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Encyclopedia > Stevenage
Borough of Stevenage
Stevenage
Shown within Hertfordshire
Geography
Status: Borough
Region: East of England
Admin. County: Hertfordshire
Area:
- Total
Ranked 342nd
25.96 km²
Admin. HQ: Stevenage
Grid ref: TL2424
ONS code: 26UH
Demographics
Population:
- Total (2006 est.)
- Density
Ranked 299th
79,300
3055 / km²
Ethnicity: 92.5% White
3.0% S.Asian
1.7% Black
1.7% Mixed Race
1.1% Chinese or other[1]
Politics
Stevenage Borough Council
http://www.stevenage.gov.uk/
Leadership: Leader & Cabinet
Executive: Labour
MP: Barbara Follett

Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England. It is to the east of junctions 7 and 8 of the A1(M), and is between Letchworth Garden City to the north, and Welwyn Garden City to the south. Stevenage may refer to: Stevenage, a town and district in Hertfordshire, UK. Stevenage (UK Parliament constituency) Stevenage Borough F.C., Stevenages football club Stevenage railway station, the station which serves Stevenage Category: ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 11 KB) Summary Description: A blank map of the United Kingdom, with country outline and coastline; contact the author for help with modifications or add-ons Source: Reference map provided by Demis Mapper 6 Date: 2006-21-06 Author: User... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Image File history File links HertfordshireStevenage. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... This is a list of districts of England ordered by area. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Daphne Barbara Follett (born 25 December 1942, Kingston, Jamaica as Daphne Barbara Hubbard) is a British politician - she is the Labour Member of Parliament for Stevenage, which she first won at the 1997 general election. ... Ronda, Spain Main street in Bastrop, Texas, United States, a small town A town is a community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This page is about the A1 road in Great Britain. ... , Letchworth Garden City, more commonly Letchworth, is a town in Hertfordshire, England. ... Not to be confused with Welwyn. ...


Its population was 1,430 in 1801, 4,049 in 1901 and 79,724 in 2001. The largest increase occurred in the 1950s and 1960s after becoming a new town. However, to be more accurate Stevenage was a new town - created just after the Second World War under the New Towns Act of 1946. The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... See New Town for places with that name. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Place-name meaning

Stevenage may derive from Old English stiþen āc / stiōen āc / stithen ac (various Old English dialects cited here) meaning '(place at) the strong oak'. Old English redirects here. ... Old English redirects here. ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), which are listed in the List of Quercus species, and some related genera, notably...


The name was recorded as Stithenæce, c.1060 and Stigenace in 1086 in the Domesday Book. A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ...


History

The present site of Stevenage lies near a Roman road that ran from Verulamium to Baldock. Some Romano-British remains were discovered during the building of the New Town, and a hoard of 2,000 silver Roman coins was discovered in 1986 during new house building in the Chells Manor part of Stevenage. The most substantial evidence of activity from Roman times are the Six Hills, six tumuli by the side of the old Great North Road - presumably the burial places of a local family. Not to be confused with Romans road. ... Remains of the city walls Verulamium was the third largest city in Roman Britain. ... Baldock is a town in Hertfordshire, England where the River Ivel rises. ... Romano-British is a term used to refer to the Romanized Britons under the Roman Empire (and later the Western Roman Empire) and in the years after the Roman departure exposed to Roman culture and Christian religion. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The Six Hills, April 2004 The Six Hills are a collection of Roman barrows situated alongside the Great North Road in Stevenage, Hertfordshire UK. They are classed as a Scheduled Ancient Monument and are protected by law. ... A tumulus (plural tumuli, from the Latin word for mound or small hill, from the root to bulge, swell also found in ) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. ... Sign at Junction 1 of the A1(M) at South Mimms in Hertfordshire The A1, at 409 miles (658 km) long, is the longest numbered British road. ...


A little to the east of the Roman sites the first Saxon camp was made in a clearing in the woods. This is where the church, manor house and the first village were later built. Similar settlements sprang up in the nearby areas of Chells, Broadwater and Shephall. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... Ightham Mote For the London district, see Manor House, London. ... Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... Chells Manor is a neighbourhood in Stevenage that was built to help with the expanding population in Stevenage. ... Broadwater was built to help with the expansion of Stevenage ... Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England, and is part of the London Commuter Belt. ...


In the Domesday Book, its Lord of the Manor was the Abbot of Westminster. The settlement had moved down to the Great North Road and in 1281 it was granted a Royal Charter to hold a weekly market and annual fair (still held in the High Street). A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... The title of Lord of the Manor arose in the English medieval system of Manorialism following the Norman Conquest. ... For other uses, see Abbot (disambiguation). ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ...


The earliest part of St Nicholas Church dates from the 12th century, but it was probably a site of worship much earlier. The known list of priests or rectors is relatively complete from 1213. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... May 30 - Battle of Damme; English fleet under William Longsword destroyes a French fleet off the Belgian port in the first major victory for the fledgling Royal Navy. ...


The remains of a medieval moated homestead in Whomerley Wood is an 80 yard square trench almost 5 feet wide in parts. It was probably the home of Ralph de Homle, and both Roman and later pottery has been found there. Church of the Intercession on the Nerl(1165) - an archetypal example of early Russian architecture. ...


For a description of the medieval manorial records, and details of Stevenage's history from the Tudor period to the Victorian era - see the external history link. Allegory of the Tudor dynasty (detail), attributed to Lucas de Heere, c. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ...


In 1281 Stevenage was granted a twice weekly market and an annual fair. Both were probably held in the wide part of the present High Street to the north of Middle Row. The High Street is closed for an annual fair even today. For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ...


Around 1500 the Church was much improved, with decorative woodwork within, and with the addition of a clerestory. Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. ...


It was in the 16th century (1558) that Thomas Alleyne founded the free grammar school — the school (now a comprehensive school) still exists on its original site at the north end of the High Street. Francis Cammaerts was headmaster of the school from 1952 to 1961. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Thomas Alleyne was an English priest of the C16th. ... A grammar school is a school that may, depending on regional usage as exemplified below, provide either secondary education or, a much less common usage, primary education (also known as elementary). Grammar schools trace their origins back to medieval Europe, as schools in which university preparatory subjects, such as Latin... A comprehensive school is a secondary school that does not select children on the basis of academic attainment or aptitude. ... Francis Cammaerts was a very successful SOE agent in German occupied France during World War II, responsible for setting up and organising Resistance forces reputed to be of the magnitude of 10,000. ...


Stevenage's prosperity came in part from the North Road, which was turnpiked in the early 18th century. Many inns in the High Street served the stage coaches, 21 of which passed through Stevenage each day in 1800. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... A stagecoach is a type of four-wheeled enclosed passenger and/or mail coach, strongly sprung and drawn by four horses, widely used before the introduction of railway transport. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF...

Stevenage Old Town
Stevenage Old Town

In 1857 the Great Northern Railway was constructed, and the era of the stage coach had ended. Stevenage grew only slowly throughout the 19th century and a second church (Holy Trinity) was constructed at the south end of the High Street. In 1861 Dickens commented "The village street was like most other village streets: wide for its height, silent for its size, and drowsy in the dullest degree. The quietest little dwellings with the largest of window-shutters to shut up nothing as if it were the Mint or the Bank of England." 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Great Northern Railway (GNR) was a British railway company, founded by the London & York Railway Act of 1846. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1928, Philip Vincent bought the HRD Motorcycle Co Ltd out of receivership, immediately moving it to Stevenage and renaming it the Vincent HRD Motorcycle Co Ltd. He produced the legendary motorcycles, including the Black Shadow and Black Lightning, in the town until 1955. H.R.D. Motors Ltd, was a British motorcycle manufacturer of the 1920s. ... Vincent Rapide Vincent Motorcycles was a British manufacturer of motorcycles in the United Kingdom from 1928 to 1955. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...


Modern Stevenage

This slow growth continued until, after the Second World War, the Abercrombie Plan called for the establishment of a ring of new towns around London. It was designated the first New Town on 1 August 1946, and was planned with six self-contained neighbourhoods. The first two of these to be occupied were the Stoney Hall and Monks Wood "Estates" in 1951. Next to be built and occupied was Bedwell in 1952 - The Twin Foxes pub was Stevenage's first "new" public house and is still situated in the Bedwell estate. The public house was named after local notorious identical twin poachers (Albert Ebenezer and Ebenezer Albert Fox). Next came Broadwater and Shephall (1953), then Chells in the 1960s and later Pin Green and Symonds Green. Another area, (currently under construction) is Great Ashby, which will be completed in 2008. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The County of London Plan was prepared for the London County Council by J. H. Forshaw and Patrick Abercrombie in 1943. ... A New town or planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lieutenant Commander Frederick Bedwell (1796–1853) was a sailor in the Royal Navy. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Albert Ebenezer and Ebenezer Albert Fox were infamous poachers who lived in Stevenage in the late 1800s and early 1900s. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Symonds green is a neighbourhood within the English New Town of Stevenage. ...


At least two other public houses are worth mentioning, for they have got a direct relationship to local history: The name of the pub "Edward the Confessor"(closed 2006) could have a connection to the time in which the St Mary Church in nearby Walkern was built, for King Edward ruled from 1042 until his death in 1066. Walkern's village church dates from this time. The second pub with a strong bond to local history seems to be the "Our Mutual Friend" in Shephall, for the name of the pub is the title of a novel by Charles Dickens. Dickens was at some occasion guest to Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton in nearby Knebworth House, and for that reason he knew Stevenage very well. St Edward the Confessor or Eadweard III (c. ... Walkern is a village and civil parish in East Hertfordshire. ... Our Mutual Friend (written in the years 1864–65) is the last novel completed by Charles Dickens. ... Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England, and is part of the London Commuter Belt. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton (May 25, 1803 - January 18, 1873) was an English novelist, playwright, and politician. ... Knebworth House is a country house near Stevenage in Hertfordshire, England. ...

pedestrianised town centre
pedestrianised town centre
cycle track in roundabout
cycle track in roundabout
Old town high street
Old town high street

The pedestrianised town centre was the first purpose built traffic-free shopping zone in Britain, and was officially opened in 1959 by the Queen. By the clock tower and ornamental pool is Joyride, a mother and child sculpture by Franta Belsky. Although revolutionary for its time, the town centre is showing signs of age and in 2005 plans were revealed for a major regeneration due to take place over the next decade. Details are still being debated by the council, landowners and other interested parties. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Clocktower at Geelong Grammar School, Victoria, Australia A clock tower is a tower built with one or more (often four) clock faces. ... Franta Belsky was a Czech sculptor. ...


Next to the Town Gardens, the Church of St George and St Andrew is an example of modern church design, and houses Stevenage Museum in its crypt.


A distinctive feature of Stevenage is its urban landscape. It has many roundabouts, few traffic lights, a network of cycle tracks, and some of the tallest street-lights in Britain. Fairlands Valley is a large area of parkland with boating lakes. The town is a very green town, with avenues of trees (typically Norway Maple) throughout but also large woods such as Monks & Whomerley Wood, which is ancient semi-natural woodland. Indeed in the UK it is only matched for the ease of access to large woodland by places such the Forest of Dean (Woodland Trust data). There are also many playing fields (e.g. St. Nicholas playing fields near Ripon Road). The town's schools all have a substantial amount of ground; key examples are Ashtree Primary School, Moss Bury Primary School, Longmeadow Primary School and Barnwell. A roundabout, rotary, or gyratory circus is a type of road junction (or traffic calming device) at which traffic streams circularly around a central island after first yielding to the circulating traffic. ... Traffic lights will sometimes differ where there are several lanes of traffic. ... Cycleway, Bicycle street and Pedestrian/Cyclist bridge in Nuremberg, Germany Segregated cycle facilities may consist of separate roads, tracks, paths or lanes designated for use by cyclists and from which motorised traffic is generally excluded. ... A streetlight in front of a red sky at night A street light, also known as a light standard, is a raised light on the edge of a road, turned on or lit at a certain time every night. ...


Stevenage has a King George's Field in memorial to King George V. There are 471 King George V Playing Fields[2] in the United Kingdom, all part of an enormous memorial to King George V, each of which is an individual registered charity[3]. This is the page for Hertfordshire. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...


In the old town centre of Stevenage, next to St Nicholas Church, in the parochial house there, called Rooksnest ("under the big wych-elm") the novelist Edward Morgan Forster lived from 1884 to 1894. Stevenage later acquired a monument through him, when he had Rooksnest in mind as a role model for the setting of his novel Howards End. In the preface of one paperback edition of Howards End, there is a lot to be found about landmarks of Stevenage and their relationship to the story of the novel, such as the Stevenage High Street and the Six Hills. Binomial nomenclature Ulmus glabra Huds. ... Edward Morgan Forster (January 1, 1879 - June 7, 1970) was an English novelist. ... Howards End is a novel by E. M. Forster, first published in 1910, which tells a story of class struggle in turn-of-the-century England. ... The Six Hills, April 2004 The Six Hills are a collection of Roman barrows situated alongside the Great North Road in Stevenage, Hertfordshire UK. They are classed as a Scheduled Ancient Monument and are protected by law. ...


Also close to Stevenage is Knebworth House, a gothic stately home and venue of globally well-known rock concerts since 1974. The house was once home to Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Victorian English novelist and spiritualist, who, as reported by one of his visitors, was so deep in the belief of spiritual realities that he sometimes thought himself to be invisible while others were around. Knebworth House is a country house near Stevenage in Hertfordshire, England. ... Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton (May 25, 1803 - January 18, 1873) was an English novelist, playwright, and politician. ...


The Stevenage Leisure Centre contains the Gordon Craig Theatre and many facilities for sports. The nearby Stevenage Leisure Park has a multiplex cinema, clubs and restaurants. The main shopping area is around Queensway and the Westgate. At the south of the town there is a retail park called Roaring Meg, named after the river that runs under it. The river can be seen along the western edge of the area. There is also shopping in the Old Town. Roaring Meg may refer to several things:- A cannon used in the English Civil War A public house in Biddulph named after the above cannon A brand of beer brewed by Springhead Brewery also named after the above cannon Another cannon used in the Siege of Derry of 1689 A...


In 1999 a millennium countdown clock was mounted on the town centre clock tower, displaying the time remaining until the year 2000.


Adjoining the residential parts of the town is the Industrial Area. For many years, British Aerospace (now MBDA) was the largest employer in the town, but now GlaxoSmithKline has a large pharmaceutical research laboratory complex (which is known as 'The Palace' to many of its inhabitants). A smaller but interesting enterprise is Astrium which has for some decades manufactured spacecraft, both as prime contractor and equipment supplier. There are many small to medium size firms as well. British Aerospace (BAe) was a UK aircraft and defence systems manufacturer, now part of BAE Systems. ... MBDA is a European arms company which manufactures missiles and is the result of the 2001 merger of Aérospatiale-Matra Missiles (of EADS), Alenia Marconi Systems missile divisions and Matra BAe Dynamics. ... GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE: GSK NYSE: GSK) is a United Kingdom based pharmaceutical, biological, and healthcare company. ... ...


The town is still growing, is set to expand west of the A1(M) motorway and may be further identified for development depending on the outcome of the Examination In Public of the Regional Spatial Strategy. The main area of recent development is Great Ashby to the northeast of the town (but actually in North Herts District). Motorway symbol in UK, Australia, Spain, France and Ireland. ...


Stevenage Borough F.C., the town's major football team, plays in the Football Conference. Stevenage Borough F.C. won the 2007 FA Carlsberg Trophy beating Kidderminster 3-2 at Wembley Stadium. It was the first competitive club game and cup final to be held at the new stadium. Stevenage Borough F.C. are an English football team based in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, currently playing in the Conference National. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The Football Conference is a football league at the top of the National League System of non-League football in England. ... For the old stadium, see Wembley Stadium (1923). ...


Stevenage holds a number of annual events, including the Stevenage Town Show (formerly Stevenage Day), Rock in the Park and Stevenage Carnival.


Transport

Stevenage is served by the A1(M) motorway, taking traffic both north and south. It is also served by the smaller A602 road taking traffic southeast, meeting the A10 road at Ware. Sign at Junction 1 of the A1(M) at South Mimms in Hertfordshire The A1, at 409 miles (658 km) long, is the longest numbered British road. ... The A602 is a road linking Hitchin in Hertfordshire, England, with A10 at Ware in Hertfordshire, via Stevenage. ... The A10 is a major road in England. ... For other uses, see Ware (disambiguation). ...


It is also served by Stevenage railway station, sitting on the East Coast Mainline. As such regular trains to London are available. Stevenage railway station serves the town of Stevenage in Hertfordshire. ... GNER White Rose train at Kings Cross railway station The East Coast Main Line (ECML) is a major railway line in the United Kingdom which links London to Aberdeen, via Stevenage, Peterborough, Grantham, Doncaster, York, Durham, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Berwick-upon-Tweed, Dunbar, Edinburgh, Leuchars, Dundee and Arbroath. ...


Famous inhabitants

Ian James Robert Allinson (born October 1, 1957) is an English former football player and manager. ... Harry Bates (April 26, 1850 - January 30, 1899) British sculptor, was born at Stevenage, Herts. ... Colonel Noel Andrew Croft DSO OBE Polar Medal (November 30, 1906) - (June 26, 1998) was a member of the Special Operations Executive in the Second World War and apparently one of the inspirations for James Bond; an explorer, holding the longest self-sustaining journey in the Guinness Book of Records... The Special Operations Executive (SOE), sometimes referred to as the Baker Street Irregulars after Sherlock Holmess fictional group of spies, was a World War II organization initiated by Winston Churchill and Hugh Dalton in July 1940 as a mechanism for conducting warfare by means other than direct military engagement. ... Francis Cammaerts was a very successful SOE agent in German occupied France during World War II, responsible for setting up and organising Resistance forces reputed to be of the magnitude of 10,000. ... Elliott in The Signal-Man Denholm Mitchell Elliott (May 31, 1922 – October 6, 1992) was a distinguished British actor, well known for his appearances on stage, film and television. ... Fields of the Nephilim is a gothic rock band formed in Stevenage, Hertfordshire in 1984. ... Daphne Barbara Follett (born 25 December 1942, Kingston, Jamaica as Daphne Barbara Hubbard) is a British politician - she is the Labour Member of Parliament for Stevenage, which she first won at the 1997 general election. ... Ken Follett (born June 5, 1949) is a British author of thrillers and historical novels. ... Albert Ebenezer and Ebenezer Albert Fox were infamous poachers who lived in Stevenage in the late 1800s and early 1900s. ... This article is about the Formula One racing driver. ... Alexander Richard Pettyfer[1] (born April 10, 1990) is an English actor. ... Kevin Mark Phillips (born July 25, 1973 in Hitchin, Hertfordshire) is an English footballer who currently plays for West Bromwich Albion. ... Ian James Poulter (born 10 January 1976) is an English golfer who is a member of the worlds top two professional golf tours, the U.S. based PGA Tour and the European Tour. ... Jason Shackell (b. ... John Thurloe (1616-1668) was a secretary to the council of state in Protectorate England and spymaster for Oliver Cromwell. ... Edward Ed Westwick (born June 27, 1987) is an English actor best known for his role as Chuck Bass on the American television series Gossip Girl. ... Ashley Simon Young (born 9 July 1985 in Stevenage, England) is an English professional footballer of Jamaican origin who currently plays as both a midfielder and a striker for Aston Villa. ... Timecode, real name Rob Playford, is a UK drum and bass DJ, producer and record label owner. ... Moving Shadow is a UK based jungle/drum and bass record label that was started in 1990 by Rob Playford (aka Timecode). ... Edward Henry Gordon Craig (16 January 1872-29 July 1966), usually known as Gordon Craig, was a British actor, producer, director and scenic designer. ... Rupert Alexander Lloyd Grint[1] (born August 24, 1988) is an English actor best known for playing Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter films. ...

Schools

Many schools were built in the 1950s/60s due to a massive rush of Londoners to affordable terraced housing in areas such as Shephall, Broadwater, Chells and St Nicholas. The town has around 23 primary schools (see below). Some go to the surrounding villages for schools in Aston, Benington, Walkern, Datchworth. Stevenage also has a number of secondary schools. Aston is a village and civil parish in the East Hertfordshire district of Hertfordshire, England. ... Benington is one of eighteen parishes which, together with Boston, form the Borough of Boston in the county of Lincolnshire, England. ... Walkern is a village and civil parish in East Hertfordshire. ... Datchworth is a small, friendly, rural village between the towns of Hertford, Stevenage and Welwyn Garden City in Hertfordshire, England. ...


Primary schools

Local

  • Camps Hill
  • Round Diamond (Relocated)
  • Lodge Farm
  • Martins Wood
  • Giles
  • The Leys
  • Moss Bury
  • Trotts Hill
  • Bedwell
  • St Vincent de Paul RC
  • Pin Green (now closed)
  • Almond Hill & Letchmore Rd
  • Ashtree
  • St Nicholas C of E
  • Featherstone Wood
  • Broom Barns
  • Fairlands
  • Peartree Spring
  • St Margaret Clitherow RC
  • Roebuck
  • Longmeadow
  • Shephalbury Park Primary School (amalgamated with Shephall Green Infant School, September 2005, now closed)
  • Woolenwick

This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

Nearby

  • Walkern
  • Aston St Mary's C of E
  • Graveley
  • Benington C of E
  • Weston
  • Knebworth JMI

Special Needs schools

  • Larwood
  • Lonsdale
  • Redemption Academy
  • Greenside
  • The Valley School
  • Barnwell (containing the VIBase for the Visually impaired pupils and the SPLD Base for Pupils with specific learning difficulties)

Secondary schools

In Stevenage

  • Barnwell School Barnwell, SG2 9SW (September 2006 Barnwell school took in the students from Collenswood School after the closure of the school students now remain on two sites: Barnwell East and Barnwell West)
  • The Barclay School, Walkern Rd, Stevenage, SG1 3RB
  • The Heathcote School Shephall Green, Stevenage, SG2 9XT
  • John Henry Newman RC (a specialist arts school) Hitchin Road, Stevenage, SG1 4AE
  • Marriotts School (a sports college), Telford Avenue, Stevenage, SG2 0AN
  • The Nobel School, Mobbsbury Way, Stevenage, SG2 0HS
  • The Thomas Alleyne School, High Street, SG1 3BE

The John Henry Newman School is a Roman Catholic Secondary School located in Stevenage in Hertfordshire. ...

Places of worship

Stevenage has an active network of churches of many denominations. Many of the churches work together for town-wide projects under the banner of "Churches Together in Stevenage". Stevenage also has a mosque. The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ...


Some of the churches are listed here:

Town twinnings

Image File history File links Flag_of_Kazakhstan. ... Shymkent (Kazakh: , Russian: ) or Chimkent, is the capital city of Ongtustik Qazaqstan (South Kazakhstan) Province, the most populated region in Kazakhstan. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zimbabwe. ... Kadoma is a city in Zimbabwe in the Mashonaland West province, 140km south-west of Harare on the main road to Bulawayo. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Ingelheim am Rhein is the administrative centre of the Mainz-Bingen local government district, situated on the left bank of the Rhine within the federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. The town has approx. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Autun is a town in the Saône-et-Loire département in Burgundy, France, and has a history which dates back to Roman times. ...

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Coordinates: 51°54′N, 0°12′W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Stevenage travel guide - Wikitravel (5370 words)
Stevenage is a town of approximately 80,000 in the county of Hertfordshire, in the south east of England, only around 32 miles north of central London.
Stevenage is like any other UK town, it has its problems and these should not be dismissed, but it also benefits from a good transport infrastructure, wide open spaces, plenty of sporting facilities, a theatre of some reputation and lovely countryside both around it, and within it.
Stevenage was probably affected by the Danish invasions in the late 9th century as several places very close by have the name Dane End, which usually marks the edge of 'Dane-law'.
Stevenage at AllExperts (1384 words)
Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England, and is part of the London Commuter Belt.
Stevenage's prosperity came in part from the North Road, which was turnpiked in the early 18th century.
Stevenage grew only slowly throughout the 19th century and a second church (Holy Trinity) was constructed at the south end of the High Street.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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