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Encyclopedia > Street Fighter II
Street Fighter II

A promotional Street Fighter II flyer illustrating the original eight playable world warriors.
Developer(s) Capcom
Publisher(s) Capcom
Designer(s) Planners: Akira Nishitani (Nin Nin), Akira Yasuda (Akiman)
Series Street Fighter
Release date(s) NA 1991
JPN 1991
EU 1992
Genre(s) Fighting
Mode(s) Up to 2 players simultaneously
Platform(s) Arcade, Super NES, Mega Drive/Genesis, PC Engine, Amiga, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, PC, Amiga CD32, 3DO, Sega Master System, Game Boy, Game Boy Advance, PlayStation, Sega Saturn, PlayStation 2, Xbox, Mobile Phone, Xbox Live Arcade, Virtual Console
Media ROM, cartridge, HuCard, floppy disk, CD-ROM, DVD-ROM
Input 8-way joystick, 6 buttons
Arcade cabinet Upright
Arcade system(s) CPS-1
Arcade display Raster, horizontal orientation, 384 x 224 pixels, 4096 colors, 60 Hz refresh rate

Street Fighter II (ストリートファイターⅡ Sutorîto Faitâ Tsū?) is a 1991 competitive fighting game by Capcom. It is widely credited with launching the fighting genre into the mainstream and extending the life of the worldwide arcade scene for several years with its unique six button "combo" controls and revolutionary loser pays competitive gameplay. Its popularity far eclipsed that of its comparatively obscure predecessor, thanks in part to its inclusion of eight selectable characters (a number which increased in subsequent revisions of the game to 16) with their unique playing style and refinement of the unique play controls featured in the first game, setting the template for future fighting games. Its success also led to the production of several revised versions of the game (including home versions), as well as merchandising and cross-media adaptations (including two separately produced theatrical films). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 423 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (826 × 1169 pixel, file size: 381 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) // Promotional flyer for the original Street Fighter II by Capcom. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Akira Yasuda ) (born July 21, 1964) is a Japanese illustrator, animator, character designer, game designer and mecha designer, who works under the pen name, akiman. ... “Street Fighter” redirects here. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay. ... Screenshot of The King of Fighters XI (2005, SNK Playmore). ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... Amiga is the name of a range of home/personal computers using the Motorola 68000 processor family, whose development started in 1982. ... The Commodore 64 is the best-selling single personal computer model of all time. ... The ZX Spectrum is a home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 3DO can refer to: The 3DO Company, a developer of computer and video game software and hardware 3DO Interactive Multiplayer, the name of a number of video game consoles based on specifications created by above company This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... It has been suggested that Arcade Racer Joystick be merged into this article or section. ... “PS2” redirects here. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... Xbox Live Arcade (XBLA) is an online service operated by Microsoft that is used to distribute video games to Xbox and Xbox 360 owners and from late 2007 to Games for Windows - Live users [1]. The service was first launched in late 2004 and offers games from about US$5... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ... Read-only memory (usually known by its acronym, ROM) is a class of storage media used in computers and other electronic devices. ... In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ... A HuCard is a memory card developed by Hudson Soft with the size of a credit card and were used with the NEC PC Engine and SuperGrafx video game consoles. ... A floppy disk is a data storage device that is composed of a disk of thin, flexible (floppy) magnetic storage medium encased in a square or rectangular plastic shell. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... DVD is an optical disc storage media format that is used for playback of movies with high video and sound quality and for storing data. ... Joystick elements: 1. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Button (computing). ... This arcade cabinet, containing Centipede, is an upright. ... An arcade system board is a standardized printed circuit board or group of printed circuit boards that are used as the basis for multiple arcade games with very similar hardware requirements. ... The CPS-1 (CPシステム shÄ«pÄ« shisutemu) or Capcom Play System 1, is an arcade system board by Capcom that debuted in 1988 with Forgotten Worlds and Ghouls n Ghosts. ... A computer display monitor, usually called simply a monitor, is a piece of electrical equipment which displays viewable images generated by a computer without producing a permanent record. ... Suppose the smiley face in the top left corner is an RGB bitmap image. ... The refresh rate (or vertical refresh rate, vertical scan rate for CRTs) is the number of times in a second that a display is illuminated. ... Notable events of 1991 in computer and video games. ... Screenshot of The King of Fighters XI (2005, SNK Playmore). ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... The English Rule is a rule regarding assessment of attorneys fees arising out of litigation. ... Street Fighter ) is a 1987 arcade game developed by Capcom. ...


Street Fighter II was followed by a prequel titled Street Fighter Alpha: Warriors' Dreams and a sequel titled Street Fighter III: The New Generation. Both games also inspired their own series of revisions. A prequel is a work that portrays events which include the structure, conventions, and/or characters of a previously completed narrative, but occur at an earlier time. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Sequel (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

Overview

Street Fighter II, released on Capcoms CPS-1 arcade board in 1991, was one of the most popular games of the early 1990s, shaping the direction of arcade games for nearly a decade to follow. It is widely acknowledged as the premier fighting game of its era, due to its game balance with regard to the timing of attacks and blocks, which was unparalleled at the time; and due to "special moves" in which experienced players could execute complex fighting moves (special moves) by moving the joystick and tapping the buttons in certain combinations. The game featured a six button "fighting" layout, with punch buttons consisting of 'jab', 'strong', and 'fierce' and kick buttons consisting of 'short', 'forward', and 'roundhouse', in ascending order of strength. This was not new or exclusive to fighting games, but the way in which the game relied on them was. These complicated fighting moves were given names, such as the Shoryuken (the Rising Dragon Punch), the Tatsumaki Senpuu Kyaku (the Tornado Whirlwind Kick) and the Hadouken (Wave-Motion Fist)[1], which provided a framework for players to have conversations about their games. It also introduced the convention of "cancelling" or "interrupting" moves into other moves, which enabled a player to create sequences of continuous hits. Rumor has it that this ability to "cancel" moves into other moves was the result of a programming bug. Regardless, it gave the game much greater depth than it would have had otherwise. Also, this was the game which introduced to the gaming world the concept of the combo, a sequence of attacks which, when executed with proper timing, did not allow the opponent to interrupt the combination. Mastery of these techniques led almost directly to the high-level competition which has been a cornerstone of this type of game ever since. The CPS-1 (CPシステム shīpī shisutemu) or Capcom Play System 1, is an arcade system board by Capcom that debuted in 1988 with Forgotten Worlds and Ghouls n Ghosts. ... Shoryuken , properly pronounced as three syllables, sho-ryu-ken) roughly translates as Rising Dragon Fist (Sho=Rising, Ryu=Dragon, Ken=Fist or Punch). ... Tatsumaki Senpuukyaku (竜巻旋風脚 lit. ... Ryu (left) performs a Shakunetsu Hadouken in Super Street Fighter II Turbo: Revival on the Game Boy Advance Hadouken ) is a fictional special attack that originated in the classic Capcom fighting video game series Street Fighter. ... Liu Kang after performing a 7-hit combo on Scorpion in Ultimate Mortal Kombat 3. ...

Versus screen that appears before a match.

The game features eight fighters that players can choose from: Ryu, Ken, Blanka, Zangief, Dhalsim, Guile, E. Honda, and Chun-Li), plus four bosses (Balrog, Vega, Sagat, and M. Bison). The character known as M. Bison in the original Japanese game was considered a legal liability by Capcom USA, his backstory and appearance very similar to that of professional Boxer Mike Tyson as, of course, was his name. In order to pre-empt any lawsuits on the part of Tyson, the names of all the bosses except Sagat (who had been around since the original Street Fighter), were re-arranged, something which has since caused no shortage of confusion when attempting description. For the sake of reference, the Japanese bosses M. Bison, Balrog, and Vega became Balrog, Vega, and M. Bison, respectively. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...   , also written as 隆) is a video game character created by Capcom, and is the main character in the Street Fighter series. ... Ken Masters ) is a video game character created by Capcom. ... Blanka ) is a video game character from the Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dhalsim , based on Malayalam ധല്സിമ്) is a video game character from the Street Fighter series of fighting games, who comes from the land of Kerala, India. ... Guile ) is a video game character in Capcoms Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Edmond Honda ), more commonly known as E. Honda, is a video game character created by Capcom. ... Chun-Li (春麗) is a video game character created by Capcom. ... Flag Ship from the video game Gorf A boss is a particularly challenging computer-controlled enemy in video games. ... “Mike Bison” redirects here. ... For the Street Fighter character known as Vega in Japan, see M. Bison. ... ‹ The template below (Vg-in-universe) has been proposed for deletion. ... For the Street Fighter character known as M. Bison in Japan, see Balrog (Street Fighter). ... Michael Gerard Tyson (born June 30, 1966) is a former American world heavyweight boxing champion and is the youngest man to have won a world heavyweight title. ...


Street Fighter II was followed by a slew of other games of similar design, some by Capcom, some by other companies. One of the most well-known competitors to Street Fighter II was Mortal Kombat. SNK, however, developed a reputation for fighting games very soon after Capcom; Art of Fighting, The King of Fighters, and Fatal Fury are the three most notable examples, the first Fatal Fury game being released within months of SFII. For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... Mortal Kombat was the first entry in the famous and highly controversial Mortal Kombat fighting game series by Midway, released in arcades in 1992. ... SNK Playmore (formerly SNK) is a Japanese video game hardware and software company. ... Art of Fighting , which literally translates to Fist of the Dragon and Tiger but can also be interpreted as Fist of Two Mighty Rivals) is a trilogy of competitive fighting game titles that were released for the Neo Geo platform in the early 1990s. ... The King of Fighters ), officially abbreviated KOF, is the premiere series of fighting games by SNK Playmore, formerly SNK. The series was originally developed for SNKs Neo-Geo MVS arcade hardware, which served as the main platform for the series until 2004, when SNK retired the MVS in favor... Fatal Fury , Legend of the Hungry Wolf) is a fighting game series developed by SNK for the Neo-Geo system. ...


The last completely new Street Fighter game to be released was Street Fighter III: Third Strike in 1999. The characters from the Street Fighter universe have appeared in numerous other Capcom fighting games.


Updated versions

Street Fighter II′: Champion Edition

Street Fighter II′: Champion Edition (pronounced Street Fighter II Dash in Japan, hence the prime symbol) - Champion Edition included several significant updates:[1] This article is not about the symbol for the set of prime numbers, â„™. The prime (′, Unicode U+2032, ′) is a symbol with many mathematical uses: A complement in set theory: A′ is the complement of the set A A point related to another (e. ...

  • All four boss characters (Balrog, Vega, Sagat, and M. Bison) were playable.
  • Players could choose the same character to fight against each other, using palette swapping to differentiate the second player.
  • Character portraits were re-drawn
  • The backgrounds of each player's stage were re-colored (a theme throughout most of the revisions).
  • Added the ability to execute reversal attacks (special attacks either when blocking or rising from the ground that would cancel the animation frames and give higher priority)
  • There were various bug fixes for serious glitches (such as Guile's Handcuffs), as well as some balancing of the characters.

“Mike Bison” redirects here. ... For the Street Fighter character known as Vega in Japan, see M. Bison. ... ‹ The template below (Vg-in-universe) has been proposed for deletion. ... For the Street Fighter character known as M. Bison in Japan, see Balrog (Street Fighter). ... A red Koopa Troopa from Super Mario Bros. ...

Street Fighter II′ Turbo: Hyper Fighting

Street Fighter II′ Turbo: Hyper Fighting (Street Fighter II Dash Turbo in Japan and plain Street Fighter II' Hyper Fighting outside of Japan) was released in response to an explosion of modified bootlegs of the Champion Edition which were becoming popular amongst arcade operators[2] Changes included:

  • Faster gameplay.
  • Many characters gained new moves, and several that could now be performed in mid-air.
  • All characters were given new color palettes, which served as the default palettes.

Super Street Fighter II: The New Challengers

Super Street Fighter II: The New Challengers was the first Street Fighter game that Capcom would release on its CPS-2 hardware. All prior Street Fighter games had been released on Capcom's CPS-1 hardware. The arcade version of this game also included a variant that allowed four arcade cabinets to be connected together for simultaneous tournament play. This version contained the most extensive changes introduced in the series: CPS-2 (CPシステムII shīpī shisutemu tsū) or Capcom Play System 2, is an arcade system board that debuted in 1993 with Super Street Fighter 2, and Dungeons & Dragons: Tower of Doom. ... The CPS-1 (CPシステム shīpī shisutemu) or Capcom Play System 1, is an arcade system board by Capcom that debuted in 1988 with Forgotten Worlds and Ghouls n Ghosts. ...

  • Four new characters were added (Fei Long, T. Hawk, Cammy, and Dee Jay).
  • Boss characters received updated regular move sets.
  • Boss characters also received new, individual game endings.
  • Each character could be selected with one of eight different color palettes.
  • Some of the original eight playable characters received updated art and audio.
  • The speed introduced in Hyper Fighting was reduced.
  • A combo counter (a first despite combos being in the game since the original), as well as point bonuses for first attack, combos and reversals.

Fei Long , based on Chinese 飛龍) is a character from Capcoms Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... This article is about the Street Fighter character. ... Cammy ), also known by the full name Cammy White (in Super Street Fighter II) and the codename Killer Bee (in Street Fighter Alpha 3), is a video game character in the Street Fighter series. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ...

Super Street Fighter II Turbo

Super Street Fighter II Turbo (Super Street Fighter II X: Grand Master Challenge in Japan) was a slightly updated version of Super Street Fighter II. This version introduced:

  • The addition of the "SUPER" bar. This allowed character to build up and unleash a very powerful special attack (typically a special attack with more strength, and the character gained "shadows" of the previous frames of animation.)
  • The speed was again raised from Super SF2, close to Hyper Fighting levels.
  • Intentional Air juggling (a series of attacks that could hit an opponent while airborne)
  • The ability to tech or "soften" non-multi hit throws (teching allows a character to land on one's feet instead of on their back, resulting in less damage).
  • A new secret character (Akuma).
  • Alternate versions of each character that played very similar (but not quite identical) to their Super Street Fighter II incarnation without the super bar or the ability to tech throws, they are also identifiable by the fact that they are the new default colors.
  • The bonus stages (where players try to destroy all the objects in the stage before time runs out) that were present in the series since Street Fighter II are removed. Bonus stages would not re-appear in any Street Fighter related game until Street Fighter III.

Akuma as seen in Capcom VS. SNK 2, illustrated by Shinkiro Akuma (demon in Japanese), known in Japan as Gouki , strong oni(strong demon,strong ogre)), is a video game character created by Capcom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition

Hyper Street Fighter II was a slightly arranged version of Super Street Fighter II Turbo with the ability to choose every previously playable version of all the characters within the SFII series. This game commemorates the 15th Anniversary of the Street Fighter series.


Ports

These are the major ports of the Street Fighter II games made for consumer devices and is not comprehensive.


Street Fighter II: The World Warrior

Street Fighter II: The World Warrior for the Super NES was released in 1992 as a 16Mbit game pak. Character sprites were slightly smaller and less detailed, and some frames of animation were omitted. The arcade's Frequency modulation synthesis background music was adapted to the SNES's SPC700 PCM based sound chip. It went on to become one of the biggest selling titles for the SNES. The SNES version is available for download on the Wii's Virtual Console. The European SNES design is identical to the Super Famicom. ... Frequency modulation synthesis (or FM synthesis) is a form of audio synthesis where the timbre of a simple waveform is changed by frequency modulating it with a modulating frequency that is also in the audio range, resulting in a more complex waveform and a different-sounding tone. ... The SONY SPC700 is the 8-bit sound chip used in the Super Famicom/Super Nintendo Entertainment System video game console together with a DSP. The SPC700 chip was very advanced for its time (1991) and may in some ways be said to rival todays wavetable synthesizer sound cards. ... PCM is an initialism which can have different meanings: Phase Change Material Pulse-code modulation, a way to digitally encode signals representing sound and their video counterparts Potential Cancer Marker Communist Party of Mexico Plug Compatible Manufacturer Power-train control module, a computer in a car which controls the car... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ...


Street Fighter II′: Champion Edition and Street Fighter II′ Turbo: Hyper Fighting

The PC Engine was the first console to receive the updated Street Fighter II and was ported by NEC. The game is contained on a standard PCE Game chip and features graphics comparable to the more powerful SNES port which came later. A 6 Button PCE Controller was created specifically for use with this game. It was never released in the US for the Turbo Grafx system. NEC Corporation (Jp. ...


The Mega Drive/Genesis port, known as Street Fighter II′: Special Champion Edition (Street Fighter II ′ Plus or Dash Plus in Japan), contained both Champion Edition and Hyper Fighting — as did the SNES release of Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting (the SNES port does not contain a prime symbol on its title). The Mega Drive/Genesis version received the Special Champion Edition subtitle because it was intended to be a port of Street Fighter II′: Champion Edition to be released in the fall of 1993, about one year after the SNES version of the original SF2.


The Mega Drive/Genesis was to be the only US console to receive a SF2 game that allowed people to play as the bosses, but 5 months before its release Nintendo announced an exclusive deal with Capcom to port the newer Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting to the SNES for release before the Mega Drive/Genesis version of the game. However, their contract only extended exclusivity to the name and presentation of the game, allowing Capcom to add Hyper Fighting mode to the Mega Drive/Genesis game as a bonus, giving both versions of the game the same features. The legacy of this contractual obligation is apparent in the games as the Mega Drive/Genesis version presents the Champion Edition intro, attract mode (only presenting Champion Edition gameplay and color scheme) and title screen and defaults to Champion Edition mode, while the SNES version contains the Hyper Fighting intro (though missing the fight in front of the skyscraper), attract mode (presenting Hyper Fighting gameplay and color scheme) and title screen and defaults to Turbo mode.


Street Fighter II′: Special Champion Edition for the Mega Drive/Genesis allowed the selection of game speed by increasing 'stars' at game start, up to 10-star speed (as opposed to an estimate 4-star speed that the original arcade featured. The SNES Version has the 4-10 option, but requires a controller code to activate Stars 5 to 10). The Mega Drive/Genesis port also allowed for four stars of speed in Normal/Champion mode, but the SNES version lacked this feature, allowing stars only in Turbo mode. Gameplay was faster than the arcade versions.


Though both versions of the game were identical in overall gameplay and graphics, there were huge differences in the sound. The SNES even mimicked the different tones of Ryu's voice using different levels of the Hadoken attack. His voice was quick and percise for the fierce attack, or slow and prolonged for the jab version. The Sega versions had only one version of the sound for each level of the attack. While the SNES-voices sound somewhat muffled the Mega Drive-version´s voices are clearer, but scratchy. All tunes had to be remixed for the SNES-version, offering a more natural instrumentation, while the Mega Drive was closer to the arcade-original thanks to the Yamaha-soundchip being a relative of the one found in the arcade. The result are two very different sounding versions where every player had to judge his favourite by personal preferences. The PC-Engine-version is to be mentioned for having by far the clearest voices. The soundtrack is closer to the Mega Drive-version than to the SNES-version.


In Brazil, there was an official port of Street Fighter II′[3] for the Sega Master System, developed and published by Tec Toy. This version had collision detection problems, missing moves and missing characters, but the graphics were very impressive regarding the system´s limited capabilities and were not too far from the 16-Bit counterparts. The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... Tec Toy (often misspelled as TecToy) is a Brazilian videogame and electronics company. ...


Street Fighter II′: Hyper Fighting (the American arcade version never had the word Turbo in the title) has also been released on the Xbox 360's Xbox Live Arcade service featuring online play through Xbox Live and a new 'Quarters mode' which allows players to watch, and challenge others to matches. The order in which the players fight is represent by a US quarter. This was done to re-enact the arcade scene of the 1990s. The game was released on August 2, 2006 for a cost of 800 points ($10 USD) and has become the fastest selling game on the Xbox Live Arcade service. It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ... Xbox Live Arcade (XBLA) is an online service operated by Microsoft that is used to distribute video games to Xbox and Xbox 360 owners and from late 2007 to Games for Windows - Live users [1]. The service was first launched in late 2004 and offers games from about US$5... Xbox Live is a subscription-based online gaming service for Microsofts Xbox and Xbox 360 video game consoles. ... A quarter is a coin worth one-quarter of a United States dollar, or 25 cents. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Microsoft Points are the currency of the Xbox Live Marketplace and Zune online stores. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Xbox Live Arcade (XBLA) is an online service operated by Microsoft that is used to distribute video games to Xbox and Xbox 360 owners and from late 2007 to Games for Windows - Live users [1]. The service was first launched in late 2004 and offers games from about US$5...


Recently, the Super NES port, Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting, has been released on the Virtual Console for America and Europe. This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ...


Super Street Fighter II and Super Street Fighter II Turbo

The SNES and Mega Drive/Genesis received a port of Super Street Fighter II a year after their respective SF2'T port, but was a commercial failure at retail and a financial hit to Capcom who had overestimated consumer demand.[citation needed] This was a sign that the audience was not willing to pay for annual updates of SFII, especially when Super Street Fighter II Turbo already superseded Super Street Fighter II in the arcades and fixed many of the complaints people had of SSF2. There was also endless speculation that Capcom would release Super Street Fighter II Turbo in less than a year, causing people to wait for what was thought to be the inevitable SSF2T release though no port was ultimately released.[citation needed]


The 3DO received the first console port of Super Street Fighter II Turbo, it's noted for having much better sound than even the arcade, with full Q Sound support, and slightly updated graphics. The second port was for the IBM PC by Eurocom (released by Gametek) in 1995 and was the first truly ported version of a Street Fighter game for a home computer, helped by the fact that PC hardware was sufficiently powerful to reasonably duplicate the 2D graphics and sound capabilities, to the results of dedicated 2D game machines like the CPS-2, the original platform of the game. Up until this release, home computers received interpretive remakes of past Street Fighter games that did not play like the arcade games they were based on. An interpretive remake of Super Street Fighter II Turbo was on the Commodore Amiga for its AGA chipset based systems, coming on 12 floppy discs and requiring a hard drive to play. 3DO can refer to: The 3DO Company, a developer of computer and video game software and hardware 3DO Interactive Multiplayer, the name of a number of video game consoles based on specifications created by above company This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... CPS-2 (CPシステムII shÄ«pÄ« shisutemu tsÅ«) or Capcom Play System 2, is an arcade system board that debuted in 1993 with Super Street Fighter 2, and Dungeons & Dragons: Tower of Doom. ... Amiga is the name of a range of home/personal computers using the Motorola 68000 processor family, whose development started in 1982. ...


In 1997, the PlayStation and Sega Saturn received a port of both Super Street Fighter II and Super Street Fighter II Turbo along with Street Fighter Alpha 2 Gold in Street Fighter Collection. The Saturn version was thought to turn out superior because of the dramatic increase in Video RAM it offered over the PlayStation version. The last stand-alone version of SSF2T released is for the Dreamcast and was released only in Japan. It featured online play via Capcom of Japan's Matching Service, making this the first Street Fighter game to be officially playable through a network connection. Street Fighter Collection is a compilation of three 2D fighting games: Super Street Fighter II, Super Street Fighter II Turbo, and a special home version of Street Fighter Alpha 2 titled Street Fighter Alpha 2 Gold, which contained various features not found in the stand-alone Playstation port of Street...


A reworked portable version of Super Street Fighter II Turbo titled Super Street Fighter II Turbo: Revival (Super Street Fighter II X: Revival in Japan) was released for the Game Boy Advance in 2001. It featured new character artwork on the versus and post-fight screens, as well as for the game endings. Some of the game endings were changed to reconcile the storyline with the Street Fighter Alpha games. There were new stage backgrounds for Ryu, Ken, Chun-Li, Guile, Zangief and Bison and the car and barrel bonus stages from Super Street Fighter II returned. There were two unlockable versions of Akuma. However, the classic versions of the other main characters were removed. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


A high-definition remake of Super Street Fighter II Turbo titled Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix will be released on Xbox Live Arcade and Playstation Network in the Fall of 2007. It will feature redrawn graphics at 1080p HD resolution and online play. Projection screen in a home theater, displaying a high-definition television image. ... Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix is a downloadable game on the PlayStation Store and Xbox Live Arcade. ... Xbox Live Arcade (XBLA) is an online service operated by Microsoft that is used to distribute video games to Xbox and Xbox 360 owners and from late 2007 to Games for Windows - Live users [1]. The service was first launched in late 2004 and offers games from about US$5... Icons of the various PSN features PlayStation Network is Sonys free online service provided for use with their PlayStation 3 video game console. ... 1080p is the shorthand name for a category of display resolutions. ...


Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition

Street Fighter Anniversary Collection was released in 2004 for the Xbox, PS2 and CPS-2 , which contained both Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike and Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition. CPS-2 version was updated version of SSF2T. Capcom also included the censored version of Street Fighter II: The Animated Movie as a bonus. Hyper Street Fighter II on its own was released for the PS2 in Europe, which also included the censored version of Street Fighter II: The Animated Movie as a bonus. Street Fighter Anniversary Collection is a compilation of two Street Fighter video games: one new title, Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition, and a port of Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ...


Retro collections

The Street Fighter Collection was released both in the US and Japan in late 1997 on the original Sony PlayStation and the Sega Saturn. It featured near arcade perfect versions of both Super Street Fighter II and Super Street Fighter II: Turbo as well as Street Fighter Alpha 2 Gold. It has been suggested that Arcade Racer Joystick be merged into this article or section. ...


A second collection, titled Street Fighter Collection 2, was released in the US in late 1998 on the Sony PlayStation and featured the first three major Street Fighter II titles: Street Fighter II: The World Warrior, Street Fighter II′: Champion Edition and Street Fighter II′ Turbo: Hyper Fighting.


In 2003 Capcom Arcade Hits - Volume 1 was released for Windows PC, featuring emulated arcade versions of the original Street Fighter and Street Fighter II: Champion Edition. 1. ...


2005 saw the release of Capcom Classics Collection on the Sony PlayStation 2 and Xbox and it also featured the first three major Street Fighter II titles: Street Fighter II: The World Warrior, Street Fighter II′: Champion Edition and Street Fighter II′ Turbo: Hyper Fighting as well as a multitude of other Capcom games. The versions contained in this collection are actually ports of Capcom Generation vol. 5 (released in North America as Street Fighter Collection 2) for the PlayStation and the Sega Saturn, complete with its special modes including versus mode, CPU battle mode, training mode, and more. Even the cast artwork and information is the same as Street Fighter Collection 2, but there is some new unlockable artwork that was not featured in that collection. One complaint about the game is that the load times from Street Fighter Collection 2 were ported over, which is unusual since each game should be able to fit into the system RAM of the PS2 and Xbox in their entirety. Perhaps the best feature for fans is the Street Fighter Deluxe mode in all three versions of the game, which allows players to battle with characters from different versions of the game, for example, matching Champion Edition Ken vs. Turbo Chun-Li. The Deluxe mode is not unlike the concept found in Hyper Street Fighter II and Vampire Chronicle. Capcom Classics Collection is a compilation of arcade games that was released by Capcom for the PlayStation 2 and Xbox on September 27, 2005. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ...


2006 saw the release of Capcom Classics Collection Vol. 2 for the Playstation 2 and Xbox and contains Super Street Fighter II Turbo. Capcom Classics Collection Vol. ...


Control methods for ports

As a result of the different ports of Street Fighter II, it is often played with control pads, instead of the arcade-style joysticks for which it was originally designed to be played with. Some of these control pads, such as the official Super Nintendo pad, feature only four face buttons, leaving two attack buttons on shoulder buttons. Most, if not all, home releases of Street Fighter II have allowed for players to configure the buttons as they see fit. Capcom released two specialized controls for the SNES (a joystick and a joypad) that have six face buttons instead of four (with the L and R buttons being located around the X button).


Subsequently, whereas some players find the game easier with this control method, others have found that purchasing an arcade-style joystick for their home system makes it significantly easier for them to execute many of the game's special moves.


The Sega Genesis ports suffered from the 3-button layout of the original pad. The start button was used to toggle the three button punches or kicks. This made executing combos very difficult. Wise gamers purchased the official 6-button Sega pad, or aftermarket pads.


Characters

The characters in Street Fighter II were all associated with different countries around the world, although some countries had more than one representative. For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ...


Original eight

These were the eight World Warriors available in the original Street Fighter II. All of the characters named, except for Ryu and Ken have made their debut in the series.

  , also written as 隆) is a video game character created by Capcom, and is the main character in the Street Fighter series. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Edmond Honda ), more commonly known as E. Honda, is a video game character created by Capcom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Blanka ) is a video game character from the Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Guile ) is a video game character in Capcoms Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Ken Masters , his first name is sometimes written as 拳) is a video game character created by Capcom. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For the member of Morning Musume, see Li Chun. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Soviet_Union. ... Dhalsim , based on Malayalam ധല്സിമ്) is a video game character from the Street Fighter series of fighting games, who comes from the land of Kerala, India. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ...

Bosses

Four boss characters (listed in order faced) were only encountered after defeating the other normal fighters. They were not playable characters in the original Street Fighter II, but they have been playable from Champion Edition onward. All of the bosses made their debut in this game, and had their names changed for the western version, except for Sagat; see individual entries for the explanation. Flag Ship from the video game Gorf A boss is a particularly challenging computer-controlled enemy in video games. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

(Note: In the game M.Bison fights in Thailand, though his nationality is unknown.) “Mike Bison” redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For the Street Fighter character known as Vega in Japan, see M. Bison. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... ‹ The template below (Vg-in-universe) has been proposed for deletion. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Thailand. ... For the Street Fighter character known as M. Bison in Japan, see Balrog (Street Fighter). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Thailand. ...


The New Challengers

These four new characters were introduced in Super Street Fighter II. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Street Fighter II. (Discuss) Super Street Fighter II: The New Challengers was the penultimate release of a long string of fighting games in the Street Fighter II series. ...

Cammy ), also known by the full name Cammy White (in Super Street Fighter II) and the codename Killer Bee (in Street Fighter Alpha 3), is a video game character in the Street Fighter series. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Jamaica. ... This article is about the Street Fighter character. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Fei Long , based on Chinese 飛龍) is a character from Capcoms Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hong_Kong_1959. ...

Secret characters

  • Akuma (Gouki in Japan) first appeared in Super Street Fighter II Turbo. He was not given a country of origin. Akuma is a secret character in the game, and is only playable through a secret code.

Akuma as seen in Capcom VS. SNK 2, illustrated by Shinkiro Akuma (demon in Japanese), known in Japan as Gouki , strong oni(strong demon,strong ogre)), is a video game character created by Capcom. ... A secret character (not to be confused with an unseen character) is usually a playable character (although not always) in a video game that can only be played (or in some cases fought) by completing some task in the game. ... Cheat codes (also called debug codes or backdoors) are codes that can be entered into a video game to change the games behavior, alter characters looks and abilities, skip levels, or access other hidden features. ...

Other media

Street Fighter II was adapted into two different movies in 1994, Street Fighter II: The Animated Movie (a Japanese anime released in the U.S. courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment) and an American-produced live-action film, simply titled Street Fighter. Starring Jean-Claude Van Damme as Guile, Kylie Minogue as Cammy and Raul Julia as M. Bison, the live-action film effectively incorporated the main cast of the video game and wrapped them into an action adventure very reminiscent of the classic adventure films of yore. Director Steven E. de Souza's take on the premise: "I especially loved films like The Longest Day, The Great Escape and The Guns of Navarone. What made those films great wasn't the random violence. It was the clear-cut struggle between forces of good and evil, leading to an ultimate showdown." “Moving picture” redirects here. ... Street Fighter is a 1994 action movie based on Capcoms popular fighting game series Street Fighter. ... Kylie Ann Minogue (IPA: [1]) (born May 28, 1968) is a Grammy Award-winning Australian pop singer-songwriter and occassional actress. ... Raúl Rafael Juliá y Arcelay (March 9, 1940 - October 24, 1994) was a Puerto Rican actor who lived and worked for many years in the United States. ... Steven de Souza is among the handful of screenwriters whose films have earned over two billion dollars at the box office. ...


Street Fighter the movie is considered one of the worst movies ever made, it has gained a sizable cult following and has even seen numerous DVD releases, complete with a plethora of special features and bonus content[citation needed]. In contrast, the animated film was better received due for having a more faithful approach to the game's plot and has also seen some DVD releases.


There was also a US Street Fighter cartoon, which followed the plot of the Van Damme movie, and an unrelated anime titled Street Fighter II V. Street Fighter is an American animated television series that was featured on the USA Networks Cartoon Express and Action Extreme Team. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... Street Fighter II V , pronounced two vee) is an anime series based on the fighting game Street Fighter II. Directed by Gisaburo Sugii, the series first aired in Japan in 1995, from April 10 to November 27, on YTV. The series is a loose adaptation of the games, taking several...


References

  1. ^ Alexis Bousiges:Street Fighter II' - Champion Edition at Arcade-History.com - A coin-operated game & machine database project (2006). Retrieved on 08 August 2006.
  2. ^ Alexis Bousiges:Street Fighter II' - Hyper Fighting at Arcade-History.com - A coin-operated game & machine database project (2006). Retrieved on 08 August 2006.
  3. ^ GameSpot Staff:Street Fighter II' (2006). Retrieved on 08 August 2006.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Street Fighter (series) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8830 words)
Street Fighter or commonly abbreviated as SF, (ストリートファイター in Japan) is a popular series of fighting video games in which the players pit combatants from around the world, each with his or her own special moves, against one another.
Street Fighter II, released on Capcom's CPS-1 arcade board in 1991, was one of the most popular games of the early 1990s, shaping the direction of arcade games for nearly a decade to follow.
Street Fighter III was not ported to a home system until December 1999 in Japan and early 2000 in the U.S. when it was released in a double pack with its follow-up SFIII: 2nd Impact for the Dreamcast.
Street Fighter II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3400 words)
Street Fighter Anniversary Collection was released in 2004 for the Xbox and PS2, including a version of SSF2T which had the ability to select different "revisions" of each character (Championship Edition Version, Hyper Fighting Version, etc).
Street Fighter II was adapted into two different movies in 1994, Street Fighter II: The Animated Movie (a Japanese anime released in the U.S. courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment) and an American-produced live-action film, simply titled Street Fighter.
Street Fighter II and the other two original versions (Champion Edition and Turbo) are featured in Capcom Classics Collection, a compilation of classic Capcom games from the 80s to the early 90s, available for the Xbox and Playstation 2.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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