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Encyclopedia > Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs

Jobs holding a MacBook Air at Macworld Conference & Expo 2008
Born Steven P. Jobs
February 24, 1955 (1955-02-24) (age 53)[1]
San Francisco, California, U.S.A.[1]
Occupation Chairman and CEO of Apple Inc.[2]
Salary US$1[3][4]
[5]
Net worth US $5.4 billion (2008 Forbes) [6]
Children 4

Steven Paul Jobs (February 24, 1955) is the co-founder, chairman, and CEO of Apple Inc. In 1986, he acquired the computer graphics division of Lucasfilm Ltd which was spun off as Pixar Animation Studios.[7] He remained CEO and majority shareholder until its acquisition by the Walt Disney Company in 2006.[2] Jobs is currently the Walt Disney Company's largest individual shareholder and a member of its Board of Directors. He is considered a leading figure in both the computer and entertainment industries. Steve Jobs was listed as Fortune Magazine's Most Powerful Businessman of 2007.[8] Photograph of Steve Jobs, Courtesy of Apple. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... San Francisco redirects here. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Apple Inc. ... USD redirects here. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Look up founder in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Chief Executive redirects here. ... Apple Inc. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Lucasfilm Ltd. ... Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California, United States, and is notable for its eight Academy Awards. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Disney redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chairman of the Board redirects here. ... Computer industry is a collective term used to describe the whole range of businesses involved in developing computer software, designing computer hardware and computer networking infrastructures, the manufacture of computer components and the provision of information technology services. ... The entertainment industry consists of a large number of sub-industries devoted to entertainment. ... Categories: Magazines stubs | Time Warner subsidiaries | Business magazines ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Jobs' history in business has contributed greatly to the myths of the quirky, individualistic Silicon Valley entrepreneur, emphasizing the importance of design while understanding the crucial role aesthetics play in public appeal. His work driving forward the development of products that are both functional and elegant has earned him a devoted following.[9] For the Nintendo 64 game, see Space Station Silicon Valley. ... For the computer game by Peter Molyneux, see The Entrepreneur. ... All Saints Chapel in the Cathedral Basilica of St. ...


Jobs, with Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, helped popularize the personal computer in the late '70s. In the early '80s, still at Apple, Jobs was among the first to see the commercial potential of the mouse-driven GUI (Graphical User Interface).[10] After losing a power struggle with the board of directors in 1985, Jobs resigned from Apple and founded NeXT, a computer platform development company specializing in the higher education and business markets. NeXT's subsequent 1997 buyout by Apple Inc brought Jobs back to the company he co-founded, and he has served as its CEO from then on. Stephen Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San José, California) is an American computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Operating a mechanical 1: Pulling the mouse turns the ball. ... GUI redirects here. ... For other meanings, see Next. ... In computing, a platform describes some sort of framework, either in hardware or software, which allows software to run. ... A buyout is an investment transaction by which the entire stock of a company is sold. ... Apple Inc. ... Chief Executive redirects here. ...

Contents

Biography

Early years

Jobs was born in San Francisco[1] and was adopted by Justin and Clara (née Hagopian) Jobs of Mountain View, Santa Clara County, California who named him Steven Paul. His biological parents, Joanne Carole Schieble and Abdulfattah Jandali[citation needed] — a graduate student from Syria who became a political science professor[11] — later married and gave birth to Jobs' sister, the novelist Mona Simpson. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see Adoption (disambiguation). ... The French word née (feminine) or né (masculine) (or the English word nee) is still commonly used in some newspapers when mentioning the maiden name of a woman in engagement or wedding announcements. ... For the community near Martinez, California, see Mountain View, Contra Costa County, California. ... Santa Clara County is a county located in the San Francisco Bay Area of the U.S. state of California. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Mona Simpson (born June 14, 1957 in Green Bay, Wisconsin) is a novelist and essayist. ...


Jobs attended Cupertino Junior High School and Homestead High School in Cupertino, California,[9] and frequented after-school lectures at the Hewlett-Packard Company in Palo Alto, California. He was soon hired there and worked with Steve Wozniak as a summer employee.[12] In 1972, Jobs graduated from high school and enrolled in Reed College in Portland, Oregon. Although he dropped out after only one semester,[13] he continued auditing classes at Reed, such as one in calligraphy. "If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts," he said.[14] Homestead High School serves western Cupertino, western Sunnyvale, and portions of southern Los Altos, in Santa Clara County, California. ... Location of Cupertino within Santa Clara County, California. ... The Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ), commonly known as HP, is a very large, global company headquartered in Palo Alto, California, United States. ... Location in Santa Clara County and the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Clara Government  - Mayor Yoriko Kishimoto[1] Area  - City 25. ... Stephen Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San José, California) is an American computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ... Reed College is a private, independent liberal arts college located in Portland, Oregon. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Type Commission  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 145. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Dropping out means to withdraw from established society, especially because of disillusion with conventional values. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Contemporary Western Calligraphy. ... “Font” redirects here. ...


In the autumn of 1974, Jobs returned to California and began attending meetings of the Homebrew Computer Club with Steve Wozniak.[15] He took a job as a technician at Atari, a manufacturer of popular video games, with the primary intent of saving money for a spiritual retreat to India. The Homebrew Computer Club was an early computer hobbyist club in Silicon Valley, which met (under that name) from March 1975 to roughly 1977. ... This article is about the corporate brand. ... This article is about the British magazine covering computer and video games. ...


Jobs then backpacked around India with a Reed College friend (and, later, the first Apple employee), Daniel Kottke, in search of philosophical enlightenment. He came back with his head shaved and wearing traditional Indian clothing. During this time, Jobs experimented with LSD, calling these experiences "one of the two or three most important things he has done in his life."[16] He has stated that people around him who did not share his countercultural roots could not understand certain aspects of his thinking.[16] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ...


He returned to his previous job at Atari and was given the task of creating a circuit board for the game Breakout. According to Atari Founder Nolan Bushnell, Atari had offered US$100 for each chip that was reduced in the machine. Jobs had little interest or knowledge in circuit board design and made a deal with Wozniak to split the bonus evenly between them if Wozniak could minimize the number of chips. Much to the amazement of Atari, Wozniak reduced the number of chips by 50, a design so tight that it was impossible to reproduce on an assembly line. At the time, Jobs told Wozniak that Atari had only given them US$600 (instead of the actual US$5000) and that Wozniak's share was thus US$300.[17][18][19][20][21][22] Close-up photo of one side of a motherboard PCB, showing conductive traces, vias and solder points for through-hole components on the opposite side. ... For other uses of this term, see Breakout (disambiguation). ... Nolan K. Bushnell (born February 5, 1943) is an American electrical engineer and entrepreneur who founded both Atari and the Chuck E. Cheeses Pizza-Time Theaters chain. ... USD redirects here. ...

Steve Jobs and Bill Gates at D5
Steve Jobs and Bill Gates at D5

For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ...

Beginnings of Apple Computer

See also: History of Apple

As Apple continued to expand, the company began looking for an experienced executive to help manage its expansion. In 1983, Jobs lured John Sculley away from Pepsi-Cola, to serve as Apple's CEO, challenging him, "Do you want to spend the rest of your life selling sugared water, or do you want a chance to change the world?"[23][24] The following year, Apple set out to do just that, starting with a Super Bowl television commercial titled, "1984." Two days later at Apple's annual shareholders meeting on January 24, 1984, an emotional Jobs introduced the Macintosh to a wildly enthusiastic audience; Andy Hertzfeld described the scene as "pandemonium."[25] The Macintosh became the first commercially successful computer with a graphical user interface, although it was heavily influenced by Xerox PARC. The development of the Mac was started by Jef Raskin, and eventually taken over by Jobs. This article is about the History of Apple, a Silicon Valley company based in Cupertino, California, whose core business is computer technologies. ... John Sculley (born April 6, 1939) was a vice-president (1970-1977) and president of PepsiCo (1977-1983), until he became CEO of Apple on April 8, 1983, a position he held until leaving in 1993. ... The current Pepsi logo Pepsi-Cola (often shortened to Pepsi), is a carbonated cola soft drink manufactured by PepsiCo, and the principal rival of Coca-Cola. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... A screenshot from the commercial. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Macintosh (disambiguation) and Mac. ... Andy Hertzfeld (born April 6, 1953), was a key member of the original Apple Macintosh development team, and some would consider him a pioneer among software engineers. ... GUI redirects here. ... Bold text // Headline text Link title This article is about the computer research center. ... Jef Raskin outdoors, photographed by his son Aza Raskin. ...


While Jobs was a persuasive and charismatic dictator for Apple, some of his employees from that time had described him as an erratic and tempestuous manager. An industry-wide sales slump towards the end of 1984 caused a deterioration in Jobs' working relationship with Sculley, and at the end of May 1985 – following an internal power struggle and an announcement of significant layoffs – Sculley relieved Jobs of his duties as head of the Macintosh division.[26]


Around the same time, Jobs founded another computer company, NeXT Computer. Like the Apple Lisa, the NeXT workstation was technologically advanced, but was never able to break into the mainstream mainly owing to its high cost. Among those who could afford it, however, the NeXT workstation garnered a strong following because of its technical strengths, chief among them its object-oriented software development system. Jobs marketed NeXT products to the scientific and academic fields because of the innovative, experimental new technologies it incorporated (such as the Mach kernel, the digital signal processor chip, and the built-in Ethernet port). For other meanings, see Next. ... The Apple Lisa was a revolutionary personal computer designed at Apple Computer during the early 1980s. ... Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a computer programming paradigm in which a software system is modeled as a set of objects that interact with each other. ... Mach is an operating system kernel developed at Carnegie Mellon University to support operating system research, primarily distributed and parallel computation. ... A digital signal processor (DSP) is a specialized microprocessor designed specifically for digital signal processing, generally in real-time. ... Ethernet is a large, diverse family of frame-based computer networking technologies that operate at many speeds for local area networks (LANs). ...


The NeXT Cube was described by Jobs as an "interpersonal" computer, which he believed was the next step after "personal" computing. That is, if computers could allow people to communicate and collaborate together in an easy way, it would solve a lot of the problems that "personal" computing had come up against. During a time when e-mail for most people was plain text, Jobs loved to demo the NeXT's e-mail system, NeXTMail, as an example of his "interpersonal" philosophy. NeXTMail was one of the first to support universally visible, clickable embedded graphics and audio within e-mail. NextMail. ...


Jobs ran NeXT with an obsession for aesthetic perfection, as evidenced by such things as the NeXTcube's magnesium case. This put considerable strain on NeXT's hardware division, and in 1993, after having sold only 50,000 machines, NeXT transitioned fully to software development with the release of NeXTSTEP/Intel. NEXTSTEP is the original object-oriented, multitasking operating system that NeXT Computer, Inc. ...


NeXT technology played a large role in catalyzing three unrelated events:

  • The World Wide Web. Tim Berners-Lee developed the original World Wide Web system at CERN on a NeXT workstation. Jean-Marie Hullot's 'SOS Interface' became the basic for Interface Builder which Hullot built for NeXT and which Berners-Lee also used in his project the program 'WorldWideWeb'.
  • NeXT computers were used in the development of the computer game Doom and later the series "Quake".[27]
  • The return of Apple Computer. Apple's reliance on outdated software and internal mismanagement, particularly its inability to release a major operating system upgrade, had brought it near bankruptcy in the early-to-mid 1990s. Jobs' progressive stance on Unix and open source underpinnings was considered overly ambitious and somewhat backward in the 1980s but ultimately became an expandable solid foundation for an operating system. Apple would later acquire this software and under Jobs' leadership experience a renaissance.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee Sir Tim (Timothy John) Berners-Lee, KBE (TimBL or TBL) (b. ... The World Wide Web and WWW redirect here. ... CERN logo The European Organization for Nuclear Research (French: ), commonly known as CERN (see Naming), pronounced (or in French), is the worlds largest particle physics laboratory, situated just northwest of Geneva on the border between France and Switzerland. ... For other meanings, see Next. ... For information on general interface builders, please see User interface builder. ... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... Doom (or DOOM)[1] is a 1993 computer game by id Software that is a landmark title in the first-person shooter genre. ... This article is about the original video game. ... Filiation of Unix and Unix-like systems Unix (officially trademarked as UNIX®, sometimes also written as or ® with small caps) is a computer operating system originally developed in 1969 by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie and Douglas McIlroy. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ...

Return to Apple

See also: "1998 to 2005: New beginnings" in Apple Inc.

In 1996, Apple announced that it would buy NeXT for US$429 million. The deal was finalized in late 1996,[28] bringing Jobs back to the company he founded. He soon became Apple's interim CEO after the directors lost confidence in and ousted then-CEO Gil Amelio in a boardroom coup. In March of 1998, in order to concentrate Apple's efforts on returning to profitability, Jobs immediately terminated a number of projects such as Newton, Cyberdog, and OpenDoc. In the coming months, many employees developed a fear of encountering Jobs while riding in the elevator, "afraid that they might not have a job when the doors opened. The reality was that Jobs's summary executions were rare, but a handful of victims was enough to terrorize a whole company."[29] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (626x1041, 80 KB) Steve Jobs auf der Macworld in San Francisco 11. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (626x1041, 80 KB) Steve Jobs auf der Macworld in San Francisco 11. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Apple Inc. ... For other meanings, see Next. ... Gil Amelio Gilbert F. Amelio (born March 1, 1943 in New York City) is an American technology executive. ... A boardroom coup is the sudden overthrow of the managment or governing body of a corporation by an individual or small group of individuals, usually from within the company. ... The Apple Newton MessagePad 100 The Apple Newton, or simply Newton, is an early line of personal digital assistants developed and marketed by Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ... Cyberdog Cyberdog is an OpenDoc-based suite of internet applications, including email and news readers, a web browser and address book management components, as well as Drag and Drop FTP. Used together they produce a single suite similar to those offered at the time by larger monolithic applications such as... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


With the purchase of NeXT, much of the company's technology found its way into Apple products, notably NeXTSTEP, which evolved into Mac OS X. Under Jobs's guidance the company increased sales significantly with the introduction of the iMac and other new products; since then, appealing designs and powerful branding have worked well for Apple. At the 2000 Macworld Expo, Jobs officially dropped the "interim" modifier from his title at Apple and became permanent CEO. NEXTSTEP is the original object-oriented, multitasking operating system that NeXT Computer, Inc. ... Mac OS X (pronounced ) is a line of graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... The original Bondi Blue iMac G3 was introduced in 1998. ...


In recent years, the company has branched out, introducing and improving upon other digital appliances. With the introduction of the iPod portable music player, iTunes digital music software, and the iTunes Store, the company made forays into consumer electronics and music distribution. In 2007, Apple entered the cellular phone business with the introduction of the iPhone, a multi-touch display cell phone, iPod, and internet device. While stimulating innovation, Jobs also reminds his employees that "real artists ship",[30] by which he means that delivering working products on time is as important as innovation and attractive design. iPod is a brand of portable media players designed and marketed by Apple Inc. ... This article is about the iTunes application. ... The iTunes Store is an online business run by Apple Inc. ... For the Internet appliance line, see Linksys iPhone. ... iPod is a brand of portable media players designed and marketed by Apple Inc. ...


Jobs is both admired and criticized for his consummate skill at persuasion and salesmanship, which has been dubbed the "reality distortion field" and is particularly evident during his keynote speeches (colloquially known as "Stevenotes") at Macworld Expos and at Apple's own World Wide Developers Conferences. Reality distortion field is a term coined by Bud Tribble at Apple Inc. ... Steve Jobs at WWDC 2006 Stevenote is a slang term for keynote speeches by Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs, generally given at Apple events such as the Macworld Expo, and the Apple Expo. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In 2005, Jobs responded to criticism of Apple's poor recycling programs for e-waste in the U.S. by lashing out at environmental and other advocates at Apple's Annual Meeting in Cupertino in April. However, a few weeks later, Apple announced it would take back iPods for free at its retail stores. The Computer TakeBack Campaign responded by flying a banner from a plane over the Stanford University graduation at which Jobs was the commencement speaker. The banner read "Steve — Don't be a mini-player recycle all e-waste". In 2006 he further expanded Apple's recycling programs to any U.S. customer who buys a new Mac. This program includes shipping and "environmentally friendly disposal" of their old systems.[31] Abandoned monitor Electronic waste or e-waste is any broken or unwanted electrical or electronic appliance. ... The Computer TakeBack Campaign is a recycling initiative launched by Apple Inc. ...


Jobs began 2007 with Macworld Expo at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. He began the episodic keynote address by reviewing Apple's music business through iTunes music and video highlights, mentioning that rumors of the decline in Internet music business were false. Highlights included the long-awaited iPhone mobile device as well as the rebranding and official introduction of Apple TV. Produced by Boston-based IDG World Expo, Macworld Conference & Expo is a trade show dedicated to the Apple Macintosh platform with conference tracks occurring twice a year in the United States. ... Colored flags flying high outside the Moscone Convention Center The Moscone Center is San Francisco, Californias largest convention center and exhibition hall. ... Apple TV is a digital media receiver designed, marketed and sold by Apple. ...


At Apple's annual WWDC (World Wide Developers Conference) on June 9, 2008, Jobs unveiled the revised iPhone 3G with faster 3G mobile speeds and the new GPS feature as well as the iPhone OS 2.0 software update for half the price of the original iPhone. The iPhone will be released on July 11 in 22 selected countries, including the USA and the United Kingdom and later on this year and 2009, will be expanded to 70 different countries. Jobs also previewed the next version of Mac OS X, version 10.6, codenamed 'Snow Leopard' and promises a focus on performance and stability. For other uses, see June (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year 9. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Internet appliance line, see Linksys iPhone. ... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... This article is about the year 11. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Mac OS X (pronounced ) is a line of graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ...


Stock options issue

In 2001, Steve Jobs was granted stock options in the amount of 7,500,000 shares of Apple with an exercise price of US$18.30, which allegedly should have been US$21.10, thereby incurring taxable income of $20,000,000 that he did not report as income. Apple overstated its earnings by that same amount. If found liable, Jobs may face a number of criminal charges and civil penalties. Apple claimed that the options were originally granted at a special board meeting that may never have taken place. Furthermore, the investigation is focusing on false dating of the options resulting in a retroactive US$20 million increase in the exercise price. The case is the subject of active criminal and civil government investigations,[32] though an independent internal Apple investigation completed on December 29, 2006 found that Jobs was unaware of these issues and that the options granted to him were returned without being exercised in 2003.[33] is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Pixar and Disney

In 1986, Jobs bought The Graphics Group (later renamed Pixar) from Lucasfilm's computer graphics division for the price of US$10 million, US$5 million of which was given to the company as capital.[34] The major cause of the low purchase price was George Lucas' need to finance his 1983 divorce without significantly reducing his stock and control of the Star Wars enterprises. Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California, United States, and is notable for its eight Academy Awards. ... Lucasfilm Ltd. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ...


The new company, which was originally based in San Rafael, California, has since relocated to Emeryville, California, contracted with Disney to produce a number of computer-animated feature films, which Disney would co-finance and distribute. San Rafael (IPA: ; originally IPA: ), is the county seat of Marin County, California, United States. ... The city of Emeryville highlighted within Alameda County Emeryville is a small city located in Alameda County, California, in the United States. ...


The first film produced by the partnership, Toy Story, brought fame and critical acclaim to the studio when it was released in 1995. Over the next ten years, under Pixar's creative chief John Lasseter, the company would produce the box-office hits A Bug's Life (1998), Toy Story 2 (1999), Monsters, Inc. (2001), Finding Nemo (2003), The Incredibles (2004), Cars (2006), and Ratatouille (2007). Finding Nemo, The Incredibles and Ratatouille each received the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, an award introduced in 2001. In the years 2003 and 2004, as Pixar's contract with Disney was running out, Jobs and Disney chief executive Michael Eisner tried but failed to negotiate a new partnership, and in early 2004 Jobs announced that Pixar would seek a new partner to distribute its films once its contract with Disney expired. Personal animosity between the two executives was largely blamed for the companies' failure to renew their partnership.[citation needed] Toy Story is a 1995 CGI animated feature film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution It grossed $191,773,049 in the United States and it took in a grand total of $354,300,000 worldwide. ... John Alan Lasseter (born January 12, 1957) is an Academy Award-winning American animator and the chief creative officer at Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios. ... A Bugs Life is a computer animated film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Buena Vista Distribution in the United States on November 25, 1998, in Australia on January 12, 1999 and in the United Kingdom on February 5, 1999. ... -1... Monsters, Inc. ... Finding Nemo is a 2003 Academy Award-winning computer-animated film. ... The Incredibles is a 2004 American Academy Award winning computer-animated feature film produced by Pixar Animation Studios for Walt Disney Pictures, centering around a family of superheroes. ... This article is about the animated movie. ... For other uses, see Ratatouille (disambiguation). ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards given to achievements in film; the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature was given the first time for the 2001 film year. ... Michael Dammann Eisner (born March 7, 1942) was CEO of The Walt Disney Company from September 22, 1984 to September 30, 2005. ...


In October 2005, Bob Iger replaced Eisner at Disney, and Iger quickly worked to patch up relations with Jobs and Pixar. On January 24, 2006, Jobs and Iger announced that Disney had agreed to purchase Pixar in an all-stock transaction worth US$7.4 billion. Once the deal closed, Jobs became The Walt Disney Company's largest single shareholder with approximately 7% of the company's stock.[35] Jobs' holdings in Disney far exceed those of Eisner, who holds 1.7%, and Disney family member Roy E. Disney, who holds about 1% of the company's stock and whose criticisms of Eisner included the soured Pixar relationship and accelerated his ousting. Jobs joined the company's board of directors upon completion of the merger. Robert Bob Iger is the President and COO of the Walt Disney Company and Michael Eisners hand_picked successor as CEO. Previously he served as President and COO of Capital Cities/ABC until that companys merger with Disney. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Disney redirects here. ... Roy Edward Disney, KCSG, (born January 10, 1930) was a longtime senior executive for The Walt Disney Company, which his father Roy Oliver Disney and his uncle Walt founded. ...

Wikinews has related news:

Jobs also helps oversee Disney and Pixar's combined animation businesses with a seat on a special six-man steering committee. One of the committee's first decisions was to discontinue the production of so-called "cheapquels" (cheap direct-to-video sequels). Many also see Jobs as a valuable and influential advisor to Iger and Disney on technology matters. Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ...


Management style

Much has been made of Jobs' aggressive and demanding personality. Fortune noted that he "is considered one of Silicon Valley's leading egomaniacs."[36] Commentaries on his temperamental style can be found in Mike Moritz’s The Little Kingdom, one of the few authorized biographies of Jobs; Jeffrey S. Young’s unauthorized Steve Jobs: The Journey Is the Reward; The Second Coming of Steve Jobs, by Alan Deutschman; and iCon: Steve Jobs, by Jeffrey S. Young & William L. Simon. Fortune magazine is Americas second longest-running business magazine after Forbes magazine. ... Egotism is the the motivation to maintain and enhance favorable views of self to the point of being self-destructive. ... Michael Moritz is a venture capitalist with Sequoia Capital in Menlo Park, California, in the Silicon Valley. ... The Little Kingdom is a book that documents Apple Computer. ...


In iCon: Steve Jobs the authors point out that Paul Jobs, his father by adoption, was also known for his aggressive side: "Paul was soon hired as a kind of strongarm man by a finance company that sought help collecting on auto loans — an early repo man. Both his bulk and his aggressive personality were well suited to this somewhat dangerous pursuit, and his mechanical bent enabled him to pick the locks of the cars he had to repossess and hot-wire them if necessary." Alternate meaning: Hotwire (filesharing protocol) Hotwiring is the process of bypassing an automobiles ignition interlock and thus starting it without the key. ...


In the 1996 documentary Triumph of the Nerds, the reaction to Jobs' famous firing from Apple by CEO John Sculley and the Apple Board of Directors was discussed by various people: Triumph of the Nerds: The Rise of Accidental Empires is a documentary film written and hosted by Robert X. Cringely. ... John Sculley (born April 6, 1939) was a vice-president (1970-1977) and president of PepsiCo (1977-1983), until he became CEO of Apple on April 8, 1983, a position he held until leaving in 1993. ...

The grandiose plans of what Macintosh was gonna be was just so far out of whack with the truth of what the product was doing. And the truth of what the product was doing was not horrible, it was salvageable. But the gap between the two was just so unthinkable that somebody had to do something, and that somebody was John Sculley.

—Chris Espinoza

The board had to make a choice and I said look, it's Steve's company, I was brought in here to help. If you want him to run it, that's fine by me. But we gotta at least decide what we're gonna do and everybody's got to get behind it … and ultimately after the board talked with Steve and talked with me, the decision was that we would go forward with my plans and Steve left.

John Sculley John Sculley (born April 6, 1939) was a vice-president (1970-1977) and president of PepsiCo (1977-1983), until he became CEO of Apple on April 8, 1983, a position he held until leaving in 1993. ...

What can I say? I hired the wrong guy. He destroyed everything I spent 10 years working for; starting with me, but that wasn't the saddest part. I would have gladly left Apple if Apple would have turned out like I wanted it to.

—Steve Jobs

People in the company had very mixed feelings about it, everyone had been terrorized by Steve Jobs at some point or another, and so there was a certain relief that the terrorist would be gone. And on the other hand I think there was incredible respect for Steve Jobs by the very same people, and we were all very worried what would happen to this company without the visionary, without the founder, without the charisma.

Larry Tesler Lawrence G. (Larry) Tesler (born April 24, 1945) is a computer scientist working in the field of human-computer interaction. ...

He took it as a personal attack, started attacking Sculley, in which, you know, backed himself into a corner. Because he was sure that the board would support him and not Sculley … Apple never recovered from losing Steve; Steve was the heart and soul and driving force; it would be quite a different place today; they lost their soul.

Andy Hertzfeld Andy Hertzfeld (born April 6, 1953), was a key member of the original Apple Macintosh development team, and some would consider him a pioneer among software engineers. ...

Jobs has always aspired to position Apple and its products at the forefront of the information technology industry by foreseeing and setting trends, at least in terms of innovation and style. He summed up that self-concept nicely at the end of his keynote speech at the Macworld Conference and Expo in January 2007 by quoting ice hockey legend Wayne Gretzky[37]: This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born 26 January 1961 in Brantford, Ontario) is a retired Canadian-American professional ice hockey player who is currently part-owner and head coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. ...

There's an old Wayne Gretzky quote that I love. 'I skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been.' And we've always tried to do that at Apple. Since the very very beginning. And we always will."

—Steve Jobs

Personal life

Jobs married Laurene Powell, nine years his junior, on March 18, 1991. Presiding over the wedding was the Zen Buddhist monk Kobun Chino.[38] Jobs has had three children with Ms. Powell. He also had a daughter named Lisa Brennan-Jobs with Chris-Ann Brennan, whom he did not marry. Lisa (born May 17, 1978) is a journalist who wrote for The Harvard Crimson. Laurene Powell Jobs is co-founder and President of the Board of College Track, an after- school program providing comprehensive support to high school students who have the desire but lack the resources to attain higher education. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... A woodblock print by Yoshitoshi, (Japan, 1887) depicting Bodhidharma the founder of Chinese Zen. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... The Harvard Crimson, the breakfast daily of Harvard University, was founded in 1873. ...


In the unauthorized biography The Second Coming of Steve Jobs, author Alan Deutschman reports that Jobs once dated Joan Baez. Deutschman quotes Elizabeth Holmes, a friend of Jobs from his time at Reed College, as saying she "believed that Steve became the lover of Joan Baez in large measure because Baez had been the lover of Bob Dylan." In another unauthorized biography, iCon: Steve Jobs by Jeffrey S. Young & William L. Simon, the authors suggest that Jobs might have married Baez, but her age at the time (41) meant it was unlikely the couple could have children. Baez included a mention of Jobs in the acknowledgments of her 1987 memoir And A Voice To Sing With. For other uses, see Biography (disambiguation). ... The Second Coming of Steve Jobs is a book chronicling the life of Steve Jobs, a co-founder of Apple Computer by Vanity Fair Magazine writer Alan Deutschman. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... This article is about the recording artist. ...


Steve Jobs is also a devoted Beatles fan. He has referenced them on more than one occasion at Keynotes and also was interviewed on a showing of a Paul McCartney concert. He also enjoys Bach, who like him was Lutheran, and other classical music. When asked about his Business Model on 60 Minutes, he replied: The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer-songwriter, composer, multi-instrumentalist, poet, entrepreneur, painter, record producer, film producer, and animal-rights activist. ... In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ...


"My model for business is The Beatles; they were four guys that kept each other's negative tendencies in check - they balanced each other. And the total was greater than the sum of the parts. Great things in business are not done by one person, they are done by a team of people."


Jobs is not a vegetarian or vegan as is often claimed. Although he does not eat mammalian meat or fowl, he eats fish from time to time. This is known as pescetarianism.[39] For animals adapted to eat primarily plants, sometimes referred to as vegetarian animals, see Herbivore. ... Hens kept in cramped conditions — the avoidance of animal suffering is the primary motivation of people who become vegans A vegan is a person who avoids the ingestion or use of animal products. ... Pesco/pollo vegetarianism, pescetarianism, and semi-vegetarianism are neologisms coined to describe certain lifestyles of restricted diet. ...


In 1982, Jobs bought an apartment in The San Remo, an apartment building in New York City with a politically progressive reputation, where Demi Moore, Steven Spielberg, Steve Martin, and Princess Yasmin Aga Khan, daughter of Rita Hayworth, also had apartments. With the help of I.M. Pei, Jobs spent years renovating his apartment in the top two floors of the building's north tower, only to sell it almost two decades later to U2 frontman Bono. Jobs had never moved in.[40][41] From West Drive of Central Park The San Remo (145 and 146 Central Park West) is a luxury co-operative apartment building in New York City, two blocks north of the Dakota building. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Demi Kutcher (born Demetria Gene Guynes on November 11, 1962) is an American actress. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. ... For other uses, see Steve Martin (disambiguation). ... Princess Yasmin Aga Khan (b. ... Rita Hayworth (October 17, 1918 – May 14, 1987), was an American actress who rose to stardom in the 1940s as the eras leading sex symbol. ... Ieoh Ming Pei (貝聿銘 pinyin Bèi Yùmíng) is a Chinese American architect born in Suzhou, China on April 26, 1917. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In 1984, Jobs purchased a 17,000-square-foot (1,600 m²), 14 bedroom Spanish Colonial mansion, designed by George Washington Smith in Woodside, California, also known as Jackling House. Although it reportedly remained in an almost unfurnished state, Jobs lived in the mansion for ten years. According to reports, he kept an old BMW motorcycle in the living room, and let Bill Clinton use it in 1998. He allowed the mansion to fall into a state of disrepair, planning to demolish the house and build a smaller home on the property; but he met with complaints from local preservationists over his plans. In June 2004, the Woodside Town Council gave Jobs approval to demolish the mansion, on the condition that he advertise the property for a year to see if someone would move it to another location and restore it. A number of people expressed interest, including several with experience in restoring old property, but no agreements to that effect were reached. Later that same year, a local preservationist group began seeking legal action to prevent demolition. In January 2007 Jobs was denied the right to demolish the property, by a court decision.[42] George Washington Smith, (February 22, 1876 – 1930), was an American architect and painter. ... Woodside (pop. ... The Jackling House is a mansion in 460 Mountain Home Road, Woodside, California. ... For other uses, see BMW (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


He usually wears a black long-sleeved mock turtleneck made by St. Croix, Levis 501 blue jeans, and New Balance 992 sneakers.[43] Levis can refer to: Levis, a brand of denim jeans Lévis, Quebec This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... -1...


Jobs had a public war of words with Dell Computer CEO Michael Dell, starting when Jobs first criticized Dell for making "un-innovative beige boxes." On October 6, 1997, in a Gartner Symposium, when Michael Dell was asked what he would do if he owned then-troubled Apple Computer, he said "I'd shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders."[44] In 2006, Steve Jobs sent an email to all employees when Apple's market capitalisation rose above Dell's. The email read: Dell Inc. ... Michael Saul Dell (born February 23, 1965, in Houston, Texas) is an American businessman and the founder and CEO of Dell, Inc. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Gartner, Inc. ... Market capitalization, often abbreviated to market cap, mkt. ...

Team, it turned out that Michael Dell wasn't perfect at predicting the future. Based on today's stock market close, Apple is worth more than Dell. Stocks go up and down, and things may be different tomorrow, but I thought it was worth a moment of reflection today. Steve."[45]

In 2005, Steve Jobs banned all books published by John Wiley & Sons from the Apple retail stores in response to their publishing an unauthorized biography, iCon: Steve Jobs.[46] John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ... This article is about the retail chain. ...


When Jobs spoke at the Stanford Commencement, he spoke frankly about his opinions on entrepreneurship, work, and life. He reflected on what kept him going through challenging times: "I’m convinced that the only thing that kept me going is that I loved what I did. You’ve got to find what you love." He continued to stress the importance of "finding something you love" and "following your own inner voice." (The full podcast of his speech can be downloaded free from the iTunes music store, the video at YouTube.com and the text can be found here)


In May 2007, Jobs recommended Al Gore to run for the U.S. Presidential Race.[47] This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ...


Health concerns

In mid-2004, Jobs announced to his employees that he had been diagnosed with a malignant tumor in his pancreas.[48] The prognosis for pancreatic cancer is usually very grim. Jobs, however, stated that he had a rare, far less aggressive type known as islet cell neuroendocrine tumor.[48] After initially resisting the idea of conventional medical intervention and embarking on a special diet to thwart the disease, July 31, 2004 Jobs underwent surgery that successfully removed the tumor; he did not apparently require nor receive chemotherapy or radiation therapy.[48] During his absence, Timothy D. Cook, head of worldwide sales and operations at Apple, ran the company.[48] For malignant tumors specifically, see cancer. ... Pancreatic cancer is a malignant tumor of the pancreas. ... Neuroendocrine tumors, or more properly gastro-entero-pancreatic or gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs), are cancers of the interface between the endocrine (hormonal) system and the nervous system. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chemotherapy, in its most general sense, refers to treatment of disease by chemicals that kill cells, specifically those of micro-organisms or cancer. ... Varian Clinac 2100C Linear Accelerator Radiation therapy (or radiotherapy) is the medical use of ionizing radiation as part of cancer treatment to control malignant cells (not to be confused with radiology, the use of radiation in medical imaging and diagnosis). ... Timothy D. Cook. ...


In early August 2006, Jobs delivered the keynote for Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference. His “thin, almost gaunt” appearance and unusually “listless” delivery,[49][50] together with his choice to delegate significant portions of his keynote to other presenters, inspired a flurry of media and internet speculation about his health.[51] WWDC 2005, at Moscone Center The Worldwide Developers Conference, commonly abbreviated WWDC, is an annual trade show for Apple developers. ...


According to an Ars Technica journal report, WWDC attendees who saw Jobs in person said he “looked fine.”[52] Following the keynote, an Apple spokesperson said that "Steve's health is robust."[53] Ars Technica is a technology-related website catering to PC enthusiasts. ... WWDC 2005, at Moscone Center The Worldwide Developers Conference, commonly abbreviated WWDC, is an annual trade show for Apple developers. ...


Similar concerns followed his appearance during the 2008 WWDC keynote address. One interviewer noted: "[H]is handshake was moderate, his hands felt bony and I was taken aback by his extremely narrow face, slight build, and noticeable shoulder bones through his shirt. Those aren't my impressions looking back in time through the prism of speculation since. That's what I thought then; that these weren't the features of a guy who'd been working out, or on a diet. They seemed far more severe. Sickly." Apple explained his appearance by saying he had a "common bug" and was taking antibiotics. [54]


June 13, 2008: Fortune Magazine publishes an article concerning the Whipple procedure which they believe Steve Jobs underwent. [55] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Pancreaticoduodenectomy. ...


In popular culture

Jobs was prominently featured in three films about the history of the personal computing industry.

Triumph of the Nerds: The Rise of Accidental Empires is a documentary film written and hosted by Robert X. Cringely. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... This article is primarily about a certain class of Personal computers from the late 1970s to mid 1980s, see Domotics or Home servers for home computers used in home automation. ... Nerds 2. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Pirates of Silicon Valley (1999) is an unauthorized made-for-television docudrama written and directed by Martyn Burke. ... // Docudramas tend to demonstrate some or most of the following characteristics: A strict focus on the facts of the event being treated, as they are known; A tendency to avoid overt commentary or authorial editorializing; The use of literary and narrative techniques to flesh out or render story-like the... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Noah Strausser Speer Wyle (born June 4, 1971; last name pronounced ) is an American TV and film actor, perhaps best known for his role as Dr. John Carter on the television drama ER. // Wyle, one of six children, was born in Hollywood, California, to Marjorie (Speer), a registered orthopedic head...

Honors

He has been awarded the National Medal of Technology from President Ronald Reagan in 1985 and the Jefferson Award for Public Service in 1987. The National Medal of Technology is an honor granted by the President of the United States to inventors and innovators that have made significant contributions to the development of new and important technology. ... Reagan redirects here. ...


On November 27, 2007, Jobs was named the most powerful person in business by Fortune Magazine.


On December 5, 2007, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and First Lady Maria Shriver inducted Jobs into the California Hall of Fame, located at The California Museum for History, Women and the Arts.[56] Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German IPA: ; born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe-winning actor, businessman and politician currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... Maria Owings Shriver (pronounced: ; born November 6, 1955)[1] is an award-winning American journalist from the Kennedy Family, a prolific author and First Lady of California. ... Conceived by First Lady Maria Shriver, the California Hall of Fame was established with The California Museum for History, Women and the Arts to honor legendary individuals and families who embody California’s innovative spirit and have made their mark on history. ... The California Museum for History, Women and the Arts – home of the California Hall of Fame – is housed in the State Archives Building in Sacramento, one block from the State Capitol. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b c Smithsonian Oral and Video Histories: Steve Jobs. Smithsonian Institution (1995-04-20). Retrieved on 2006-09-20.
  2. ^ a b Apple - Press Info - Bios - Steve Jobs. Apple Inc. (May 2006). Retrieved on 2006-09-20.
  3. ^ "Putting Pay for Performance to the Test", New York Times, 2007-04-08. 
  4. ^ "Apple again pays Jobs $1 salary", CNET News.com, 2006-03-13. 
  5. ^ "Jobs's salary remained at $1 in 2005", AppleInsider, 2006-03-14. 
  6. ^ "Forbes "The World's Billionaires list 2008"", Forbes, 2008-03-14. Retrieved on 2008-03-14. 
  7. ^ Pixar History - 1986. Pixar. Retrieved on 2008-04-25.
  8. ^ Apple's Jobs is most powerful businessman-Fortune. Fortune Magazine (2007-11-27). Retrieved on 2007-11-28.
  9. ^ a b Cringely, Robert X.. "Steve Jobs – Apple Computer, Pixar", Inc. Magazine, 2004-04-01. Retrieved on 2006-09-20. 
  10. ^ Kahney, Leander. "Wired News: We're All Mac Users Now", Wired News, 2004-01-06. Retrieved on 2006-09-20. 
  11. ^ Behrendt, Andy. "Apple Computer mogul's roots tied to Green Bay", Green Bay Press-Gazette, 2005-12-05. Retrieved on 2006-04-19. 
  12. ^ Biography: Steve Jobs. The Apple Museum. Retrieved on 2006-05-18.
  13. ^ Campbell, Duncan. "The Guardian Profile: Steve Jobs", Guardian Unlimited, 2004-06-08. Retrieved on 2006-03-31. 
  14. ^ "'You've got to find what you love,' Jobs says", Stanford Report, 2005-06-14. Retrieved on 2006-03-31. 
  15. ^ Seyfer, Jessie. "New can-do club wants to build better cell phone", The Mercury News, 2006-05-10. Retrieved on 2006-05-18. [dead link]
  16. ^ a b Markoff, John (2005). What the Dormouse Said: How the 60s Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry. The Penguin Group. pg. xviii-xix, ISBN 0-670-03382-0. 
  17. ^ Letters – General Questions Answered, Woz.org
  18. ^ Wozniak, Steven: "iWoz", a: pages 147–148, b: page 180. W. W. Norton, 2006. ISBN 13:978-0-393-06143-7
  19. ^ Kent, Stevn: "The Ultimate History of Video Games", pages 71–73. Three Rivers, 2001. ISBN 0-7615-3643-4
  20. ^ Player 2 Stage 1: The Coin Eaters
  21. ^ Arcade History: Breakout
  22. ^ Classic Gaming: A Complete History of Breakout
  23. ^ Leonard, Andrew (1999-09-28). Do penguins eat apples?. Salon.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  24. ^ His Opportunity to Change the World.
  25. ^ Hertzfeld, Andy. The Times They Are A-Changin'. folklore.org.
  26. ^ Hertzfeld, Andy. The End Of An Era. folklore.org.
  27. ^ Apple-NeXT Merger Birthday!. planet rome.ro (2006-12-20). Retrieved on 2008-06-11.
  28. ^ Apple Computer, Inc. Finalizes Acquisition of NeXT Software Inc., Apple Inc., 1997-02-07. Retrieved on 2006-06-25.
  29. ^ "The once and future Steve Jobs", Salon.com, 2000-10-11. 
  30. ^ Real Artists Ship.
  31. ^ "Apple Improves Recycling Plan", PC Magazine, 2006-04-21. 
  32. ^ "New questions raised about Steve Jobs' role in Apple stock options scandal", 2006-12-28. 
  33. ^ "Apple restates, acknowledges faked documents", EE Times, 2006-12-29. Retrieved on 2007-01-01. 
  34. ^ Pixar Founding Documents
  35. ^ 2006-01-25 Disney buys Pixar for $7.4 bn, rediff.com
  36. ^ Colvin, Geoff. "Steve Jobs' Bad Bet." Fortune, 2007-03-19.
  37. ^ JOBS MACWORLD 07
  38. ^ Steve Jobs (pg 2) - Mar. 4, 2008
  39. ^ The resurrection of Steve Jobs. The Economist. Retrieved on 2007-03-14.
  40. ^ Morgenson, Gretchen. "At home with Steve Jobs", Forbes, 1987-12-28. Retrieved on 2007-04-30. 
  41. ^ Tallant, Nicola. "Bono's E11.5M 'Bargain Buy'", The Sunday People, 2005-05-01. Retrieved on 2007-04-30. 
  42. ^ "Appeals court says Jobs can't raze Woodside mansion", San Francisco Chronicle. 
  43. ^ http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/pcs/wear-the-exact-outfit-of-steve-jobs-for-458-157402.php Gizmodo on Steve Jobs's attire
  44. ^ "Dell: Apple should close shop", CNET. 
  45. ^ "Michael Dell Should Eat His Words, Apple Chief Suggests", The New York Times. 
  46. ^ Hafner, Katie. "Steve Jobs's Review of His Biography: Ban It", The New York Times, 2005-04-30, p. Technology. Retrieved on 2006-10-16. 
  47. ^ Evans, Jonny. "Steve Jobs proposes Al Gore for president", Macworld, 2007-05-23, p. Business. Retrieved on 2007-06-04. 
  48. ^ a b c d Evangelista, Benny. "Apple’s Jobs has cancerous tumor removed", San Francisco Chronicle, 2004-08-02, p. A1. Retrieved on 2006-08-09. 
  49. ^ “Looking very thin, almost gaunt”:Kahney, Leander. Has Steve Jobs Lost His Magic?. Cult of Mac. Wired News. Retrieved on 2006-08-08.
  50. ^ “they were uninspired (and concerned) by Jobs' relatively listless delivery”:Meyers, Michelle. "Jobs speech wasn’t very Jobs-like", BLOGMA, CNET News.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-08. 
  51. ^ Saracevic, Al. "Where's Jobs' Mojo?", San Francisco Chronicle, 2006-08-09, p. C1. Retrieved on 2006-08-09. 
  52. ^ Cheng, Jacqui. What happened to The Steve we know and love?. Infinite Loop. Ars Technica. Retrieved on 2006-08-08.
  53. ^ Claburn, Thomas (2006-08-11). Steve Jobs Lives!. InformationWeek. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  54. ^ Goldman, Jim. Apple's Jobs And His Health: Take Accurate Over Being First. Retrieved on 2008-06-11.
  55. ^ Fortune Magazine Article
  56. ^ Jobs inducted into California Hall of Fame, California Museum, Accessed 2007

The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Apple Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CNET Networks Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the community of Macintosh rumor sites. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California, United States, and is notable for its eight Academy Awards. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Magazines stubs | Time Warner subsidiaries | Business magazines ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert X. Cringely is the pen name of both technology journalist Mark Stephens and a string of writers for a column in InfoWorld, the weekly computer trade newspaper published by IDG. // Stephens was the third author to contribute to Infoworld under the Cringely pseudonym, the first two being Rory J... Inc. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Markoff (born October 24, 1949) is an American writer and journalist. ... Stephen Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San José, California) is an American computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ... Steve Wozniak or Woz co-founded Apple Computer and designed the Apple II, contributing greatly to the personal computer revolution. ... W. W. Norton & Company is an American book publishing company that has remained independent since its founding. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Salon. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Andy Hertzfeld (born April 6, 1953), was a key member of the original Apple Macintosh development team, and some would consider him a pioneer among software engineers. ... Andy Hertzfeld (born April 6, 1953), was a key member of the original Apple Macintosh development team, and some would consider him a pioneer among software engineers. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Salon. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PC Magazine (or PC Mag) is a computer magazine published biweekly (except in January and July) both in print and online. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... EE Times is an electronics industry newspaper with several decades of history. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Fortune magazine is Americas second longest-running business magazine after Forbes magazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year 1987. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The People (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... CNET Networks, Inc. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... MacWorld magazine (April 2004) Macworld is a monthly computer magazine dedicated to Macintosh products. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CNET Networks, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ars Technica is a technology-related website catering to PC enthusiasts. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Caddes, Carolyn (1986). Portraits of Success: Impressions of Silicon Valley Pioneers. Tioga Publishing Co.. ISBN 0-935382-56-9. 
  • Cringely, Robert X (1996). Accidental Empires. HarperBusiness. ISBN 0-88730-855-4. 
  • Denning, Peter J. & Frenkel, Karen A. (1989). A Conversation with Steve Jobs. Comm. ACM. Vol. 32, No. 4, pp. 437–443. 
  • Deutschman, Alan (2001). The Second Coming of Steve Jobs. Broadway. ISBN 0-7679-0433-8. 
  • Freiberger, Paul & Swaine, Michael (1999). Fire in the Valley: The Making of The Personal Computer. McGraw-Hill Trade. ISBN 0-07-135892-7. 
  • Hertzfeld, Andy (2004). Revolution in the Valley. O'Reilly Books. ISBN 0-596-00719-1. 
  • Kahney, Leander (2004). The Cult of Mac. No Starch Press. ISBN 1-886411-83-2. 
  • Levy, Steven (1984). Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution. Anchor Press, Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-19195-2. 
  • Levy, Steven (1994). Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer that Changed Everything. Penguin Books. ISBN 0-670-85244-9. 
  • Malone, Michael S. (1999). Infinite Loop. Aurum Press. ISBN 1-85410-638-4.  Bantam Doubleday Dell. ISBN 0-385-48684-7.
  • Markoff, John (2005). What the Dormouse Said: How the 60s Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry. ISBN 0-670-03382-0. 
  • Simon, William L. & Young, Jeffrey S. (2005). iCon: Steve Jobs, The Greatest Second Act in the History of Business. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 0-471-72083-6. 
  • Stross, Randall E. (1993). Steve Jobs and The NeXT Big Thing. Atheneum Books. ISBN 0-689-12135-0. 
  • Slater, Robert (1987). Portraits in Silicon. MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-19262-4.  Chapter 28
  • Young, Jeffrey S. (1988). Steve Jobs: The Journey is the Reward. Scott, Foresman & Co.. ISBN 0-673-18864-7. 
  • Wozniak, Steve (2006). iWoz Computer Geek to Cult Icon: How I invented the personal computer, co-founded Apple and had fun doing it. W. W. Norton & Co.. ISBN 0-393-06143-4. 

Robert X. Cringely is the pen name of both technology journalist Mark Stephens and a string of writers for a column in InfoWorld, the weekly computer trade newspaper published by IDG. // Stephens was the third author to contribute to Infoworld under the Cringely pseudonym, the first two being Rory J... Accidental Empires: How the Boys of Silicon Valley Make Their Millions Battle Foreign Competition and Still Cant Get a Date (1992, ISBN 0887308554), is the title of a book written by Robert X. Cringely. ... Communications of the ACM (CACM) is the flagship monthly magazine of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). ... The Second Coming of Steve Jobs is a book chronicling the life of Steve Jobs, a co-founder of Apple Computer by Vanity Fair Magazine writer Alan Deutschman. ... The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. ... Andy Hertzfeld (born April 6, 1953), was a key member of the original Apple Macintosh development team, and some would consider him a pioneer among software engineers. ... Programming Perl is a classic OReilly book. ... Leander Kahney is an editor at Wired News. ... Apple Logo Tattoo The Cult of Mac is a popular term used to refer to the group of Apple Macintosh owners, those who aspire to become one, and those who admire the Macintosh lifestyle. It is also the title of a very popular blog authored by Leander Kahney and hosted... No Starch Press is a publishing company specializing in computer books for the technically savvy, or geek entertainment as they term it. ... Steven Levy Steven Levy (born 1951) is an American journalist who has written several books on computers, technology, cryptography, the Internet, cybersecurity, and privacy. ... Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution (ISBN 0385191952) is a book by Steven Levy about the hacker culture. ... It has been suggested that The Crime Club be merged into this article or section. ... Steven Levy Steven Levy (born 1951) is an American journalist who has written several books on computers, technology, cryptography, the Internet, cybersecurity, and privacy. ... It has been suggested that Penguin Modern Poets, Penguin Great Ideas be merged into this article or section. ... Disambiguation: Michael S. Malone is not the same author as Michael Malone. ... Doubleday is one of the largest book publishing companies in the world. ... John Markoff (born October 24, 1949) is an American writer and journalist. ... John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ... Robert Slater (born November 22, 1964 in Lancashire, England) is an Australian football (soccer) player. ... MIT Press Books The MIT Press is a university publisher affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Stephen Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San José, California) is an American computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ...

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Articles

Andy Hertzfeld (born April 6, 1953), was a key member of the original Apple Macintosh development team, and some would consider him a pioneer among software engineers. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ...

Interviews

Business positions
Preceded by
Gil Amelio
CEO of Apple
1997–present
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Persondata
NAME Jobs, Steve
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Jobs, Steven Paul
SHORT DESCRIPTION CEO and Co-Founder of Apple Inc.
DATE OF BIRTH February 24, 1955
PLACE OF BIRTH San Francisco, California, U.S.
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
“PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Internet Archive headquarters is in the Presidio, a former US military base in San Francisco. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gil Amelio Gilbert F. Amelio (born March 1, 1943 in New York City) is an American technology executive. ... Apple Inc. ... Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California, United States, and is notable for its eight Academy Awards. ... Toy Story is a 1995 CGI animated feature film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution It grossed $191,773,049 in the United States and it took in a grand total of $354,300,000 worldwide. ... A Bugs Life is a computer animated film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Buena Vista Distribution in the United States on November 25, 1998, in Australia on January 12, 1999 and in the United Kingdom on February 5, 1999. ... -1... Monsters, Inc. ... Finding Nemo is a 2003 Academy Award-winning computer-animated film. ... The Incredibles is a 2004 American Academy Award winning computer-animated feature film produced by Pixar Animation Studios for Walt Disney Pictures, centering around a family of superheroes. ... This article is about the animated movie. ... For other uses, see Ratatouille (disambiguation). ... WALL-E (promoted with a stylized hyphen as WALL•E) is a 2008 computer animated science fiction film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. ... Up is the tenth computer-animated film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. ... TS3 redirects here. ... This article is about the animated movie. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Reds Dream is a short film produced by Pixar Animation Studios, released in 1987. ... Tin Toy is a 1988 Pixar Animation Studios short film using computer animation. ... Knick Knack is a computer animated Pixar short film released in 1989. ... Geris Game is a 4 minute long 1997 animated short film made by Pixar. ... For other uses see For the Birds (disambiguation) For the Birds is an Academy Award winning animated short film, produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released in the year 2000. ... Mikes New Car is a 2002 Pixar-animated short based on the two main characters from Monsters Inc. ... The jackalope Boundin is a Oscar-nominated short film, shown at the start of the Disney-Pixar film The Incredibles. It features a sheep whose elegant dancing is very popular with the other animals but who is shorn every year becoming naked and shy and prevented from dancing so elegantly. ... Jack-Jack Attack is a 2005 short produced by Pixar based upon their film The Incredibles. ... Treble, from One Man Band One Man Band is a Pixar short film. ... For other uses, see Ghost light (disambiguation). ... Lifted is a 2006 Pixar computer animated short film directed by Gary Rydstrom. ... Your Friend the Rat is Pixars first traditionally animated short film; at 11 minutes it is also the longest Pixar short to date. ... Tiny Toy Stories is a direct-to-video package film featuring five of the earliest CGI shorts by Pixar (with the exception of The Adventures of André and Wally B., which was made before Pixar came to be. ... Pixar Image Computer The Pixar Image Computer was a graphics designing computer made by Pixar in May 1986, intended for the high-end visualization markets, such as medicine. ... RenderMan is the name of a rendering software package developed by Pixar Animation Studios; it implements Pixars photorealistic 3D description standard, the RenderMan Interface Specification. ... from The Adventures of André and Wally B., a short film animated by John Lasseter The Adventures of André and Wally B. is an animated short made in 1984 by the Lucasfilm Computer Graphics Project, which would later be spun out as a startup company called Pixar. ... Buzz Lightyear of Star Command is a name of a Disney animated science fiction adventure series. ... John Alan Lasseter (born January 12, 1957) is an Academy Award-winning American animator and the chief creative officer at Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios. ... Edwin Catmull, Ph. ... Peter Docter was born on August 10, 1968 in Bloomington, Minnesota, USA. He is a film director, best known for Monsters, Inc. ... Andrew Stanton (born January 11, 1965 in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American animated films director, screenwriter, as well as a voice actor. ... Phillip Bradley Bird, better known as Brad Bird, (born on September 11, 1957) is an American Academy Award-winning animator who wrote and directed the 1999 Warner Bros. ... Lee Unkrich Lee Unkrich (born August 8, 1967 in Chagrin Falls, Ohio) is an American director and film editor. ... Gary Roger Rydstrom is an award winning sound designer who began his career at Skywaker Sound, Northern California in 1983. ... Brenda Chapman Lima is a staff member of Pixar. ... Brad Lewis, PhD, MD, is a liberal critical theorist, with most of his work dealing in psychiatry. ... Bob Peterson (1961-) is an animator, screenwriter, director and voice actor. ... Joseph Henry Joe Ranft (March 13, 1960 – August 16, 2005) was an animation storyboard artist and voice actor who worked for Pixar and Disney. ... Walt Disney Animation Studios is the animation studio that makes up a key element of The Walt Disney Company, and the oldest existing animation studio in the world. ... This is a list of theatrical animated feature films produced and/or released by Walt Disney Productions/The Walt Disney Company: // The following is a list of the fifty-two feature films that are part of the Walt Disney Animation Studios canon, also known as the Walt Disney Animated Classics. ... Disney redirects here. ... Chairman of the Board redirects here. ... Susan Arnold is a member of the board of directors of The Walt Disney Company. ... John E. Bryson is chairman, president and chief executive officer of Edison International, based in Rosemead, California. ... Judith L. Estrin is President and Chief Executive Officer of Packet Design, LLC, a company that she co-founded in May 2000 to develop networking technology. ... Robert A. Iger (born February 10, 1951) or Bob Iger is head of the Walt Disney Company. ... Fred H. Langhammer is Chairman, Global Affairs, of The Estée Lauder Companies Inc. ... Aylwin B. Lewis is an American businessman, Chief Executive Officer and President of Sears Holdings Corporation was born 28 May, 1954. ... Robert W. Matschullat is a private equity investor, and served from October 1995 until June 2000 as Vice Chairman of the board of directors of The Seagram Company Ltd. ... John E. Pepper, Jr. ... Orin C. Smith was President and Chief Executive Officer of Starbucks Corporation from 2000 to 2005. ... Disney redirects here. ... Buena Vista Motion Pictures Group, a fictitious business name of Walt Disney Motion Pictures Group, Inc. ... Old logo from 1985-2006 Walt Disney Pictures refers to several different entities associated with The Walt Disney Company: Walt Disney Pictures, the film banner, was established as a designation in 1983, prior to which Disney films since the death of Walt Disney were released under the name of the... Touchstone Pictures (also known as Touchstone Films in its early years) is one of several alternate film labels of The Walt Disney Company, established in 1984. ... The Hollywood Pictures sphinx logo Hollywood Pictures is one of The Walt Disney Companys several alternate movie labels. ... Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California, United States, and is notable for its eight Academy Awards. ... Walt Disney Animation Studios is the animation studio that makes up a key element of The Walt Disney Company, and the oldest existing animation studio in the world. ... Miramax Films is a film production and distribution brand that was a Big Ten film motion picture distribution and production company headquartered in New York City before being bought out by The Walt Disney Company. ... Hollywood Records is a record label owned by Disney Music Group. ... Walt Disney Records is a record company and part of The Walt Disney Company. ... Lyric Street Records is a sister label of Hollywood Records. ... Founded in 1989 in Carrboro, North Carolina, Mammoth Records was one of the premiere independent record labels of the 1990s. ... Wonderland Music Company, Inc. ... Walt Disney Music Company is a U.S. music publisher. ... ... New Amsterdam Theater in New York City Walt Disney Theatrical Productions, informally known as Walt Disney Theatrical, is the stageplay and musical production arm of The Walt Disney Company. ... Disney-ABC Television Group manages all of The Walt Disney Companys U.S. and global entertainment and news television properties. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... ABC News logo ABC News Special Report ident, circa 2006 ABC News is a division of American television and radio network ABC, owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... ABC News Now is a 24 hour broadband news channel offered via television and streaming video at ABCNews. ... ABC Family is an American cable television network currently owned by Disney-ABC Television Group, a division of The Walt Disney Company. ... For the Disney Channel in other countries, see Disney Channel around the world. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... For Jetix in each country, see Jetix around the world. ... Jetix Play is the sister channel of Jetix owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... SOAPnet (stylized from 2000 to 2002 as SoapNet) is an American cable television channel. ... Fox Playhouse is the brand name for Disney Channels preschool programs, often airing as its own channel outside of the United States. ... Toon Disney is a 24-hour American cable television channel owned by The Walt Disney Company that mostly airs childrens animated television series. ... Disney Cinemagic is the movie service for the Disney Channel in the UK, available through Sky Digital, Tiscali TV and Virgin Media. ... Lifetime Entertainment Services is an American entertainment industry company, dedicated to entertainment and information programming as well as advocating a range of issues that women find relevant serving over 88 million households across the nation [1], Lifetime Entertainment services has spawned: Three networks Lifetime Television Lifetime Movie Network (launched in... A&E Television Networks is a media company that owns several TV networks on cable and satellite. ... ABC News is a division of the American Broadcasting Company television and radio networks (ABC). ... Radio Disney is a radio network based in Dallas, Texas in the United States broadcasting music and other content targeted at children and young teenagers. ... Disney-ABC International Television (DAIT) is responsible for The Walt Disney Company’s branded and non-branded filmed entertainment distribution, now distributing more than 30,000 hours of content to over 1300 broadcasters across 240 territories worldwide. ... Disney-ABC Domestic Television is the domestic television syndication firm of the Disney-ABC Television Group, a division of The Walt Disney Company, that handles the television distribution of product from Walt Disney Television and ABC Studios, such as Scrubs, My Wife and Kids, and According to Jim. ... ABC Studios (formerly Touchstone Television Productions, LLC and ABC Television Studio) is a television production company formed in 1989 and renamed in May 2007 to its latest inception. ... Walt Disney Television Animation is the animated television production division of The Walt Disney Company. ... The Walt Disney Internet Group (WDIG) oversees several websites owned by The Walt Disney Company and its subsidiaries. ... Go. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... ABC News is a division of ABC television and radio networks (ABC), owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... ESPN.com is the official website of ESPN and a division of ESPN Inc. ... Disney. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... KABC-TV, channel 7, is an owned-and-operated television station of the Walt Disney Company-owned American Broadcasting Company, licensed to Los Angeles, California. ... KFSN-TV is the ABC owned and operated television station in Fresno, California. ... KGO-TV (ABC7) is an owned-and-operated television station of The Walt Disney Company-owned ABC, based in San Francisco, California. ... KTRK TV is a television station in Houston, Texas, affiliated with the American Broadcasting Company network. ... , WABC-TV, channel 7, is the flagship station of the Walt Disney Company-owned American Broadcasting Company, located in New York City. ... WJRT-TV is the American Broadcasting Company-owned and operated television station (O&O) in the Flint-Saginaw-Bay City, Michigan television market. ... WLS-TV abc Disney 7 is an American television station in Chicago, Illinois and thats owned and operated by the abc-TV Network & The Walt Disney Company. ... WPVI-TV, channel 6, is an owned-and-operated station of the Walt Disney Company-owned American Broadcasting Company, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... WTVD, channel 11, is an owned-and-operated station of the Walt Disney Company-owned ABC television network, based in Durham, North Carolina. ... WTVG, known on air as 13ABC, is the ABC owned and operated television station in Toledo, Ohio with a coverage area serving northwestern Ohio, Southeastern Michigan and Essex County, Ontario. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... KDIS 1110 AM is a Radio Disney affiliate. ... KDIS-FM broadcasts in the Little Rock, Arkansas area at 99. ... KDIZ (1440 AM) is a radio station serving the Minneapolis-St. ... KESN is a Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas based sports talk radio station. ... KKDZ in Seattle, Washington is the Radio Disney outlet for the Puget Sound region. ... KMIC is a Radio Disney station serving the Houston, Texas market. ... KMIK is a Tempe, Arizona AM Radio station that is part of the Radio Disney Network. ... KMKI is a Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas AM Radio station licensed inPlano, Texas that is part of the Radio Disney network, which is also based in Dallas, Texas. ... KMKY is a radio station in Oakland, California that broadcasts on 1310 AM. It has childrens variety programming and is part of the Radio Disney network. ... KNIT is an AM Southern Gospel radio station that serves the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, and is owned by James Crystal Radio Group. ... KSPN (710 AM) is an all-sports radio station based in Los Angeles, California. ... WDDY is an AM radio station licensed to Albany, New York. ... WEAE-AM is a sports talk station in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... WEPN (1050 kHz), branded as 1050 ESPN Radio, is a 24-hour sports radio station in New York City featuring national and local sports talk programs and live broadcasts of sports matches. ... WFDF is the call sign of a radio station at 910 kHz on the AM dial in Flint, Michigan, which began broadcasting in 1922. ... WMKI is a childrens radio station in the Boston market. ... WMVP (1000 AM) is the callsign of a commercial radio station in Chicago. ... WQEW 1560 AM is a Radio Disney affiliate. ... WRDZ-AM 1300 is an AM radio station licensed to La Grange, Illinois serving northeast Illinois, northwest Indiana and southeast Wisconsin. ... WRDZ is a Radio Disney station serving the Indianapolis, Indiana market. ... WSDZ is an AM radio station in Belleville, Illinois, located at 1260 kHz. ... WWCS is a Radio Disney station serving the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania market. ... WWMK AM 1260 is the Radio Disney affiliate in Cleveland, Ohio, and is owned by ABC Radio. ... The Walt Disney Company’s Golden Oak Ranch is an outdoor ranch that serves as an interior and exterior filming site. ... The Prospect Studios (also known as ABC Television Center [West]) is a lot containing several television studios located at 4151 Prospect Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, at the corner of Prospect Aveune and Talmadge Street (named in honor of silent screen star Norma Talmadge), just east... Reedy Creek Energy Services (RCES) is a wholly owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company. ... Times Square Studios is located in Times Square in New York City, New York. ... Disney Consumer Products (DCP) is the business segment of The Walt Disney Company that extends the Disney brand to merchandise ranging from apparel, toys, home décor, books and magazines to interactive games, food and beverages, stationery, electronics and animation art. ... Disney Parks Worldwide logo Walt Disney Parks and Resorts is the division of The Walt Disney Company that conceives, builds and manages the companys theme parks and vacation resorts, as well as a variety of additional family-oriented leisure enterprises. ... PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS PENIS... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... This article is about the History of Apple Inc. ... Apple Inc. ... Stephen Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San José, California) is an American computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ... Michael Scotty Scott (born 1943) was the first CEO of Apple Computer from February 1977 to March 1981. ... Harriv 09:43, 1 Feb 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Jef Raskin outdoors, photographed by his son Aza Raskin. ... Andy Hertzfeld (born April 6, 1953), was a key member of the original Apple Macintosh development team, and some would consider him a pioneer among software engineers. ... Bill Atkinson worked at Apple Computer in the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... Susan Kare (born 1954) is an artist and graphic designer who created many of the interface elements for the Apple Macintosh in the 1980s. ... Guy Kawasaki (born 1954), one of the original Apple employees responsible for marketing of the Macintosh in 1984, is a Silicon Valley venture capitalist. ... Jean-Louis Gassée (born March 1944 in Paris, France) was an executive at Apple Computer from 1981 to 1990. ... Del Yocam in 1987 from an Apple Computer company video. ... John Sculley (born April 6, 1939) was a vice-president (1970-1977) and president of PepsiCo (1977-1983), until he became CEO of Apple on April 8, 1983, a position he held until leaving in 1993. ... Michael Spindler (born 1942), nicknamed the Diesel for his reputed around the clock work habits, was president and CEO of Apple Computer from 1993 to 1996. ... Jonathan Paul Ive CBE (born February 1967) is Senior Vice President of Industrial Design at Apple Inc. ... David Nagel has held executive positions in a wide variety of technology companies and organizations. ... Gil Amelio Gilbert F. Amelio (born March 1, 1943 in New York City) is an American technology executive. ... Philip W. Schiller Philip W. Schiller (born 1960) is the senior vice president of worldwide product marketing at Apple Inc. ... As of 2005 Avadis Avie Tevanian is the Chief Software Technology Officer at Apple Computer. ... Chris Espinosa is the senior employee of Apple Computer, beginning at the age of fifteen in 1976 in Steve Jobs garage, writing software manuals and coding after school. ... Apple Inc. ... Apple Inc. ... Michael Scotty Scott (born 1943) was the first CEO of Apple Computer from February 1977 to March 1981. ... Apple Inc. ... Harriv 09:43, 1 Feb 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Apple Inc. ... John Sculley (born April 6, 1939) was a vice-president (1970-1977) and president of PepsiCo (1977-1983), until he became CEO of Apple on April 8, 1983, a position he held until leaving in 1993. ... Apple Inc. ... Michael Spindler (born 1942), nicknamed the Diesel for his reputed around the clock work habits, was president and CEO of Apple Computer from 1993 to 1996. ... Apple Inc. ... Gil Amelio Gilbert F. Amelio (born March 1, 1943 in New York City) is an American technology executive. ... Apple Inc. ... Apple Inc. ... Apple Inc. ... Millard S. Drexler is a businessman, formerly CEO of Gap Inc, he joined the board of directors of Gap in November 1983 and left his position in October 2002. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Andrea Jung (鍾彬嫻, pinyin: Zhōng Bīnxián) (born 1959) is a Chinese-Amsdffgfdgfdgerican business executive born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Arthur D. Levinson (born March 31, 1950 in Seattle, Washington) is President and Chief Executive Officer of Genentech. ... Eric Emerson Schmidt, Ph. ... Jerry York is an American businessman, he was the former CFO of IBM and Chrysler. ... Apple TV is a digital media receiver designed, marketed and sold by Apple. ... For the Internet appliance line, see Linksys iPhone. ... iPod is a brand of portable media players designed and marketed by Apple Inc. ... The iPod classic is the flagship iPod digital audio player designed and marketed by Apple Inc. ... The iPod nano is a portable media player designed and marketed by Apple Inc. ... iPod shuffle is an iPod digital audio player designed and marketed by Apple Inc. ... The iPod touch is a portable media player and Wi-Fi mobile platform designed and marketed by Apple Inc. ... For other uses, see Macintosh (disambiguation) and Mac. ... The original Bondi Blue iMac G3 was introduced in 1998. ... The Mac mini is the smallest desktop computer made by Apple Inc. ... The Mac Pro is a workstation computer manufactured by Apple Inc. ... This article is about the Apple computer called MacBook. For the MacBook family as a whole, see MacBook family. ... The MacBook Pro is a line of Macintosh portable computers by Apple Inc. ... A small Xserve cluster with an Xserve RAID. Xserve is the name of Apple Computers Macintosh 1U rackmount line of server computers. ... Dual 30 Apple Cinema HD Displays Previous-generation Apple Studio Display (the Studio Display in an aspect ratio of 4:3 instead of 16:10) The Apple Cinema Display is a product line of widescreen flat panel monitors made by Apple Inc. ... Mighty Mouse The Mighty Mouse (code-named Houdini) is the first multi-button USB mouse ever manufactured and sold by Apple Computer. ... Aperture is a software program for Mac OS X announced by Apple Inc at a New York media event on October 19, 2005, designed to assist professional photographers in post-production work. ... FileMaker Pro is a cross-platform database application from FileMaker Inc. ... Image:Fcstudio2 box. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is about the iTunes application. ... iWork is a suite of applications created by Apple Inc. ... Logic Studio is a music production suite by Apple Inc. ... Mac OS X (pronounced ) is a line of graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... Mac OS X Server is the server-oriented version of Apples operating system, Mac OS X. Mac OS X, in both desktop and server versions, is a Unix operating system based on technology that Apple acquired from NeXT Computer. ... QuickTime is a multimedia framework developed by Apple Inc. ... Safari is a web browser developed by Apple Inc. ... Xsan is Apple Inc. ... The Apple Developer Connection is Apple Computers developer network. ... AppleCare Protection plan box. ... Apple Specialist is an independent Apple Computer reseller which over time has demonstrated exceptional, consistent, and comprehensive knowledge of Apple technology, offers its entire line of hardware and software, offers complete service and support for branded products, and has been designated as Specialist by the manufacturer. ... This article is about the retail chain. ... Apple Online Store This page is about the online store. ... Apple certification programs are programs designed by Apple Inc. ... The Genius Bar is a station located inside every Apple Retail Store (see Apple Store (retail)) that offers help and support for Apple products. ... The iTunes Store is an online business run by Apple Inc. ... ProCare is a service offered by the Apple Store that provides additional services from the Genius Bar. ... ProCare is a service offered by the Apple Store that provides additional services from the Genius Bar. ... In the past two decades, Apple Inc. ... John Hodgman as PC and Justin Long as Mac The Get a Mac campaign is a current (2006–present) television advertising campaign created for Apple Inc. ... An example of the original style of silhouettes, on a billboard, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... This is a list of slogans that have been used by Apple Inc. ... Braeburn Capital is an asset management company based in Reno, Nevada and a subsidiary of Apple Computer, Inc. ... FileMaker Inc. ... This article is about the History of Apple, a Silicon Valley company based in Cupertino, California, whose core business is computer technologies. ... The following is a list of Apple Inc. ... From the 1980s to the present Apple Inc. ... This article, Typography of Apple Inc. ... USD redirects here. ... A fiscal year (or financial year or accounting reference date) is a 12-month period used for calculating annual (yearly) financial statements in businesses and other organizations. ... NASDAQ in Times Square, New York City. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... The Frankfurt Stock Exchange (outside) The DAX chart (inside) The Frankfurt Stock Exchange (German: FWB® Frankfurter Wertpapierbörse) is a stock exchange located in Frankfurt, Germany. ... Apple Inc. ... Apple Inc. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...

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Find new employment or contract. Job/career search database. Career opportunities. Apply online today. Steve jobs (621 words)
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Steve Jobs - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4496 words)
Jobs' progressive stance on Unix underpinnings was considered overly ambitious and somewhat backward in the 1980s, but his choice ultimately became an expandable, solid foundation for an operating system.
Jobs is both admired and criticized for his consummate skills of persuasion and salesmanship, which has been dubbed the "reality distortion field" and is particularly evident during his keynote speeches at Macworld Expos.
Jobs is not a vegetarian or vegan as is often claimed.
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