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Encyclopedia > Stew
Beef Stew
Beef Stew

A stew is a combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in water or other water-based liquid, typically by simmering, and that are then served without being drained. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 140 KB) Photographer: Kurt Nordstrom from Ponder, TX, USA Title: Beef Stew! Description: Yeah, my Flickring has been rather lax as of late. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 140 KB) Photographer: Kurt Nordstrom from Ponder, TX, USA Title: Beef Stew! Description: Yeah, my Flickring has been rather lax as of late. ... This box:      For other uses, see Solid (disambiguation). ... An ingredient is one of the things that goes into a mixture when something is made, especially in cooking or in following a formula. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food for consumption. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Simmering is a cooking technique in which foods are cooked in hot liquids kept at or just barely below the boiling point of water (at average sea level air pressure), 100 °C (212 °F). ...


Ingredients in a stew can include any combination of vegetables (potatoes, beans, etc.), fruits (such as peppers and tomatoes), meat, poultry, sausages and seafood. While water can be used as the stew-cooking liquid, wine, stock, and beer are also common. Seasoning and flavourings may also be added. Stews are typically cooked at a relatively low temperature (simmered, not boiled), to allow flavors to marry. Vegetables on a market Vegetable is a nutritional and culinary term denoting any part of a plant that is commonly consumed by humans as food, but is not regarded as a culinary fruit, nut, herb, spice, or grain. ... Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a perennial plant of the Solanaceae, or nightshade, family, grown for its starchy tuber. ... This article is on the plant. ... Popular Japanese fashion magazine throughout the 1990s; the photography of which has recently been reissued in two collections from Phaidon press. ... Species C. annuum (incl. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Meat (disambiguation). ... Ducks amongst other poultry The Poultry-dealer, after Cesare Vecellio Poultry is the category of domesticated birds kept for meat, eggs, and feathers. ... This article is about the prepared meat. ... Spaghetti with seafood (Spaghetti allo scoglio). ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... Stock is a flavoured liquid. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Seasoning is the process of adding flavours, or enhancing natural flavour of any type of food. ... Flavouring (CwE) or flavoring (AmE) is a product which is added to food in order to change or augment its taste. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Boiling is the rapid vaporization of a liquid, which occurs when a liquid is heated to a temperature such that its vapor pressure is above that of the surroundings. ...


The distinctions between stew, soup, and casserole are fine ones. The ingredients of a stew may be cut into larger pieces than a those of a soup and retain more of their individual flavours; a stew may have thicker liquid than a soup, and more liquid than a casserole; a stew is more likely to be eaten as a main course than as a starter, unlike soup; and a stew can be cooked on either the stove top (or range) or in the oven, while casseroles are almost always cooked in the oven, and soups are almost always cooked on the stovetop. There are exceptions; for example, an oyster stew is thin bodied, more like a soup. The choice of name is largely a matter of custom; it is possible for the same dish to be described as soup, stew, or casserole. For other uses, see Soup (disambiguation). ... In cooking, a casserole (from the French for stew pan) is a large, deep, covered pot or dish used both in the oven and as a serving dish. ... A stove is a heat-producing device. ... Oven depicted in a painting by Millet An oven is an enclosed compartment for heating, baking or drying. ... For other uses, see Oyster (disambiguation). ...


Stewing is suitable for the least tender cuts of meat that become tender and juicy with the slow moist heat method. This makes it popular in low-cost cooking. Cuts having a certain amount of marbling and gelatinous connective tissue give moist, juicy stews, while lean meat may easily become dry.


Stews may be thickened by reduction, but are more often thickened with flour, either by coating pieces of meat with flour before searing, or by using a roux or beurre manié, a dough consisting of equal parts of butter and flour. Other thickeners like cornstarch or arrowroot may also be used. For other uses, see Flour (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Roux (disambiguation). ... Beurre manié is a dough consisting of equal parts of soft butter and flour used to thicken soups and sauces. ... Products treated with cornstarch Cornstarch, or cornflour, is the starch of the maize grain, commonly known as corn. ... Binomial name Maranta arundinacea L. Arrowroot, or obedience plant, (Maranta arundinacea) is a large perennial herb of genus Maranta found in rainforest habitats. ...

Contents

History

Food has been boiled since prehistoric times, first using naturally occurring vessels and later pottery. Herodotus says that the Scythians (8th to 4th centuries BC) "put the flesh into an animal's paunch, mix water with it, and boil it like that over the bone fire. The bones burn very well, and the paunch easily contains all the meat once it has been stripped off. In this way an ox, or any other sacrificial beast, is ingeniously made to boil itself." Some sources consider that this was how boiling was first done by primitive man, perhaps as long ago as ½ to 1 million years ago[citation needed]. Pottery on display in Dilli Haat, Delhi, India. ... Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: HÄ“ródotos Halikarnāsseús) was a Greek historian who lived in the 5th century BC (c. ... Approximate extent of Scythia and Sarmatia in the 1st century BC (the orange background shows the spread of Eastern Iranian languages, among them Scytho-Sarmatian). ...


There is ample evidence that primitive tribes which survived into the 19th and 20th centuries boiled foods together. Amazonian tribes used the shells of turtles as vessels, boiling the entrails of the turtle and various other ingredients in them. Other cultures used the shells of large mollusks (clams etc.) to boil foods in. There is archaeological evidence of these practices going back 8,000 years or more. Map of the Amazon rainforest ecoregions as delineated by the WWF. Yellow line encloses the Amazon rainforest. ...


The Book of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible records that Esau traded his inheritance to his twin brother Jacob for a meal of lentil stew.[1] For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... Esaw redirects here. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... This article is about the species Lens culinaris. ...


There are recipes for lamb stews & fish stews in the Roman cookery book Apicius, believed to date from the 4th century. Le Viandier, one of the oldest cookbooks in French, written by the French chef known as Taillevent (1310-1395, real name Guillaume Tirel) has ragouts or stews of various types in it. Apicius was a name applied to three celebrated Roman epicures, the first of whom lived during the Republic; the second of whom, Marcus Gavius (or Gabius) Apicius—the most famous in his own time—lived under the early Empire; a third lived in the late 4th or early 5th century. ... Taillevent alias Guillaume Tirel (1310-1395) was the cook of the kings of France Charles V and Charles VI. He wrote a famous book on cookery named Le Viandier. ... The term ragout (French ragoût) can refer to a main-dish stew or to a sauce for noodles or other starchy foods. ...


Hungarian Goulash dates back to the 9th century Magyar shepherds of the area, before the existence of Hungary. Paprika was added in the 18th century. Capsicum fruit which comes in various shapes and colours can be used to make paprika. ...


The first written reference to 'Irish stew' is in Byron's 'Devil's Drive' (1814): "The Devil . . . dined on . . . a rebel or so in an Irish stew.” Irish stew (Irish: Stobhach Gaelach) is a traditional Irish dish made from lamb or mutton as well as potatoes, onions, and parsley [1]. It originated in Ireland but appears in cookbooks all over Europe, including in Escoffiers Guide Culinaire. ...


Popular recipes for regional stews, such as gumbo, bouillabaise, Brunswick stew, and burgoo were published during the 19th century and increased in popularity during the 20th. A bowl of shrimp gumbo Gumbo is a spicy, hearty stew or soup, found typically in the states on the Gulf of Mexico in the United States, and very common in the southern part of Louisiana and the Lowcountry around Charleston, South Carolina. ... Bouillabaisse is a traditional Provençal fish stew originating from the port city of Marseilles. ... Brunswick stew is a traditional dish from the southeastern United States. ... Burgoo is a term used for many types of stew made from a mixture of ingredients. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


Types of stew

In meat-based stews, white stews, also known as blanquettes or fricassées, are made with lamb or veal that is blanched, or lightly seared without browning, and cooked in stock. Brown stews are made with pieces of red meat that are first seared or browned, before a browned mirepoix, sometimes browned flour, stock and wine are added. Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Blanching The first step in blanching green beans Blanching is a cooking term that describes a process of food preparation wherein the food substance, usually a vegetable or fruit, is plunged into boiling water, removed after a brief, timed interval and finally plunged into... Searing is a technique used in grilling, roasting, braising, sautéing, etc. ... Mirepoix is the French name for a combination of onions, carrots and celery (either common Pascal celery or celeriac). ...


List of stews

Baeckeoffe is a dish that is a slow-cooked mix of sliced potatoes and other items. ... Elsaß redirects here. ... Wikibooks has a book on the topic of Cookbook:Barbacoa Barbacoa specialty market in Corpus Christi, Texas Barbacoa generally refers to meats or a whole sheep slow cooked over an open fire, or more traditionally, in a pit covered with leaves, although the interpretation is loose, and in the present... Beef Bourguignon (BÅ“uf Bourguignon in French) is very well-known, traditional French recipe. ... A spicy meat stew usually made from lamb or goat. ... This article is about the food. ... Coat of arms of Provence Provence (Provençal Occitan: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) was a Roman province and now is a region of southeastern France on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to Italy. ... Booyah or Booya is a food that is prepared like a stew, but on a very large scale. ... Brunswick stew is a traditional dish from the southeastern United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Carolinas is a collective term used in the United States to refer to the states of North and South Carolina together. ... Burgoo is a term used for many types of stew made from a mixture of ingredients. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Caldeirada is a typical Portuguese stew consisting of a large variety of fish, and sometimes shellfish, with potatoes, tomato and onion. ... Tex-Mex is a term for a type of American food which is used primarily in Texas and the Southwestern United States to describe a regional cuisine which blends food products available in the United States and the culinary creations of Mexican-Americans that are influenced by the cuisines of... Carnitas (from the Spanish for little meats) is a type of braised or roasted (often after first being boiled) pork in Mexican cuisine. ... Other Mexican States Capital Morelia Other major cities Lázaro Cárdenas list of municipalities Area 59,928 km² Ranked 16th Population (2000 census) 3,979,180 Ranked 7th Governor (2002-08) Lázaro Cárdenas Batel (PRD) Federal Deputies (13) PRD = 9 PRI = 2 PAN = 1 disputed = 1 Federal... Typical Cassoulet Cassoulet is a rich, slow-cooked bean stew or casserole originating in the southwest of France, containing meat (typically pork sausages, pork, goose, duck and sometimes mutton), pork skin (couennes) and white haricot beans. ... Cawl is a traditional Welsh stew-like dish consisting of meat and vegetables. ... This article is about the country. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Location within Mexico Municipalities of Sinaloa Country Mexico Capital Municipalities 18 Government  - Governor Jesús Alberto Aguilar Padilla  - Federal Deputies PRI: 6 PAN: 2  - Federal Senators PRI: 2 PAN: 1 Area Ranked 18th  - Total 58,238 km² (22,485. ... Chamin is the Hebrew word used to describe the special dish made for the Shabbat. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal: ספרד, Standard Hebrew Səfárad, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄áraḏ / Səp̄āraḏ), or whose ancestors were among the Jews expelled from... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Chankonabe is a Japanese stew commonly eaten in vast quantity by sumo wrestlers as part of a weight gain diet. ... Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Soy sauce (US) or soya sauce is a fermented sauce made from soybeans (soya beans), roasted grain, water and salt. ... Miso ) is a traditional Japanese food produced by fermenting rice, barley and/or soybeans, with salt and kōji (the most typical miso is made with soy). ... For other uses, see Sumo (disambiguation). ... Chakchouka is a Moroccan salad made of cooked tomatoes, peppers, spices and eggs. ... The Cuisine of Israel is incredibly diverse due to the diversity of the young countrys population. ... A pot of chili con carne with beans and tomatoes. ... Tex-Mex is a term for a type of American food which is used primarily in Texas and the Southwestern United States to describe a regional cuisine which blends food products available in the United States and the culinary creations of Mexican-Americans that are influenced by the cuisines of... Pot of Chili sin carne, cooking on the stove. ... Mexican may have several meanings. ... Bold textChilorio ... Location within Mexico Municipalities of Sinaloa Country Mexico Capital Municipalities 18 Government  - Governor Jesús Alberto Aguilar Padilla  - Federal Deputies PRI: 6 PAN: 2  - Federal Senators PRI: 2 PAN: 1 Area Ranked 18th  - Total 58,238 km² (22,485. ... Cholent (from Eastern European Yiddish טשאָלנט tsholnt) or shalet (from Western European Yiddish שאלעט shalet), a food of Ashkenazi Jews, is a type of stew (or stewing) that has simmered over a very low flame or inside a slow oven (set to a low-heat temperature) or crock pot for many hours... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi,AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... The Yucatán Peninsula separates the Caribbean Sea from the Gulf of Mexico. ... Cotriade is a fish stew from Brittany that is made with different kinds of fish, as well as potatoes. ... This article is about the historical kingdom, duchy and French province, as well as one of the Celtic nations. ... Daube is a classic French stew made with cubed beef braised in wine,vegetables, garlic, and herbes de provence. ... Fabada Asturiana, a typical dish of Asturias Fabada Asturiana, often simply known as Fabada, is a rich bean stew, originally from and most commonly found in Asturias, but widely available throughout Spain and in Spanish restaurants world-wide. ... Brazilian Feijoada and common accompanying dishes. ... Green beans Bean is a common name for large plant seeds of several genera of Fabaceae (formerly Leguminosae) used for food or feed. ... Gaisburger Marsch Gaisburger Marsch (march of Gaisburg) is a traditional swabian stew. ... Spätzle with butter (dried convenience food, not the real thing) Spätzle (German, sometimes explained as being a diminutive of Spatz small sparrows) are noodles much used in southern Germany, western Austria, Switzerland, Alsace and sometimes also in Italy (there they are named Troffi). They are fabricated by grating... Germany, showing modern borders. ... Ghormeh Sabzi is an Iranian stew. ... For a style of play of contract bridge, see Goulash (bridge). ... Capsicum fruit which comes in various shapes and colours can be used to make paprika. ... A bowl of shrimp gumbo Gumbo is a spicy, hearty stew or soup, found typically in the states on the Gulf of Mexico in the United States, and very common in the southern part of Louisiana and the Lowcountry around Charleston, South Carolina. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Hasenpfeffer (literally, peppered hare) is a traditional German stew made from marinated rabbit or hare. ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... Haleem is a thick Indian, high calarie dish, brought to the Indian sub-continent by Persians. ... This article is about the species Lens culinaris. ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... Hayashi rice is a dish popular in Japanese family restaurants. ... Demi-glace is a type of brown sauce common to the culinary industry. ... Irish stew (Irish: Stobhach Gaelach) is a traditional Irish dish made from lamb or mutton as well as potatoes, onions, and parsley [1]. It originated in Ireland but appears in cookbooks all over Europe, including in Escoffiers Guide Culinaire. ... Sheep redirects here. ... Mutton may refer to either: The meat of a sheep In parts of Asia, the meat of a goat Category: ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... This article is about the herb. ... Jjigae (pronounced jih- geh)is a Korean dish similar to a Western stew. ... The Karelian hot pot (karjalanpaisti in Finnish) is a traditional meat stew originating in the Karelia region of Finland. ... Khash is a traditional Armenian dish, originating in the Shirak region. ... Khoresht (Persian: ), also called Khoresh (Persian: ), is the common name of different stews in Persian cuisine which is typically served beside Polow (rice dish). ... The cuisine of Iran is diverse, with each province featuring dishes, as well as culinary traditions and styles, distinct to their regions. ... Binomial name Crocus sativus L. Saffron (IPA: ) is a spice derived from the flower of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), a species of crocus in the family Iridaceae. ... Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Lancashire hotpot Lancashire hotpot is a culinary dish consisting essentially of meat, onion and potatoes left to bake in the oven all day in a heavy pot and on a low heat. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Locro is a hearty stew popular in Argentina. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... This article is about the mountain system in South America. ... Nikujaga (Japanese:肉じゃが) (meaning meat-potato) is a Japanese dish of meat, potatoes and onion stewed in sweetened soy, sometimes with ito konnyaku and vegetables. ... Olla podrida is a popular dish in Spain and Galicia. ... A perpetual stew is a pot into which whatever one can find is placed and cooked. ... Pátzcuaro, Michoacán Pátzcuaro, which means place of stones in the Purepecha language, is a city in the state of Michoacán, Mexico. ... Other Mexican States Capital Morelia Other major cities Lázaro Cárdenas list of municipalities Area 59,928 km² Ranked 16th Population (2000 census) 3,979,180 Ranked 7th Governor (2002-08) Lázaro Cárdenas Batel (PRD) Federal Deputies (13) PRD = 9 PRI = 2 PAN = 1 disputed = 1 Federal... Pörkölt (Slovak: Perkelt) is a hot dish which originates in Hungary and Balkans. ... Capsicum fruit which comes in various shapes and colours can be used to make paprika. ... A pot-au-feu, with this recipe. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... The term ragout (French ragoût) can refer to a main-dish stew or to a sauce for noodles or other starchy foods. ... For the animated film, see Ratatouille (film). ... Red-cooked pork belly served with thickened braising sauce Red cooking is an English umbrella term used to describe two slow braising Chinese cooking techniques: hóng shāo (Traditional Chinese: 紅燒) or lÇ” (Traditional Chinese: æ»·; pinyin: lÇ”). While the former can be done in less than 20 minutes and usually... China has one of the richest culinary heritages on Earth. ... Sancocho is a term used in Hispanic American countries for a soup made with beef, chicken or fish stock most often containing large pieces of solid food, i. ... West Indies redirects here. ... A tajine is a Moroccan dish as well as a special pot for preparing this dish. ... Waterzooi is a classic stew of Belgian cuisine. ...

See also

Wikibooks
Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on
Stews
Look up Stew in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... In cooking, a casserole (from the French for stew pan) is a large, deep, covered pot or dish used both in the oven and as a serving dish. ... A Jumar is mechanical device for ascending on a rope, named after a popular brand, and is more generically known as an ascender. ... Raw meats ready to be cooked. ... Raw meats ready to be cooked. ...

References

  1. ^ Genesis 25:29-34

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fresh milk products and great customer service at Stew Leonard's (498 words)
Stew Leonard's history can be traced back to the early 1920s, when Charles Leo Leonard started Clover Farms Dairy in Norwalk, Connecticut.
Stew Leonard's dream was to build a retail dairy store where children could watch milk being bottled, while mothers did their shopping in a farmer's market atmosphere.
Stew Leonard's was dubbed the "Disneyland of Dairy Stores" by the New York Times, because of its own milk processing plant, costumed characters, scheduled entertainment, petting zoo and animatronics throughout the stores.
Stew - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (564 words)
A stew is a common dish made of vegetables, meat, poultry, or seafood cooked in some sort of broth or sauce.
The line between stew and soup is a fine one, but generally a stew's ingredients are cut in larger pieces and retain some of their individual flavours, a stew may have thicker broth, and a stew is more likely to be eaten as a main course than as a starter.
Popular recipes for regional stews, such as gumbo, bouillabaise, Brunswick stew, and burgoo became common during the 19th century and have increased in popularity during the 20th century.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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