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Encyclopedia > Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty

Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC) is an international animal rights campaign to close down Huntingdon Life Sciences (HLS),[2] Europe's largest contract animal-testing laboratory. HLS tests products like household cleaners, drugs, pesticides, cosmetics and food additives, mostly for toxicity, on around 75,000 animals every year. Most of the animals used are rodents,[3] with some dogs, cats, marmosets, macaques, and baboons. [4][5][6] Image File history File links Monkey filmed inside Huntingdon Life Sciences, U.S. taken from http://www. ... Image File history File links Monkey filmed inside Huntingdon Life Sciences, U.S. taken from http://www. ... Huntingdon Life Sciences (HLS) is a contract animal-testing company founded in 1952 in England, now with facilities in Huntingdon in the United Kingdom, New Jersey in the United States, and Japan. ... A civet, or sea fox, photographed in the Zigong Peoples Zoo, Sichuan, 2001. ... Huntingdon Life Sciences (HLS) is a contract animal-testing company founded in 1952 in England, now with facilities in Huntingdon in the United Kingdom, New Jersey in the United States, and Japan. ... Enos the space chimp before insertion into the Mercury-Atlas 5 capsule in 1961. ...


SHAC was started in November 1999 by British animal-rights activists Greg Avery and Heather James after video footage shot covertly inside HLS in 1997 by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) was aired on British television.[2] The footage showed staff shaking, punching, shouting and laughing at beagles in an HLS lab. [7] (video) The employees were dismissed and prosecuted, and HLS's Home Office licence to perform animal experiments was revoked for six months. Along with the British video, footage shot in the U.S. appeared to show technicians dissecting a live monkey. HLS employees were also discovered to be taking drugs on the job and falsifying animal care reports. [8] (video) Greg Avery (born 1963), also known as Greg Jennings and Greg Harrison, is a British animal rights activist and co-founder of Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC), an international campaign to force the closure of Huntingdon Life Sciences (HLS), a controversial animal-testing company with bases in Huntingdon, England, and... People Eating Tasty Animals logo People Eating Tasty Animals (PETA) is the largest animal rights organization in the world. ... This article is about the dog breed; for other meanings of Beagle see Beagle (disambiguation). ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of statutory and common law that deals with crime and the legal punishment of criminal offenses. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ...


PETA withdrew its campaign against the company after being threatened with legal action, and SHAC took over.[9] Avery and James had both been involved in previous high-profile, successful campaigns to close Consort Kennels, which bred beagles for animal-testing purposes, and Hillgrove Farm, which bred cats. Consort Kennels was a commercial breeder of beagles for animal testing, based in Hereford, UK. It closed in September 1997 after a 10-month campaign by animal rights activists. ... This article is about the dog breed; for other meanings of Beagle see Beagle (disambiguation). ... Hillgrove Farm is located near Witney in Oxfordshire, UK. It was the last commercial breeder of cats for animal experiments in the UK and closed down in 1999 after an intense two-year campaign by animal rights activists under the banner of Save The Hillgrove Cats. ...


SHAC has been criticized for its apparent willingness to condone violence, intimidation, and attacks on property. The Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors U.S. domestic extremism, has described SHAC's modus operandi as "frankly terroristic tactics similar to those of anti-abortion extremists." [4] On May 26, 2005, the Animal Liberation Front issued a warning in support of SHAC that threatened further violence: "A new era has dawned for those who fund the abusers and raise funds for them to murder animals with. You too are on the hit list: you have been warned. If you support or raise funds for any company connected with Huntingdon Life Sciences we will track you down, come for you and destroy your property with fire."[10] The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) is an American non-profit legal organization, whose stated purpose is to combat racism and promote civil rights through research, education, and litigation. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Beagles removed by British ALF activists from a testing laboratory owned by the Boots Group. ...

Contents

The SHAC campaign

Organization

A protest march against Huntingdon Life Sciences.
A protest march against Huntingdon Life Sciences. [11]

The SHAC spokespersons are Greg Avery, his second wife, Natasha Avery (nee Dellemagne), and his first wife, Heather Nicholson, who as of April 2004 live together rent-free in a £500,000 cottage provided by a supporter, named as Virginia Jane Steele. The Observer describes Steele as an "extremely wealthy" anti-vivisectionist who "in effect bankrolls the jobless Averys ... allowing them to devote their time to the group's cause." [12] Image File history File links Shacdemo. ... Image File history File links Shacdemo. ...


Together, Nicholson, Avery and his wife publish SHAC reports on their website and by mail, and provide press information and interviews. As a result of these activities, the three were jailed for six months in December 2001 for conspiracy to cause a public nuisance.[13] Greg Avery was also jailed for six months in 1998 for affray and for four months in 2000.[14] He served 14 days for assaulting a policeman in 1998, and previously six months for affray.[15] Nicholson and Natasha Avery were sentenced to 16-month prison sentences in July 2006 after shouting and spitting at a 75-year-old woman and her family because their car, stuck in traffic, had a Countryside Alliance sticker on it.[16] In law, the affray is the fighting of two or more persons in a public place to the terror (in French: à leffroi) of the lieges. ... The Countryside Alliance strongly opposes House of Commons plans to ban fox hunting. ...


The SHAC website and mailing list serve as a platform for supporters. Action reports are published on the website and mailed out to subscribers, and may contain details of potential targets and lists of the companies that have severed links with HLS. According to Greg Avery, "[t]hey've made their beds and now it's time to lie in them, and they're all whining."[17] The information disseminated and shared between activists allows SHAC groups throughout the UK and North America to act autonomously. SHAC maintains a decentralized approach to organizing with no central leadership.


Methods

SHAC's modus operandi is direct action, comprising intimidation, harassment or even physical attacks against the property of HLS, its employees, its employees' families, its business partners, their business partners, insurers, caterers, cleaners and children's nursery school.[18] This direct action approach is designed to force the financial backers of HLS to take personal accountability. Direct action is a form of political activism which seeks immediate remedy for perceived ills, as opposed to indirect actions such as electing representatives who promise to provide remedy at some later date. ...


The Daily Mail cites as examples a SHAC activist sending 500 letters to the neighbours of a company manager who did business with HLS. The letter warned parents to keep their children away from the man - falsely claiming that he had raped the letter writer when she was a child. Police subsequently visited every household in the manager's area to tell his neighbours that the allegations were false. A woman in her 60s who worked for a HLS-related company allegedly had every window in her house smashed twice, both after visits from SHAC supporters during the night, and found an effigy hanging outside her home, which read "R.I.P. Mary, Animal Abusing Bitch".[19]


SHAC say they publish names and addresses only so that people can protest peacefully and within the law. [20] However, testimony to the British House of Commons on March 19, 2003 included excerpts from a document reported to have come from within the SHAC organization. Quotes include: The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • A simple tactic has been adopted recently. Pick your target. Throw a couple of rape alarms in their roof guttering or thick hedgerow, and leg it....
  • Being kept awake at night hardly puts you in a good mood at work or with your family....
  • Another idea is to set off extra loud fireworks from a safe distance that will wake up the HLS scum and everybody else for miles around....
  • From the comfort of your own home, you can swamp all these bastards with send no money offers. They cause huge inconvenience and can give them a bad credit rating. Order them taxis, pizzas, curries, etc, the possibilities are endless.
  • Above all, stay free and safe, and don't get caught. The more preparation you do the better.... Think, think, think. Don't lick stamps, use gloves when pasting stuff.... No idle talk in pubs. Burn your shoes and clothes after your night of action.[21]

A few months later, HLS marketing director Andrew Gay was attacked on his doorstep with a chemical spray to his eyes which left him temporarily blinded. [4]


The campaign continues to develop new tactics and targets. In 2006 alone, SHAC activists were charged with and found guilty of burglary [22], affray [23], illegal street collection [24], highway obstruction [25], public order offences [26], inciting violence and terror [27] and stalking. [27]


Alleged ties to ALF

Robin Webb, who runs the Animal Liberation Press Office, addresses a meeting of SHAC.
Robin Webb, who runs the Animal Liberation Press Office, addresses a meeting of SHAC.

The SHAC spokespersons deny any link between their campaign and attacks carried out by activists using the name of the Animal Liberation Front. However, the SHAC website features ALF news, and Kevin Jonas, the president of SHAC USA, who took charge of SHAC UK while the Averys and James were jailed for six months in 2002, has declared his "unequivocal support" for the ALF. Robin Webb, spokesman for the ALF in the UK, has attended and addressed SHAC conferences in the U.S., announcing: "We'll sweep Huntingdon Life Sciences aside, and we'll raze this evil place right to the ground." [28] Image File history File links This work is copyrighted. ... Image File history File links This work is copyrighted. ... Robin Webb appearing on Channel 4s Dispatches Robin Webb runs the Animal Liberation Press Office in the UK. He was previously a member of the ruling council of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), and a director of Animal Aid. ... The Animal Liberation Press Office was set up in October 1991 to relay information to the media about direct action undertaken by the Animal Liberation Front, the Animal Rights Militia, the Justice Department, and other radical animal-rights groups. ... Beagles removed by British ALF activists from a testing laboratory owned by the Boots Group. ... Robin Webb appearing on Channel 4s Dispatches Robin Webb runs the Animal Liberation Press Office in the UK. He was previously a member of the ruling council of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), and a director of Animal Aid. ...


According to Keith Mann, described by The Guardian as a "senior figure" within the ALF, a government clampdown on legal protest against HLS means "all that is left to them is extremism". He commented after a May 26, 2005 warning was posted on the ALF website: "A new era has dawned for those who fund the abusers ... If you support or raise funds for any company connected with Huntingdon Life Sciences we will track you down, come for you and destroy your property with fire." [29] The warning coincided with the ALF firebombing of a car belonging to the finance director of, Canaccord Capital, a brokerage firm. Members of SHAC defended the bombing, suggesting the company acted as brokers for Phytopharm, which had used HLS for contract testing. [29] Keith Mann is a British animal-rights campaigner, believed to be a senior Animal Liberation Front activist. ... Extremism is a term used to describe the actions or ideologies of individuals or groups outside the perceived political center of a society; or otherwise claimed to violate common standards of ethics and reciprocity. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Phytopharm is a pharmaceutical company with a plant extract division. ...


The ALF continued to target individuals associated with HLS throughout 2006. [30] [31] On August 17, 2006 Donald Currie was charged with a number of fire bombing offenses [30], leading police to describe him as an "active bomber for the Animal Liberation Front" who may be responsible for "eight or nine" other similar crimes targeting HLS [31]. In December 2006 Currie was jailed for 12 years for the crimes. [32] On its web site SHAC encourages supporters to help Currie, and other jailed ALF activists, explaining: "write a letter now, help them whilst they are in there, it could be you!" [33] August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


"Dangerous activists are moving freely between these groups, money is changing hands and the threat is escalating," David Martosko, spokesman for the Center for Consumer Freedom (CCF) — a group largely funded by the fast-food, alcohol, tobacco, and pharmaceutical industries — told The Observer in August 2004. The FBI suspects that British SHAC activists are being bankrolled by groups and individuals in the U.S. [28] The Center for Consumer Freedom (CCF), formerly called the Guest Choice Network, is a non-profit U.S. lobby group funded by the food and tobacco industries, [1] [2][3] [4] [5] as well as more than 1,000 concerned individuals, according to its website. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Effects of campaign on HLS and its customers

The campaign has reportedly had a major impact on HLS's business deals, share price, and profits.[34][35] The SHAC website maintains a list of companies, 166 (June 2005) up to 272 (06/July/2006), that they claim have severed business ties with HLS.[36] The British Department of Trade and Industry had to insure HLS because all previous insurers had abandoned them after being targeted by SHAC. The Department of Trade and Industry is a United Kingdom government department. ...


Shareholders published

In 2000, SHAC obtained a list of HLS shareholders. The list included the names of beneficial owners: anonymous individuals and companies who bought shares using the name of a third party. Shareholders included the pension funds of the Labour Party, Rover cars, and the London Borough of Camden. The Labour Party sold its 75,000 shares in January 2000. The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... Rover was a British automobile manufacturer and later a marque based at the Longbridge plant in Birmingham. ... The London Borough of Camden is an inner-London borough created in 1965 to replace the metropolitan boroughs of Hampstead, Holborn, St Pancras. ...


The list was passed to the Sunday Telegraph, which published it on December 3, 2000, and several beneficial owners disposed of their shares. Two weeks later, an equity stake of 32 million shares was placed on the London Stock Exchange for one penny each. HLS quotes crashed immediately. The Royal Bank of Scotland closed HLS's bank account and the British government arranged for the state-owned Bank of England to give them an account. The British Banking Association said "Huntingdon Life Sciences are in a nightmare situation," (Huntingdon Life Sciences, financial report 2002). December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... The Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc (LSE: RBS) is the successor to The Royal Bank of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: [1]), founded in 1727 by Royal Charter of King George I.[2] Based in Edinburgh, it is a banking and insurance holding company. ... Headquarters London Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound Sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ...


Dropped from NYSE

On December 21, 2000, HLS was dropped from the New York Stock Exchange because of its share collapse: its market capitalization had fallen below NYSE limits and the NYSE did not accept HLS's revised business plan. On March 29, 2001, HLS lost both of its market makers and its place on the main platform of the London Stock Exchange. December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... This article is about the stock exchange itself. ... Market capitalization, often abbreviated to market cap, is a measurement of corporate size that refers to the current stock price times the number of outstanding shares. ... March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (89th in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A market maker is a person or a firm which quotes a buy and sell price in a financial instrument or commodity hoping to make a profit on the turn or the bid/offer spread. ...


Move to the U.S.

Because of SHAC's use of public records to threaten HLS investors, HLS moved its financial centre to the United States and incorporated in Maryland as Life Sciences Research, Inc., in order to take advantage of stricter U.S. securities laws, which allow greater anonymity of shareholders. Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,417 sq mi (32,160 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33...


Saved from banktruptcy

HLS was saved from bankruptcy when its largest shareholder, American investment bank Stephens, Inc, gave the company a $15-million loan. SHAC supporters reacted by targeting Stephens, Inc. HLS's position remains unstable, as is shown by their $87.5-million debt and by documents leaked to SHAC.[37]


Firebombing

In June 2005, a Vancouver-based brokerage announced that it had dropped a client, Phytopharm PLC, in response to the May 2005 ALF firebombing of a car belonging to Canaccord executive Michael Kendall. The ALF stated on its website that activists placed an "incendiary device" under the car, which was in Kendall's garage at home when it caught fire during the night. Kendall and his family went into hiding. The brokerage, Canaccord Capital Corp., stated that it was not "worth risking its employees' lives" to do business with a company "targeted by animal rights extremists". Vancouver (pronounced: ) is a city in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. ...


Phytopharm was targeted, as were those doing business with it, because it had business links with HLS. The ALF warned Phytopharm to stay away from HLS or "see your share price crash and your supporters' property go up in flames."[38]


Carr Securities withdraws

Carr Securities announced it had withdrawn from making a market in HLS shares after a New York yacht club was covered in red paint by the U.S. branch of the ALF, because members of the club worked for Carr Securities, which traded in HLS shares. NY redirects here. ...


The ALF announced on its bulletin board: "Let this be a message to any other company who chooses to court HLS in their ... entrance into the NYSE. If you trade in LSR shares, make a market, process orders, or purchase shares you can expect far worse treatment. The message is simple, don't touch HLS!"


On October 26, 2005, Testimony to the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works by John Lewis, Deputy Assistant Director Federal Bureau of Investigation Oversight on Eco-terrorism included statements that in September, "Carr Securities began marketing the Huntingdon Life Sciences stock. The next day, the Manhasset Bay Yacht Club, to which certain Carr executives reportedly belong, was vandalized by animal rights activists. The extremists sent a claim of responsibility to the SHAC website, and three days after the incident, Carr terminated its business relationship with HLS. These are just some of the examples of SHAC’s use of threats and violence to financially strangle HLS and permanently mar its public image. These examples demonstrate some of the difficulties law enforcement faces in combating acts of extremism and domestic terrorism. Extremists are very knowledgeable about the letter of the law and the limits of law enforcement. The SHAC website has a page devoted to instructing activists on how to behave toward law enforcement officers, how to deal with interrogations, and what to say — and not say — if they are arrested." October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


NYSE listing postponed

On September 7, 2005, the New York stock exchange asked Life Sciences Research, the name HLS is trading under in the U.S., to delay its listing. The company has been listed on the junior OTC bulletin board since its move out of the UK. The NYSE offered no reason for the delay.[39] September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


GlaxoSmithKline targeted

A posting on the website Bite Back on September 7, 2005 said that the ALF had carried out an attack on the home of Paul Blackburn, the corporate controller of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), in Buckinghamshire, because GSK is a customer of Huntingdon Life Sciences. The activists admitted to detonating a device containing two litres of fuel and four pounds of explosives on the doorstep of Blackburn's home, causing minor damage. September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE: GSK NYSE: GSK) is a British based pharmaceutical, biologicals, and healthcare company. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ...


HLS can no longer trade on OTCBB

On February 4, 2006, activist pressure resulted in HLS losing its only listed market maker, Legacy Trading. As a result of this, the company can no longer trade on the OTC Bulletin Board. February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


GlaxoSmithKline small investors targeted

In May 2006, an anonymous group said it would be writing to every one of GlaxoSmithKline's 170,000 small investors warning them to sell their shares, as part of the campaign against Huntingdon Life Sciences. The letters began arriving at investors' home addresses on May 7, 2006, asking that shares be sold within 14 days, and that the group should be informed of the sale by e-mail via a hotmail address. It added: "We will be checking that you have done this. The choice is yours."[40] The number of letters sent was much smaller than was claimed, reports suggesting "at least 50" shareholders received the warning.[41] Writing in the Sunday Telegraph the following week, British Prime Minister Tony Blair expressed support for animal experimentation in the face of an "appalling...campaign of intimidation."[42] May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hotmail is a free webmail e-mail service, which is accessible via a web browser. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament...


Criticism of SHAC

Animal rights

Activists
Greg Avery · David Barbarash
Rod Coronado · Barry Horne
Ronnie Lee · Keith Mann
Ingrid Newkirk · Andrew Tyler
Jerry Vlasak · Robin Webb
A civet, or sea fox, photographed in the Zigong Peoples Zoo, Sichuan, 2001. ... Image File history File links Olive_baboon1. ... Greg Avery (born 1963), also known as Greg Jennings and Greg Harrison, is a British animal rights activist and co-founder of Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC), an international campaign to force the closure of Huntingdon Life Sciences (HLS), a controversial animal-testing company with bases in Huntingdon, England, and... David Barbarash is the North American press officer for the Animal Liberation Front. ... Rod Coronado Rodney Adam Coronado is an American eco-anarchist and animal rights activist. ... Barry Horne Barry Horne was a British animal rights activist who died of kidney failure in Ronkswood Hospital, Worcester on November 5, 2001, following a series of four hunger strikes while serving an 18-year sentence for planting incendiary devices. ... Ronnie Lee is a British animal rights activist, and founder of the Animal Liberation Front. ... Keith Mann is a British animal-rights campaigner, believed to be a senior Animal Liberation Front activist. ... PETAs president and co-founder Ingrid Newkirk Ingrid Newkirk (born July 11, 1949) is a British-born animal rights activist, author, and president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the worlds largest animal rights organization. ... Andrew Tyler is the director of Animal Aid, the UKs largest animal rights organization. ... Jerry Vlasak is a U.S. physician and prominent member of several controversial nonprofit organizations, including Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society. ... Robin Webb appearing on Channel 4s Dispatches Robin Webb runs the Animal Liberation Press Office in the UK. He was previously a member of the ruling council of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), and a director of Animal Aid. ...

Groups/campaigns
Animal Aid · ALF
Animal liberation movement
Animal Rights Militia
BUAV · Great Ape Project
Justice Department
PETA · PCRM · SPEAK
Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty
Viva!
Animal Aid logo Animal Aid is the United Kingdoms largest animal rights group and one of the longest established in the world, having been founded in 1977. ... Beagles removed by British ALF activists from a testing laboratory owned by the Boots Group. ... For the concept, see Animal rights The animal liberation movement or animal rights movement, also sometimes called the animal personhood movement, is the worldwide movement of individual activists, academics, lawyers, campaigns, and organized groups who oppose or engage in direct action against the use of non-human animals in research... The Animal Rights Militia (ARM) is a name used by animal-rights activists who are prepared to carry out acts of violence against human beings. ... The British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection is a pressure group based near Highbury Corner in North London, United Kingdom that campaigns peacefully against vivisection. ... The logo of The Great Ape Project, which aims to expand moral equality to great apes, and to foster greater understanding of them by humans. ... The Justice Department is a militant animal-rights organization, set up in Britain in 1993, and active there and in the United States. ... People Eating Tasty Animals logo People Eating Tasty Animals (PETA) is the largest animal rights organization in the world. ... The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) is a non-profit organization based in Washington, D.C., that promotes preventive medicine, conducts clinical research, and encourages higher standards for ethics and effectiveness in research. ... SPEAK, the Voice for the Animals is a British animal rights campaign that aims to end animal experimentation and vivisection in the UK. Its current focus is opposition to a new animal testing center being built by Oxford University. ... Viva!, or Vegetarians International Voice For Animals, Founded by Juliet Gellatley in 1995, is an animal-rights based organisation which promotes vegetarianism and veganism. ...

Issues
Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act
Animal rights · Animal testing
Bile bear · Factory farming
Operation Backfire
Speciesism
Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... A civet, or sea fox, photographed in the Zigong Peoples Zoo, Sichuan, 2001. ... Enos the space chimp before insertion into the Mercury-Atlas 5 capsule in 1961. ... A bile bear in Huizhou Farm, Vietnam. ... Beef cattle on a feedlot in the Texas Panhandle Factory farming is a term used to describe a set of controversial practices in large-scale, intensive agriculture. ... Operation Backfire is an ongoing multi-agency criminal investigation, led by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), into violent acts in the name of animal rights and environmental causes in the United States [1]. // Background In 2004 the FBI merged seven independent investigations from its Portland, Oregon field office and... The relevance of particular information in (or previously in) this article or section is disputed. ...

Cases
Britches
Cambridge University primates
Pit of despair · Silver Spring monkeys
Unnecessary Fuss
Britches after being removed from the laboratory by the Animal Liberation Front Britches was the name given by researchers to a stumptail macaque monkey who was born into a breeding colony at the University of California, Riverside in March 1985. ... A marmoset inside Cambridge University, filmed by BUAV The use of primates in experiments at Cambridge University is controversial, first coming to widespread public attention in the UK following undercover investigations lasting ten months in 1998 by the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection (BUAV), the results of which... Harry Harlows pit of despair The pit of despair, or vertical chamber, was a device used in experiments conducted on rhesus macaque monkeys during the 1970s by American comparative psychologist Harry Harlow and his students at the University of Wisconsin. ... The Silver Spring monkeys were 17 monkeys kept in small wire cages inside the Institute of Behavioral Research in Silver Spring, Maryland, by Dr. Edward Taub, who was researching regeneration of severed nerves with a grant from the National Institute of Health (NIH). ... Unnecessary Fuss is the name of a film produced by Ingrid Newkirk and Alex Pacheco of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), showing footage shot inside the University of Pennsylvanias Head Injury Clinic in Philadelphia, described by the university as the longest standing and most respected center...

Writers/advocates
Steven Best · Stephen R.L. Clark
Gary Francione · Gill Langley
Tom Regan · Richard D. Ryder
Peter Singer · Steven M. Wise
Image:Steven best. ... Dr. Stephen Clark Stephen Richard Lyster Clark (born October 30, 1945) is a British philosopher and international authority on animal rights, currently professor of philosophy and Leverhulme Research Fellow at the University of Liverpool. ... Gary Lawrence Francione (1954) is an American law professor at Rutgers University. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Tom Regan (born November 28, 1938 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an American philosopher and animal-rights activist. ... Richard D. Ryder (born 1940) is a British psychologist who, after performing psychology experiments on animals, began to speak out against the practice, and became one of the pioneers of the modern animal liberation and animal rights movements. ... For other persons named Peter Singer, see Peter Singer (disambiguation). ... Steven M. Wise is the author of Though the Heavens May Fall, a book concerning the 18th century trial in England which led to the abolition of slavery. ...

Categories
Animal experimentation
Animal Liberation Front
Animal rights movement
Animal rights

SHAC has been cricitized for condoning or encouraging violence. Activists may use the information published by SHAC, which includes names and details of people and organization deemed to be targets, to cause criminal damage; for example, those associated with HLS often have their cars damaged by paint-stripper.


The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) included SHAC in its fall 2002 Intelligence Report. In an article entitled "From Push to Shove," the SPLC described SHAC's modus operandi as "frankly terroristic tactics similar to those of anti-abortion extremists." Kevin Jonas, the leader of SHAC-USA told the Intelligence Report: "There's a very famous quote by John F. Kennedy. If you make peaceful revolution impossible, you make violent revolution inevitable." [43]


SHAC's critics argue the following:

  • The campaign's tactics are not working. HLS managing director Brian Cass says that, since the formation of SHAC in 1999, HLS has seen the value of orders placed with it double to just under £100 million worth (London Evening Standard, March 31, 2003).
  • HLS says it abides by British animal welfare laws. These laws are already among the world's strictest laws on animal use in medical testing; closing down HLS would mean displacing animal testing to smaller laboratories in the UK, they say, or moving the testing to a country with less strict laws on animal testing.
  • SHAC's efforts are susceptible to the problems common to vigilantism, namely that an entirely unconnected person may be targeted or affected. SHAC relies on leaked information regarding HLS's current clients and staff members, which means the details may not be timely or accurate. The company says that SHAC has occasionally harassed staff who had already left HLS.
  • SHAC supporters have been seen soliciting donations at street stands in the UK with leaflets and collection cans. As SHAC is not a registered charity, donors cannot be sure that the funds raised are used for SHAC activities.
  • The way the campaign decorates its stands gives a misleading impression. Rodents make up 84% of animals used for testing in the UK, cats and dogs make up 0.3%, monkeys, 0.1%.[44] though these general cross-country percentages do not indicate how many of each species is used for testing by HLS. If the picture choices at the stands are not exactly in this proportion, critics say, the SHAC supporters are misrepresenting animal experimentation and are committing a fallacious appeal to emotion.

March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the aircraft, see A-5 Vigilante. ... Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents. ... Appeal to emotion is a logical fallacy wherein the arguer (who is using this fallacy) takes advantage of emotion to prove his or her argument. ...

British government response

On July 30, 2004, the British government released a paper called "Animal Welfare — Human Rights: protecting people from animal rights extremists." The paper describes what the British government sees as the benefits of medical research, which it argues would not be possible without animal studies; estimates the commercial value of the bio-medical industry in the UK; asserts its concern for the welfare of animals; asserts that all steps to replace the use of animals have been and will continue to be taken; defines 'animal-rights extremists' as those engaged in harassment and intimidation, not seeking civil discourse; says that it listens to law-abiding animal rights and welfare groups and enacts legislation where appropriate — for example, RSPCA officers now have the power to investigate animal abuse claims on the spot, and the LD50 test was permanently banned in the UK after peaceful, lawful lobbying by the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection; reviews the existing laws used to prosecute what it calls animal-rights extremists; proposes new legislation and amendments to existing legislation.[45] July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 154 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Animal welfare is the viewpoint that animals, especially those under human care, should not suffer unnecessarily, including where the animals are used for food, work, companionship, or research. ... The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) is a charity in England and Wales that promotes animal welfare. ... An LD50 test being administered In toxicology, the LD50 or colloquially semilethal dose of a particular substance is a measure of how much constitutes a lethal dose. ... The British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection is a pressure group based near Highbury Corner in North London, United Kingdom that campaigns peacefully against vivisection. ...


Legal action against SHAC

Several companies targeted by SHAC have obtained High Court injunctions against SHAC under the Protection From Harassment Act. These include HLS itself, Chiron UK, Phytopharm, Daiichi UK, Asahi Glass, Eisai, Yamanouchi Pharma, Sankyo Pharma, and BOC. The injunctions compel SHAC to print the injunction on their website, so that SHAC's action targets are juxtaposed with a legal notification that there is a 50-yard exclusion zone around the homes of employees and places of business. Protest outside HLS itself may only occur one day a week with a police presence. Her Majestys High Court of Justice (known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of England and Wales in England and Wales: see Courts of England and Wales. ... An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that either prohibits or compels (restrains or enjoins) a party from continuing a particular activity. ...


These injunctions are not permanent. HLS tried but failed to obtain a permanent injunction against SHAC, which represented itself, on June 26, 2004. SHAC's argument against the enforceability of such injunctions was that, despite having hundreds of supporters, a website, mailing address, telephone information hotline, mailing list, and bank account, it does not exist as a corporate or charitable body, and therefore cannot prevent its supporters from taking action against HLS.[46] June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Tim Lawson-Cruttenden, lawyer for HLS, has explored another legal avenue to hold SHAC financially accountable. HLS sought £205,000 in damages from the owner of a property SHAC used as a mailing address, for the costs incurred in its harassment suit, or the forfeit of the property in lieu.[47]


SHAC 7

On March 3, 2006, a federal jury in Trenton, New Jersey convicted six members of SHAC of "terrorism and Internet stalking," according to the New York Times, finding them guilty of using their website to "incite attacks" on those who did business with HLS. [48] In September 2006, the so-called "SHAC 7" received jail sentences of 3 to 6 years. March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Trenton is the name of several places in Canada and the United States. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... Logo of the SHAC 7 Support Group. ...


See also

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Covance (NYSE: CVD), formerly Hazleton Laboratories, with headquarters in Princeton, New Jersey, is one of the worlds largest and most comprehensive drug development services companies, according to its own website, with annual revenues over $1 billion, global operations in 17 countries, and approximately 6,700 employees worldwide. ... The term Green Scare, alluding to the Red Scare of the 1940s-50s, is an expression popularized by environmental activists to refer to legal action by the U.S. government against the radical environmentalist movement. ... Pamelyn Ferdin (born February 4, 1959) is an outspoken animal rights activist and former child actress. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Stop Huntington Animal Cruelty photographs
  2. ^ a b Alleyne, Richard. "Terror tactics that brought a company to its knees", The Daily Telegraph, January 19, 2001.
  3. ^ A controversial laboratory18 January, 2001
  4. ^ a b c "From push to shove" Southern Poverty Law Group Intelligence Report, Fall 2002.
  5. ^ "Diaries of despair", xenodiaries.org, Uncaged Campaigns, retrieved June 18, 2006. A report about the transplanation of pig hearts and kidneys onto the necks, abdomens, and chests of monkeys and baboons captured from the wild. The experiments were carried out by Imutran Ltd, a subsidiary of Novartis Pharma AG, in conjunction with Cambridge University. They took place at Huntingdon Life Sciences.
  6. ^ Townsend, Mark. "Exposed: secrets of the animal organ lab", The Observer, April 20, 2003.
  7. ^ Undercover video footage of HLS employees beating a puppy, filmed at the Huntingdon Research Centre, England.
  8. ^ Undercover video footage of HLS employees apparently dissecting a live monkey, filmed at the HLS Princeton Research Centre, NJ, USA.
  9. ^ Doward, Jamie & Townsend, Mark. "Beauty and the beasts", The Observer, August 1, 2004.
  10. ^ Laville, Sandra & Campbell, Duncan. "Animal rights extremists in arson spree", The Guardian, June 25, 2005.
  11. ^ SHAC World Day for Lab Animals, Indymedia Cambridge. 19 April 2004
  12. ^ Doward, Jamie. "Sex and violence allegations split animal rights campaign", The Observer, April 11, 2004.
  13. ^ Three SHAC Activists Plead Guilty to Harassing HLS Employees December 4, 2001
  14. ^ [http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/sciences/story/0,12243,1271535,00.html I won't give up until I die] July 29, 2004
  15. ^ Sex and violence allegations split animal rights campaign April 11, 2004
  16. ^ Animal Rights Trio Jailed For Grandma Attack 25 July 2006
  17. ^ Red in Tooth and Law (pdf)
  18. ^ Childcare group warned of 'hell' 29 September 2005
  19. ^ The Animals of Hatred October 15, 2003
  20. ^ SHAC Disclaimer
  21. ^ House of Commons Hansard Debates19 March 2003
  22. ^ "Four SHAC activists sentenced after burglary", National Extremism Tactical Co-ordination Unit, August 18, 2006.
  23. ^ "Animal rights activists convicted of affray", National Extremism Tactical Co-ordination Unit, July 26, 2006.
  24. ^ "Animal rights activist convicted of illegal street collection", National Extremism Tactical Co-ordination Unit, November 9, 2006.
  25. ^ "SHAC activists fined after unlicensed street collection", National Extremism Tactical Co-ordination Unit, August 15, 2006.
  26. ^ "SHAC activist found guilty of public order offence", National Extremism Tactical Co-ordination Unit, November 6, 2006.
  27. ^ a b "Six US animal rights activists convicted", National Extremism Tactical Co-ordination Unit, March 3, 2006.
  28. ^ a b Jamie Doward and Mark Townsend Beauty and the beasts, The Observer, August 1, 2004.
  29. ^ a b Sandra Laville and Duncan Campbell, "Animal rights extremists in arson spree", The Guardian, June 25, 2006, retrieved December 7, 2006
  30. ^ a b "Animal rights activist admits fire bombing offences", National Extremism Tactical Co-ordination Unit, August 17, 2006.
  31. ^ a b Esther Addley, "Animal Liberation Front bomber faces jail after admitting arson bids", The Guardian, August 18, 2006.
  32. ^ "Willing to maim in the name of animals", BBC News, December 7, 2006.
  33. ^ "UK Prisoners", SHAC.net, retrieved December 7, 2006.
  34. ^ Money talks June 1, 2006
  35. ^ Lab firm ditched by share brokers 28 Marcy 2001
  36. ^ Dumped Huntingdon
  37. ^ Quantum Analytics: Drop HLS
  38. ^ When threats turn to firebombs, Canaccord cuts loose on client June 24, 2005
  39. ^ Huntingdon delays listing after attacks September 8, 2005
  40. ^ Animal rights activists tell drug firm's small investors to sell up or else May 9, 2006
  41. ^ Glaxo wins injunction over threat 9 May 2006
  42. ^ Tony Blair: Time to act against animal rights protesters May 13, 2006
  43. ^ From Push to Shove Fall 2002
  44. ^ Animal tests see steady decline 23 April 2004
  45. ^ Animal Welfare – Human Rights: protecting people from animal rights extremists July 2004(pdf)
  46. ^ Huntingdon told to prove animal rights group exists June 24, 2004
  47. ^ Move to seize HQ of animal activists October 21, 2004
  48. ^ NYT March 3, 2006

A marmoset inside Cambridge University, filmed by BUAV The use of primates in experiments at Cambridge University is controversial, first coming to widespread public attention in the UK following undercover investigations lasting ten months in 1998 by the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection (BUAV), the results of which... Huntingdon Life Sciences (HLS) is a contract animal-testing company founded in 1952 in England, now with facilities in Huntingdon in the United Kingdom, New Jersey in the United States, and Japan. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • SHAC website
  • Undercover video footage of apparent animal abuse shot inside HLS by SHAC.
  • Undercover video footage of HLS employees beating a puppy, filmed at the Huntingdon Research Centre, England. Size: 8.6 megabytes. Format: MPEG
  • Undercover video footage of HLS employees apparently dissecting a live monkey, filmed at the HLS Princeton Research Centre, NJ, USA. Size: 5.8 megabytes. Format: Quicktime Movie.
  • "Inside HLS" describes five undercover investigations into HLS between 1989 and 2001
  • Video and photo gallery of animal abuse, a website set up by SHAC
  • Huntingdon Life Sciences an article by the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection (BUAV)
  • "Jail for lab boss attacker", BBC, August 16, 2001
  • Report on SHAC, Center for Consumer Freedom, Activistcash.com, undated
  • Statement by Dr. Ian Gibson (Norwich, North) Hansard, March 19, 2003
  • "Help needed for fellow activist" Vivisection.info, undated.
  • "From push to shove" Southern Poverty Law Group Intelligence Report, Fall 2002
  • Diaries of Despair, Uncaged Campaigns, retrieved June 18, 2006.
  • "Animal Welfare — Human Rights: protecting people from animal rights extremists (pdf) British government report, July 2004
  • SHAC7 site
  • "SHAC Convictions: The Martyrdom Effect", Strategic Forecasting, Inc. World Terrorism Report, March 15, 2006.
  • Carnell, Brian. "Three SHAC Activists Plead Guilty to Harassing HLS Employees", Animalrights.net, December 4, 2001
  • Carnell, Brian. "Activists Falsely Accuse Emerson Employees of Being Pedophiles", Animal Rights.net, October 9, 2004
  • Cox, Simon & Vadon, Richard. "How animal rights took on the world", BBC Radio 4, retrieved June 18, 2006.
  • Dean, Neville. "Animal Rights Activist Handed Wide-Ranging Asbo Curbs", The Scotsman, January 19, 2005
  • Doward, Jamie & Townsend, Mark. "Beauty and the beasts", The Observer, August 1, 2004
  • Goodwin, Jo-Ann. "The Animals of Hatred", The Daily Mail, October 15, 2003, retrieved November 2, 2005
  • Harrison, David. "Terrorist target lab's shareholders," Sunday Telegraph, December 03, 2000
  • Laville, Sandra & Campbell, Duncan. "Animal rights extremists in arson spree", The Guardian, June 25, 2005.
  • Murray-West, Rosie. "Huntingdon told to prove animal rights group exists", Daily Telegraph, June 24, 2004
  • Pilgrim, Michael. "Behind the razor wire with the man from Huntingdon", Evening Standard, March 31, 2003
  • Robbins, John. "Red in Tooth and Law", The Lawyer, August 16, 2004
  • Townsend, Mark. "Exposed: secrets of the animal organ lab", The Observer, April 20, 2003
  • Bhattacharya, Shaoni. Scientists demand law against animal rights extremism, New Scientist, April 22, 2004
  • Blake, Andrew. Demonstration at SIMR office, Seriously Ill for Medical Research (SIMR), July 2000
  • Cook, John. Thugs for puppies, Salon.com, 7 Feb 2006.

External links

  • Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty
  • The Shac 7
  • Huntingdon Life Sciences website
  • Animal Experiments - The Facts
  • Victims of Animal Rights Extremism website
  • Footage Shot Inside Huntingdon Life Sciences

  Results from FactBites:
 
Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3558 words)
SHAC was started in November 1999 by British animal-rights activists Greg Avery and Heather James after video footage shot covertly inside HLS in 1997 by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) was aired on British television.
SHAC supporters are known to have engaged in harassment; intimidation with death-threat letters and hoax bombs; arson, including the use of fire-bombs; trespass; and vandalism.
SHAC's efforts are susceptible to the problems common to vigilantism, namely that an entirely unconnected person may be targeted or affected.
Animal rights - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5101 words)
Animal rights is the concept that all or some animals are entitled to possess their own lives; that they are deserving of, or already possess, certain moral rights; and that some basic rights for animals ought to be enshrined in law.
There are criminal laws against cruelty to animals, laws that regulate the keeping of animals in cities and on farms, the transit of animals internationally, as well as quarantine and inspection provisions.
Switzerland passed legislation in 1992 to recognize animals as beings, rather than things, and the protection of animals was enshrined in the German constitution in 2002, when its upper house of parliament voted to add the words "and animals" to the clause in the constitution obliging the state to protect the "natural foundations of life...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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