymology is a term used in two distinct ways: A commonly held misunderstanding of the origin of a particular word, a false etymology. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... Sophism (gr. ...

Academic procession during the University of Canterbury graduation ceremony.

Academic procession at the University of Canterbury graduation ceremony 2004. ... Academic procession at the University of Canterbury graduation ceremony 2004. ... This page is about the New Zealand University. ...

Post-second year

In the U.S. a junior is a student in the penultimate (usually third) year and a senior a student in the last (usually fourth) year of college, university, or high school. A college student who takes more than the normal number of years to graduate is sometimes referred to as a "super senior".[3] The term "underclassman" is sometimes used to refer collectively to freshmen and sophomores, and "upperclassman" to refer collectively to juniors and seniors, sometimes even sophomores. The term "middler" is used to describe a third-year student of a school (generally college) which offers five years of study. In this situation, the fourth and fifth years would be referred to as "junior" and "senior" years, respectively. College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A super senior is a student in an American 4-year educational institution such as a high school or university who is in his or her 5th (or later) year or has more than the usual number of credits required to graduate without achieving a diploma or Bachelors degree. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ...


Mature students

Main article: Mature student

A mature, or adult student in tertiary education (at a university or a college) is normally classified as an (undergraduate) student who is at least 21 years old (23 years old in the Republic of Ireland) at the start of their course and usually having been out of the eucation system for at least two years. Mature students can also include students who have been out of the education system for decades, or students with no secondary education. Mature students also make up graduate and postgraduate populations by demographic of age. A mature student (aka adult student) in tertiary education (at a university or a college) is normally classified as an (undergraduate) student who is at least 21 years old (23 years old in Ireland) at the start of their course and usually having been away from school for at least... Students attend a lecture at a tertiary institution. ... An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly U.S. term for a university students main field of specialisation during his or her bachelors degree studies. ... Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ...


Student pranks

Main article: Student prank

University students have a long association with pranks and japes.[4][5][6][7][8] These can often involve petty crime, such as the theft of traffic cones and other public property,[9] or hoaxes. It is also not uncommon for students from one school to steal or deface the mascot of a rival school.[10] In fact, pranks play such a significant part in student culture that numerous books have been published that focus on the issue.[11][12]Pranks may reflect current events[13], be a form of protest or revenge, or have no other purpose than for the enjoyment of the prank itself. A recent report has been released focusing on the misbehaviour of university students. The report, Studentification: A Guide to Opportunities, Challenges and Practice, by Universities UK, focuses on six British universities as case studies. Students are often stereotypically associated with childish pranks and jokes. ... Traffic cones are usually used to divert traffic. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ...


Other terms

  • A student who is repeating a grade level of schooling due to poor grades is sometimes referred to as having been "held back".
  • The term pupil (originally a Latin term for a minor as the ward of an adult guardian etc.) is used in English primary and secondary schools instead of "student", but once attending higher education such as sixth-form college etc, the term "student" is standard.
  • The United States military academies use only numerical terms, except there are colloquial expressions used in everyday speech. In order from first year to fourth year, students in these institutions are officially referred to as "fourth-class", "third-class", "second-class", and "first-class" cadets or midshipmen. Unofficially, other terms are used, for example at the United States Military Academy, freshman are called "plebes," sophomores are called "yearlings" or "yuks," juniors are called "cows," and seniors are called "firsties." Some universities also use numerical terms to identify classes; students enter as "first-years" and graduate as "fourth-years" (or, in some cases, "fifth-years", "sixth-years", etc).
  • Freshers' Flu refers to the generic illness that many new students get during the first few weeks of starting the first year. This is often attributed to viral/bacterial diseases being carried by students from other regions of the country/world, to which some have no immunity.[citation needed]

Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into sixth form college. ... The United States military academies, sometimes known as the United States service academies, are federal academies for the education and training of commissioned officers for the United States armed forces. ... Flu season is mostly a colloquial term used to describe the regular outbreak in flu cases, or even cases of the common cold during the late fall or winter. ...

Idiomatic use

"Freshman" and "sophomore" are sometimes used figuratively, almost exclusively in the United States, to refer to a first or second effort ("the singer's sophomore album"), or to a politician's first or second term in office ("freshman senator") or an athlete's first or second year on a professional sports team. "Junior" and "senior" are not used in this figurative way to refer to third and fourth years or efforts, because of those words' broader meanings of "younger" and "older". (A junior senator is therefore not one who is in his or her third term of office, but merely one who has not been in the Senate as long as the other senator from his or her state.) Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Figurative art describes artworks - particularly paintings - which are clearly derived from real object sources, but are not necessarily representational. ... A singer is a musician who uses their voice to produce music. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Look up athlete in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In professional sports, athletes receive payment for their performance, as opposed to amateur sports and college sports where they do not. ... Look up Young in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Old age consists of ages nearing the average lifespan of human beings, and thus the end of the human life cycle. ... Senior Senator and Junior Senator are terms commonly used in the media to describe U.S. Senators. ... A U.S. state is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, with the District of Columbia, forms the United States of America. ...


References

  1. ^ Chambers Dictionary
  2. ^ http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=sophomore&searchmode=none
  3. ^ http://www.doubletongued.org/index.php/dictionary/super_senior/ Definition of a super senior; URL accessed October 5, 2006.
  4. ^ http://www.princeton.edu/mudd/news/faq/topics/pranks.shtml
  5. ^ http://www.kiwiblog.co.nz/2006/10/student_pranks.html
  6. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/china/story/0,7369,1075600,00.html
  7. ^ http://www.epigram.org.uk/view.php?id=1503
  8. ^ http://www.fox11az.com/news/topstories/stories/kmsb-20070614-PEjc-prank.338b9df.html
  9. ^ http://www.hero.ac.uk/uk/studying/archives/2001/nightmare_on_student_stre901.cfm
  10. ^ http://www.dailycal.org/article.php?id=10351
  11. ^ Nightwork: A History of Hacks and Pranks at MIT by T.F. Peterson (Paperback - 1 April 2003)
  12. ^ If at All Possible, Involve a Cow: The Book of College Pranks by Neil Steinberg (Paperback - 1992)
  13. ^ http://www.boston.com/news/globe/city_region/breaking_news/2006/09/mit_hacks_mark_1.html

is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Student - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1021 words)
The word student is etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb "stŭdērĕ", meaning "to direct one's zeal at"; hence a student is one who directs zeal at a subject.
A student is also known as a disciple in the sense of a religious area of study or in the sense of a "discipline" of learning.
A freshman (common replacements: frosh, newbie, etc.) is a first-year student in college or university, or, chiefly in the United States, in high school.
Texas A&M University Student Rules: Appendix VIII (2325 words)
The student organization is responsible for assuring that alcohol consumption does not detrimentally affect the health and well being of those attending the event.
A student found guilty of noncompliance with these rules or the laws of the State of Texas has committed a violation of University Student Rules and is subject to sanctions commensurate with the offense and any aggravating and mitigating circumstances.
Students 21 years of age or older who choose to consume alcoholic beverages are expected to do so in moderation to ensure residents’ rights to privacy, sleep and study within their rooms.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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