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Encyclopedia > Strategic Air Command
For the film of the same name, see Strategic Air Command (film).

The Strategic Air Command (SAC) was the operational establishment of the United States Air Force in charge of America's bomber-based and ballistic missile-based strategic nuclear arsenal from 1946 to 1992. SAC also controlled the infrastructure necessary to support their operations (such as tanker aircraft to fuel the bombers and, until 1959, fighter escorts). Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Strategic Air Command is a 1955 American film starring James Stewart and June Allyson, and directed by Anthony Mann. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... A bomber is a military aircraft designed to attack ground targets, primarily by dropping bombs. ... A Minuteman III missile soars after a test launch. ... A tanker is an aircraft used for in-flight refuelling. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ...

Original SAC patch
SAC shield
SAC shield

Contents

Image File history File links Original_SAC_patch. ... Image File history File links Original_SAC_patch. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (618x618, 82 KB) Description Shield of Strategic Air Command of the United States Air Force Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (618x618, 82 KB) Description Shield of Strategic Air Command of the United States Air Force Source: http://www. ...

History

On 21 March 1946 the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was divided into three separate commands: Tactical Air Command (TAC), Air Defense Command (ADC), and Strategic Air Command (SAC). SAC's original headquarters was Bolling Field, the headquarters of the disbanded Continental Air Forces (First, Second, Third and Fourth) in Washington, DC. Its first commander was General George C. Kenney. SAC Headquarters moved to Andrews AFB, MD on Oct. 20, 1946. is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was the aviation component of the United States Army primarily during World War II. The title of Army Air Forces succeeded the prior name of Army Air Corps in June 1941 during preparation for expected combat in what came to be known as... The Tactical Air Command (TAC) was a command of the United States Air Force charged with battlefield-level (tactical) air combat, including light bombardment, close air support of ground troops, interdiction of enemy forces, and air transport of ground troops. ... ... Bolling Air Force Base, in Southwest Washington, DC, is named for Col. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... George Churchill Kenney, August 6, 1889-August 9, 1977, was a United States Army Air Force general during World War II and was commander of Allied air forces in the South West Pacific Area (SWPA) from August 1942 until 1945. ... Andrews Air Force Base is a United States Air Force base near Washington, DC, the home base of Air Force One and SAM FOX. Location The base is a few miles southeast of Washington, in Prince Georges County, Maryland. ...


SAC's original mission statement, expressed by General Carl Spaatz, then commanding general of the USAAF, was: Carl Tooey Spaatz (June 28, 1891 – July 14, 1974) was an American general in World War II. Carl Andrew Spatz (Spaatz added the second a in 1937 at the request of his wife and daughters to clarify the pronunciation of the name) was born on June 28, 1891, in Boyertown...


"The Strategic Air Command will be prepared to conduct long-range offensive operations in any part of the world, either independently or in co-operation with land and naval forces; to conduct maximum-range reconnaissance over land or sea, either independently or in co-operation with land and naval forces; to provide combat units capable of intense and sustained combat operations employing the latest and most advanced weapons; to train units and personnel of the maintenance of the Strategic Forces in all parts of the world; to perform such special missions as the Commanding General Army Air forces may direct."


That mission makes no specific reference to nuclear weapons, which in any case SAC did not yet possess. In the wake of World War II, the U.S. underwent a major drawdown of military forces, and the few USAAF units involved in the dropping of the atomic bombs were not spared. The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter A nuclear weapon derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions of fusion or fission. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


SAC retained its organization and mission after the USAAF became the United States Air Force on 18 September 1947. On 9 November 1948, SAC moved its headquarters to Offutt Air Force Base near Bellevue, Nebraska. “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Offutt Air Force Base (Offutt AFB) is a base of the United States Air Force and a census-designated place (CDP) in Sarpy County, Nebraska, United States. ... Bellevue is a city in Sarpy County, Nebraska, United States. ...

Organizational chart of the Strategic Air Command from 1947

On October 19, 1948 Lt. General Curtis Emerson LeMay took over as commander of SAC, and set about a dramatic rebuilding of the command's forces, as well as their mission. LeMay, who had masterminded the American attacks on the Japanese mainland during the war (including the firebombing of Tokyo and other cities), was a staunch believer in the power of strategic bombing: the destruction of an enemy's cities and industrial centers. LeMay believed that the existence of the atomic bomb made this type of warfare the only workable strategy, rendering battlefield conflicts essentially obsolete. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2200x2544, 63 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2200x2544, 63 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Curtis Emerson LeMay (November 15, 1906–October 1, 1990) was a General in the United States Air Force. ... B-29 bombers were used to drop hundreds of thousands of tons of explosives onto Japanese cities during the war. ... The city heart of Rotterdam after being terror bombed by Germany in 1940, the ruin of the (now restored) Laurens Kerk is the only building that reminds people of Rotterdams medieval architecture. ...


Under LeMay's command, SAC became the cornerstone of American national strategic policy during the Cold War with the Soviet Union. This policy which was based primarily on nuclear deterrence. In 1962 there were 282,723 personnel assigned (217,650 airmen, 28,531 civilians and 38,542 officers). SAC's motto became "Peace is Our Profession," symbolizing the intention to maintain peace through the threat of overwhelming force. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Mutual assured destruction (MAD) is the doctrine of military strategy in which a full scale use of nuclear weapons by one of two opposing sides would result in the destruction of both the attacker and the defender. ...


LeMay was not a great believer in mutually assured destruction(MAD): he felt strongly (particularly in SAC's early years, when Soviet nuclear capability was still in its formative stages) that SAC should be prepared to carry out a preemptive and overwhelming attack on the USSR before the Soviets had a chance to do the same to the United States. Mutually assured destruction (MAD) is the doctrine of military strategy in which a full scale use of nuclear weapons by one of two opposing sides would result in the destruction of both the attacker and the defender. ...


From its initial handful of wartime B-29 Superfortress bombers (only a few of which were "Silverplate" aircraft capable of dropping a nuclear weapon), SAC transitioned to its first, truly intercontinental bomber, the Convair B-36. Though a major improvement over the under powered B-29, the B-36, with its six piston and four jet engines, was slow to get to its target. The Boeing B-29 Superfortress was a four-engine heavy bomber propeller aircraft flown by the United States Army Air Forces in World War II and other military organizations afterwards. ... The Convair B-36 was a strategic bomber built by Convair for the United States Air Force, the first operational bomber to truly have intercontinental range. ...


SAC built up a substantial force of jet-propelled bombers. At its peak, the SAC force included more than 1,500 bombers, most of them the B-47 Stratojet. Airborne command post arrangements were also developed, resulting in the Looking Glass program. A Pratt and Whitney turbofan engine for the F-15 Eagle is tested at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, USA. The tunnel behind the engine muffles noise and allows exhaust to escape. ... The Boeing B-47 Stratojet jet bomber was a medium range and size bomber capable of flying at high subsonic speeds and primarily designed for penetrating the Soviet Union. ... Looking Glass (or Operation Looking Glass) is a code name for an airplane operated by the United States Navy. ...


When the first operational intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) became available in the late 1950s, they, too, were placed under SAC command. This led to a gradual decline in SAC's bomber strength. A Minuteman III ICBM test launch from Vandenberg AFB, California, United States. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ...


Wartime experience in Europe had shown the inability of bombers to survive without fighter escort, so for a number of years SAC had a fighter force as well as bomber squadrons. Despite some USAF efforts to develop long-range escort fighters, the range of fighter aircraft was too limited for truly intercontinental range, and SAC philosophy held that interception of bombers was of limited value in the atomic age. As a result, on 1 July 1957 SAC's fighter squadrons were either disbanded or passed to TAC. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The MiG-25 is a Russian interceptor that was the mainstay of the Soviet air defence. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... The Tactical Air Command (TAC) was a command of the United States Air Force charged with battlefield-level (tactical) air combat, including light bombardment, close air support of ground troops, interdiction of enemy forces, and air transport of ground troops. ...


Curtis LeMay left SAC to become USAF Vice Chief of Staff in 1957, and was succeeded by General Thomas S. Power, who served as SAC commander until December 1964. He was followed by General John Dale Ryan (1964-1967) and General Bruce K. Holloway (1968-1972). Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... General Thomas Sarsfield Power was commander in chief of the Strategic Air Command and an active military flier for more than 30 years. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... John Dale Ryan (1915–1983) was a U.S. Air Force general. ... General Bruce K. Holloway was commander in chief of the Strategic Air Command. ...


In 1992, following the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the end of the Cold War, SAC was eliminated in a reorganization of the major Air Force commands. SAC, Tactical Air Command(TAC), and Military Airlift Command(MAC) were reorganized into two commands, AMC (Air Mobility Command) and ACC (Air Combat Command). These two commands were essentially given the same missions that MAC and TAC held respectively, with AMC inheriting SAC's tanker force and ACC inheriting SAC's strategic bombers. The nuclear component was combined with the Navy's nuclear component to form USSTRATCOM (United States Strategic Command) which is headquartered at Offutt Air Force Base (SAC's former headquarters). Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This is a history of the Soviet Union from 1985 to 1991. ... The Tactical Air Command (TAC) was a command of the United States Air Force charged with battlefield-level (tactical) air combat, including light bombardment, close air support of ground troops, interdiction of enemy forces, and air transport of ground troops. ... MAC shield Military Airlift Command (MAC) was a former United States Air Force command. ... Air Mobility Command (AMC) is a major command (MAJCOM) of the United States Air Force, and the air force component of United States Transportation Command. ... Air Combat Command (ACC) is a major command (MAJCOM) of the United States Air Force. ... United States Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM) is one of the nine Unified Combatant Commands of the United States Department of Defense. ... Offutt Air Force Base (Offutt AFB) is a base of the United States Air Force and a census-designated place (CDP) in Sarpy County, Nebraska, United States. ...


Strategic Air Command insignia

The insignia of The Strategic Air Command was designed by Staff Sergeant R. T. Barnes, then assigned to the 92nd Bombardment Wing, in 1951. Submitted in a Command-wide contest, it was chosen as the winner by a three judge panel. The judges were: General Curtis E. LeMay, Commander-In-Chief, Strategic Air Command [CINCSAC]; General Thomas S. Power, Vice Commander-In-Chief, Strategic Air Command; and Brigadier General A. W. Kissner, Chief of Staff, Strategic Air Command. Staff Sergeant Barnes' winning design netted him a $100 United States Savings Bond.


On a sky-blue shield over two clouds, one in the upper left and one in the lower right extending to the edges of the shield, white shaded blue-gray, a cubit arm in armor issuing from the lower left and extending toward the upper part of the shield, the hand grasping an olive branch green, and three lightning flashes red.


Azure, two clouds proper, one issuing from sinister chief and one issuing from dexter base, a cubit arm in armor in bend, issuing from the sinister, the hand grasping a branch of olive proper, and three lightning flashes gules.


The blue sky is representative of the Air Force operations. The arm and armor are a symbol of strength, power and loyalty and represents the science and art of employing far-reaching advantages in securing the objectives of war. The olive branch, a symbol of peace, and the lightning flashes, symbolic of speed and power are qualities underlying the mission of the Strategic Air Command.


The blue background of the SAC Crest meant that SAC's reach was through the sky and that it was global in scope. The clouds meant that SAC was all-weather capable; bad weather was not a limiting factor. The mailed fist depicted force, symbolized by lightning bolts of destruction; the olive branch, of course, represents peace.


In addition to the SAC Crest, SAC aircraft bore the SAC Stripe. The stripe consisted of a very dark blue background which was speckled with stars. The stripe appeared on the sides of SAC aircraft in the area of the cockpit running from the top to the bottom of the fuselage at an angle from roughly 11:00 O'clock to 5:00 O'clock. The SAC Crest was a bit wider than the stripe and was placed on over of the stripe. The stripe indicated that SAC was always ready, night or day, to fulfill its mission.


Numbered Air Forces within SAC

This is a list of Numbered Air Forces (NAF) of the United States Air Force Historically, a NAF is a level of command below a MAJCOM (Major Command), and above one or more Wings or independent Groups. ... The Second Air Force was formed in the United States to provide air defense and train personnel of newly formed units in World War II. The Second was briefly a part of Air Defense Command after the war. ... The Eighth Air Force is a numbered air force (NAF) of the major command (MAJCOM) of Air Combat Command of the United States Air Force and it is headquartered at Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana. ... Activated on November 1, 1943, the Fifteenth Air Force was established as part of the U.S. Army Air Force in the World War II Mediterranean Theater of Operations as a strategic air force and commenced combat operations the day after it was formed. ... Sixteenth Air Force is the Warfighting Headquarters for United States Air Forces in Europe (USAFE) . It is headquartered at Ramstein AB, Germany. ... Twentieth Air Force is a Numbered Air Force in Air Force Space Command (AFSPC). ...

Subordinate components

Air Divisions

Redirected from:Strategic Air Command The Air Force official policy dictated the use of Araic numerals for numbered air and aerospace divisions. ...

Wings

Wings of the Strategic Air Command. ...

Groups

SAC Bases

Main article: Strategic Air Command // Present Name (Future Name and date of name change), Location. ...

Aircraft and Missiles

Aircraft - Primary Mission

Boeing B-52D bomber #56-0687 on display at B-52 Memorial Park, Orlando International Airport, Florida (Ex-McCoy Air Force Base). Photo taken April 4, 2003.
Boeing B-52D bomber #56-0687 on display at B-52 Memorial Park, Orlando International Airport, Florida (Ex-McCoy Air Force Base). Photo taken April 4, 2003.
  • B-1 Lancer from 1986 to 1992.
  • B-17 Flying Fortress (RB-17G) from 1946 through 1951.
  • B-26 Invader (RB-26) from 1949 through 1950
  • B-29 Superfortress from 1946 through 1953.
  • B-36 Peacemaker from 1948 through 1958.
  • B-45 Tornado from 1950 through 1953.
  • B-47 Stratojet 1951 through 1965.
  • B-50 Superfortress from 1948 through 1954.
  • B-52 Stratofortress from 1955 to 1992.
  • B-57 Canberra from 1956 through 1962.
  • B-58 Hustler from 1960 through 1969.
  • C-119 Flying Boxcar from 1956 through 1973.
  • DC-130 Hercules from 1966 through 1976.
  • E-4 Nightwatch from 1975 to 1992.
  • EC-135 Looking Glass from 1963 (variant of) to 1992.
  • F-2 Expeditor (F=Fotorecon) (C-45)
  • F-6 Mustang (F=Fotorecon) (P-51)
  • F-9 Flying Fortress (F=Fotorecon) (B-17F/G)
  • F-13 Superfortress, (F=Fotorecon), (B-29A)
  • F-47 Thunderbolt (P-47) from 1946 through 1947.
  • F-51 Mustang (P-51) from 1946 through 1949.
  • F-82 Twin Mustang from 1947 through 1950.
  • F-80 Shooting Star from 1946 through 1948.
  • F-84 Thunderjet 1948 through 1957.
  • F-86 Sabre 1949 through 1950.
  • F-102 Delta Dagger 1960
  • F-111 Aardvark from 1969 through 1990.
  • H-3 Sea King
  • KC-10 Extender from 1981 to 1992.
  • KB-29 from 1949 through 1956.
  • KC-97 Stratotanker SAC from 1951 through 1964. ANG from 1973 through 1977.
  • KC-135 Stratotanker SAC from 1957 through 1991. ANG/Reserves from 1975 through 1991.
  • RC-45 Expeditor
  • RC-135 Rivet Joint/Rivet Brass/Rivet Amber/Rivet Card/Rivet Ball/Cobra Ball/Cobra Eye/Combat Sent
  • SR-71 Blackbird from 1966 through 1991.
  • U-2 Dragon Lady from 1962 through 1991.
  • TR-1 Dragon Lady from 1989 through 1991.
  • UC-45 Expeditor

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 105 KB) Summary Boeing B-52D bomber #56-0687 on display at B-52 Memorial Park, Orlando International Airport, Florida (Ex-McCoy Air Force Base). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 105 KB) Summary Boeing B-52D bomber #56-0687 on display at B-52 Memorial Park, Orlando International Airport, Florida (Ex-McCoy Air Force Base). ... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA, TYO: 7661) is a major aerospace and defense corporation, originally founded by William Edward Boeing. ... “B-52” redirects here. ... KMCO redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... McCoy Air Force Base is a former United States Air Force base near Orlando, Florida. ... The B-1 Lancer is an American strategic bomber with variable geometry wings. ... The Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress is an American four-engine heavy bomber aircraft developed for the US Army Air Corps (USAAC). ... First flying in 1942, the Douglas A-26 Invader (after 1948, the B-26, and after 1966, the A-26A) was a twin-engined light attack bomber aircraft built during World War II and seeing service in both the Korean and Vietnam wars. ... The Boeing B-29 Superfortress was a four-engine heavy bomber propeller aircraft flown by the United States Army Air Forces in World War II and other military organizations afterwards. ... The Convair B-36 (officially named the Peacemaker, but the name is rarely used) was an American strategic bomber aircraft, and the largest bomber ever flown by the United States. ... The North American B-45 Tornado was the United States Air Forces first operational jet bomber, and the first jet aircraft to be refueled in the air. ... The Boeing B-47 Stratojet jet bomber was a medium range and size bomber capable of flying at high subsonic speeds and primarily designed for penetrating the Soviet Union. ... The Boeing B-50 Superfortress was basically a post-World War II revision of the wartime B-29 Superfortress with new, more powerful 3,500-HP Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major radial engines, a taller vertical stabilizer, and numerous detail improvements. ... “B-52” redirects here. ... The Martin B-57 Canberra was a twin-engine jet bomber and reconnaissance aircraft which entered service in the 1950s. ... The Convair B-58 Hustler was a American high-speed jet bomber capable of Mach 2 supersonic flight. ... The Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar was a U.S. military transport aircraft developed from the World War II Fairchild C-82 Packet, designed to carry cargo, personnel, litter patients, and mechanized equipment, and to drop cargo and troops by parachute. ... The DC-130 is a variant of C-130 Hercules, designed for drone control. ... The Boeing E-4B Nightwatch, formerly known as NEACP (National Emergency Airborne Command Post - pronounced Kneecap) and sometimes called NAOC (National Airborne Operations Center), is a Boeing 747-200 aircraft specially built to serve as a survivable mobile command post for the President of the United States of America and... The Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker is an aerial refueling tanker aircraft, first manufactured in 1956 and expected to remain in service into the 2040s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... ... During World War II, several B-17 Flying Fortresses were converted to long-range photographic reconnaissance aircraft, designated F-9 Flying Fortress. ... The Boeing B-29 Superfortress was a four-engine heavy bomber propeller aircraft flown by the United States Army Air Forces in World War II and other military organizations afterwards. ... ... The North American P-51 Mustang was a successful long range fighter aircraft which set new standards of excellence and performance when it entered service in the middle years of World War II and is still regarded as one of the very best piston-engined fighters ever made. ... The North American F-82 Twin Mustang was the last piston-powered fighter ordered into production by the U.S. Air Force. ... The Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star was the first operational jet fighter used by the United States Army Air Force. ... The Republic Aviation F-84 Thunderjet was an American-built turbojet fighter-bomber aircraft. ... The North American F-86 Sabre (sometimes called the Sabrejet) was a transonic combat aircraft developed for the US Air Force. ... The Convair F-102 Delta Dagger fighter aircraft was part of the backbone of the United States air defenses in the late 1950s. ... A U.S. Air Force F-111 The General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark (the nickname was unofficial for most of its lifespan, but it was officially named Aardvark at its retirement ceremony for the United States Air Force) is a long-range strategic bomber, reconnaissance, and tactical strike aircraft. ... The Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King (company designation S-61) is a twin-engined anti-submarine warfare (ASW)helicopter. ... The KC-10 Extender is an air-to-air tanker aircraft in service with the United States Air Force derived from the civilian DC-10-30 airliner. ... The Boeing B-29 Superfortress was a four-engine heavy bomber propeller aircraft flown by the United States Army Air Forces in World War II and other military organizations afterwards. ... The Boeing KC-97 Stratotanker was a strategic tanker aircraft. ... The Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker is an aerial refueling tanker aircraft. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Boeing RC-135 is a United States Air Force reconnaissance aircraft used to support theater and national level consumers with near real-time on-scene intelligence collection, analysis and dissemination capabilities. ... SR-71 redirects here. ... The U-2 is a single-seat, single-engine, high-altitude reconnaissance airplane flown by the United States Air Force. ... The Lockheed U-2R/TR-1 in flight The Lockheed U-2, nicknamed Dragon Lady, is a single-seat, single-engine, high-altitude surveillance aircraft flown by the United States Air Force. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Aircraft - Support

  • AT-11 Kansan
  • B-26 Invader from 1949 through 1950.
  • C-45 Expeditor from 1946 through 1951.
  • C-47 Skytrain from 1946 through 1947.
  • C-54 Skymaster from 1946 through 1975.
  • C-82 Packet from 1946 through 1947.
  • C-97 Stratofreighter from 1949 through 1978.
  • C-118 Liftmaster from 1957 through 1975.
  • C-124 Globemaster II from 1959 through 1962.
  • C-131 Samaritan
  • C-135 Stratolifter
  • L-4 Grasshopper from 1949 through 1950.
  • L-5 Sentinel from 1949 through 1950.
  • L-13 Grasshopper from 1949 through 1950.
  • PBY Catalina (OA-10 Catalina) from 1946 through 1947.
  • T-38 Talon from 1981 through 1991.

Beechcraft 18/C-45 at the National Museum of the United States Air Force Beechcraft 18 on floats The Beechcraft Model 18 was a small six- to 11-place, twin-engine, low-wing, conventional-gear aircraft manufactured by the Beech Aircraft Corporation of Witchita, Kansas. ... First flying in 1942, the Douglas A-26 Invader (after 1948, the B-26, and after 1966, the A-26A) was a twin-engined light attack bomber aircraft built during World War II and seeing service in both the Korean and Vietnam wars. ... Beechcraft 18 on floats The Beechcraft Model 18 was a small six to eleven place, all metal, aircraft manufactured by the Beech Aircraft Corporation of Witchita, Kansas. ... The Douglas C-47 Skytrain or Dakota is a military transport that was developed from the Douglas DC-3 airliner. ... The Douglas C-54 Skymaster was a four-engined transport aircraft used by the United States Army Air Force in World War II. Like the C-47 Skytrain, the C-54 Skymaster was derived from a civilian airliner (the DC-4). ... The C-82 Packet was a twin-engine, twin-boom aircraft that was used briefly by the United States Army Air Forces following World War II. Developed by Fairchild, the aircraft was first flown in 1944. ... The Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter was developed towards the end of World War II by fitting an enlarged upper fuselage onto a lower fuselage and wings which were essentially the same as the B-29 Superfortress. ... The Douglas DC-6 is an aircraft built by the Douglas Aircraft Company from 1946 to 1959. ... The Douglas C-124 Globemaster II, nicknamed Old Shakey, was a heavy-lift cargo aircraft built by the Douglas Aircraft Company in Long Beach, California. ... ... The C-135 Stratolifter is a transport aircraft derived from Boeing’s prototype 367-80 jet airliner (also the basis for the 707) in the early 1950s. ... A Piper J-3 Cub at Embrun, Ontario, August 2004 The Piper J-3 ‘Cub’ was designed by Walter Jamouneau as a small, light and simple utility aircraft. ... The L-5 Sentinel began life as the pre-war Stinson model 105. ... The Stinson L-13 (sometimes known as the Grasshopper, like other aircraft of its type) was a US military utility aircraft first flown in 1946. ... PBY Catalina was the United States Navy designation for an American and Canadian-built flying boat of the 1930s and 1940s. ... The Northrop T-38 Talon is a widely used US-built supersonic jet trainer. ...

Missiles

Titan II missile launching from silo.
Titan II missile launching from silo.

This is a list of missiles fielded by the Strategic Air Command. Download high resolution version (559x700, 41 KB)Titan 2 missile launching from silo. ... Download high resolution version (559x700, 41 KB)Titan 2 missile launching from silo. ... Titan II launch vehicle launching Gemini 11 (Sept. ...

  • ADM-20 Quail
  • AGM-28 Hound Dog
  • AGM-69 SRAM
  • AGM-84 Harpoon
  • AGM-86 Air Launched Cruise Missile
  • AGM-129 Advanced Cruice Missile
  • HGM-16 Atlas
  • LGM-25 Titan II
  • LGM-30A/B Minuteman I
  • LGM-30F Minuteman II
  • LGM-30G Minuteman III
  • LGM-118A Peacekeeper
  • SM-62 Snark
  • PGM-17A Thor
  • PGM-19A Jupiter

The McDonnell ADM-20 Quail was a subsonic, jet powered, air-launched decoy cruise missile built by McDonnell Aircraft Corporation. ... The North American AGM-28 Hound Dog was the first air-launched nuclear stand-off missile developed by the United States. ... The Boeing AGM-69 SRAM (Short-range attack missile) was a nuclear air-to-surface missile designed to replace the older AGM-28 Hound Dog stand-off missile. ... The AGM-84 Harpoon is a U.S. all-weather, over-the-horizon, anti-ship cruise missile system, originally developed by McDonnell Douglas, with development and manufacturing now taken over by Boeing Integrated Defense Systems. ... The Boeing AGM-86B and AGM-86C ALCM are sub-sonic air-launched cruise missiles (ALCMs) operated by the United States Air Force. ... “ACM” redirects here. ... Atlas missile launch from Cape Canaveral in 1957 Atlas was a missile built by the Convair Division of General Dynamics. ... Titan II launch vehicle launching Gemini 11 (Sept. ... The LGM-30 Minuteman is a United States nuclear missile, a land-based intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). ... The LGM-30 Minuteman is a United States nuclear missile, a land-based intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). ... The LGM-30 Minuteman is a United States nuclear missile, a land-based intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). ... The LGM-118A Peacekeeper, initially known as the MX missile, was a land-based ICBM deployed by the United States starting in 1986. ... Snark missile launch The Northrop SM-62 Snark was a specialised intercontinental missile with a nuclear warhead briefly operated by the US Strategic Air Command from 1958 until 1961. ... Thor-Ablestar Thor was the United Statess first operational ballistic missile. ... Jupiter IRBM mobile missile The PGM-19 Jupiter was an intermediate-range ballistic missile of the United States Air Force. ...

Resources

  • Adams, Chris, Inside The Cold War; A Cold Warrior's Reflections, Air University Press, 1999;2nd Printing 2004;3rd Printing 2005.
  • Adams, Chris, Ideologies In Conflict, iUniverse Press, 2001.
  • Baugher, Joseph F., American Military Aircraft Encyclopedia, 1998. Internet address: http.//www.csd.ca/~pettypi/elevon/baugher_us/
  • Broyhill, Marvin T. at http//:www.strategic-air-command.com.
  • Boyne, Walter, Boeing B-52. A Documentary History, Jane Publishing Company, 1981.
  • Bright, Charles D., Historical Dictionary of the United States Air Force, Greenwood Press, 1982.
  • Clark, Rita F. Major, From Snark to Peacekeeper, Office of the Historian, HQ. SAC, Offutt AFB. NE. 1990.
  • Clark, Rita F. Major, SAC Missile Chronology 1939 - 1988, Office of the Historian, HQ. SAC, Offutt AFB. NE. 1988.
  • Clark, Rita F. Major, Strategic Air Command, U.S. Government Printing Office.
  • Cragg, Dan, Guide to Military Installations, 4th Edition.
  • Evinger, William R., Directories of Military Bases in the U.S., Oryx Press, 1979.
  • Francillion, Rene J., The United States Air National Guard, Aerospace Publishing LTD, 179 Dalling Road, London, W6 OES, England 1992
  • GlobalSecuriry.org.
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  • Heflin, Woodford A., United States Air Force Dictionary, D. Van Nostram Co., 1990.
  • Henrotin, Joseph. L'Airpower au 21ème siècle. Enjeux et perspectives de la stratégie aérienne. Bruxelles : Bruylant (RMES), 2005.
  • Knaack, Marcelle Size, Post-World War II Bombers 1945-1973, Office of Air Force History, United States Air Force, Washington D.C. 1988.
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  • Lloyd, Alwyn T., B-47 Stratojet in detail & scale, TAB Books, 1988.
  • Lloyd, Alwyn T., A Cold War Legacy, Pictorial Publishing Company, Inc. 2000
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  • Moody, Walton S. Dr., Building a Strategic Air Force, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1998.
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SAC Sayings

  • "To err is human. To forgive is divine. Neither of which is current SAC policy" -- from a poster using SAC's gauntlet emblem. Instead of lightning, the gauntlet was redrawn to hold a pair of bloody testicles.
  • "Peace Through Strength -- Victory Through Devastation"
  • "Peace Is Our Profession"
  • "Peace Is Our Profession. War Is Just Our Hobby."
  • "Peace Is Our Profession. Mass murder is just a hobby."[1]
  • "The Cold War didn't just end, it was WON!" Motto of the Society of the Strategic Air Command
  • "In God We Trust. Everybody else has to have the right (SAC security) badge and know the right (response) numbers."
  • SAC's Motto was also: "PRIDE" or "Professional Results In Daily Effort", In 1969, the inside joke was that it was changed from "PRIDE" to "SHAME" or "Sustained Half-Assed Minimum Effort." [citation needed]

See also

The Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP) is a blueprint which specifies how American nuclear weapons would be used in the event of nuclear attacks. ... The museums SR-71A Blackbird. ... See:Strategic Air Command Commander in Chief Strategic Air Command (CINCSAC) Commanding General - 21 March 1946 General George C. Kenney - 21 March 1946 - 15 October 1948 General Curtis E. LeMay - 19 October 1948 - Jun 1953 Commander - June 1953 General Curtis E. LeMay - June 1953 - 31 March 1955 Commander in Chief... Redirected from: Strategic Air Command Senior Enlisted Advisors CMSgt James M. McCoy - Mar. ...

References

  1. ^ Henley, Gary. We Were Crewdogs page 62

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Strategic Air Command - Wikipedia (801 words)
Das Strategic Air Command (SAC) war während des Kalten Krieges die zentrale Luftstreitmacht innerhalb der US-Luftwaffe und der Inbegriff der militärischen Wachsamkeit und der nuklearen Abschreckung der USA.
Der Einsatz von Atombomben wäre ebenfalls vom SAC durchgeführt worden, da sie als strategische Waffen begriffen wurden und wegen ihrer Größe nur mit schweren Bombern transportiert werden konnten.
Die Tank- und Transportflugzeuge wurden dem Air Mobility Command zugeordnet, während die Bomber, Aufklärer und Interkontinentalraketen zusammen mit den Kampfflugzeugen des Tactical Air Command das neue Air Combat Command bildeten.
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