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Encyclopedia > Stirling
Stirling
Gaelic: Sruighlea
Scots: Srivling
Location
OS grid reference: NS795935
Statistics
Population: 41,243
Administration
Council area: Stirling
Constituent country: Scotland
Sovereign state: United Kingdom
Other
Police force: Central Scotland Police
Lieutenancy area: Stirling and Falkirk
Former county: Stirlingshire
Post office and telephone
Post town: STIRLING
Postal district: FK7-FK8
Dialling code: 01786
Politics
Scottish Parliament: Stirling
UK Parliament: Stirling
European Parliament: Scotland
Scotland
Broad Street at the heart of Stirling's Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals)
Broad Street at the heart of Stirling's Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals)
Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect)
Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect)
The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. It is said that the ghost of a soldier has been seen walking out from under the stairs (centre bottom.)
The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. It is said that the ghost of a soldier has been seen walking out from under the stairs (centre bottom.)

Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is a city and ancient burgh, in the Stirling council area of Scotland. // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ... Image File history File links Stirlings location in Scotland File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils. They have been in use since April 1, 1996, under the provisions of the Local Government etc. ... Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland with a population of about 85,000. ... Constituent countries is a phrase sometimes used, usually by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia (example here) and European institutions such as the Council of Europe... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Map showing the council areas of Scotland with the ones in the police area highlighted. ... The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for the ceremonial lords-lieutenant, the monarchs representatives, in Scotland. ... Stirling and Falkirk is a Lieutenancy area of Scotland. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Stirlingshire (Siorrachd Sruighlea in Gaelic) is a traditional county of Scotland, based around Stirling, the traditional county town. ... This is a list of post towns in the United Kingdom, sorted by the postal area (the first part of the outward code of a postcode). ... This is a list of the post towns of the United Kingdom sorted in postcode sequence. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... The Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) has 73 constituencies, each electing one Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) by the first past the post system of election, and eight additional member regions, each electing seven additional member MSPs. ... Stirling is a plurality voting system constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament since 1999 and is part of the Mid Scotland and Fife electoral region for the additional member system (AMS). ... Scotland is divided into 59 constituencies of the United Kingdom Parliament - 19 Burgh constituencies and 40 County constituencies. ... Stirling is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Stirling(DonaldMacDonald)Dec2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Stirling(DonaldMacDonald)Dec2005. ... The centre of the Old Town in the city of Stirling, Scotland. ... The centre of the Old Town in the city of Stirling, Scotland. ... A photograph of Stirling Castle, in Stirling, Scotland. ... A photograph of Stirling Castle, in Stirling, Scotland. ... Stirling Castle (southwest aspect) For ships named after the castle, see Stirling Castle (disambiguation) Stirling Castle is a castle in Stirling, one of the largest and most important, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland and indeed Western Europe. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (667x1000, 705 KB) Summary >Stirling_Castle. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (667x1000, 705 KB) Summary >Stirling_Castle. ... Stirling Castle (southwest aspect) For ships named after the castle, see Stirling Castle (disambiguation) Stirling Castle is a castle in Stirling, one of the largest and most important, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland and indeed Western Europe. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Historically, city status was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... A sign in Linlithgow, Scotland. ... Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland with a population of about 85,000. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km...


The city is clustered around a large castle and mediæval old-town. It is a centre for government, retail, and light industry. Its population (as of the 2001 census) was 41,243, making it the smallest city in Scotland. - Stirling Castle (southwest aspect) For ships named after the castle, see Stirling Castle (disambiguation) Stirling Castle is a castle in Stirling, one of the largest and most important, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland and indeed Western Europe. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A former capital of the Kingdom of Scotland, Stirling was a royal burgh until 1975. In 2002, as part of Queen Elizabeth's Golden Jubilee, Stirling was granted city status. In politics, a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has a second meaning based on an alternative sense of capital) is the principal city or town associated with a countrys government. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one strikes me with impunity) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the Crowns March 24, 1603  - Act of Union... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... A Golden Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 50th anniversary of a monarchs reign. ... Historically, city status was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ...

Contents

History

Originally a Stone Age Settlement, Stirling has been strategically significant since at least the Roman occupation of part of Britain, due to its easily defensible hill (latterly the site of Stirling Castle) and its commanding position beside the River Forth. It is supposed that Stirling is the fortress of Iuddeu or Urbs Giudi where Oswiu of Northumbria was besieged by Penda of Mercia in 655, as recorded in Bede and contemporary annals. Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Stirling Castle (southwest aspect) For ships named after the castle, see Stirling Castle (disambiguation) Stirling Castle is a castle in Stirling, one of the largest and most important, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland and indeed Western Europe. ... The River Forth meanders over fertile farmlands near Stirling The River Forth, 47 km (29 miles) long, is the major river draining the eastern part of the central belt of Scotland. ... Oswiu (612–February 15, 670), also written as Oswio, Oswy, and Osuiu was an Anglo-Saxon Bretwalda. ... Stained glass window from the cloister of Worcester Cathedral showing the death of Penda of Mercia. ... Events November 15 - Northumbrian king Oswiu defeats the pagan Mercian king Penda in the Battle of Winwaed Empress Saimei ascends to the throne of Japan. ... Depiction of Bede from the Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493. ...


A ford, and later bridge, of the river at Stirling brought wealth and influence, as did its port. The town was chartered as a royal burgh by King David in the 12th century, with charters later reaffirmed by later monarchs (the town then referred to as Strivelyn). Major battles in Scotland's long conflict with England took place at the Stirling Bridge in 1297 and at the nearby village of Bannockburn in 1314. A ford is a section of water (most commonly a section of a river) that is sufficiently shallow as to be traversable by wading. ... King David I (or Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim; also known as Saint David I or David I the Saint) (1084 – May 24, 1153), was King of Scotland from 1124 until his death, and the youngest son of Malcolm Canmore and of Saint Margaret (sister of Edgar Ætheling). ... Combatants Kingdom of Scotland Kingdom of England Commanders Andrew Moray William Wallace Surrey Cressingham† Strength 7,000 infantry and 150 cavalry 30,000[citation needed] infantry and 750 cavalry Casualties  ? Over 7,000 killed The Battle of Stirling Bridge was one of the series of conflicts of the Wars of... Events 8 January - Monaco gains independence. ... Combatants Kingdom of Scotland Kingdom of England Commanders Robert Bruce Edward II of England Strength about 8,000 20,000 Casualties unknown unknown The Battle of Bannockburn (June 23, 1314 – June 24, 1314) was a significant Scottish victory in the Wars of Scottish Independence. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ...


The place-name is of unknown origin.


The town has two Latin mottoes, which appeared on the earliest burgh seal of which an impression of 1296 is on record:[1] Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Events March 30 - Edward I stormed Berwick-upon-Tweed, sacking the then Scottish border town with much bloodshed. ...

Hic Armis Bruti Scoti Stant Hic Cruce Tuti (The Britons stand by force of arms, The Scots are by this cross preserved from harms) and
Continet Hoc in Se Nemus et Castrum Strivilinse (The Castle and Wood of Stirling town are in the compass of this seal set down.)

Standing near the castle, the Church of the Holy Rude (Holy Cross) is one of the town's most historically important buildings. The Church of the Holy Rude, which was rebuilt in the 1400s after Stirling suffered a catastrophic fire in 1405, is the only surviving church in the United Kingdom apart from Westminster Abbey, to have held a coronation. On the 29 July 1567 the infant son of Mary Queen of Scots was crowned James VI of Scotland here. Gun shot marks from Cromwell's troops during the civil war are clearly visible on the tower and apse. The Abbeys western façade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... Events The Duke of Alva arrives in the Netherlands with Spanish forces to suppress unrest there. ... Mary I (Mary Stuart, popularly known as Mary, Queen of Scots); (December 8, 1542 – February 8, 1587) was Queen of Scots (the monarch of the Kingdom of Scotland) from December 14, 1542 to July 24, 1567. ... James VI and I (James Stuart) (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625) was King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland. ... Oliver Cromwell (April 25, 1599–September 3, 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for making England a republic and leading the Commonwealth of England. ... Map of Scotland The Scottish Civil War The Scottish Civil War of 1644-47 was part of wider conflict known as the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, which included the Bishops Wars, the English Civil War and Irish Confederate Wars. ...


During the Civil War the Battle of Stirling (1648) took place in the centre of Stirling on 12th September 1648. Combatants Scottish Parliment & the Earl of Lanerick Rebel Forces of the Marquis of Argyll Commanders Sir George Munro MacKenzie Strength unknown around 1000 soldiers Casualties unknown 200 dead & 400 captured. ...


The fortifications continued to play a strategic military role during the 18th century Jacobite Risings. In 1715, the Earl of Mar failed to take control of the castle. In January 1746, the army of Bonnie Prince Charlie seized control of the town but failed to take the Castle. On their consequent retreat northwards, they blew up the church of St. Ninians where they had been storing munitions; only the tower survived and can be seen to this day. The Jacobite Risings were a series of uprisings, rebellions, and wars in the British Isles occurring between 1688 and 1746. ... // Events July 24 - Spanish treasure fleet of ten ships under admiral Ubilla leave Havana, Cuba for Spain. ... The Jacobite title of Duke of Mar was conferred on John Erskine, 6th/23rd Earl of Mar by the Jacobite pretender James III and VIII. He was created Duke of Mar, Marquess Erskine or Marquess of Stirling, Earl of Kildrummie, Viscount of Garoich and Lord Alloa, Ferriton and Forrest in... For the U.S. politician, see Charles E. Stuart Bonnie Prince Charlie Charles Edward Louis Philip Casimir Stuart (December 31, 1720 – January 31, 1788), was the exiled claimant to the thrones of Ireland, commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. Charles was the son of James Francis Edward Stuart, the... St. ...


Economically, the River Forth port facilities at Riverside supported trade, including tea trade with India and timber trade with the Baltic. The coming of the railways started the decline of the river trade, not least because a railway bridge downstream made access for shipping more awkward. By the mid 20th century the port had ceased to operate.


Famous residents have included Mary, Queen of Scots, King James VI of Scotland, Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman (former British Prime Minister), documentary film pioneer John Grierson, film music composer Muir Mathieson, animation pioneer Norman McLaren, and TV presenter Kirsty Young. Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman (7 September 1836 – 22 April 1908) , also known as Andie McDowell, was a British Liberal statesman who served as Prime Minister from December 5, 1905 until resigning due to ill health on April 3, 1908. ... John Grierson (April 26, 1898 - February 19, 1972) is often considered the father of British and Canadian documentary film. ... Muir Mathieson was born in Stirling, Scotland on 24 January 1911 and died in London on 1 January 1975). ... Norman McLaren, C.C., C.Q., (April 11, 1914-January 27, 1987) was a Scottish animator and film director known for his work for the National Film Board of Canada (NFB). ... Kirsty Young on Five News Kirsty Jackson Young (born 23 November 1968 in East Kilbride) is a Scottish television journalist, presenter, actress and radio presenter. ...


The Barnwell brothers, Frank and Harold, worked at Grampian Motors in Causewayhead, and in 1909 they designed and flew the first powered flight in Scotland. Frank Barnwell went on to design aircraft including the Bristol Blenheim. A small monument to the brothers' pioneering achievement has been erected at Causewayhead roundabout. Frank Barnwell (1880 - August 2, 1938) was an aeronautical engineer, who performed the first powered flight in Scotland and later went on to a career as an aircraft designer. ... The Bristol Type 142M Blenheim was a high-speed light bomber used extensively in the early days of World War II, built by Bristol Aeroplane Company. ...


Stirling is also famous for its many hauntings, like the Green Lady of the Castle, seen by many a Soldier and the Settle Inn near the Castle which is one of the most haunted places in Scotland. Other haunted pubs include "Nicky tams bar and bothy" and the Albion bar - named after the local football team Stirling Albion.


Geography and climate

Stirling is renowned as the Gateway to the Highlands and is generally regarded as occupying a strategic position at the point where the flatter largely undulating Scottish Lowlands meet the rugged slopes of the Highlands. The starkness of this contrast is evidenced by the many hills and mountains of the lower Highlands such as Ben Vorlich and Ben Ledi which can be seen to the northwest of the city. On the other hand, to the east of the city, the Carse of Stirling is one of the flattest and most agriculturally productive expanses of land in the whole of Scotland. The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... For the landform that extends above the surrounding terrain and that is smaller than a mountain, see the article on mountain. ... Mount Cook, a mountain in New Zealand A mountain is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain in a limited area. ... Ben Vorlich is a Scottish mountain situated between the northernmost section of Loch Lomond and Loch Sloy. ... Ben Ledi (Gaelic, the hill of God) is a mountain of Perthshire, Scotland, 876 metres (2875 feet) high, five miles by road north-west of Callander. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km...


The land surrounding Stirling has been most affected by glacial erosion and deposition. The city itself has grown up around its castle which stands atop an ancient volcanic plug a major defensive position, which is, in turn at the lowest crossing point on the River Forth. Stirling stands on the River Forth at the point where the river widens and becomes tidal. To the east of the city the Ochil Hills dominate the skyline with the highest peaks in the range being Dumyat and Ben Cleuch. The Ochils meet the flat floodplain of the River Forth to the east of the distinctive geographical feature - Abbey Craig, a crag and tail feature upon which sits the 220ft (67m) high Wallace National Monument[2]. Austrias longest glacier, the Pasterze, winds its 8 km (5 mile) route at the foot of Austrias highest mountain, the Grossglockner A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... Deposition is a word used in many fields to describe different processes: In law, deposition is the taking of testimony outside of court. ... Stirling Castle (southwest aspect) For ships named after the castle, see Stirling Castle (disambiguation) Stirling Castle is a castle in Stirling, one of the largest and most important, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland and indeed Western Europe. ... The River Forth meanders over fertile farmlands near Stirling The River Forth, 47 km (29 miles) long, is the major river draining the eastern part of the central belt of Scotland. ... The River Forth meanders over fertile farmlands near Stirling The River Forth, 47 km (29 miles) long, is the major river draining the eastern part of the central belt of Scotland. ... This article is about tides in the ocean. ... Ochil Hills viewed from South-West of Tillicoultry The Ochil Hills [1](from the Celtic uchil - the high ground) are a range of hills in Scotland north of the Forth valley bordered by the towns of Stirling, Alloa, Kinross and Perth. ... Dumyat, the hill at the western extremity of the Ochil Hills. ... Gravel floodplain of a glacial river near the Snow Mountains in Alaska, 1902. ... The River Forth meanders over fertile farmlands near Stirling The River Forth, 47 km (29 miles) long, is the major river draining the eastern part of the central belt of Scotland. ... The Abbey Craig is the hill upon which the Wallace Monument stands, at Causewayhead, just to the north of Stirling. ... The Abbey Craig, a crag with tail near The University of Stirling. ... The monument The monument seen from the University of Stirling The Wallace National Monument (generally known as the Wallace Monument) is a tower standing on the summit of Abbey Craig, a hilltop near Stirling in Scotland. ...


The climate of Stirling differs little from that of much of the rest of central Scotland. Warm, unstable air from the Atlantic Ocean is the predominant influence, with a prevailing southwesterly wind Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km...


Areas of Stirling

The centre of Bannockburn Telfords circular roadbridge over the Bannock Burn Bannockburn is a village immediately south of the city of Stirling in Scotland. ... Cambuskenneth is a village in the city of Stirling, located in Central Scotland. ... Cornton is a district of the city of Stirling on the North Bank of the River Forth in central Scotland. ... Raploch is a district of the city of Stirling to the south of the River Forth in central Scotland. ... St. ...

Demographics

The city of Stirling had a population of 41,243 at the 2001 census, which has risen to 44,460 according to mid-2004 population estimates[3]. The wider Stirling Council area had a population of 86,370 in 2004. The city is reputed to be the third fastest growing area of Scotland in terms of population[4]. According to the 2001 census[5], 52.7% of the population was female compared to 47.2% male. Stirling had both a smaller proportion of under 16's, at 16.7% compared to the Scottish average of 19.2% and a smaller proportion of those of pensionable age - 17.8% - compared to the Scottish average of 18.6%. The highest proportion of the population, at 24.3% was concentrated in the 16-29 age group. Stirling also had a higher proportion of non-Scottish born residents at 16.5% compared to the Scottish average of 12.8%. The population was also slightly younger than the Scottish average - the median age for males was 34 to the national average of 37; and the median age for females was 36, to the national average of 39. The population peaks and troughs significantly when the students come and go from the city. 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland with a population of about 85,000. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km... In probability theory and statistics, a median is a number dividing the higher half of a sample, a population, or a probability distribution from the lower half. ... The shield and spear of the Roman God Mars are often used to represent the male sex In heterogamous species, male is the sex of an organism, or of a part of an organism, which typically produces smaller, mobile gametes (spermatozoa) that are able to fertilise female gametes (ova). ... In probability theory and statistics, a median is a number dividing the higher half of a sample, a population, or a probability distribution from the lower half. ...


Government and politics

In terms of local government, the city of Stirling is a part of the wider Stirling Council area, which governs on matters of local administration as set out by the Local Government etc (Scotland) Act 1994. Elections to the council take place every 4 years, with the next elections scheduled to take place in May 2007. Currently the council is controlled by the Labour Party. The Provost of Stirling is Colin O'Brien. Local governments are administrative offices of an area smaller than a state or province. ... Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland with a population of about 85,000. ... The Local Government etc. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... Look up provost in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In terms of national government, there is a Stirling constituency of the Scottish Parliament with the MSP being Sylvia Jackson of the Labour Party and a Stirling constituency of the House of Commons represented by Anne McGuire of the Labour Party. As Scotland comprises a single European Parliament Constituency, Stirling participates in electing 7 MEP's using the d'Hondt method of proportional representation every 4 years. Stirling is a plurality voting system constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament since 1999 and is part of the Mid Scotland and Fife electoral region for the additional member system (AMS). ... MSP is a three-letter abbreviation with several meanings: In computing, MSP is a mainframe operating system from Fujitsu Magic Solution Partner Malabar Special Police Maintenance Support Package Managed Service Provider Manic Street Preachers, a Welsh rock band Mass Storage Pedestal Master Sales Plan Medical Services Plan Medicare Secondary Payer... Dr. Sylvia Jackson (born 3 December 1946) is a Scottish Labour politician, and Member of the Scottish Parliament for Stirling constituency since 1999. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... Stirling is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Anne Catherine McGuire (born 26 May 1949, Glasgow as Anne Catherine Long) is a politician in Scotland. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP) is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ... DHondt can refer to: DHondt method, a method for allocating seats in party-list proportional representation political election systems Victor DHondt (1841–1901), a Belgian lawyer, professor and mathematician Category: ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ...


Economy

At the centre of a large rural agricultural hinterland that encompasses some of the flattest and most productive land in Scotland, Stirling principally functioned as a market town with farmers coming to sell their products and wares in the large agricultural market that was held in the town. Today, agriculture still plays a part in the economic life of Stirling, given its focus at the heart of a large rural area, but to a much less extent than previously. Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km... The market town is a medieval phenomenon. ...


With Stirling's development as a market town and its location as the focus of transport and communications in the region, it has developed a substantial retail sector serving a wide range of surrounding communities as well as the city itself. Primarily centred on the city centre, there are a large number of chain stores. However this has been augmented by out-of-town developments such as the Springkerse Retail Park on the city bypass to the east of Stirling, the development of a large Sainsbury's at Raploch. The market town is a medieval phenomenon. ... Drawing of a self-service store. ... J Sainsbury plc is the parent company of Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd, commonly known as Sainsburys, a chain of supermarkets in the United Kingdom. ... Raploch is a district of the city of Stirling to the south of the River Forth in central Scotland. ...


In terms of the services, financial services as well as tourism are the biggest employers in this sector. The financial services and insurance company - Prudential - have a large and well-established base at Craigforth on the outskirts of Stirling. In terms of tourism, the presence of such historical monuments as Stirling Castle, the National Wallace Monument and the key role which Stirling has played in Scottish history, as well as the scenery of the area, has bolstered Stirling's position as an important tourist destination in Scotland. Financial services is a term used to refer to the services provided by the finance industry. ... Tourists at Oahu island, Hawaii Tourism is the act of travel for predominantly recreational or leisure purposes, and also refers to the provision of services in support of this act. ... Prudential plc is a United Kingdom based financial services company. ... Stirling Castle (southwest aspect) For ships named after the castle, see Stirling Castle (disambiguation) Stirling Castle is a castle in Stirling, one of the largest and most important, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland and indeed Western Europe. ... The monument The monument seen from the University of Stirling The Wallace National Monument (generally known as the Wallace Monument) is a tower standing on the summit of Abbey Craig, a hilltop near Stirling in Scotland. ... Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km...


The University of Stirling and Stirling Council are two of the biggest employers in the area. Knowledge related industries, research and development as well as life sciences have clustered around the university in the Stirling University Innovation Park, close to its main campus. Other public sector agencies that are major employers in the city include Central Scotland Police, Forth Valley Health Board and the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency. The University of Stirling is a campus university created in 1967, and located on the outskirts of Stirling in central Scotland. ... Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland with a population of about 85,000. ... The phrase research and development (also R and D or R&D) has a special commercial significance apart from its conventional coupling of scientific research and technological development. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ... Map showing the council areas of Scotland with the ones in the police area highlighted. ... Map of Scotland showing the location of the former Central region Central (Roinn Meadhanach in Gaelic) was a local government region of Scotland from 1974 to 1996. ... The Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) is a powerful non-departmental public body in Scotland sponsored by the Scottish Executive Environment and Rural Affairs Department. ...


With good transport connections to the major cities of Glasgow and Edinburgh, Stirling is home to a large number of commuters, with 12,000 residents commuting to work in other areas, with 13,800 workers travelling in to the city[6] For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ...


Sport

The headquarters of the Scottish Institute of Sport in Stirling.
The headquarters of the Scottish Institute of Sport in Stirling.

Local sporting teams include the football team Stirling Albion F.C., and the rugby union team Stirling County. Footballers Billy Bremner and Duncan Ferguson were born in Stirling, as was rugby internationals Kenny Logan and Allister Hogg, jockey Willie Carson, and cricketer Dougie Brown. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2288x1282, 433 KB) The headquarters of the Scottish Institute of Sport on the campus of the University of Stirling in Stirling, Scotland. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2288x1282, 433 KB) The headquarters of the Scottish Institute of Sport on the campus of the University of Stirling in Stirling, Scotland. ... The Scottish Institute of Sport has a clear focus on high performance sport and provides individual programmes and services for Scotlands top athletes to aid their progression to the highest levels in international sport. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Stirling Albion FC are a football club currently playing in the Scottish Football League. ... A rugby union scrum. ... Stirling County is a rugby union team currently playing in the Scottish BT Premier Division 1. ... Billy Bremner (born Stirling, Scotland, 9 December 1942; died Doncaster, England, 7 December 1997) was the inspirational captain of the legendary Leeds United football team of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Duncan Ferguson, (born December 27, 1971 in Stirling, Scotland) is a British football player formerly of Everton F.C. Ferguson began his footballing education at Carse Thistle before being signed to Dundee United F.C. in 1990 on his first professional contract. ... Kenny Logan (born 3 April 1972) is a wing three-quarter back who played for the Scotland national rugby union team and London Wasps. ... Allister Hogg (born 20 January 1983, in Stirling, Scotland) plays rugby union at either flanker or number eight for Edinburgh Gunners and Scotland, and makes a formidable partnership with Simon Taylor at both club and country level. ... Toulouse-Lautrec - The Jockey (1899) This article is about the sports occupation. ... Willie Carson (16 November 1942) is a Scottish jockey. ... For the insect, see Cricket (insect). ... Douglas Robert Brown, (born October 29, 1969), is a Scottish cricketer, he currently plays for Warwickshire C.C.C.. He is an all-rounder who has represented both Scotland, prior to them joining the ICC, and England at one-day level. ...


Stirling is also a major centre of sports training and education in Scotland. The Scottish Institute of Sport is headquartered in a purpose built facility on the campus of Stirling University which opened in 2002. Also at the university in the state of the art Scottish National Swimming Academy as well as the Gannochy National Tennis centre which is seen as a tennis centre of excellence[7]. Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km... The Scottish Institute of Sport has a clear focus on high performance sport and provides individual programmes and services for Scotlands top athletes to aid their progression to the highest levels in international sport. ... Looking out over Airthrey Loch on the main campus of The University of Stirling The University of Stirling is a campus university created in 1967 and is based in a custom-built campus situated on a greenfield site in the outskirts of Stirling, Scotland. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


Furthermore the university itself has its own dedicated Sports Studies department and was ranked amongst the best in the United Kingdom for its provision of sports facilities, with the maximum 5 star award, shared by 16 other universities in the UK[8].


Stirling and its surrounding area has a number of 9 and 18 hole golf courses, the largest of which is the Stirling Golf Course, located in the Kings Park area of the city. This article is about the sport of golf. ...


Education

Looking out over Airthrey Loch on the main campus of The University of Stirling
Looking out over Airthrey Loch on the main campus of The University of Stirling

The University of Stirling opened in 1967 on a greenfield site outside the town. Currently there are 9000 students studying at the university, of which 7000 are undergraduates and 2000 are postgraduates. Students of over 80 nationalities are represented at the university, with 14% of students coming from overseas[9]. It has grown into a major research centre, with a large science park - Innovation Park, located immediately adjacent to the main university campus. Innovation Park has grown since its initiation in 1993, and is now home to 40 companies engaging in various forms of research and development[10]. Stirling is also home to part of the wider Forth Valley College which was formed on August 1st 2005 from the merger of Falkirk, Stirling and Clackmannan colleges. Buildings at University of Stirling, Airthrey Loch, Wallace Monument, all in Stirling, Scotland. ... Buildings at University of Stirling, Airthrey Loch, Wallace Monument, all in Stirling, Scotland. ... The University of Stirling is a campus university created in 1967, and located on the outskirts of Stirling in central Scotland. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ... A science park is a property development designed for a concentration of high tech or science related businesses. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The phrase research and development (also R and D or R&D) has a special commercial significance apart from its conventional coupling of scientific research and technological development. ... Forth Valley College was formed in 2005 by the merger of Falkirk College of Further & Higher Education and Clackmannan College. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Falkirk (An Eaglais Bhreac in Scottish Gaelic) is a town in central Scotland. ... From 1975, Clackmannan (Clach Mhanainn in Gaelic) was the name of a local government district in the Central region of Scotland, corresponding to the traditional county of Clackmannanshire. ...


There are four main high schools in Stirling itself - Stirling High School, with a school roll of 940 pupils, Wallace High School with 950 pupils, St Modan's High School, located in the suburb of St Ninians and Bannockburn High School in Broomridge. Stirling High School is situated in Stirling, in Central Scotland, UK. It is the main high school (a school for 12-18 year olds) in the Stirling district, and currently has approximately 940 pupils attending. ... The Wallace High School is a co-educational voluntary grammar school in Lisburn, Northern Ireland, founded in 1880 by a bequest from the estate of Sir Richard Wallace. ... St Modans RC High School is an S1-S6 Catholic High School In Stirling, Scotland. ... The steeple following restoration St. ...


Twinned cities

Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... Saint-Pierre dAscq church Located between Lille and Roubaix, at the crossroads of the principal freeways towards Paris, Ghent, Antwerp and Brussels, Villeneuve dAscq (which means New city of Ascq in French) is one of the principal cities of the communauté urbaine Lille Métropole. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... Bandstand at Edgewater Park. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 162 miles (260 km)  - Length 497 miles (800 km)  - % water 17. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Óbuda (sometimes is written in English as Obuda) was a historical city in Hungary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Canada_(bordered). ... Waterfront development at Summerside Summerside (pop. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ RM Urquhart, Scottish Burgh and County Heraldry, London, 1973
  2. ^ Gazetteer for Scotland Abbey Craig
  3. ^ Settlement Population Estimates 2004General Register Office for Scotland, 2004
  4. ^ Stirling Council City Profile Stirling Profile
  5. ^ Scotland's Census Results online Results for the Stirling locality, 2001
  6. ^ Stirling Council, Property and the economy Keeping an eye on your business
  7. ^ Stirling University University background
  8. ^ Stirling University External Visitor Information
  9. ^ Visitor Information - Useful facts and figures Stirling University Facts and Figures
  10. ^ Stirling University Innovation Park About us

Mair, Craig (1990). Stirling: The Royal Burgh. John Donald Publishers. ISBN 0-85976-420-6.  1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ...


See also

Stirling Castle (southwest aspect) For ships named after the castle, see Stirling Castle (disambiguation) Stirling Castle is a castle in Stirling, one of the largest and most important, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland and indeed Western Europe. ... Combatants Kingdom of Scotland Kingdom of England Commanders Andrew Moray William Wallace Surrey Cressingham† Strength 7,000 infantry and 150 cavalry 30,000[citation needed] infantry and 750 cavalry Casualties  ? Over 7,000 killed The Battle of Stirling Bridge was one of the series of conflicts of the Wars of... Combatants Scottish Parliment & the Earl of Lanerick Rebel Forces of the Marquis of Argyll Commanders Sir George Munro MacKenzie Strength unknown around 1000 soldiers Casualties unknown 200 dead & 400 captured. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Stirling
  • Stirling Council Website
  • Stirling Castle (Historic Scotland)
  • Mapping the Town: the history of Stirling, presented by Julian Richards (BBC Radio 4) (RealAudio format)
  • University of Stirling
  • Photos of Stirling
  • More photos of Stirling - Taken by Stuart Gillespie, Pastor of Calvary Chapel Stirling
  • Cambusbarron Village - Local website with lots of information about the village and the Stirling area
  • Stirling travel guide from Wikitravel


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Historic Scotland is the Scottish agency looking after historic monuments. ... == Julian Richards is a presenter on television and radio, a writer and an archaeologist with over 30 years experience of fieldwork and publication. ... BBC Radio 4 is a British domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of chiefly spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... RealAudio is a proprietary audio format developed by RealNetworks. ... Calvary Chapels dove logo which represents the Holy Spirit. ... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ...

 
Places with City status in Scotland
AberdeenDundeeEdinburghGlasgowInvernessStirling

Coordinates: 56°07′02″N, 03°56′23″W Historically, city status was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Inverness (Inbhir Nis in Scottish Gaelic) is the only city in the Highland council area and the Highlands of Scotland. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Stirling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (837 words)
Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is a city in the Stirling area of central Scotland.
Stirling is an ancient burgh, clustered around a large castle and mediæval old-town.
Stirling is twinned with Dunedin, Florida in the United States and with Villeneuve d'Ascq in northern France.
Stirling engine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2865 words)
Notably, some are in hot pursuit of the rotary Stirling engine; the goal is to convert power from the Stirling cycle directly into torque, a similar goal to that of the design of the rotary combustion engine.
Stirling engines that run on small temperature differentials are quite large for the amount of power that they produce, due to the heat exchangers.
Robert Stirling's innovative contribution of 1816 was what he called the 'Economiser' now known as the regenerator which acts to retain heat in the hot portion of the engine as the air passes to the cold part and thus improve the efficiency.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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