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Encyclopedia > Stregheria
Ways of the Strega published in 1994, described Raven Grimassi's view of Stregheria and popularized Italian-based witchcraft. Cover shown is from the 2000 edition.
Ways of the Strega published in 1994, described Raven Grimassi's view of Stregheria and popularized Italian-based witchcraft. Cover shown is from the 2000 edition.

Stregheria is an archaic Italian word meaning "witchcraft",[1] that has been revived, principally by Raven Grimassi, to refer to an Italian-based tradition of witchcraft. It is sometimes called La Vecchia Religione (the Old Religion). Image File history File links Ways_of_the_Strega_book_cover. ... Image File history File links Ways_of_the_Strega_book_cover. ... Raven Grimassi (b. ... “Witch” redirects here. ... Raven Grimassi (b. ...


Italian witchcraft was a focus of the work of folklorist Charles G. Leland who interviewed people in old Italy claiming to be witches (as evidenced in his books Etruscan Roman Remains, and especially Aradia: Gospel of the Witches). Stregheria practitioners hold Aradia and the work of other historians as important to the understanding of their religious practice and the background of their tradition. Unlike most other witchcraft traditions, with the exception of Gardnerian Wicca, Stregheria has received attention from the academic community. Charles Godfrey Leland (1824–1903) was an American humorist and folklorist, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and educated at Princeton University, and in Europe. ... Title page of the original edition of Aradia Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches is an 1899 book by Charles Godfrey Leland. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Academia is a collective term for the scientific and cultural community engaged in higher education and research, taken as a whole. ...


Stregheria has both similarities and differences with Wicca, and in some ways resembles other culturally-based Neopagan religions. Practices include the celebration of seasonal holidays, ritual magic, and reverence for Gods, ancestors and tradition-specific spirits. Stregheria itself has variant traditions, and individual practices may vary considerably. For other uses, see Wicca (disambiguation). ... Neopaganism or Neo-Paganism is any of a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, primarily pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions. ... In the United States, a holiday is a day set aside by a nation or culture (in some cases, multiple nations and cultures) typically for celebration but sometimes for some other kind of special culture-wide (or national) observation or activity. ... Ritual magic is the performance of a ritual for magical purposes. ...

Contents

Origins and history

As described in Grimassi's books, especially Ways of the Strega, Stregheria claims a seven-hundred year history. This history incorporates historical and anthropological evidence from Italian history with a religious origin myth unique to the tradition. Modern Italian uses stregoneria as the word for witchcraft, but the word stregheria appears in a number of texts from the last three centuries. United in 1861, Italy has significantly contributed to the cultural and social development of the entire Mediterranean area, deeply influencing European culture as well. ... The word mythology (from the Greek μυολογία mythología, from mythologein to relate myths, from mythos, meaning a narrative, and logos, meaning speech or argument) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use the supernatural to interpret natural events and...


Usage of the word

The word "stregheria" is used almost exclusively in Apologia della Congresso Notturno Delle Lamie, by Girolamo Tartarotti (1751) and also appears as an entry in Vocabolario piemonteno-italiano del professore di gramatica italiana e latina - by Michele Ponza (1860), Vocabolario Bolognese Italiano - by Carolina Coronedi Berti (1874), and Nouveau dictionnaire italien-francais et francais-italien - by Costanzo Ferrari, Arthur Enkenkel (1900) - where both "stregheria" and "stregoneria" appear as separate entries with slightly different meanings; the entry on stregoneria refers strictly to sorcery, whereas the entry on stregheria refers to organized witchcraft in connection with the Sabbat. The word "stregheria" also appears in a modern Italian dictionary as a rare usage in place of the modern word "stregoneria" (Vocabolario della Lingua Italiana, edited by Nicola Zingarelli, 1970). Charles Godfrey Leland's nineteenth-century books on Italian witchcraft survivals, Etruscan Roman Remains, and Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches are both cited extensively by contemporary practitioners but the word stregheria is found only once in Etruscan Roman Remains in a quoted dialect of Italian.[citation needed] Usage of "stregheria" was revived by Raven Grimassi with his publication of Ways of the Strega in 1994. Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... In Neopaganism, the Wheel of the Year is the natural cycle of the seasons, commemorated by the eight Sabbats. ... Charles Godfrey Leland (1824–1903) was an American humorist and folklorist, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and educated at Princeton University, and in Europe. ... Title page of the original edition of Aradia Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches is an 1899 book by Charles Godfrey Leland. ...


Witchcraft in Italy

In the late medieval period and early Renaissance Italy was a stronghold of Roman Catholicism, and was less affected than other countries by the witch craze that gripped much of Europe during that period.[2] For that reason, it was somewhat overlooked by mainstream witchcraft historians, such as Jeffrey Russell.[3] Witchcraft trials nevertheless took place in Italy, where witchcraft was largely conflated with heresy in the view taken by Inquisitors. Dante by Michelino The Late Middle Ages is a term used by historians to describe European history in the period of the 14th and 15th centuries (1300–1500 CE). ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... A witch-hunt is a search for suspected witches; it is a type of moral panic. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... http://id-www. ... There is a disputed proposal that this article should be merged with witch-hunt. ... Look up Heresy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Christian views on witchcraft arise from scriptural, theological, and historical considerations. ...


After studying manuscripts of these trials, microhistorian Carlo Ginzburg, discerned an unusual constellation of beliefs about witchcraft amongst some of the accused. In his two books on the subject, Ecstasies: Deciphering the Witches' Sabbath and, especially, Night Battles, Ginzburg described the beliefs of a group of people called the Benandanti. While the Inquisition treated the Benandanti much the same as it did others suspected of witchcraft in Europe, the Benandanti themselves believed that they were Christians engaged in a supernatural fight against witches (or the "Malandanti").[4] Grimassi views the Benandanti as secretly being part of the witches' sect.[5] A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... Microhistory is a branch of the study of history. ... Carlo Ginzburg is a noted historian and pioneer of microhistory. ... The Benandanti were an agrarian fertility cult in Northern Italy in the 16th century. ... This article is about the Inquisition of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Hans Baldung Griens Three Witches, circa 1514. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ...

The title page of Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches.
The title page of Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches.

Anthropologist Sabina Magliocco has criticized interpreting Italian folk traditions as a religious survival of pagan elements as doing "violence" to the way practitioners perceive themselves. It is important to remember that practitioners think of themselves as Catholic." [6] However, some Italian scholars, such as David Gentilcore, view elements of Italian folk traditions and folk magic "as a surviving pre-Christian magical formula on to which has been tacked the Christian historiola". [7] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 383 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (504 × 789 pixel, file size: 97 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 383 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (504 × 789 pixel, file size: 97 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ...


In 1899 Charles Godfrey Leland published Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches. Leland claimed that the material in the book, which describes a secret messianical Pagan religion, was found for him by his assistant Maddalena in the course of studying Italian folklore. In the myths given in the text, the goddess Diana has a daughter named Aradia, who comes to Earth to teach witchcraft to the oppressed. Other major characters in the myths include Lucifer and Cain. Leland's claims of authenticity have been disputed, but the book became very influential, fifty years after its publication, as a primary source for Wicca and other Neo-paganism. Grimassi's position on Aradia is that Leland's published version is a "distorted version"[5] of the story of Aradia, and that, instead, there really had existed a mortal woman named Aradia di Toscano. Charles Godfrey Leland (1824–1903) was an American humorist and folklorist, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and educated at Princeton University, and in Europe. ... Title page of the original edition of Aradia Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches is an 1899 book by Charles Godfrey Leland. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oi on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ... Pagan and heathen redirect here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the 1934 film, see, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... Diana was the equivalent in Roman mythology of the Greek Artemis (see Roman/Greek equivalency in mythology for more details). ... In the neopagan religions of Stregheria and Wicca, Aradia was the daughter of Diana and Lucifer. ... Earth, also known as the Earth or Terra, is the third planet outward from the Sun. ... This article is about the star or fallen angel. ... In stories common to the Abrahamic religions, Cain or Káyin (קַיִן / קָיִן spear Standard Hebrew Qáyin, Tiberian Hebrew Qáyin / Qāyin; Arabic قايين QāyÄ«n in the Arabic Bible; قابيل QābÄ«l in Islam) is the eldest son of Adam and Eve, and the first man born in creation... For other uses, see Wicca (disambiguation). ... Neopaganism (sometimes Neo-Paganism, meaning New Paganism) is a heterogeneous group of religions which attempt to revive ancient, mainly European pre-Christian religions. ... Aradia di Toscano, or Aradia de Toscano, is the name given by Raven Grimassi for the founder of Stregheria, which he describes as the Old Religion of Italy. ...


Grimassi's history

Grimassi describes the roots of Stregheria as a syncretic offshoot of Etruscan religion that later blended with "Tuscan peasant religion", medieval Christian heresy, and Saint worship.[5] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ...


Grimassi claims that Aradia di Toscano passed on a religion of witchcraft, based on ancient Etruscan Paganism, to her followers (whom Grimassi calls "The Triad Clans"). The Triad Clans, "an alliance of three related Witch Clans known as the Tanarra, Janarra, and Fanarra"[5] in turn, passed on the myths and practices until the modern day, when Grimassi published a modernized version of them in Ways of the Strega. The Etruscans were a race of unknown origin from North Italy who were eventually integrated into Rome. ...


Along with references to Ginzburg and Leland, Grimassi points to a number of historians, anthropologists and other scholars who have mentioned witchcraft beliefs in Italy as demonstrating the survival of Aradia di Toscano's religion.[8]


Stregheria popularized

Italian-American Leo Martello claimed to belong to a "family tradition" of religious witchcraft in his 1970s book Witchcraft: The Old Religion. Martello does not use the word "Stregheria" when referring to his personal practice, but refers to it as "the Strega tradition". Languages American English, Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, other (predominantly southern) Italian dialects and languages of italian historical minorities Religions Roman Catholic An Italian American is an American of Italian descent. ... Leo Martello (1931-2000) was an author, lecturer, gay civil rights activist, and an early voice in the American Neopagan movement. ...


Grimassi began teaching the "Aridian Tradition", a modernized public system presented in his published works, in 1980 in the San Diego, California area. He currently teaches the Arician tradition, an initiate level variant of Stregheria that he describes as based upon an older system taught to him. [9] Regarding his published material, Professor Sabina Magliocco points out that "Grimassi never claims to be reproducing exactly what was practiced by Italian immigrants to North America; he admits Italian-American immigrants "have adapted a few Wiccan elements into their ways".[6] “San Diego” redirects here. ...


After the release of Ways of the Strega, people who had not studied under Grimassi began to adopt Stregheria practices, using the book as either a guide or as an addition to Eclectic Wiccan practice. Grimassi published additional books on the topic, such as Hereditary Witchcraft, now manages an annual spiritual retreat for practitioners, and is developing a "mystery school". Eclectic Wicca is a widespread branch of Neopaganism, in which followers, most of whom are Solitary Practitioners, include multiple aspects involved in various Wiccan traditions. ...


Practices

Drawing of a pentagram ring from Crotone, Italy, taken from IMAGINI DEGLI DEI ANTICHI (V. Catari, 1647)
Drawing of a pentagram ring from Crotone, Italy, taken from IMAGINI DEGLI DEI ANTICHI (V. Catari, 1647)

Like Wicca, Grimassi's Stregheria uses a pentagram as an important symbol. Grimassi and other members of his tradition wear a pentagram ring, which was also used by Pythagoreans. Grimassi's Stregheria uses the ritual tools of cup, wand, pentacle and blade, which are seen in the suits of the tarot and amongst many systems of Western occultism.[10] Some Stregheria rituals take place in a circle, with an altar facing North. Ritual actions include prayer, and the blessing of food.[11] Image File history File links Crotona_Pentagram_ring. ... Image File history File links Crotona_Pentagram_ring. ... Crotone is a city in Calabria, southern Italy, on the Gulf of Taranto. ... A pentagram A pentagram (sometimes known as a pentalpha or pentangle or, more formally, as a star pentagon) is the shape of a five-pointed star drawn with five straight strokes. ... The Pythagoreans were an Hellenic organization of astronomers, musicians, mathematicians, and philosophers; who believed that all things are, essentially, numeric. ... Chalice For other uses, see Chalice A chalice (from Latin calix, cup) is a goblet intended to hold drink. ... The giant Galligantua and the wicked old magician transform the dukes daughter into a white hind. ... A pentacle or pantacle is an amulet, generally made of parchment, paper or metal (although it can be of other materials), on which the symbol of a spirit being evoked is drawn. ... Athame Athame, athamé or arthame is what some practitioners of ritual magic call their ceremonial knives. ... This article is about the general history, iconography, and uses of tarot cards. ... For other uses of this term, see occult (disambiguation). ... Circle illustration This article is about the shape and mathematical concept of circle. ... Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mary Magdalene in prayer. ... Look up blessing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Like Wicca, Grimassi's Stregheria celebrates eight holidays, called "Treguendas", while others celebrate the Catholic holidays or the ancient Roman holidays. One unified practice among Streghe is "ancestor reverence through spirits known as Lares (Roman deities)". Some Stregheria groups (a Stregheria group, according to Grimassi, is called a Boschetto) practice their religion skyclad.[5] The Aridian tradition contains a rite of initiation, similar to some Wiccan traditions. Unlike Scott Cunningham and Silver RavenWolf, his contemporaries at Llewellyn Publications,[12] Grimassi emphasizes the importance of initiation. Lares (pl. ... Depiction of nude witches from the 16th century. ... For other uses, see Initiation (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wicca (disambiguation). ... Occult author Scott Cunningham Scott Douglas Cunningham (June 27, 1956 – March 28, 1993) was the author of dozens of popular books on Wicca and various other alternative religious subjects. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Llewellyn Worldwide (formerly Llewellyn Publications) is a New Age publisher, currently based in Woodbury, Minnesota, a suburb of St. ...


Most practitioners of Stregheria think of themselves as witches and believe that magic can have an effect upon reality. Like other books published by Llewellyn Publications,[12] Ways of the Strega contains a great deal of information on casting spells (as did Leland's Aradia). Stregheria contains a specific belief about the influence of spiritual beings on magic. Grimassi believes that beings known as the Grigori, or "Watchers" witness the "ritual display of prescribed signs and gestures", and that they have the power to "negate magickal energy" from the "astral plane". Grimassi notes that those outside Stregheria erroneously "dispute the role of the Grigori."[13] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Witchcraft. ... For other uses, see Reality (disambiguation). ... The spell is a magical act intended to cause an effect on reality using supernatural means of liturgical or ritual nature. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Grigori are a group of fallen angels told of in Biblical apocrypha who mated with mortal women, giving rise to a race of hybrids known as the Nephilim, who are described as giants in Genesis 6:4. ... The astral plane, also called the astral world or desire world, is a plane of existence according to esoteric philosophies, some religious teachings and New Age thought. ...


Relationship with other traditions

While Grimassi, whose books on the subject have been through a number of reprints, remains the principal name associated with Stregheria, there are also people who identify with the tradition, and Grimassi's history of it, but do not recognize him as a religious leader. Some other parties interested in Italian witchcraft have been critical of both him and his writing.[14]


Stregheria shares commonalities with both Wicca and polytheistic Reconstructionism. Stregheria is one of a number of ethnicity- or culture-oriented traditions of witchcraft, such as Celtic Wicca, Kemetic Wicca, or Seax-Wica. Some Stregheria members attempt to distance themselves from Wicca, in a manner similar to Pagan Reconstructionism, or argue that their belief system pre-dates it.[15] Some adherents of these traditions also reject the label of "Neopaganism", preferring to emphasize a cultural continuity with the past.[16] While those interested in the pre-Christian belief systems of the Celts, "Kemetic" (Egyptian) religion, or the beliefs of the Norse, can readily find information on either associated Wiccan traditions or as Reconstructionist projects in books and websites, information on Etruscan or Roman Reconstructionism has yet to become available through book publishing. Polytheism is belief in or worship of multiple gods or deities. ... This term is used for religious movements that deal with the relations between the adherents of a religion and a secular society, but in two diametrically opposed directions. ... This article or section should be merged with ethnic group Ethnicity is the cultural characteristics that connect a particular group or groups of people to each other. ... Celtic Wicca is a synthesis of Wicca with Celtic traditions. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Celts, normally pronounced // (see article on pronunciation), refers primarily to the members of any of a number of peoples in Europe using the Celtic languages or descended from those who did. ... Norseman redirects here; for the town of the same name see Norseman, Western Australia. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


In comparing his version of Stregheria to Wicca, Grimassi notes both similarities between the two and differences. The differences include holiday names and the element of "ancestor reverence".[5] Grimassi has defended his material as being significantly different from Wicca[17] at the roots level, and asserts that many of the foundational concepts in Gerald Gardner's Wicca can be found earlier in works on Italian Witchcraft and ancient Mediterranean mystery sects.[18][19] It has been suggested that New Forest coven be merged into this article or section. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ Nuovo Dizionario Italiano-Latino, the Società Editrice Dante Alighieri (1959). The word for 'witchcraft' in modern Italian is stregoneria.
  2. ^ Barstow, Anne (1995). Witchcraze. HarperSanFrancisco. ISBN 0-06-251036-3. 
  3. ^ Russell, Jeffrey (1984). Witchcraft in the Middle Ages. Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-9289-0. 
  4. ^ Ginzburg, Carlo (1991). Ecstasies: Deciphering the Witches' Sabbath. ISBN 0-226-29693-8.  Ginzburg, Carlo (1983). The Night Battles: Witchcraft and Agrarian Cults in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. ISBN 0-8018-4386-3. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f Stregheria.com FAQ. Retrieved on October 14, 2005.
  6. ^ a b Magliocco, Sabina (2001). "Spells, Saints, and Streghe: Witchcraft, Folk Magic, and Healing in Italy". Pomegranate: The Journal of Pagan Studies, 13: –. 
  7. ^ Gentilcore, David (1992). From Bishop to Witch:The System of the Sacred in Early Modern Terra D'Otranto. Manchester University Press, 134. ISBN 0-7190-3640-2. 
  8. ^ History of Stregheria. Retrieved on October 14, 2005.
  9. ^ Arician tradition. Witchvox. Retrieved on February 7, 2006.
  10. ^ Tools and Symbols of Stregheria. Retrieved on October 14, 2005.
  11. ^ Grimassi, Raven (1994). Ways of the Strega. Llewellyn Publications. ISBN 1-56718-253-4. 
  12. ^ a b See Cunningham, Scott (2002) Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner. 0875421180 and RavenWolf, Silver (2002). To Ride a Silver Broomstick. Llewellyn Publications. ISBN 0-87542-791-X. 
  13. ^ Mediterranean/Aegean Parallels in Modern Wicca. Retrieved on October 14, 2005.
  14. ^ See, for example The Stregoneria Italiana Project. Retrieved on October 14, 2005.
  15. ^ Clarian Stregheria. Retrieved on October 14, 2005.
  16. ^ See, for example Sgath. Retrieved on October 14, 2005., and Asatru.
  17. ^ Common misunderstandings about my works. Retrieved on October 14, 2005.
  18. ^ Grimassi, Raven (2000). Italian Witchcraft. Llewellyn Publications, 281-285. ISBN 1-56718-259-3. 
  19. ^ Grimassi, Raven (2001). Hereditary Witchcraft. Llewellyn Publications, 13-22. ISBN 1-56718-256-9. 

http://id-www. ... Carlo Ginzburg is a noted historian and pioneer of microhistory. ... Carlo Ginzburg is a noted historian and pioneer of microhistory. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Raven Grimassi (b. ... Occult author Scott Cunningham Scott Douglas Cunningham (June 27, 1956 – March 28, 1993) was the author of dozens of popular books on Wicca and various other alternative religious subjects. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... satr , also known as Odinism, describes a number of attempts to reconstruct the indigenous religions of Northern Europe. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Raven Grimassi (b. ... Raven Grimassi (b. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Stregheria Information (1619 words)
Grimassi describes the roots of Stregheria as a syncretic offshoot of Etruscan religion that later blended with "Tuscan peasant religion", medieval Christian heresy, and Saint worship.
Stregheria uses the ritual tools of cup, wand, pentacle and blade, which are seen in the suits of the tarot and amongst many systems of Western occultism.
Stregheria is one of a number of ethnicity- or culture-oriented traditions of religious witchcraft, such as Celtic Wicca, Kemetic Wicca, or Seax-Wica.
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