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Encyclopedia > Straßburg
Ville de Strasbourg
(City flag) (City coat of arms)
City motto: –
Location of Strasbourg
City proper
(commune)
Région Alsace
Département Bas-Rhin (67)
Mayor Fabienne Keller
(UMP) (since 2001)
Area 78.26 km²
Population
2004 estimate
1999 census
(Ranked 7th)
273,100
264,115
Density 3,375/km² (1999)
Metropolitan area
(aire urbaine)
Communes 182 1 (1999)
Area 1,351.5 km² 1 (1999)
Population
1999 census
(Ranked 9th)
612,104 1
650,000 2
Yearly growth +0.81 % 1
Density 453/km² 1 (1999)
Intercommunality

  - president

Urban Community of Strasbourg
Robert Grossmann
(UMP) (since 2001)
Miscellaneous
Twin cities Boston (USA)
Leicester (UK)
Stuttgart (Germany)
Dresden (Germany)
Ramat Gan (Israel)
Notes:

1 Only the part of the metropolitan area on French territory
2 Including the part of the metropolitan area on German territory (Kehl)
This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... A motto is a phrase or collection of words intended to describe the motivation or intention of a sociological grouping or organization. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Strasbourg Template:Strasbourg infobox Categories: GFDL images ... The commune is an administrative division of France. ... France is divided into 26 régions: 21 of these are in the continental part of metropolitan France, one is Corse on the island of Corsica (although strictly speaking Corse is in fact a territorial collectivity, not a région, but is referred to as a région in common... Capital Strasbourg Area 8,280 km² Regional President Adrien Zeller Population  - 2004 estimate  - 1999 census  - Density 1,793,000 1,734,145 209/km² Arrondissements 13 Cantons 75 Communes 903 Départements Bas-Rhin Haut-Rhin Alsace (French: Alsace; Alsatian/German: Elsaß) is a région of France. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France, roughly analogous to British counties and are now grouped into 22 metropolitan and four overseas régions. ... History The département was created on March 4, 1790, during the French Revolution. ... A mayor (from the Latin maīor, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... The Union for a Popular Movement, initially named the Union for a Presidential Majority, and in both cases also known by its French acronym UMP (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire and Union pour la Majorité Présidentielle, respectively) is a French right-wing, conservative political party. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article explains the meaning of area as a physical quantity. ... (Redirected from 1 E7 m2) To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Density (symbol: ρ - Greek: rho) is a measure of mass per unit of volume. ... In France an aire urbaine (literally: urban area) is roughly the equivalent of a US Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... The commune is an administrative division of France. ... This article explains the meaning of area as a physical quantity. ... (Redirected from 1 E9 m2) To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... In France an aire urbaine (literally: urban area) is roughly the equivalent of a US Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... In France an aire urbaine (literally: urban area) is roughly the equivalent of a US Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... Density (symbol: ρ - Greek: rho) is a measure of mass per unit of volume. ... The commune is an administrative division of France. ... Founded December 4, 1967 President Robert Grossmann (UMP) (since 2001) Communes 27 Area 305. ... The Union for a Popular Movement, initially named the Union for a Presidential Majority, and in both cases also known by its French acronym UMP (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire and Union pour la Majorité Présidentielle, respectively) is a French right-wing, conservative political party. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Twin cities are either: two towns or cities that are geographically close to each other, and often referred to collectively; or two distant cities which, perhaps because of similar circumstances, such as industrial decline, or demographics, agree to partner each other and share expertise (e. ... Alternative meanings: Boston (disambiguation) The 18th-century Old State House in Boston is surrounded by tall buildings of the 19th and 20th centuries. ... Leicester (pronounced ) is the largest city in the English East Midlands, on the River Soar. ... Stuttgart is a city located in southern Germany, it is the capital of the state of Baden-Württemberg, and has a population of approximately 600,000 as of June 2004. ... Brühls Terrace and the Frauenkirche Dresden [ˈdreːsdn̩] (Sorbian/Lusatian Drježdźany), the capital city of the German federal state of Saxony, is situated in a valley on the river Elbe. ... Ramat Gan (רמת-גן) is a city in Israel, on the central coastal strip, just east of Tel Aviv, and part of the metropolis known as Gush Dan, in the Tel Aviv District. ... Kehl is a town in southwestern Germany in the Ortenaukreis, Baden-Württemberg. ...

Strasbourg (French: Strasbourg; Alsatian: Strossburi, "town [at the crossing] of roads"; German: Straßburg) is the capital and principal city of the Alsace région of northeastern France. It is the préfecture (capital) of the Bas-Rhin département. Alsatian (French Alsacien, German Elsässisch) is a German Alemannic dialect spoken in Alsace, a region now in eastern France, and historically passing between French and German control many times. ... Capital Strasbourg Area 8,280 km² Regional President Adrien Zeller Population  - 2004 estimate  - 1999 census  - Density 1,793,000 1,734,145 209/km² Arrondissements 13 Cantons 75 Communes 903 Départements Bas-Rhin Haut-Rhin Alsace (French: Alsace; Alsatian/German: Elsaß) is a région of France. ... is divided into 26 régions, further subdivided into départements. ... In France, a préfecture is the capital city of a département. ... History The département was created on March 4, 1790, during the French Revolution. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France, roughly analogous to British counties and are now grouped into 22 metropolitan and four overseas régions. ...


Strasbourg is an important centre of manufacturing and engineering, as well as of road, rail and river communications.


Strasbourg is the seat of the Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rights and it hosts the new seat of the European Parliament (with Brussels) after the asbestos scandal in the 1980s. The Palace of Europe in Strasbourg The Council of Europe is an international organisation of 46 member states in the European region. ... The ECHR should not be mistaken for the European Court of Justice, an institution of the European Union for the resolution of disputes under EU law. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... Asbestos (Greek a-, not; sbestos, extinguishable) is a group of fibrous metamorphic minerals. ... Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ...

Contents

Geography

Strasbourg is situated on the Ill River, where it flows into the Rhine on the frontier with Germany. The German town across the river is Kehl. The Ill is a river of Alsace, in north-eastern France. ... The Rhine canyon (Ruinaulta) in Graubünden in Switzerland Length 1,320 km Elevation of the source Vorderrhein: approx. ... Kehl is a town in southwestern Germany in the Ortenaukreis, Baden-Württemberg. ...


Sights

River Ill
Strasbourg townscape

The city is known for its sandstone gothic cathedral, and for its medieval cityscape of Rhineland black and white timber-framed buildings, particularly in the Petite-France district alongside the river Ill, which has been declared a World Heritage site by the UNESCO. Download high resolution version (7396x1451, 1985 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (7396x1451, 1985 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Red Sandstone in Wyoming Layered sandstone Sandstone is an arenaceous sedimentary rock composed mainly of feldspar and quartz and varies in colour (in a similar way to sand), through grey, yellow, red, and white. ... Gothic architecture characterizes any of the styles of European architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, in use throughout Europe during the high and late medieval period, from the 12th century onwards. ... A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a bishopric. ... The Rhineland (Rheinland in German) is the general name for the land on both sides of the river Rhine in the west of Germany. ... Petite-France is an area in Strasbourg, Alsace, France. ... Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ... UNESCO logo The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations system established in 1946. ...


History

At the site of Strasbourg, the Romans established a military outpost and named it Argentoratum. It belonged to the Germania Superior Roman province. From the 4th century, Strasbourg was the seat of a bishopric. Roman Empire between AD 60 and 400 with major cities. ... Categories: Historical stubs | Ancient Roman provinces | German history | Germany | History of the Germanic peoples ... A Roman province (Latin, provincia, pl. ... (3rd century - 4th century - 5th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ...


The Alamanni fought a battle against Rome in Strasbourg in 357. They were defeated by Julian, later Emperor of Rome, and their king Chonodomarius was taken prisoner. On January 2, 366 the Alamanni crossed the frozen Rhine in large numbers, to invade the Roman Empire. Early in the 5th century the Alamanni appear to have crossed the Rhine, conquered and then settled what is today Alsace and a large part of Switzerland. The Alamanni, Allemanni or Alemanni, are a Germanic tribe, first mentioned by Dio Cassius, under the year 213. ... Events Battle of Strasbourg: Julian leads the Roman forces to victory against the Alamanni at Strasbourg Births Deaths Categories: 357 ... For other meanings of Julian, see Julian (disambiguation). ... Roman Emperor is the title historians use to refer to the ruler of the Roman Empire. ... January 2 is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events January 2, Alamanni cross frozen Rhine in large numbers, invading Roman Empire October 1 - Pope Damasus I becomes Bishop of Rome. ... The Rhine canyon (Ruinaulta) in Graubünden in Switzerland Length 1,320 km Elevation of the source Vorderrhein: approx. ... ( 4th century - 5th century - 6th century - other centuries) Events Rome sacked by Visigoths in 410. ...


The town was occupied successively in the 5th century by Alamanni, Huns and Franks. In 842, Strasbourg was the site of the Oath of Strasbourg. Many historians consider the Huns (meaning person in Mongolian language) the first Mongolian and Turkic people mentioned in European history. ... The Franks were one of several west Germanic tribes who entered the late Roman Empire from Frisia as foederati and established a lasting realm in an area that covers most of modern-day France and the region of Franconia in Germany, forming the historic kernel of both these two modern... Events Oath of Strasbourg - alliance of Louis the German and Charles the Bald against emperor Lothar - sworn and recorded in vernacular languages. ... In 842, Louis the German, son of Louis the Pious, and ruler of the eastern Frankish kingdom, met with his brother, Charles the Bald, ruler of the western Frankish kingdom, at Strasbourg. ...

1888 German map of Strasbourg

A major commercial centre in the later Middle Ages, it became in 1262 an Imperial Free City of the Holy Roman Empire, with a broad-based city government from 1332. The minster of Strasbourg was completed in 1439, and became the World's Tallest Building, surpassing the Great Pyramid of Giza. During the 1520s the city embraced the religious teachings of Martin Luther, whose adherents established a university in the following century. 1888 German map of Strasbourg This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 1888 German map of Strasbourg This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Events Strasbourg becomes a Free City of the Holy Roman Empire First Visconti become the lord of Iceland swear fealty to the king of Norway, bringing an end to the Icelandic Commonwealth Births Ladislaus IV of Hungary Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona... In the Holy Roman Empire, an Imperial Free City (in German: Freie Reichsstadt) was a city formally responsible to the Emperor only — as opposed to the majority of cities in the Empire, which belonged to a territory and were thus governed by one of the many princes and dukes of... The crown of the Holy Roman Empire (2nd half of the 10th century), now held in the Vienna Schatzkammer. ... Events November 7 - Lucerne joins the Swiss Confederation with Uri, Schwyz, and Unterwalden. ... A minster is a type of cathedral. ... Events Battle of Grotnik, which ended the hussite movement in Poland Eric of Pomerania, King of Sweden, Denmark and Norway is declared deposed in Sweden. ... For many millennia the record holder for worlds tallest structure was clearly defined (see table below. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Centuries: 15th century - 16th century - 17th century Decades: 1470s 1480s 1490s 1500s 1510s - 1520s - 1530s 1540s 1550s 1560s 1570s Years: 1520 1521 1522 1523 1524 1525 1526 1527 1528 1529 Events and Trends Fall of Tenochtitlán and conquest of Spanish. ... Martin Luther (originally Martin Luder or Martinus Luther) (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German theologian and an Augustinian monk whose teachings inspired the Protestant Reformation and deeply influenced the doctrines of Lutheran, Protestant and other Christian traditions (a broad movement composed of many congregations and church bodies). ...


Annexing Strasbourg in September 1681, France was confirmed in possession of the city by the Treaty of Ryswick (1697). The official policy of religious intolerance which drove many Protestants from France after the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685) was not applied in Strasbourg, as the Edict of Nantes (1598) had still been in effect in France at the time of the city's annexation. With the growth of industry and commerce, the city's population tripled in the 19th century to 150,000. Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... The Treaty of Ryswick was signed on 20 September 1697 and named after Ryswick in the United Provinces (now the Netherlands). ... Events September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher Polhem starts Swedens first technical school. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Edict of Fontainebleau (October 1685) was an edict issued by Louis XIV of France. ... Events February 6 - James Stuart, Duke of York becomes King James II of England and Ireland and King James VII of Scotland. ... The Edict of Nantes was issued on April 13, 1598 by Henry IV of France to grant French Protestants (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a Catholic nation. ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle composed "La Marseillaise" on April 25, 1792 in Strasbourg during a dinner organised by Frédéric de Dietrich, Strasbourg's mayor. Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle (b. ... This article is about the anthem La Marseillaise. A sculpture popularly called La Marseillaise is part of the sculptural programme of the Arc de Triomphe. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (116th in leap years). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Annexed to the newly-established German Empire, as part of Alsace-Lorraine, in 1871 following the Franco-Prussian War (Treaty of Frankfurt), the city was restored to France after World War I, in 1919 by the Treaty of Versailles. It was again part of Germany during World War II, from 1940 to 1945. The term German Empire (Deutsches Reich) commonly refers to Germany, from its consolidation as a unified nation-state on January 18, 1871, until the abdication of Kaiser ( Emperor) Wilhelm II on November 9, 1918. ... Imperial Province of Elsass-Lothringen (497 Kb) Alsace-Lorraine (French: Alsace-Lorraine; German: Elsaß-Lothringen) was the territory originally of the German empire, ceded to Louis XIV by the peace of Westphalia in 1648, but restored by France to the newly-unified Germany under the 1871 Treaty of Frankfurt (which... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Franco-Prussian War (July 19, 1870 – May 10, 1871) was fought between France and Prussia (backed by the North German Confederation) allied with the south German states of Baden, Bavaria and Württemberg. ... The Treaty of Frankfurt was signed May 10, 1871, at the end of the Franco-Prussian War. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Woodrow Wilson with the American Peace Commissioners The Treaty of Versailles of 1919 is the peace treaty created as a result of six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 which put an official end to World War I between the Allies and Central Powers. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... 1940 was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Education

There are three universities in Strasbourg: The University Palace in Strasbourg, and a monument to one of the universitys students, Johann Wolfgang Goethe The University of Strasbourg in Strasbourg, Alsace, France, is divided into three separate institutions. ...

The campus of the École nationale d'administration (ENA) is located in Strasbourg (the former one being in Paris). The location of the "new" ENA was meant to give a European vocation to the school. The Université Louis Pasteur, also known as Strasbourg I or ULP is a large university in Strasbourg, Alsace, France. ... The Université Marc Bloch, also known as Strasbourg II or UMB is a university in Strasbourg, Alsace, France. ... The Université Robert Schuman, also known as Strasbourg III or URS is a university in Strasbourg, Alsace, France. ... The École nationale dadministration (generally known as ENA) is the school where many of France senior officials are instructed. ... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ...


The permanent campus of the International Space University (ISU) is located in the south of Strasbourg. International Space University was formed in 1987 by Peter Diamandis, Todd Hawley, and Bob Richards. ...

Tram station in Place de l'Homme de Fer in Strasbourg

Download high resolution version (808x659, 153 KB)Tram station in Place de lHomme de Fer in Strasbourg. ... Download high resolution version (808x659, 153 KB)Tram station in Place de lHomme de Fer in Strasbourg. ...

Transportation

A modern-looking tram system has operated in Strasbourg since 1994. A modern tram in the Töölö district of Helsinki, Finland a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 For modern innovations to make these systems higher-capacity and higher-speed, see light... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ...


Two TGV lines are planned to link Strasbourg to the European high-speed train network: The TGV is Frances train à grande vitesse; literally high-speed train. Developed by Alsthom and SNCF, and operated by SNCF, the French national railway company, it connects cities in France, especially Paris, and in some other neighbouring countries, such as Belgium, Germany and Switzerland. ...

  1. TGV Est (Paris-Strasbourg) (under construction, to open 2007)
  2. TGV Rhin-Rhône (Strasbourg-Lyon)

The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the French city. ...

Famous residents

Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (circa 1398 – February 3, 1468), a German metal-worker and inventor, achieved fame for his contributions to the technology of printing during about the 1450s, including a type metal alloy and oil-based inks, a mold for casting type accurately, and a new kind... Erasmus Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (also Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam) (October 27, probably 1466 – July 12, 1536) was a Dutch humanist and theologian. ... Martin Bucer (or Butzer) (1491 - 1551) was a German Protestant reformer. ... John Calvin John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a preeminent Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and is the namesake of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 26, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ... W.A. Mozart at the age of 21 W.A. Mozart at the age of 34 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) is considered one of the greatest composers of European classical music. ... Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle (b. ... This article is about the anthem La Marseillaise. A sculpture popularly called La Marseillaise is part of the sculptural programme of the Arc de Triomphe. ... Louis Pasteur (December 27, 1822 – September 28, 1895) was a French microbiologist and chemist. ...

European role

West façade of the Strasbourg Cathedral

Strasbourg is sometimes regarded as: Download high resolution version (4076x3982, 2428 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (4076x3982, 2428 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

France and Germany are negotiating the creation of a Eurodistrict straddling the Rhine river combining the Greater Strasbourg and the Ortenau district of Baden-Württemberg, with some common administration. The combined population of this "European Washington, D.C." would be 860,000. In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... The Palace of Europe in Strasbourg The Council of Europe is an international organisation of 46 member states in the European region. ... The ECHR should not be mistaken for the European Court of Justice, an institution of the European Union for the resolution of disputes under EU law. ... Emblem of the Brussels-Capital Region Flag of The City of Brussels Brussels (Dutch: Brussel, French: Bruxelles, German: Brüssel) is the capital of Belgium and is considered by many to be the de facto capital of the European Union, as two of its three main institutions have their headquarters... The French and German governments are currently discussing the creation of a commonly administered region incorporating Greater Strasbourg/Straßburg (a formerly German city) and the Ortenau district of Baden-Württemberg. ... The Ortenaukreis is a district (Kreis) in the west of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... With an area of 35,742 km² and 10. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


See also

Categories: Strasbourg | Stub ... The Musée dArt Moderne et Contemporain of Strasbourg (MAMCS, Museum of modern and contemporary art) opened at the end of 1998. ... The Convention on the Unification of Certain Points of Substantive Law on Patents for Invention or Strasbourg Convention is a multilateral treaty signed by Member States of the Council of Europe on November 27, 1963 in Strasbourg, France. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a government to an inventor or applicant for a limited amount of time (normally maximum 20 years from the filing date, depending on extension). ...

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