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Encyclopedia > Street theatre
A troupe of street theatre performers by the beach in Vancouver, Canada.
A troupe of street theatre performers by the beach in Vancouver, Canada.
Nottingham based arts activist collective The Mischief Makers use the street for their performances
Nottingham based arts activist collective The Mischief Makers use the street for their performances

Street theatre is a form of theatrical performance and presentation in outdoor public spaces without a specific paying audience. These spaces can be anywhere, including shopping centres, car parks, recreational reserves and street corners. They are especially seen in outdoor spaces where there are large numbers of people. The actors who perform street theatre range from buskers to organised theatre companies or groups that want to experiment with performance spaces, or to promote their mainstream work. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1439 KB) Summary Street performers performing a theatrical show by the beach in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1439 KB) Summary Street performers performing a theatrical show by the beach in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mischief_makers_04. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mischief_makers_04. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... The Mischief Makers are a group of activists and artists based in Nottingham (UK) who formed early 2005 as a creative response to the G8 Summit, held at Gleneagles Hotel, Scotland in July that year. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Buskers perform in San Francisco A performance, in performing arts, generally comprises an event in which one group of people (the performer or performers) behave in a particular way for another group of people (the audience). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gathering place. ... For other uses, see Audience (disambiguation). ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see pedestrian street or promenade. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A city-centre street in Frankfurt, Germany A residential street in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA A street is a public thoroughfare in the built environment. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Busking is the practice of doing live performances in public places to entertain people, usually to solicit donations and tips. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Scale model of a Wheaties cereal box at a pep rally Promotion is one of the four key aspects of the marketing mix. ... Look up mainstream in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Sometimes performers are commissioned, especially for street festivals, children's shows or parades, but more often street theatre performers are unpaid or gather some income through the dropping of a coin in a hat by the audience. For other uses, see Festival (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Child (disambiguation). ... United States Marines on parade. ... Income, generally defined, is the money that is received as a result of the normal business activities of an individual or a business. ... This article is about monetary coins. ... A hat is an item of clothing which is worn on the head; a kind of headgear. ...


The logistics of doing street theatre necessitate simple costumes and props, and generally there is little or no amplification of sound, with actors depending on their natural vocal and physical ability. This issue with sound has meant that physical theatre, including dance, mime and slapstick, is a very popular genre in an outdoor setting. The performances need to be highy visible, loud and simple to follow in order to attract a crowd. Yarkand ladies summer fashions. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The term amplifier as used in this article can mean either a circuit (or stage) using a single active device or a complete system such as a packaged audio hi-fi amplifier. ... This article is about audible acoustic waves. ... The human voice consists of sound made by a human using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, crying and screaming. ... Physical theatre is a general term used to describe any mode of performance that pursues storytelling through primarily physical means. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Look up mime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Slapstick (disambiguation). ... A genre [], (French: kind or sort from Greek: γένος (genos)) is a loose set of criteria for a category of literary composition; the term is also used for any other form of art or utterance. ...


Street theatre should be distinguished from other more formal outdoor theatrical performances, such as performances in a park or garden, where there is a discrete space set aside (or roped off) and a ticketed audience. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... Ticket (unseparated) of the Kurkino in Berchtesgaden CeBIT Home 1998 student day ticket with barcode A Parisians transport ticket A ticket to the 2003 Rugby World Cup sporting event. ...


In some cases, street theatre performers have to get a licence or specific permission through local or state governments, in order to perform. A license or licence is a document or agreement giving permission to do something. ... Local governments are administrative offices that are smaller than a state or province. ... Most countries with a federal constitution are made up of a number of entities called states. ...


Street theatre is arguably the oldest form of theatre in existence: most mainstream entertainment mediums can be traced back to origins in street performing, including religious passion plays and many other forms. More recently performers who, a hundred years ago, would have made their living working in variety theatres, music halls and in vaudeville, now often perform professionally in the many well-known street performance areas throughout the world. Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... A Passion play is a dramatic presentation depicting the suffering and death of Jesus. ... A variety show is a show with a variety of acts, often including music and comedy skits, especially on television. ... Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ... This article is about the musical variety theatre. ...


One of the most interesting points about modern street theatre is its unique sociopolitical place. People who might not have ever been to, or been able to afford to go to, the "legitimate" theatre can watch a street show. By virtue of where the shows take place, their audience is made up of anyone and everyone who wants to watch. If an audience member can't afford it, then it's free.

Contents

Performance Violence & Theater of Terrorism

Street theater also refers to public demonstration “committed to achieve a number of objectives, the most important being publicity for the movement or cause,”[1] including activism of all sorts such as eco-terrorism, religious extremism, and anti-globalization. Actors performing in this particular kind of street theater may stage non-violent exhibitions or engage in more sensational violent acts or threats to commit violent acts against property or persons which may involve reckless endangerment, harassment, stalking, intimidation, or criminal mischief[2]. While some of the more creative and imaginative protests can be similar to artistic street theatre, when performed by more aggressive combatants, 'street theater' takes on the framework of terrorism. These spectacles are orchestrated with the specific strategy to impress, disturb or otherwise affect a wider audience beyond the immediate vicinity of the violence itself, especially through media coverage of the demonstrations including "…acts not only of destruction but also of bloodshed executed in a deliberate intense and vivid way...to maximize the savage nature of their violence and meant purposely to elicit anger."[3] As a vehicle for making a political, social, or religious message “the street theater of performance violence…gives the perpetrators of terrorism a kind of celebrity status.”[4] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A man holds up a street puppet designed to resemble George W. Bush at a demonstration against the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005 in Washington, D.C.. American Civil Rights March on Washington, leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial, August 28... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action or inaction to bring about social or political change. ... Eco-terrorism is defined by the Federal Bureau of Investigations Domestic Terrorism Section as the use or threatened use of violence of a criminal nature against innocent victims or property by an environmentally-oriented, subnational group for environmental-political reasons, or aimed at an audience beyond the target, often... Extremism is a term used to describe the actions or ideologies of individuals or groups outside the perceived political center of a society; or otherwise claimed to violate common standards of ethics and reciprocity. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Exhibition is a word with several meanings. ... In law, endangerment comprises several types of crimes involving conduct that is wrongful and reckless or wanton, and likely to produce death or grievous bodily harm to another person. ... Harassment refers to a wide spectrum of offensive behavior. ... For other uses, see Stalking (disambiguation). ... Intimidation is generally used in the meaning of criminal threatening. ... Mischief, in criminal law, is an offense against property that does not involve conversion. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... The Mona Lisa Although today the word art usually refers to the visual arts, the concept of what art is has continuously changed over centuries. ... A combatant (also referred to as an enemy combatant) is a soldier or guerrilla member who is waging war. ... Look up Framework in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... In general spectacle refers to an event that is memorable for the appearance it creates. ... Look up disturb in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Audience (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ...


Some organized groups find their roots in such public performances, conveying political messages through identifiable forms of dramatic presentations such as carnivals,[5] marches[6], minstrel shows,[7] and “brutal acts of ceremonial and ritualized mob violence”[8] such as the “terror of lynching[9]. Lynch mobs [10] use illegal, unjustified force[11] to commit acts of collective violence[12] for the executions and punishments of presumed criminal offenses as well as the intimidating effect[13] created by threatening violence[14] for the purpose of terrorism.[15] Lynching is associated with hate crimes [16], as defined in the 1999 NCVS (National Crime Victim Survey), "A hate crime is a criminal offense committed against a person or property motivated, in whole or in part, by the offender's bias against a race, religion, ethnicity/national origin, gender, sexual preference, or disability. The offense is considered a hate crime whether or not the offender's perception of the victim as a member or supporter of a protected group is correct.”[17] See also: Carnival Corporation, Carnival Cruise Lines, Carnivàle Swabian-Alemannic carnival clowns in Wolfach, Germany A carnival parade is a public celebration, combining some elements of a circus and public street party, generally during the Carnival Season. ... For other uses, see March (disambiguation). ... The minstrel show, or minstrelsy, is an indigenous form of American entertainment consisting of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music, usually performed by white people in blackface. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Collective can also refer to the collective pitch flight control in helicopters A collective is a group of people who share or are motivated by at least one common issue or interest, or work together on a specific project(s) to achieve a common objective. ... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ...


Propaganda, Promise, & Intent to Cause Harm

A further usage of performance violence in Street Theatre is that of discrediting tactics and smear campaigns. Propaganda, as an essential element of warfare, [18] can be a useful tool for groups to express political, religious, or terrorist messages[19]. In this form of propagandist campaign actors engage in a form of informational warfare or psychological terrorism which can be defined as ‘an organised system of intimidation, especially for political ends'…'the systematic use of terror especially as a means of coercion'…'domination or coercion by intimidation”[20], or “symbolic action in a complex performative field”[21] to frighten, intimidate, or otherwise communicate a threat of harm[22], injury[23], or promise of impending violence by word or deed through deceptive, censored, or distorted information systematically distributed with malicious intent, to damage or destroy the reputation or status of a person, persons, or entity. The Defense Department officially defines terrorism as the “calculated use of unlawful violence to inculcate fear; intended to coerce or intimidate governments or societies in pursuit of goals that are generally political, religious, or ideological.”[24] Intimidation is intentional behavior which causes "a person of ordinary sensibilities" fear of injury or harm. It's not necessary to prove that the behavior was so violent as to cause terror or that the victim was actually frightened.[25] As an organized form of strategic harassment, actors in a task force of two or more people commonly associated with a larger group premeditate[26], collude[27] or conspire[28] to attack a specific target (with and without weapons) with frequency and persistence. Through invasion of privacy or intimidation including surveillance[29] the actors not only violate civil liberties[30] and basic human rights[31] but acquire without permission the possessions of others including ideas, theories, writings, or other forms of information with intent to use such acquisitions for an illegal purpose. Attacks might also include criminal mischief, “arson and destruction, damage or vandalism of property ... from graffiti to aggravated assault”,[32] involving actors who strike often individually in sequence to mitigate group liability. The actors may occasionally form mobs, with several striking simultaneously with intent to cause injury, or engage in group bullying[33] which is persistent or repeated “physical or emotional intimidation...to harm a person or group by denying their rights to property, opportunity, or physical safety”[34] and may include insults, slurs, ridicule, or threats to commit violence conveyed through innuendo, indirect remark or gesture[35], signal[36], sign[37] defamation of character, libel, slander, or false light. Prejudice, discrimination,[38] and other violations of civil liberties and human rights, such as infringement upon privacy and freedom of speech, opinion, and expression[39], which result in undue influence, exploitation, intentional infliction of physical or emotional distress, unlawful penalty[40],or denial of justice or substantive and procedural entitlements to protection[41] from exile, false imprisonment, sanction, embargo, social exclusion, segregation, isolation, coercion[42], exaction[43], or extortion[44] are “tools of intimidation…thus, as threats, terrorists, terrorist organizations, and terrorist states are one and the same.”[45] The expression discrediting tactics in politics refers to personal attacks against a public figure intended to discourage people from believing in the figure or supporting their cause (see damaging quotations). ... Political campaign Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This page is about a political tactic. ... For other uses, see Propaganda (disambiguation). ... Look up Campaign in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Coercion (disambiguation). ... A threat is a declaration of intention to inflict punishment or harm on another. ... Injury is damage or harm caused to the structure or function of the body caused by an outside agent or force, which may be physical or chemical. ... Deception is providing intentionally misleading information to others. ... For omission and secrecy, see censorship. ... The ASCII codes for the word Wikipedia represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information. ... Look up damage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up destroy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up reputation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Person (disambiguation). ... An entity is something that has a distinct, separate existence, though it need not be a material existence. ... Harassment refers to a wide spectrum of offensive behavior. ... A task force (TF) is a temporary unit or formation established to work on a single defined task or activity. ... Look up Premeditation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up collusion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... ... In military science, an attack is the aggressive attempt to conquer enemy territory, installations, personnel, or equipment or to deny the enemy the use of territory, installations, personnel, or equipment, for example by destroying the equipment. ... For other uses, see Weapon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Frequency (disambiguation). ... Invasion of privacy is a legal term essentially defined as a violation of the right to be left alone. ... For other uses, see Surveillance (disambiguation). ... Mischief, in criminal law, is an offense against property that does not involve conversion. ... The Skyline Parkway Motel in Afton, Virginia after an arson fire on July 9, 2004. ... Vandalism is the conspicuous defacement or destruction of a structure, a symbol or anything else that goes against the will of the owner/governing body. ... For other uses, see Graffiti (disambiguation). ... In the most general sense, a liability is anything that is a hindrance, or puts individuals at a disadvantage. ... MOB as an initialism may refer to: Management and Organizational Behavior Mail-order bride Man overboard Marching Owl Band Mobile Regional Airport Montreux-Oberland Bernois, Swiss railway Movable Object Block, used in computer graphics Mob The Mob Money Over Bitches Category: ... Injury is damage or harm caused to the structure or function of the body caused by an outside agent or force, which may be physical or chemical. ... Bullying is the act of intentionally causing harm to others through verbal harassment, physical assault, or other more subtle methods of coercion such as manipulation. ... An insult is a statement or action which affronts or demeans someone. ... Slur could mean: A Slur (music) is a symbol in Western musical notation indicating that the notes it embraces are to be played legato (smoothly). ... Look up Ridicule on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Ridicule is a 1996 French film set in the 18th-century at the decaying court of Versailles. ... A threat is a declaration of intention to inflict punishment or harm on another. ... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up signal, signaling in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Sign (disambiguation). ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... Invasion of privacy is a legal term essentially defined as a violation of the right to be left alone. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to control the flow of information about themselves and thereby reveal themselves selectively. ... This article is about the general concept. ... Undue influence (as a term in jurisprudence) is an equitable doctrine that involves one person taking advantage of a position of power over another person. ... Exploitation means many different things. ... Look up Distress in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A penalty is a punishment: a legal sentence, e. ... Exile (band) may refer to: Exile - The American country music band Exile - The Japanese pop music band Category: ... False imprisonment is a tort, and possibly a crime, wherein a person is intentionally confined without legal authority. ... Sanction is an interesting word, in that, depending on context, it can have diametrically opposing meanings. ... For delayed access after publication, see Embargo (academic publishing). ... In mathematics, inclusion is a partial order on sets. ... Segregation means separation. ... Look up isolation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Coercion (disambiguation). ... Extortion, outwresting, or exaction is a criminal offense, which occurs when a person either unlawfully obtains money, property or services from another through coercion or intimidation or threatens one with physical or reputational harm unless they are paid money or property. ... Extortion is a criminal offense, which occurs when a person either obtains money, property or services from another through coercion or intimidation or threatens one with physical harm unless they are paid money or property. ...



Additional uses of street theater used against targets both foreign and domestic are associated with terrorist operations which “do not function in the open.“[46] The method “bears more resemblance to a protracted hunt…the cutting edge…likely to be intelligence,”[47] related to information warfare and psychological warfare used by military, paramilitary, terrorist, and counter-terrorist forces all over the globe including CIA and Special Forces. The Lansdale “trickster” approach to psychological warfare as published by the Department of the Army in training manuals and pamphlets include ‘pranks’ such as distributing drinks laced with drugs and also devastating acts of “criminal violence – the murder[48] and mutilation of captives and the display of their bodies.”[49] An example of information warfare can be seen in the movie “School for Scoundrels” in which the protagonist is falsely implicated as an obsessive stalker.[50] Information warfare is the use and management of information in pursuit of a competitive advantage over an opponent. ... The U.S. Department of Defense defines psychological warfare (PSYWAR) as: The planned use of propaganda and other psychological actions having the primary purpose of influencing the opinions, emotions, attitudes, and behavior of hostile foreign groups in such a way as to support the achievement of national objectives. ... Paramilitary designates forces whose function and organization are similar to those of a professional military force, but which are not regarded as having the same status. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... For other uses, see Special forces (disambiguation). ... The trickster figure Reynard the Fox as depicted in an 1869 childrens book by Michel Rodange. ... The U.S. Department of Defense defines psychological warfare (PSYWAR) as: The planned use of propaganda and other psychological actions having the primary purpose of influencing the opinions, emotions, attitudes, and behavior of hostile foreign groups in such a way as to support the achievement of national objectives. ... College pranks Practical jokes, such as Cow tipping (which is in actuality a myth) April Fools Day pranks (see examples in April 1, 2002) Candid Camera pranks Student Liberation Front pranks World Wide Web pranks Related topics Myth Joke Humour This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid... For other uses, see Drug (disambiguation). ... for other uses please see Crime (disambiguation) A crime is an act that violates a political or moral law. ... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ... Mutilation or maiming is an act or physical injury that degrades the appearance or function of the (human) body, usually causing death. ...


See also

Wikipedia:Translation/Royal de luxe Giant marionette performing The Hidden Rhinoceros at Santiago, Chile. ... Dog and pony show was a colloquial term used in the United States in the late 19th and early 20th century to refer to small traveling circuses that toured through small towns and rural areas. ... Clark Stanleys Snake Oil Liniment. ... For other uses of this word, see Freakshow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sideshow (disambiguation). ... A living statue at EPCOT. The term living statue is often used to refer to a type of mime artist who poses like a statue or mannequin, usually with realistic statue-like makeup, sometimes for hours at a time. ... Spiral Q Performer Spiral Q Puppet Theater was founded in 1995 by Matthew (Mattyboy) Hart in Philadelphia. ... A task force (TF) is a temporary unit or formation established to work on a single defined task or activity. ... MOB as an initialism may refer to: Management and Organizational Behavior Mail-order bride Man overboard Marching Owl Band Mobile Regional Airport Montreux-Oberland Bernois, Swiss railway Movable Object Block, used in computer graphics Mob The Mob Money Over Bitches Category: ... High-tech lynching is a term describing a period of nonstop, vicious verbal attacks directed at a particular person or group that is communicated through the mass media such as TV, radio, newspapers, periodicals, or the Internet. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... KKK may refer to: // Ku Klux Klan, white supremacy group(s) Katipunan (Society), a revolutionary group from Philippine history; full name Kataastaasang Kagalanggalangang Katipunan Anak ng Bayan (roughly translated: Supreme and Venerable Society of the Sons of the Nation) Kokusai Kogyo Kabushikigaisha, a Japanese bus and taxi company AG K... For other uses, see Vigilante (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Stalking (disambiguation). ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Understanding Terrorism [1]
  2. ^ Terroristic Threat Law & Legal Definition [2]
  3. ^ Terror in the Mind of God [3]
  4. ^ Understanding the New Terrorism, Mark Juergensmeyer [4]
  5. ^ The Politics of Carnival: Festive Misrule in Medieval England [5]
  6. ^ God and the Gun [6]
  7. ^ Midnight Rangers: Costume and Performance in the Reconstruction-Era Ku Klux Klan
  8. ^ Creating Jim Crow: In-Depth Essay, by Ronald L. F. Davis, Ph. D. pg.1[7]
  9. ^ Creating Jim Crow: In-Depth Essay, by Ronald L. F. Davis, Ph. D. pg.7 [8]
  10. ^ Lynch Mob [9]
  11. ^ Violence criminal law [10]
  12. ^ Lynching in Guatemala Legacy of War and Impunity [11]
  13. ^ Intimidate [12]
  14. ^ Threat [13]
  15. ^ Lynching [14]
  16. ^ Federal Bureau of Investigation – Civil Rights -Hate Crime [15]
  17. ^ DEVELOPING HATE CRIME QUESTIONS FOR THE NATIONAL CRIME VICTIMIZATION SURVEY [16]
  18. ^ Propaganda and Persuasion [17]
  19. ^ Cults, Violence and Religious Terrorism: An International Perspective, JF Mayer – Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Volume 24, Number 5, 1 September 2001 , pp. 361-376(16) [18]
  20. ^ Nonviolence versus Terrorism, originally published as: Martin, B, Nonviolence versus terrorism, Social Alternatives, 2002, 21(2), 6-9 [19]
  21. ^ From the Depths of Despair: Performance, Counter-Performance, and September 11th, Jeffrey Alexander, Department of Sociology, Yale University [20]
  22. ^ Threat of Harm [21]
  23. ^ Injury [22]
  24. ^ Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms, Washington, DC: Department of Defense, April 2001, p. 428.
  25. ^ Legal Definition of Intimidate [23]
  26. ^ Premeditation [24]
  27. ^ Collusion [25]
  28. ^ Conspiracy [26]
  29. ^ Guatemala Human Rights Commission/USA (GHRC), Guatemala Human Rights UPDATE Vol.19 No.04. February 13-28, 2007
  30. ^ The Right to Privacy [27]
  31. ^ Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article 12 [28]
  32. ^ Restorative justice responses to post-September 11 hate crimes: Potential and challenges [29]
  33. ^ Bullying [30]
  34. ^ Bullying Facts [31]
  35. ^ Innuendo [32]
  36. ^ Signal [33]
  37. ^ Noose: ‘Shameful' sign makes ominous return, by Darryl Fears, Washington Post [34]
  38. ^ Prejudice, Discrimination, and the Law [35]
  39. ^ International Human Rights [36]
  40. ^ Civil Liberties and Human Rights [37]
  41. ^ Denial of Justice in International Law [38]
  42. ^ Coercion [39]
  43. ^ Exaction [40]
  44. ^ Extortion [41]
  45. ^ The National Security Strategy, p.15
  46. ^ Defining Terrorism, B. Hoffman, in R. D. Howard & R. L. Sawyer, eds., Terrorism and Counterterrorism: Understanding the New Security Environment, 2003, p. 22
  47. ^ Maintaining Effective Deterrence, Colin S. Gray, Carlisle, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, 2003, p. 5.
  48. ^ Murder[42]
  49. ^ Instruments of Statecraft: U.S. Guerilla Warfare, Counterinsurgency, and Counterterrorism, 1940-1990 [43]
  50. ^ School for Scoundrels, Director: Todd Phillips, Writers(WGA): Todd Phillips & Scot Armstrong [44]

  Results from FactBites:
 
Street theatre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1363 words)
Street theatre should be distinguished from other more formal outdoor theatrical performances, such as performances of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream in a garden, where there is a discrete space set aside (or roped off) and a ticketed, paying clientele who come to see the show.
Street theatre activists were attacked, often by the police, and this resulted in the death of at least two activists, Ashis Chatterjee of Theatre Unit in 1972, and Prabir Datta of Silhouette in 1974.
This form of street theatre involves the actors to elongate themselves and remain motionless until fed. This form of avante-garde influenced theatre was introduced to the Pakistani markets by Saleh Chaudhry, who was on a hunger strike, protesting for male pregnancy.
Walnut Street Theatre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (509 words)
The Walnut Street Theatre was built by The Circus of Pepin and Breschard, a French circus which toured from 1807 until 1815.
The first use of The Walnut Street Theatre as its name occurred in 1820, however it was changed back to The Olympic in 1822 and then back again to The Walnut, this time for good, in 1828.
In 1964, The Walnut Street Theatre was designated a National Historic Landmark and in 1969, the theatre was purchased by a non-profit organization and turned over to the new Walnut Street Theatre Corporation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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